Sustainability CEL Course Inventory

University of Toronto’s 2021-2022 Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Sustainability Inventory

The CEL Sustainability Course Inventory gathers information about all sustainability-related undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto with a community engaged learning component (public, civil or private sector). This CEL inventory builds off of U of T’s Sustainability Course Inventory, an inventory that contains all sustainability-related courses based on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Sustainability Community-Engaged Learning Courses must cover the following criteria:

  • it is a credit-bearing academic course with full or partial CEL component
  • it takes place in partnership with a community or grassroots, non-profit or for-profit, public or private, or non-governmental organization
  • it responds to partner-led priorities
  • it is reciprocal so both the community partner and the students benefit from the engagement students undertake reflection that connects their community engagement to the learning outcomes of the initiative
  • it works towards one or more of the sixteen United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The 2021 CEL course inventory includes 93 sustainability-oriented CEL courses. The purpose of the CEL sustainability course inventory is to increase the visibility of sustainability courses that foster community engagement and partnerships. In the 2021-22 Sustainability Undergraduate Course Inventory, the following ten CEL keywords were used to filter for potential CEL courses: *placement, *community, *experiential, *internship, *partner, *client, *service, *capstone, *office, *professional. The search results were then manually reviewed for quality assurance by CECCS. Any output deemed irrelevant to CEL based on the course description has been removed. 

If you are an instructor at the University of Toronto and think that a CEL course should be included in or removed from this inventory, please contact ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

Course CodeCourseCourse DescriptionCampusDepartmentCreditTermCEL Keyword(s)Max EnrollmentSDG Keyword(s)SDGs Covered
ACMD01H3ACMEE Applied Practice IIAn advanced study of the arts, culture and/or media sector through reflective practice. Students will further engage with work places as "learning laboratories" and play a mentorship role for students in earlier stages of the experiential education process.ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media0.5Fall, Winterexperiential20labor, educatSDG4, SDG8
ANTD20H3Culture and CommunityA field-based research seminar exploring the cultural dimensions of community and sense of place. Partnering with community-based organizations in Scarborough and the GTA, students will investigate topical issues in the immediate urban environment from an anthropological perspective. Yearly foci may include food, heritage, diaspora, and family.ScarboroughAnthropology0.5Wintercommunity, partner15environment, urban, foodSDG2, SDG11, SDG13
CCT409H5Special Topics in Work-Based LearningAn advanced unpaid field placement working on specially designed projects that explore collaborative, collective and global approaches to practical knowledge application. The placements may include international internships, collaborative group internships and community-based initiatives. The projects may vary from year to year depending on the external partners. Students will engage with others in the course through an online class component and complete individual reports and critical evaluations of the work experience.MississaugaUniversity of Toronto Mississauga0.5placement, community, internship, partnerlaborSDG8
CHMD47H3Advanced Bio-Organic ChemistryThis course will teach biochemical reactions in the context of Organic Chemistry. This course will build on topics from CHMC47H3. Application of enzymes in organic synthesis, chemical synthesis of complex carbohydrates and proteins, enzyme catalyzed proton transfer reactions and co-enzymes will be discussed in depth with recent literature examples. Experiential learning is an integral part of this course. Students will explore the applications of Bio-Organic Chemistry in healthcare and industrial settings as part of an experiential learning projectScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences0.5Winterexperiential40industr, healthSDG3, SDG9
CITC01H3Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East ScarboroughThis course engages students in a case study of some of the issues facing urban communities and neighbourhoods today. Students will develop both community-based and academic research skills by conducting research projects in co-operation with local residents and businesses, non-profit organizations, and government actors and agencies.ScarboroughHuman Geography0.5Wintercommunity23urbanSDG11
CITC02H3Placements in Community DevelopmentWith a focus on building knowledge and skills in community development, civic engagement, and community action, students will learn by doing through weekly community-based placements with community organizations in East Scarborough and participatory discussion and written reflections during class time. The course will explore topics such as community-engaged learning, social justice, equity and inclusion in communities, praxis epistemology, community development theory and practice, and community-based planning and organizing. Students will be expected to dedicate 3-4 hours per week to their placement time in addition to the weekly class time. Community-based placements will be organized and allocated by the course instructor.ScarboroughHuman Geography0.5Winterplacement, community25justiceSDG16
CITD12H3Planning and Building Public Spaces in TorontoThis course is designed to develop career-related skills such as policy-oriented research analysis, report writing, and presentation and networking skills through experiential learning approaches. The policy focus each year will be on a major current Toronto planning policy issue, from Complete Streets to improvements to parks and public space infrastructure, to public transit-related investments. Students work closely in the course with planners and policymakers from the City of Toronto, policy advocates, and community organizers.ScarboroughHuman Geography0.5Fallcommunity, experiential25infrastructureSDG9
CJS401Y1Community & IdentityExploration of Jewish notions of community, identity, and humanity in classic and contemporary sources as well as through experiential learning in which students are placed in internships at organizations and institutions that identify themselves as Jewish and as serving the Jewish community in the GTA. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science1.0community, experiential, internshipinstitutSDG16
CPS401Y5Research and Development in Science EducationThis course is intended for students in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program. It provides an experiential learning opportunity with secondary school students and teachers. Students will research the literature of science pedagogy and acquire pedagogical content knowledge, particularly that of problem-based learning and the use of case studies. Then, through the creation of original, problem-based learning materials for Grades 11 and 12 classes and the preparation of teachers' notes for these materials, they will enhance their subject specialization knowledge. They will then assist a teacher in implementing their materials in a school or, where the materials involve experiments, in the field or in the UTM teaching laboratories. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrollment requires submitting an application to the CPS Department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required.MississaugaChemical & Physical Sciences1.0Fall+experiential20environment, labor, educatSDG4
CRI386H1Origins of Criminal JusticeCriminal justice practice, as well as political debate concerning crime and criminal justice, are often influenced by ideas that are initially developed outside the criminal justice arena. This course examines the history, current influence and efficacy of a range of such ideas, such as: the role of religious practice in rehabilitating offenders; military service and participation in sports as preventive of delinquency; the influence of environmental pollution on crime rates; the concept of the ‘problem family’; intelligence based policing and the use of management theories in criminal justice organizations. Note: The course may include an optional Service Learning component. If offered, additional information will be provided in the Faculty of Arts and Science's timetable.St. GeorgeCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5Winterservice60justice, pollut, environmentSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
CRI428H1Neighbourhoods and CrimeAn advanced seminar exploring the connection between neighbourhoods and the perpetuation of poverty, social marginalization, segregation and crime.
The course may include an optional Service Learning component. Check the timetable for details.
St. GeorgeCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5Winterservice60povertySDG1
ECO400Y5Economics InternshipThrough a part time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply economics content and skills. Placements are made throughout the GTA in both the private and public sectors. Successful candidates gain an opportunity to enhance their University experience through on-site work placements providing the possibility to develop skill sets within a business setting. Monthly class meetings plus year-end and presentation are required. Normally, the 200 hours will be completed by attending the work placement one full day each week from September to April. Students interested in a finance-industry placement are strongly recommended to arrange their course schedule to allow for a two day a week work placement in one semester. This arrangement increases the possibility of placement and enhances the experience although careful course planning is essential. Apply to Course Coordinator: Corrine Bent-Womack Room #KN 3246 Innovation Complex Email: corrine.bent.womack@utoronto.caMississaugaEconomics1.0Fall+placement, internship40industr, innovatSDG9
ECO417H1Economic Development Policy: Community Engaged LearningAn examination of the causes and consequence of poverty in developing countries with a microeconomic focus, and how it relates it to poverty in the developed world, using a 30-hour service placement at a community organization. Importance of community and context specific factors in policy implementation; learn how local organizations have responded. Use of reflection assignments, papers, group work and class discussions to relate to course concepts. Topics include: poverty traps, health, education, and credit. An application to the instructor is necessary. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science0.5placement, community, serviceeducat, health, povertySDG1, SDG3, SDG4
EDS200H5Child, Adolescent and Adult Development in EducationThis course focuses on the physical skills, cognitive abilities, and socioemotional experiences that shape an individual's capacity to learn throughout the lifespan (i.e., infancy to late adulthood). It will address how learning is a lifelong process and how we are continually educating ourselves in different ways by incorporating strategies that best suit our lifespan stage. Critical research and theorists will be discussed to enhance the topics presented. Students are required to complete an 8-hour field experience, and obtain a valid vulnerable sector police check in advance of placement.MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5Fall, Winterplacement100educatSDG4
EDS220H5Equity and Diversity in EducationThis course focuses on raising awareness and sensitivity to equity and diversity issues facing teachers and students in diverse schools and cultural communities. It includes a field experience which entails observation of, and participation in, equity and diversity efforts in a community organization.MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5Wintercommunity70educatSDG4
EDS325H5Supplemental Instruction in Higher Education: Peer-Facilitated Study GroupsLooking for an opportunity to become a facilitator of small group learning in a subject discipline in which you have expertise? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in higher education. Particular focus will be on the history and evolution of SI and the rationale for its use in different university contexts. EDS325H5 course participants will complete a mandatory internship that involves developing and delivering 8-10 peer led study sessions through the Facilitated Study Group (FSG) Program run by the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre. Class work will embed relevant pedagogical tools, resources and research to support the development, delivery and success of FSG sessions. Current research investigating the impact of Supplemental Instruction on student success will also be explored. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured an FSG leader position with the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre.MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5Fall, Winterinternship55educatSDG4
EDS360Y0Education Internship - InternationalStudents are required to complete an internship in an educational environment in Beijing, China. Arranged through Victoria College and the Centre for International Exchange, the Beijing International Exchange is only for students in the Education & Society Minor. Written assessment of the internship is required. Restricted to students enrolled in the Education and Society Minor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeVictoria College1.0Fall, WinterinternshipeducatSDG4
EDS360Y1Education InternshipStudents are required to complete an internship in an educational environment. This can be satisfied by participation in an organization with the approval of the Program Coordinator. Written assessment of the internship is required. Restricted to students enrolled in the Education and Society Minor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeVictoria College1.0Fall+, Fall, WinterinternshipeducatSDG4
EMU425H1Music and Urban EngagementThis course provides a reflective practicum experience in unique urban settings. Under the mentorship of professional community music teachers, students assist and lead music-making sessions with youth from the Regent Park School of Music and/or youth residing in detention centers. Students have the opportunity to investigate how music is an important tool for social justice.St. GeorgeMusic0.5Wintercommunity, professional8justice, urbanSDG11, SDG16
EMU435H1Internship in Music EducationThis course provides a community-based experience that will enable students to merge theory and practice in music education. Placements must be approved by the instructor during the first week of classes. Two options exist: (1) Students will volunteer for three hours a week in a community music or school setting of their choosing; or (2) Students receive lectures on anti-racist and anti-oppression approaches and undertake internship opportunities in partnership with the Marigold Group and GTA high schools identified as high needs.St. GeorgeMusic0.5Winterplacement, community, internship, partner5educatSDG4
ENGD02Y3Teaching Academic Writing: Theories, Methods and Service LearningThis course explores the theories and practices of teaching academic writing, mostly in middle and secondary school contexts as well as university writing instruction and/or tutoring in writing. Through its 60-hour service-learning component, the course also provides student educators with the practical opportunities for the planning and delivering of these instruction techniques in different teaching contexts.ScarboroughEnglish1.0Fall+service15educatSDG4
ENT391H1Exploring New VenturesThis experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new ventures or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization or the students' own venture, with oversight from the Centre for Entrepreneurship. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students' entrepreneurial skills.St. GeorgeCentre for Entrepreneurship0.5Winterexperiential30innovatSDG9
ENT392Y1Exploring New VenturesThis experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new ventures or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization or the students' own, with oversight from the Centre for Entrepreneurship. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students' entrepreneurial skills.St. GeorgeCentre for Entrepreneurship1.0experiential30innovatSDG9
ENV332H5Practicum in Environmental Project ManagementThis course, offered in collaboration with campus administrative offices of the University of Toronto Mississauga and various community partners, provides Environment Students with practical collaborative work experience in preparation for upper-year field courses and internships. Students will work in teams to develop skills in communication, project management, interdisciplinary teamwork, problem identification, report writing and formal presentations while working on an environmental project on campus or in the local community. This course is strongly recommended for Specialist and Major students in any of the Environment Programs.MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment0.5Wintercommunity, internship, partner, office70environment, laborSDG13
ENV440H1Professional Experience CourseRegular academic seminars complement off-campus work on an environmental project. The course enables students to gain practical experience of the needs and demands of professional environmental agencies. Students are given a choice of placements in a variety of sectors (such as government, NGOs, industry). Eligible students who wish to do a work placement in the upcoming summer or fall session are must submit an application form to the Placement Coordinator by mid-January of each year. Please contact the School of the Environment's Placement Coordinator, David Powell, at ug.office.env@utoronto.ca, or consult the School’s undergraduate courses webpage for access to the application form, instructions and application deadline.St. GeorgeSchool of Environment0.5Fallplacement, office, professional60environment, industrSDG9, SDG13
ENV461H1The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of SustainabilitySustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research and teaching. Arguably, it is such living lab approaches that offer the largest potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to work across disciplines and fields of study, and with non-academic partners. This course will put students to work on operational sustainability projects identified by the staff working in or with the Sustainability Office at the University of Toronto. Students will be organized into groups, each of which will be assigned one project, to be overseen by one or more U of T staff members. The bulk of the course will consist of regular meetings with the staff "clients", with instructors, and in small groups to undertake a group project. Each group will produce a mid-term and final report, and give a mid-term and final presentation. Each student will also submit two 360 reviews of the group process. A crucial aspect of this course is the ability of students to work collaboratively together in a group environment, and to work effectively with a university staff person acting as a “client” for their work. Students will be provided with a Handbook outlining information on working in groups and the focus of the class in the second week will be on this issue. The first 360 peer review will serve to provide information on how well each group is working. Students are encouraged to discuss and resolve group process issues in the weekly group meetings, and in their regular meetings with the instructor and TA. The second 360 review will occur at the end of the term. The results of the two 360 reviews will be used, where appropriate, to adjust individual marks from the group averages.St. GeorgeSchool of Environment0.5Fallpartner, client, office24environment, laborSDG13
ESC101H1Praxis IPraxis I is the cornerstone course of the Engineering Science Foundation Design sequence and introduces the foundational models and tools of engineering design, communication, teamwork, and professionalism that underlie design education within Engineering Science. In Praxis I students work both individually and in small teams to develop their knowledge and skills in through a combination of active lectures, structured interactive studios, and hands-on practical sessions. The design projects in Praxis I are scoped to the individual student and the broader University community. Each student and team is responsible for both defining and resolving their own opportunities. Praxis I also supports students as they transition into their engineering studies and into the Engineering Science learning community. This support integrates conceptual models, concrete techniques, and University resources, and addresses both academic and non-academic concerns. All courses within the Foundation Design sequence use engineering design to provide a context in which students integrate their knowledge, develop their emerging engineering identity, and codify their individual approach to engineering practice.St. GeorgeDivision of Engineering Science0.5Fallcommunity, professionaleducatSDG4
FAH375H5All Our Relations: Indigenous Land Stewardship and ArtThis class embraces land- and earth-based skills as tools in the production and maintenance of revitalization efforts in Indigenous culture and knowledge. Throughout the course students will lead the development, production and maintenance of a Community Medicine Garden initiative to be located in the heart of the UTM campus. Topics include environmental liberation, food sovereignty, kinship, gardening as resistance, matriarchy, land stewardship, landscaping with regional indigenous plants, Indigenous feminisms, place-based knowledge and knowledge sharing. Activities will include: film screenings, community feasts, public readings, drumming circles, and guests speakers with Traditional Indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, environmental activists, and local grassroots community-based partners. [24S]MississaugaUniversity of Toronto Mississauga0.5community, partnerenvironment, production, foodSDG2, SDG12, SDG13
FREC10H3Community-Engaged Learning in the Francophone CommunityIn this Community-Engaged course, students will have opportunities to strengthen their French skills (such as communication, interpersonal, intercultural skills) in the classroom in order to effectively complete a placement in the GTA's Francophone community. By connecting the course content and their practical professional experience, students will gain a deeper understanding of the principles of experiential education: respect, reciprocity, relevance and reflection; they will enhance and apply their knowledge and problem-solving skills; they will develop their critical thinking skills to create new knowledge and products beneficial to the Francophone community partners.ScarboroughLanguage Studies0.5Winterplacement, community, experiential, partner, professional30educatSDG4
GER391H1iPRAKTIKUM Experiential Learning and Internationalization InternshipThe course provides curricular support for a variety of work and community-engaged, experiential learning placements in the GTA and in German-speaking countries. The placements are designed to deepen linguistic, cultural, and analytical skills acquired in the classroom in work-related environments, create an awareness of the translatability of academic knowledge to other contexts, promote global competency, and foster links to the community. The number of weekly hours spent in the field, the scope of learning objectives, and the nature of reflective activities are determined on an individual basis in consultation with the host institution, the German Department, and other units in which the student is pursuing a program degree (as required). In addition to successfully achieving the formulated learning goals, students must complete assignments such as eJournals and research papers as well as participate in peer-to-peer reporting and post-placement interviews.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science0.5placement, community, experiential, internshipinstitut, environmentSDG16
HISD25H3Oral History and Urban ChangeAn applied research methods course that introduces students to the methods and practice of Oral history, the history of Scarborough, the field of public history and community-based research. A critical part of the class will be to engage in fieldwork related to designing and conducting oral history interviews. ScarboroughUniversity of Toronto Scarborough0.5Wintercommunity15urbanSDG11
HMB490Y1Health in CommunityAn experiential learning course exploring health-related challenges and social determinants of health in partnership with local community organizations. Lectures and tutorials will support learning of selected biological and social aspects of health and disease, neuroscience, genetics or population health, and the development of scientific knowledge translation skills relevant to the community agencies. Cannot be taken concurrently with a full year research project course.St. GeorgeHuman Biology Program1.0Fall+community, experiential, partner60healthSDG3
HST400Y1Health Studies PracticumFor students enrolled in the Health Studies Specialist and Major programs. Individual field placement with a health-related institution or organization, in which the student applies theory and skills to specific projects and/or tasks. Culminates in an oral and written report. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeUniversity College1.0Fall+placement15institut, healthSDG3, SDG16
INF402H1Work Integrated Learning PracticumThe practicum provides hands-on experience to supplement theoretical knowledge and to develop professional competencies. Students will complete a minimum of 100 hours of project work through one of the following: an unpaid internship, a faculty research project, a not-for-profit or an industry-based project. Students will be required to keep a reflective learning journal based on their personal, professional and intellectual growth, as well as produce a final report on the completion of their placement or project.St. GeorgeInformation0.5Summerplacement, internship, professionalindustrSDG9
INS460H1Indigenous Theory, Research and MethodsThis course explores the basis of Indigenous knowledge and how that translates into research theory and methodology. Students will design a research project, consider Indigenous research governance and conduct an ethics review. This is a service learning course. This course is only open to students enrolled in a Specialist or Major in Indigenous Studies.St. GeorgeIndigenous Studies Arts & Science0.5Winterservice15governanceSDG16
INT200H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the student's progress and performance. This course does not carry credit weight, is evaluated as Credit/No Credit, and no tuition fee is associated. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 2.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT300H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 2. This course does not carry credit weight and is evaluated as Credit/No Credit. No tuition fee is associated, however an ancillary fee of $900 will be assessed.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT301H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 3. This course does not carry credit weight and is evaluated as Credit/No Credit. No tuition fee is associated, however an ancillary fee of $900 will be assessed.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT400H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 2. This course does not carry credit weight and is evaluated as Credit/No Credit. No tuition fee is associated, however an ancillary fee of $900 will be assessed.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT401H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 3. This course does not carry credit weight and is evaluated as Credit/No Credit. No tuition fee is associated, however an ancillary fee of $900 will be assessed.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT450H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 2. This course does not carry credit weight, is evaluated as Credit/No Credit, and no tuition fee is associated.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT451H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 3. This course does not carry credit weight, is evaluated as Credit/No Credit, and no tuition fee is associated.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
INT471H1Arts & Science Internship Program - Professional Work TermStudents participate in a full-time, paid, career-related work experience totalling at least 420 hours within a 4-month period. Students compete for employment within the public, not-for-profit, or for-profit sectors. Students will be enrolled into the course once hired for an ASIP work term and the work experience must be approved by the Experiential Learning & Outreach Support (ELOS) Office. Student performance while on the work term will be monitored through a site visit and/or student and employer check-in. Students will be required to submit a learning plan at the start of each work term opportunity, reflective reports at regular intervals during the work period, a work term evaluation, and a final work term assignment (which may have different formats depending on the students' program). Employers will also be asked to submit a final evaluation of the students' progress and performance. This course is only open to students admitted to the ASIP stream of their program of study for Year 2. This course does not carry credit weight, is evaluated as Credit/No Credit, and no tuition fee is associated.St. GeorgeArts and Science0.0experiential, internship, office, professionalemploymentSDG8
JEG400Y5Geography / Environment Science InternshipThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the natural science based environmental science/physical geography expertise gained through previous course work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipalities, environmental consulting companies, corporations, provincial or federal agencies, and other organizations. Students must submit an application online. Instructions for the application can be found on the Geography Department home page: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-coursesMississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment1.0Fall+placement, internship15conserv, environmentSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
JEG401Y5Geography / Environment Social Science InternshipThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the knowledge and expertise gained through previous course work in geography. Placements may be made in a range of settings. For example, placements may include municipal government, regional government, neighbourhood organizations and centres, corporations as well as with non-governmental organizations. Admission for this course will be through an online application. Instructions for the application can be found on the Geography Department home page: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-coursesMississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment1.0Fall+placement, internship15environmentSDG13
JLS476H1Linguistics in the Workforce: Clinical Practice and ResearchThis course exposes students to research and practical approaches in the context of health professions of relevance to linguistics students, especially audiology and speech-language pathology. Students learn about evidence-informed practice, research methodologies, practice approaches and theories in the health professions. Students will be poised to benefit from optional service learning placements during or following the course, in research laboratories or clinical settings. Successful completion of this course provides students with exposure and experience of use in their applications to audiology, speech-language pathology, and other clinical programs and in their future health or graduate studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered every year).St. GeorgeLinguistics0.5placement, servicelabor, healthSDG3
JSC301H1Principles and Practices in Science EducationFundamental principles and practices in education and public outreach in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering, including education research, curriculum, teaching, and assessment. Students will learn and apply effective strategies which engage and educate learners at the K-16 and public level. The course assignments include a project and/or placement experience.St. GeorgeChemistry0.5Winterplacement28educatSDG4
KPE355Y1Interpersonal Theory in Kinesiology and Physical EducationThis course will provide students an opportunity to develop their knowledge and competencies in interpersonal theory in Kinesiology and Physical Education. Topics covered in this course include, verbal and non-verbal communication strategies, active listening with patients/clients, reflective practice, managing conflict, decision making, teamwork, and leadership. This course draws upon previous coursework and integrates theory and practice across course learning activities to apply the course content to the breadth of populations and settings within the field of Kinesiology and Physical Education. As a part of the course, students will participate in a field experience (100 hours) with a mentor observing and engaging in interpersonal relations and participating in the planning and implementation of programs as appropriate. Course evaluation activities include weekly class and tutorial sessions, written assignments, presentations, and examinations. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are two hours per week in addition to field experience. Please refer to the 'Fees and Financial Requirements' section of the calendar for information on ancillary fees.St. GeorgeKinesiology and Physical Education1.0Fall, WinterclienteducatSDG4
KPE455Y1Kinesiology and Physical Education in SocietyThis course builds upon KPE350Y1/KPE355Y1 to further students' theoretical grounding in the broader practice of Kinesiology and Physical Education in society. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, emotional intelligence in the workplace, integrity in community relations, performance adaptability, diversity, creativity, ethics and professionalism, and work-life balance. Adopting a values-based approach to learning and development students will be encouraged to consider strategies for enhancing the practice of Kinesiology and Physical Education within society. As a part of this course, students will spend 100 hours in the field and will work closely with a mentor. Course evaluation activities include weekly class and tutorial sessions, written assignments, presentations, and examinations. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are two hours per week in addition to field experience. For more information visit the professional placement page on our website. Please refer to the 'Fees and Financial Requirements' section of the calendar for details on ancillary fees.St. GeorgeKinesiology and Physical Education1.0Fall, Winterplacement, community, professionaleducatSDG3, SDG4
MGAD45H3Corporate Governance and Strategy - CPA PerspectiveThis course examines issues in Corporate Governance in today's business environment. Through case studies of corporate "ethical scandals", students will consider workplace ethical risks, opportunities and legal issues. Students will also examine professional accounting in the public interest as well as accounting and planning for sustainability. This course includes work-integrated-learning components, and satisfies the WIL requirement of the BBA degree.ScarboroughManagement0.5Fall, Winterprofessional40governance, environmentSDG16
MIE315H1Design for the EnvironmentLife Cycle Assessment for the measurement of environmental impacts of existing products and processes. Design for Environment principles for the reduction of environmental impacts in new product and process designs. Functional, economic, and societal analysis taught for use in a major team-written project to compare and contrast two product or process alternatives for a client. Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.St. GeorgeMechanical & Industrial Engineering0.5Winterclient72environmentSDG13
MIE429H1Machine Intelligence Capstone DesignA half-year capstone design course in which students work in small teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. The course will take a "systems approach" to machine intelligence design, where students will identify, frame and design solutions to real-world problems in the field. Students will engage with industry partners, and work through a process that results in a functional prototype. The resulting designs are assessed on their engineering quality and design credibility. In addition, each student engages in individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. Students are supported by a teaching team comprising both design and domain experts.St. GeorgeDivision of Engineering Science0.5Fallpartner, capstoneindustrSDG9
MIE490Y1Capstone DesignAn experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby student teams meet specific client needs through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process. The project must include: the application of disciplinary knowledge and skills to conduct engineering analysis and design, the demonstration of engineering judgment in integrating economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent interdisciplinary factors, elements of teamwork, project management and client interaction, and demonstration of proof of the design concept.St. GeorgeMechanical & Industrial Engineering1.0Fall+client, capstone190environment, healthSDG3, SDG13
MIE491Y1Capstone DesignAn experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby students teams meet specific client needs or the requirements of a recognized design competition through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process. The project must include:The application of disciplinary knowledge and skills to conduct engineering analysis and design,The demonstration of engineering judgement in integrating economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent interdisciplinary factors,Elements of teamwork, project management and client interaction, andA demonstration of proof of the design concept.St. GeorgeMechanical & Industrial Engineering1.0Fall+client, capstone190environment, healthSDG3, SDG13
NEW495Y1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students' experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeNew College1.0Fall+placement, community, experiential, partner, professionaljusticeSDG16
NEW496H1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeNew College0.5placement, community, experiential, partner, professionaljusticeSDG16
PCJ362H1Service LearningStudents are given a service learning placement in the GTA in partnership with local, national, or international not-for-profits or governmental organizations. Students work in teams of 2-7 students, and help partner organizations solve important problems. Student teams mostly work independently of the organization, while receiving some mentoring, critique, and advice from the organizations. Students are expected to invest 5-7 hours per week in course projects, in addition to class time. In this non-competitive course, students are asked to engage in deep personal reflection, help teammates, advise other teams, and contribute their skills and talents to their community partners. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.St. GeorgeMunk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy0.5Winterplacement, community, partner, service50justiceSDG16
PCL389H1Understanding the Role of Pharmacology and Toxicology in SocietyThis service learning course explores issues surrounding the effects that pharmaceuticals and chemicals have in society. Specifically, it integrates pharmacology and toxicology with social, health and political issues as they relate to drug abuse and addiction. Students are required to interact and work with community partners during the semester (approx. 20hrs). Classroom discussions will integrate community experiences with lecture material.St. GeorgePharmacology0.5Fallcommunity, partner, service30healthSDG3
PCL397Y0Research Abroad in Pharmacology and ToxicologyAn independent research project in a pharmacology and/or toxicology laboratory in an approved partner university. This international research experience will be supervised by a faculty member at the partner institution and will allow students to develop critical thinking and evaluation skills while applying their knowledge and trouble shooting skills to practical research questions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Off CampusPharmacology1.0partnerinstitut, laborSDG16
PHL440H1Clinical BioethicsAdvanced study of topics in bioethics, taught in conjunction with clinical bioethicists associated with the health care organization partners of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics.St. GeorgePhilosophy0.5Winterpartner30healthSDG3
PHM105H1Medication Therapy Management 1Medication Therapy Management (MTM) involves a partnership between the patient, pharmacist, and other healthcare providers to promote safe and effective medication use so that desirable patient outcomes are attained. It is founded on the philosophy of Pharmaceutical Care, and may encompass an array of services, whereby the pharmacist employs a systematic patient-centered approach to define and achieve goals related to optimal pharmacotherapy. The MTM series of courses will be delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program, with MTM 1 being the first of the four-part course series. MTM 1 will allow students to begin to apply knowledge and develop skills needed to undertake MTM, with content drawn from co-requisite and pre-requisite courses. Lecture and laboratory sessions will be designed to facilitate guided, independent, and collaborative learning. A key element of MTM 1 is that students will have the opportunity to undertake the role of a pharmacist in a simulated community practice and will be responsible for various tasks such as conducting patient interviews, assessing the appropriateness of pharmacotherapy, providing medication-related patient education, actively participating in the medication-dispensing process, responding to drug information queries from patients and health care providers, documenting pharmacotherapeutic recommendations, and interpreting the pharmacists' ethical and legal obligations within provincial and federal regulatory frameworks. This course will introduce and develop fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes intrinsic to the pharmacy students' professional identity development; these attributes will be transferable to diverse practice settings, and prepare students for their first year early experiential rotation.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Wintercommunity, experiential, partner, service, professionallabor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM130H1Pharmaceutical CalculationsAs pharmacists, you are expected to integrate your knowledge and skills gained throughout the pharmacy curriculum to provide direct patient care. Pharmacy practice is calculations intensive and accuracy is critically important to safe and effective patient care. As medication therapy experts, patients and other health care providers value and depend on pharmacists' expertise and accuracy in pharmaceutical calculations. Throughout the course, students will be required to complete pharmaceutical calculations with a focus on accuracy. A case based approach will be taken to familiarize students with real life examples of common calculations required to practice in community and hospital settings. The objective of this course is to prepare the student to apply knowledge and skills gained to other courses in the program, such as the early practice experience (EPE 1).St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.25FallcommunityhealthSDG3
PHM151H1Early Practice Experience 1This course is the first of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake this first EPE-1 during the summer following Year 1 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within a community pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Fall, Wintercommunity, experiential, service, professionalenvironment, labor, educatSDG4
PHM205H1Medication Therapy Management 2This Medication Therapy Management (MTM) course is the second of the four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses. MTM 2 will enable a student to continue to apply knowledge and develop skills needed by a pharmacist to provide patient care, using a systematic patient-care process to define and achieve the goals of optimizing safe, effective pharmacotherapy. MTM 2 course content is drawn from relevant co- and pre-requisite courses. Lectures and simulated practice sessions are designed to facilitate independent and collaborative learning that will be transferrable to diverse practice settings and prepare a student for early experiential learning. Students will be responsible to perform and document a comprehensive patient assessment to identify, resolve and prevent drug therapy problems, and educate patients on the appropriate use of medications. Students will be required to assess a patient's health status; integrate relevant information to recommend appropriate therapy, determine efficacy and safety endpoints for monitoring therapy, document a care plan, and appropriate follow-up parameters with patients to evaluate their response to therapy, in a simulated practice environment. Students will also actively participate in the medication dispensing process, prepare extemporaneously compounded pharmaceutical products and interpret the pharmacist’s professional, ethical and legal obligation within provincial and federal frameworks.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Fallexperiential, professionalenvironment, labor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM206H1Medication Therapy Management 3Medication Therapy Management 3 (MTM 3) is the third of a four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses that is delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program. MTM 3 builds on the skills developed in MTM 1 and MTM 2, focusing on more comprehensive, integrated patient centred care. MTM is founded on the philosophy of Pharmaceutical Care and involves a partnership between the patient, pharmacist, and other health care providers to promote safe and effective medication use to achieve desirable patient outcomes. MTM 3 provides students learning opportunities to apply and integrate materials learned through all courses in the curriculum to date, using simulated practice-based interactions to enhance their patient-care skills. Lectures will provide foundational material and skills which will be applied in the simulated interactions. Simulated interactions will focus on developing effective patient-centered management of multidimensional drug-therapy anchored in a professional context, in preparation for the student’s second year practice experiential course.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Winterexperiential, partner, professionalhealthSDG3
PHM251H1Early Practice Experience 2This course is the second of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake EPE-2 during the summer following Year 2 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within an institutional pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Fall, Winterexperiential, service, professionalinstitut, environment, labor, educatSDG4
PHM348H1Intermediate Pharmacy Practice ExperienceThis direct patient care rotation is designed to build and enhance students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the provision of direct patient care in institutional, community or ambulatory pharmacy practice. The rotation will build on knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in academic courses and earlier experiential rotations throughout the curriculum. This rotation will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in any patient care setting such as a hospital, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on establishing a context for the provision of pharmaceutical care in a clinical setting. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, provision of follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, with regular communication with team members to share and document their assessment of the patient’s medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5community, experientialinstitut, labor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4, SDG16
PHM350H1Pharmacotherapy in Ambulatory CareAmbulatory care pharmacists are accountable for addressing drug therapy needs and developing sustained partnerships with patients in an outpatient environment. They practice in primary care, family health teams, community pharmacies and specialty clinics. This practice can be independent or in a collaboration with other health care providers. Ambulatory care pharmacists require the knowledge and skills to triage, prescribe, administer and monitor medication therapies. They provide pharmaceutical care to patients with a variety of medical conditions and levels of acuity. This course will provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values to be a contemporary ambulatory care practitioner with an emphasis on ambulatory care sensitive conditions, preventative care, minor ailments and natural health products.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Wintercommunity, partnerenvironment, labor, healthSDG3
PHM402H1Institutional Practice Direct Patient Care 2All students will be required to complete two 5-week institutional rotations. At least five weeks will be in an adult in-patient service; the other five weeks may be in any area of the institution (including ambulatory clinics and pediatric populations). These rotations will ideally occur within academic health care institutions. The emphasis for all direct patient care rotations is for the student to be immersed in the responsibility of providing pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate effectively with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Winterserviceinstitut, labor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM411H1Community Practice Direct Patient Care 1These Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotations occur within academic community pharmacies, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage accurate and effective drug distribution under the supervision of the pharmacist and will participate in expanded scopes of pharmacy practice.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Wintercommunitylabor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM414Y1Community Practice Direct Patient CareAll students will be required to complete a 10-week rotation in a community pharmacy setting. This type of rotation will ideally be held at an academic community pharmacy, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage safe and effective drug distribution under the guidance and supervision of the pharmacist as appropriate, and will participate in the full scope of pharmacy practice.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy1.0Wintercommunitylabor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM452H1Elective Direct Patient Care 2These rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients' medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Wintercommunityinstitut, labor, educat, healthSDG3, SDG4
PHM462H1Elective Non Direct Patient Care 2These 5-week elective rotations are designed for the student to gain insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice and/or the health care system, which may require a diversity of knowledge or skills (e.g., pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). Such rotations enable students to gain awareness of a variety of roles for pharmacists and enhance the students' understanding of the broader scope within which pharmacists work. The rotation will build on the knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and other experiential rotations. The specific focus of the students' activities and rotation-specific learning objectives will be determined through a collaborative discussion between the preceptor and student, taking into account the needs of the site and student interest. Each student may complete a maximum of two 5-week NDPC rotations.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Winterexperientiallabor, healthSDG3
PHM762H1Elective Rotation IIThe rotation is designed to allow student to acquire insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice or the health care system, which may require different knowledge or skills (e.g. pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). The rotations build on knowledge, skills, and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and experiential rotations.St. GeorgeLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy0.5Fall, WinterexperientialhealthSDG3
PMDB25H3Therapeutic Communications and Crisis InterventionFocuses on the utilization of effective communication tools when dealing with persons facing health crisis. Students will learn about coping mechanisms utilized by patients and families, and the effects of death and dying on the individual and significant others. Students will have the opportunity to visit or examine community services and do class presentations. This course is taught at the Centennial HP Science and Technology Centre.ScarboroughBiological Sciences0.5Fallcommunity, service40healthSDG3
POLC65H3Political StrategyThis course focuses on analyzing and influencing individual and collective choices of political actors to understand effective strategies for bringing about policy changes. We will draw on the psychology of persuasion and decision-making, as well as literature on political decision-making and institutions, emphasizing contemporary issues. During election years in North America, special attention will be paid to campaign strategy. There may be a service-learning requirement.
Area of Focus: Public Policy
ScarboroughPolitical Science0.5serviceinstitutSDG16
PRT423H1Community Engaged Learning of Portuguese in Toronto and the GTAThis course combines advanced language instruction with the richness and complexity of the Lusophone work experience in Toronto, promoting Community Engaged Learning (CEL) as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Greater Toronto Area and volunteer for 2 hours per week, furthering their language skills and their cultural knowledge. Class work focuses on developing students' communication skills through exposure to a range of topics, from financial, legal, medical to educational, and to an extensive variety of styles and registers in Portuguese. Therefore, students meet real needs in the community by applying knowledge from their Portuguese courses.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science0.5communityeducatSDG4
PSL496Y1Translational Physiology Research ProjectEngage in supervised original science research, either basic or clinical, combined with a healthcare placement. Develop skills in defining scientific questions, designing experiments, analyzing data, and communicating your results. Gain insight into the power of translational bench-to-bedside research. Discover your interest in becoming a science researcher. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science1.0placementhealthSDG3
PSL497H1Translational Physiology Research ProjectEngage in original science research, either basic or clinical, combined with a healthcare placement. Develop skills in defining scientific questions, designing experiments, analyzing data, and communicating your results. Gain insight into the power of translational bench-to-bedside research. Discover your interest in becoming a science researcher. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFaculty of Arts and Science0.5placementhealthSDG3
PSY204H1Psychology Careers and ApplicationsPsychology has been identified as a hub science, a discipline whose research influences the work of scientists in many other fields. This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the application of the psychological sciences across various clinical, academic, and industry contexts. Students will gain valuable insight into the broad range of careers that are relevant to psychology, while also investigating barriers to rigorous application of psychological science in applied settings. Students will also learn how the skills and knowledge gained in an undergraduate psychology program can be applied to a broad range of careers and fields/sectors. Students will gain significant exposure to career and education planning considerations within the psychological sciences and will participate in at least one experiential career exploration activity.St. GeorgePsychology0.5Winterexperiential188industr, educatSDG4, SDG9
RLG376H1Touching the EarthA study of Buddhist relationships with the earth, including “earth touching” contemplative practices, ritual ceremonies for land spirits or sacred sites, geomantic and cosmographic traditions, the use of landscape imagery to depict enlightenment, contrasts between wilderness and urban spaces, and contemporary ecological movements in Buddhist communities and their responses to climate disruption. The course combines experiential learning approaches and outdoor excursions with reading and written work.St. GeorgeDepartment for the Study of Religion0.5Fallexperiential60ecolog, climate, urbanSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
RLG426H1Religion in the Public Sphere: Community-Engaged LearningFor upper-year students, from any discipline. In a 30-hour community service placement, discover first-hand religion's significance in Toronto and examine how religion manifests in public spaces, institutions, and interactions, while critically reflecting on the experience of working in settings where religious diversity is at play. The Religion in the Public Sphere (RPS) coordinator's permission is required for admission to the course.St. GeorgeDepartment for the Study of Religion0.5Winterplacement, community, service15institutSDG16
SOC480Y5Internship in Sociology, Criminology, Law and SocietyThrough a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour internship, students apply sociological knowledge gained primarily through previous coursework. Students can seek internship opportunities at municipal social service departments or non-profit agencies providing social services, social movement or community-based organizations working for social change, courts or parole offices, for-profit workplaces, or other organizations. Students must confirm internship arrangements well in advance and secure departmental approval for their internship position prior to the start of term (with students and host organizations required to complete institutional documentation in order for the internship to commence). This experiential learning course also includes class meetings, written assignments and oral presentations, as well as an assessment by the internship employer. An application/interview may be required (see Department of Sociology website for details). Note: International students should visit the International Education Centre to ensure they have the appropriate documentation required to work in Canada well before the start of the course/internship.MississaugaSociology1.0Fall+community, experiential, internship, service, office40institut, educatSDG4, SDG16
URB437Y1Urban Experiential Learning in Toronto & the GTAA method of studying city issues that combines readings, seminar discussions, and field trips with an 8 hour / week internship in the office of a municipal politician, local government, or non-profit organization. Readings focus on community development, urban planning, economic development and local governance. Students must fill out a ballot for the course (available by contacting the Urban Studies Program Office) by June 1st. Enrolment in this course is competitive and at the discretion of the Urban Studies Director and/or course instructor.St. GeorgeInnis College1.0Fall+community, internship, office20governance, urbanSDG11, SDG16
VIC116H1Politics of the PenA study of how literature challenges prevailing political beliefs and social norms. We will situate our discussion in the broader context of human rights and freedoms. We will examine cases where literature has been censored and writers have been imprisoned or driven into exile. Part of this course involves a community service-learning component. We will consider how this literature contributes to debate and advocacy around issues of social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeVictoria College0.5Fallcommunity, service25rights, justiceSDG16
VIC451H1Capstone: Learning Communities and Higher EducationThis course examines higher education in Canada using Victoria University and Victoria's affiliates as a case study. Topics covered include learning communities, mentoring, experiential learning, and international contexts of education. Students gain practical mentorship experience through placement in first-year Victoria College courses. Not eligible for CR/NCR.St. GeorgeVictoria College0.5Fall+placement, experiential, capstone10educatSDG4
VIC452H1Work-Integrated Capstone CourseThis seminar provides academic support for individual work placements in a specific sector of employment, through interdisciplinary readings, integrative discussion, and critical reflection on the culture of labour and the acquisition of workplace skills and experience. Assignments will include reflective exercises and critical analyses, leading to participation in a capstone seminar. Not eligible for CR/NCR.St. GeorgeVictoria College0.5placement, capstonelabour, employmentSDG8
WGS435Y5Women and Gender Studies PracticumThe practicum allows advanced WGS students to combine theory and practice through part-time unpaid placement with a community agency, government body, educational or social change organization.MississaugaHistorical Studies1.0Fall+placement, community12women, gender, educatSDG4, SDG5
WGS470Y1Community EngagementThe application of theoretical study to practical community experience. Advanced Women and Gender Studies students have the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired in the Women and Gender Studies curriculum through a practicum placement within a community organization. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWomen and Gender Studies Institute1.0Fall+placement, community10women, genderSDG5
WSTC23H3Community Engagement Practicumcommunity, experientialScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies0.5community, experientialwomen, gender, educatSDG4, SDG5
WSTC30H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to women and gender studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies0.5Wintercommunity40women, genderSDG5
WSTC31H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to women's and gender studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies0.5communitywomen, genderSDG5
WSTD11H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn advanced and in-depth seminar dedicated to a topic relevant to Women's and Gender Studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area, which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.ScarboroughUniversity of Toronto Scarborough0.5communitywomen, genderSDG5