Sustainability Course Inventory

University of Toronto’s 2020-2021 Undergraduate Sustainability Course Inventory

The Sustainability Course Inventory gathers information about all sustainability-related undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto. Our understanding of sustainability englobes both human and environmental concerns, and the inventory was created based on keywords from the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (see below). It includes 2,233 sustainability-oriented courses, representing approximately one-quarter of all undergraduate courses at U of T. The Inventory now includes a column for the Instructors who have provided consent via faculty survey to publish their names in the Sustainability Course Inventory. There are now 587 courses with Instructor names in the Inventory. The purpose of the sustainability course inventory is to increase the visibility of such courses, making it more accessible for students to add sustainability content to their educational experience.

We hope to encourage deeper understanding of the societal shift towards sustainability, to contribute to the creation of a culture of sustainability at the university. The SDGs were chosen as a basis for the inventory due to their comprehensiveness and widespread usage in the sustainability field. The first inventory was created in 2017 by the Expanded Student Engagement (ESE) Project, which supports the the President’s Advisory Committee on the Environment, Climate Change, and Sustainability (CECCS)’s Subcommittee on Curriculum Innovation, and this new version was made by the CECCS’ Adams Sustainability Champion Interns in August 2020. The ESE team collaborated with the CECCS to select which keywords would be used to represent each of the first 16 SDGs. (SDG 17, “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the goal partnership for sustainable development,” was excluded from the methodology, as it encompasses the act of achieving the other goals rather than bringing a new perspective to sustainability).

Sustainable development goal poster

The sustainability course inventory is below.

Note: If you are a professor at the University of Toronto and think that a course should be included or removed from the inventory, please email Ayako Ariga: ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

CodeCourse NameInstructor nameCourse DescriptionCampusTermDivisionDepartmentCreditKEYWORDSSDGs covered
ACMB10H3Equity and Diversity in the ArtsCharlie Wall-AndrewsEquity and diversity in the arts promotes diversity of all kinds, including those of race, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation or identity, age, ability or disability, religion, and aesthetics, tradition or practice. This course examines issues of equity and diversity and how they apply across all disciplines of arts, culture and media through critical readings and analysis of cultural policy.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Arts, Culture & Media (UTSC) 0.5genderSDG5
ACMD01H3ACMEE Applied Practice IIAn advanced study of the arts, culture and/or media sector through reflective practice. Students will further engage with work places as learning laboratories, and play a mentorship role for students in earlier stages of the experiential education process.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Arts, Culture & Media (UTSC) 0.5educatSDG4
ACMD01H3ACMEE Applied Practice IIAn advanced study of the arts, culture and/or media sector through reflective practice. Students will further engage with work places as learning laboratories, and play a mentorship role for students in earlier stages of the experiential education process.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Arts, Culture & Media (UTSC) 0.5educatSDG4
ACMD02H3ACMEE Applied Practice IIIAn advanced study of the arts, culture and/or media sector through reflective practice. Students will further synthesize their classroom and work place / learning laboratory experiences, and play a mentorship role for students in earlier stages of the experiential education process.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Arts, Culture & Media (UTSC) 0.5educatSDG4
ACMD02H3ACMEE Applied Practice IIIAn advanced study of the arts, culture and/or media sector through reflective practice. Students will further synthesize their classroom and work place / learning laboratory experiences, and play a mentorship role for students in earlier stages of the experiential education process.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Arts, Culture & Media (UTSC) 0.5educatSDG4
AER315H1Combustion ProcessesOmer GulderScope and history of combustion, and fossil fuels; thermodynamics and kinetics of combustion including heats of formation and reaction, adiabatic flame temperature, elementary and global reactions, equilibrium calculations of combustion products, and kinetics of pollutant formation mechanisms; propagation of laminar premixed flames and detonations, flammability limits, ignition and quenching; gaseous diffusion flames and droplet burning; introduction to combustion in practical devices such as rockets, gas turbines, reciprocating engines, and furnaces; environmental aspects of combustion.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENVIORNMENT;POLLUTSDG13, SDG14
AER407H1Space Systems DesignChristopher DamarenIntroduction to the conceptual and preliminary design phases for a space system currently of interest in the Aerospace industry. A team of visiting engineers provide material on typical space systems design methodology and share their experiences working on current space initiatives through workshops and mock design reviews. Aspects of operations, systems, electrical, mechanical, software, and controls are covered. The class is divided into project teams to design a space system in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP) formulated by the industrial team. Emphasis is placed on standard top-down design practices and the tradeoffs which occur during the design process. Past projects include satellites such as Radarsat, interplanetary probes such as a solar sailer to Mars, a Mars surface rover and dextrous space robotic systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5INDUSTR; SOLARSDG7, SDG9
AER506H1Spacecraft Dynamics and ControlBehrad VatankhahghadimPlanar “central force” motion; elliptical orbits; energy and the major diameter; speed in terms of position; angular momentum and the conic parameter; Kepler’s laws. Applications to the solar system; applications to Earth satellites. Launch sequence; attaining orbit; plane changes; reaching final orbit; simple theory of satellite lifetime. Simple (planar) theory of atmospheric entry. Geostationary satellite; adjustment of perigee and apogee; east-west stationkeeping. Attitude motion equations for a torque-free rigid body; simple spins and their stability; effect of internal energy dissipation; axisymmetric spinning bodies. Spin-stabilized satellites; long-term effects; sample flight data. Dual-spin satellites; basic stability criteria; example-CTS. “active” attitude control; reaction wheels; momentum wheels; controlmoment gyros; simple attitude control systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG7
AER507H1Introduction to Fusion EnergyNuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distributions, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) fusion plasma confinement methods (magnetic and inertial). Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG7
AER510H1Aerospace PropulsionScope and history of jet and rocket propulsion; fundamentals of air-breathing and rocket propulsion; fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of propulsion including boundary layer mechanics and combustion; principles of aircraft jet engines, engine components and performance; principles of rocket propulsion, rocket performance, and chemical rockets; environmental impact of aircraft jet engines.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
AER525H1RoboticsThe course addresses fundamentals of analytical robotics as well as design and control of industrial robots and their instrumentation. Topics include forward, inverse, and differential kinematics, screw representation, statics, inverse and forward dynamics, motion and force control of robot manipulators, actuation schemes, task-based and workspace design, mobile manipulation, and sensors and instrumentation in robotic systems. A series of experiments in the Robotics Laboratory will illustrate the course subjects.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5INDUSTRSDG9
AFSA01H3Africa in the World: An IntroductionStephen RockelAn interdisciplinary introduction to the history and development of Africa with Africa's place in the wider world a key theme. Students critically engage with African and diasporic histories, cultures, social structures, economies, and belief systems. Course material is drawn from Archaeology, History, Geography, Literature, Film Studies, and Women's Studies. Same as HISA08H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5womenSDG5
AFSB50H3Africa in the Era of the Slave TradeAn introduction to the history of Sub-Saharan Africa, from the era of the slave trade to the colonial conquests. Throughout, the capacity of Africans to overcome major problems will be stressed. Themes include slavery and the slave trade; pre-colonial states and societies; economic and labour systems; and religious change. Same as HISB50H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5LABOUR; TRADESDG8, SDG10
AFSC53H3Gender and Critical DevelopmentHow development affects, and is affected by, women around the world. Topics may include labour and economic issues, food production, the effects of technological change, women organizing for change, and feminist critiques of traditional development models.Same as WSTC10H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; gender; women; LABOUR; PRODUCTIONSDG2, SDG5, SDG8, SDG12
AFSC55H3War and Society in Modern AfricaConflict and social change in Africa from the slave trade to contemporary times. Topics include the politics of resistance, women and war, repressive and weak states, the Cold War, guerrilla movements, resource predation. Case studies of anti-colonial rebellions, liberation wars, and civil conflicts will be chosen from various regions.Same as HISC55H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; TRADESDG5, SDG10
AFSD07H3Extractive Industries in AfricaThis course examines resource extraction in African history. We examine global trade networks in precolonial Africa, and the transformations brought by colonial extractive economies. Case studies, from diamonds to uranium, demonstrate how the resource curse has affected states and economies, especially in the postcolonial period.Same as IDSD07H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; TRADESDG9, SDG10
ANT199H1Living on the Water in TorontoWhat do the Great Lakes mean to people living here? Especially Indigenous people? When and how do people care about the Great Lakes? Poems, stories, social science offer perspectives on the water from anthropology and arts. Field trips including paddling on a river, hiking; talks with local activists and artists. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5WATERSDG6, SDG14
ANT200Y1Introduction to ArchaeologyHow did art and technology develop in the course of human evolution? What led to the development of agriculture and settled village life? How did social inequality and urbanism emerge? This course takes a global perspective to explore the archaeological evidence that sheds light on these questions and other aspects of prehistory and early history. Students will engage with the challenges posed by new discoveries and also with recent developments in archaeological method and theory. The goal of the course is to involve students with the current state of archaeological research and some of the major issues archaeologists work to address.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology1agriculture; equality; INEQUALITY; URBANSDG2, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
ANT200Y1Introduction to ArchaeologyHow did art and technology develop in the course of human evolution? What led to the development of agriculture and settled village life? How did social inequality and urbanism emerge? This course takes a global perspective to explore the archaeological evidence that sheds light on these questions and other aspects of prehistory and early history. Students will engage with the challenges posed by new discoveries and also with recent developments in archaeological method and theory. The goal of the course is to involve students with the current state of archaeological research and some of the major issues archaeologists work to address.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology1agriculture; equality; INEQUALITY; URBANSDG2, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
ANT201H5World PrehistorySurvey of human cultural development over 2.5 million years. The course will cover the following topics: the nature and origins of material culture; the nature and development of hunter-gather-fisher economies; the nature and development of resource production; and the nature of development of complex societies. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5PRODUCTION; FISHSDG12, SDG14
ANT203H5Biological Anthropology: Primatology and PalaeoanthropologyBiological anthropology deals with the diversity and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives, and how they have adapted to their environments. This course will introduce students to the remarkable biological diversity of our taxonomic order: the primates. The course will also discuss the rich fossil evidence for human evolution and its interpretation. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG10, SDG13
ANT204H1Social Cultural Anthropology and Global IssuesA course focused on recent anthropological scholarship that seeks to understand and explain the transformation of contemporary societies and cultures. Topics may include some of the following: new patterns of global inequality, war and neo-colonialism, health and globalization, social justice and indigeneity, religious fundamentalism, gender inequalities, biotechnologies and society etc.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5health; gender; equality; INEQUALITY; JUSTICESDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
ANT205H1Medical Anthropology: Sociocultural Perspectives on Illness, Medicine and CareIntroduction to medical anthropology with a focus on questions, methods, and insights from sociocultural anthropology. Explores the relationships among culture, society, and medicine with special attention to power, inequality, and globalization. Examples from many parts of the world, addressing biomedicine as well as other healing systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5equality; INEQUALITYSDG5, SDG10
ANT207H5Being Human: Classic Thought on Self and SocietyThe question of what it means to be human has been at the core of anthropology for over two centuries, and it remains as pressing now as it ever was. This course introduces students to some classic attempts at addressing this question with specific reference to the nature of personhood and social life. By engaging with the writings of Marx, Weber, Freud, and DeBeauvoir among other great thinkers of the modern age, students will develop deeper knowledge of the major theories guiding anthropological research. We will pay close attention to how arguments are constructed in these texts and focus on the methodologies that these pioneers of social thought developed in their inquiries. The course covers enduring topics ranging from the production of social inequality, what it means to be an individual, how collective life is shaped by economic markets, and the role of religion in shaping human experience, to develop an understanding of central issues facing the world today. [24L 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5equality; INEQUALITY; PRODUCTIONSDG5, SDG10, SDG12
ANT208H1Medical Anthropology: an Evolutionary Perspective on Human HealthDaniel SellenIntroduction to applied evolutionary medical anthropology. It explores evidence for the evolution of human vulnerability to disease across the life cycle (conception to death) and implications for health of contemporary populations in behavioral ecological, cross-cultural, health and healing systems, historical trauma, inter-sectionality, and climate change, lenses.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5healthSDG3
ANT208H5The Culture Machine: The Anthropology of Everyday LifeThis course will introduce students to culture and social theory via the lens of popular culture. Commodities, advertising, and new technologies will be considered in light of their cultural content. The course may consider the marketing of identities, gender, sexualities, bodies, ethnicity, religion, and ideology, as well as resistance. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT209H5War, Trade and Aid: The Anthropology of Global InterventionThis course explores how anthropology approaches the study of various interventions into human life and society. These forms of intervention--nation building, human rights, and development--differ in the scale and scope of their projects and in what they hope to accomplish. They also have much in common. Each is explicitly concerned with improving the conditions under which people live, and yet each has also been criticized for making things worse rather than better. This course will explore why this might be the case by focusing on examples taken from around the world. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5TRADE; RIGHTSSDG10, SDG16
ANT214H5Anthropology of Food and NutritionCarolan WoodThis course explores human food use and nutrition from a broad anthropological perspective. It examines archaeological and osteological evidence of dietary patterns of human ancestors. It explores significant food 'revolutions', from the origins of agriculture to the relatively recent phenomenon of biotechnological food production. It uses a wide range of theoretical approaches from biological and sociocultural anthropology to understand the patterns of food production, distribution and consumption observed today. The goal of the course is to provide students with a broad understanding of the many anthropological approaches to the study of food and nutrition. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5agriculture; food; nutrition; CONSUM
PRODUCTION
SDG2, SDG12
ANT215H5How Should One Live? An Introduction to the Anthropology of EthicsFew questions are more obviously important than that which Socrates poses in Plato's Republic: "how should one live?" This course considers the various ways this question has been asked and the answers it has received across a range of very different contexts. It begins with Socrates' address to the Athenian assembly in The Apology and his conclusion that the examined life is the only one worth living. We then turn to the Greek past and the Homeric background against which the reflective life, that Socrates exemplified, stood in stark contrast. With this background in place we will proceed to consider the various ways in which the question of how one should live has been answered across of a range of social settings. Drawing on ethnography as well journalism and documentary film we will consider, for instance, Rastafarianism, Jainism, living "off-grid" in North America, deaf communities in the US, transgenderism, and non-binary gender identity. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT217H5Anthropology of LawThe course is designed to introduce the key concepts, issues, and methods of legal anthropology as a specific field of study in relation to the larger history of the discipline. The course will explore how anthropological works understand and examine the legal and social orders, political and normative authorities, frames of rights, regimes of crime and punishment, and forms of justice-seeking. Accounting for different understandings of law and everyday legal practices, the course readings include canonical texts of legal anthropology as well as recent ethnographies of law. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5JUSTICE; RIGHTSSDG16
ANT220H5Introduction to the Anthropology of HealthMadeleine MantThis course introduces the diverse approaches used by anthropologists to examine human health and illness. Archaeological, biological, sociocultural and medical anthropology examine health and disease in past and present populations using a wide variety of theoretical and methodological tools. The concept of health will be explored using these various and often complementary approaches. The goal is to provide students with a broad theoretical foundation for further study in the anthropology of health. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5healthSDG3
ANT300H5Cultural Heritage Management: The Past in the Present and for the FutureCultural Heritage Management, also known as cultural resource management or applied archaeology, aims to protect traces of the past such as artifacts, archaeological sites and cultural landscapes, that have meaning for people in the present. This course takes a broad look at cultural heritage, why it matters in the present, and why we need to preserve aspects of it for the future. Topics may include stakeholders and the politics of the past, mechanisms for the protection of heritage and archaeological sites, the heritage management industry, and the methods used to identify, document, and mitigate impacts to archaeological sites, and to preserve the materials recovered. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5CONSERVSDG15
ANT313H5China, Korea and Japan in PrehistoryThe exploration of the remarkable prehistories of China, the Koreas and Japan challenge western thought on agricultural origins, complex hunter-gatherers, urbanization and the development of centralized authority. This course evaluates current thinking about these issues in the three regions and examines the impact of local archaeological practice on the construction of narratives about the past. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5URBANSDG11
ANT317H5Pre-contact Indigenous History of Eastern North AmericaThis course is a survey of pre-contact and early contact Indigenous history in the Eastern Woodlands of North America from earliest times (ca. 12-15,000 years ago) until AD 1650. Topics covered will include earliest inhabitants, hunter-gatherer-fisher lifeways, the origins of food production, development of village-dwelling tribal communities, and first contact with Europeans. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5food; PRODUCTION; FISHSDG2, SDG12, SDG14
ANT318H1The Preindustrial City and Urban Social TheoryThis course offers a comparative examination of the rise and organization of ancient cities through a detailed investigation of urban social theory. We will explore competing anthropological interpretations of urban process while probing the political, ideological, and economic structures of the worlds earliest cities. Students will have the opportunity to consider a broad range of subjects, including mechanisms of city genesis; urban-rural relations; the intersections of city and state; and historical variation in urban landscapes, ideologies, and political economies.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5INDUSTR; CITIES
URBAN
RURAL
SDG9, SDG11
ANT327H5Agricultural Origins: The Second RevolutionA second revolution in human existence began when people developed agriculture long after the origin of modern humans and Upper Palaeolithic culture. This course critically evaluates the shift to agriculture in the context of current ecological and archaeological perspectives. The concept of "agriculture" is evaluated by considering plant and animal domestication as well as resource management in a broad range of contexts. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5agricultureSDG2
ANT329H1Language & Power StructureThe role of language and symbolism in the representation and manipulation of ideology and power structure. Case materials drawn from the study of verbal arts, gender, law, advertising, and politics with a focus on North America.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT335H5Anthropology of GenderSurvey of the function of gender roles from evolutionary and cultural perspectives. Cross-cultural variation in human sexual behaviour and gender will be examined. In some years, as part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. See Anthropology department website for more details. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT336H1Evolutionary Anthropology TheoryThis course will explore the foundational and leading concepts in evolutionary anthropology. Historically important readings and current concepts will be presented and discussed in the context of research, especially in areas of human population biology, ecology and the evolution of Homo sapiens. Topics will include behavioral ecology and life history theory, as well as a critique of the adaptationist program.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
ANT337H5Anthropology of Growth and DevelopmentThis course examines growth and development from a variety of theoretical perspectives. It begins with an examination of the fundamental biological principles of growth and how these are expressed throughout evolution. It explores the evolution of growth patterns among primates and hominins and compares patterns of growth among the living primates. The course examines human growth and development throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence and explores the influence of genetic, epigenetic and endocrine processes on the plasticity of human growth that ultimately produces the variability observed in our species. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of how evolutionary and environmental processes interact in the production of growth and health in human populations. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health;
ENVIORNMENT
SDG3, SDG12, SDG13
ANT338H5Laboratory Methods in Biological AnthropologyMadeleine MantRecommended for those who may specialize in biological anthropology. Students will be introduced to the process of conducting research, including selected laboratory procedures and how they are used to generate and/or analyze data. Students conduct anthropometric assessment of growth and body size, nutrition assessment through 24-hour dietary recall, and assessment of physical activity and sleep using triaxial accelerometry. These biometric techniques have numerous applications in both research and clinical settings. Students in this course will develop applied skills in bioanthropological assessment that can be used in the fields of anthropology, population health, public health nutrition, and human development. [12L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5nutrition; healthSDG3
ANT341H5Anthropology of Infectious DiseaseMadeleine MantInfection is a significant area of study for anthropologists because it is situated at the intersection of social and biological experience. This course examines why infectious disease occupies such a central position in our contemporary understanding of health. It examines the many theoretical and methodological approaches currently used to understand how humans experience infectious illness. Perspectives from bioarchaeology, demography, environmental anthropology, biocultural anthropology, and medical anthropology are used to examine the way epidemics and infections have been understood throughout human history and how those understandings continue to shape human perceptions of risk, the body and identity. Social inequality is a major focus of inquiry; the course explores how colonialism and injustice lead to significant and persistent health inequalities for many populations. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; equality; inequality; environment; justiceSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
ANT343H1Social Anthropology of GenderSocial anthropological perspectives on variations in gender roles and systems. Examines, through comparison of ethnography, the relationship of gender to social organization, economic and political processes, belief systems and social change.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT345H1Global Health: Anthropological PerspectivesThis course examines medical anthropologys contributions to, and critiques of, global health policies and programs. Topics covered include: colonialism and health, the political ecology of disease, indigenous constructions of illness and healing, medical pluralism, the politics of primary health care, population policies, reproductive health, and AIDS.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5health; ECOLOGYSDG3, SDG15
ANT348H1Medical Anthropology: Health, Power and PoliticsThis course deepens students? understandings of health and illness as social, cultural, political and historical phenomena. Drawing on theories and approaches from social-cultural anthropology, students will develop skills in critical analysis of experiences and meanings of healing and illness in particular contexts, with a focus on anthropological critique of dominant health policies, discourses, technologies and practices.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5healthSDG3
ANT354H5Capitalism and its RebelsThis class explores different forms of rebellion, insurgency, protest and political mobilization from an anthropological perspective, focusing specifically on anti-capitalist mobilizations. Grounded in ethnographies that range from studies of piracy, hacking, and the occupy movements, to struggles against the privatization of water and social movements organizing for "the commons," this course offers key insight into contemporary social movements, their deep groundings in the past, and the implications they might have for the future. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5WATERSDG6, SDG14
ANT366H1Anthropology of Activism and Social JusticeExplores how anthropologists have traditionally studied social movements and how new social movements have challenged anthropologists to rethink some of their ethnographic methods and approaches. Some specific movements covered include those related to indigenous rights, environmentalism, refugees, gay and lesbian issues, biotechnology, new religions, and globalization.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENT; justice; rightsSDG13, SDG16
ANT366H1Anthropology of Activism and Social JusticeExplores how anthropologists have traditionally studied social movements and how new social movements have challenged anthropologists to rethink some of their ethnographic methods and approaches. Some specific movements covered include those related to indigenous rights, environmentalism, refugees, gay and lesbian issues, biotechnology, new religions, and globalization.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENT; justice; rights;SDG13, SDG16
ANT368H5World Religions and EcologyStephen ScharperA study of the responses of selected world religious traditions to the emergence of global ecological concerns. Key concepts and tenets of the traditions and their relevance for examination of the environment crisis. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENT; ecologySDG13, SDG15
ANT370H1Introduction to Social Anthropological TheoryHollis MooreAn in-depth critical review of foundational ideas in the development of the practice of Anthropology. Topics may include questioning fieldwork, origins and legacies of functionalism, cultural materialism, politics of culture, power and political economy, globalization and post modernism, gender and post-structuralism.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT370H5Environment, Culture and FilmStephen ScharperOur present environmental challenge constitutes of the most pressing areas of contemporary social, cultural, ethical and ecological concern. Acid rain, poisoned air, forest clear-cutting, ozone depletion, global climate change, toxic waste sites--the list goes on--all weigh heavily on our personal and intellectual lives. This course attempts to introduce students to both the scope and seriousness of present ecological concerns, as well as some core principles and concepts in the field of the intersection of environment and culture, through the lens of feature films. Themes such as the precautionary principle, urban/rural dualisms, ecofeminism, deep ecology, and the overwhelming burden placed on poor populations by environmental destruction are but a few of the areas which will be examined through the use of feature films, both classic and contemporary. We will do this in part by touching on some of the major writers and classic essays in the field, Class lectures will be supplemented by audiovisuals, guest lectures and class discussions. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5URBAN; rural; waste; climate; environment; forest; ecologySDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
ANT386H1Global Catholicism: Anthropological ApproachesThis is a course on material religion and mediation, kingdom and kinship, gender symbolisms and devotions, ecologies of selves and the histories of senses that infuse Catholicism. It challenges us to think about the importance of Catholicism as a global phenomenon expressed through socio-political and cultural practices of the everyday life. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT402H5Wild Nights: Sleep, evolution, and performance in the 21st centurySleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep - that is, 'why' we sleep - remains mysterious. This course integrates research findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian and primate sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Students will learn how to use 'wearable' technology, such as actigraphy, for scientific research. The goal of the course is to empower students with the theoretical and technological tools to be able to not only critically assess their own sleep-wake behaviour and performance but also popular generalizations about how to maximize long-term health outcomes. [12L, 12S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; ecologySDG3, SDG15
ANT414H5People and Plants in PrehistoryThe relationship between plants and people through time offers important insights into our past, particularly human-environmental interaction, plant domestication, and agricultural origins and development. Students will learn archaeological plant remains identification and interpretation skills through a combination of laboratory and seminar sessions. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. Skills learned in this course are also useful in forensic investigations. Students will develop a project based on archaeological material from Japan and/or Ontario in consultation with the instructor. [12L, 24P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ANT434H1Health, Diet & Disease in the PastAdvanced exploration of the life histories of past populations, through the application of palaeodietary analyses, palaeopathology and other appropriate research methods.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5healthSDG3
ANT435H1Anthropology of Childhood and ChildcareDaniel SellenA detailed review of the classic and recently emerging literature on the anthropology of children, childhood, and childcare. Focus is on theories for evolution of human parenting adaptations, challenges in research methodology and implications for contemporary research, practice and policy in the area of care and nutrition of infants and children.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5nutritionSDG2
ANT437H5Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of HealthThis course undertakes a critical examination of theory and methods used in the study of human health. It traces the historical development of the powerful biomedical paradigm that dominates health research today and uses a critical lens to examine the systems used to measure and classify health and disease. It explores evolutionary and biological approaches to understanding human health by examining the concepts of adaptation and plasticity, genetic and epigenetic approaches, developmental origins and life history theories, social determinants of health, and critical medical anthropology. The course explores the profoundly influential role of social inequality on the production and reproduction of health in historical and contemporary populations. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; equalityl inequality; productionSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG12
ANT450H1Multispecies CitiesHilary Cunningham As of 2007, for the first time in human history, more than half the world?s peoples lived in cities. It is estimated that by 2030 over 60% will be urban-dwellers. This demographic shift suggests that for many (if not most) people, their primary encounter with ?nature? will be urban based. This course explores the idea of ?urban-nature? by 1) focusing on the ways in which various theorists have challenged traditional ways of viewing both ?the city? and ?nature? and 2) encouraging students to develop their own critical perspectives through ethnographic engagements with the city of Toronto. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5CITIES; urbanSDG3, SDG11
ANT455H1Ethnographic Approaches to the Middle East and North AfricaThis course explores the literature and concerns of anthropologists conducting ethnographic research in the greater Middle East and North Africa (MENA). It is designed for students with a background in social and cultural anthropology who wish to become familiar with the social and religious complexity of the MENA region, and the anthropological questions it has compelled. Islam has long been the area's principal social and historical force and thus provides the backdrop for much, but not all, of the ethnography considered in the course. Moreover, Muslim majority MENA countries exhibit considerable social and sectarian diversity. Readings and lectures attend to differences as well as resemblances, while considering issues such as gender roles, kinship, marriage, local level practices, medicine, secularism, 'public Islam,' nationalism, and the persistent problem of orientalism.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT460H1Global Perspectives on Womens HealthThis fourth-year seminar examines how female gender shapes health and illness. Using case studies of sexual health, fertility and its management, substance use/abuse, mental health, and occupational/labor health risks, the course investigates the material, political, and socio-cultural factors that can put women at risk for a range of illness conditions.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5health; gender; womenSDG3, SDG5
ANT462H5Living and Dying: Topics in Medical Anthropology & Global HealthThis course is concerned with contemporary medical knowledge practices, with particular emphasis on Western medicine and Public Health. Through a set of key readings in sociocultural medical anthropology, students will explore topics such as the art and science of medicine, end of life rites and rituals, expertise, and the politics and perils of intervention. This is an advanced, writing -intensive seminar that will particularly appeal to sociocultural anthropology students, and those interested in pursuing a career in the health professions. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5healthSDG3
ANT463H5Anthropologies of Water: On Meaning, Value, and FuturesAndrea MuehlebachThis class delves into the topic of water from an anthropological perspective by thinking of water not only as resource but also as meaningful substance, symbol, and mediator of human and non-human relations. Class will consist mainly of discussions of ethnographic readings but also of hands-on class exercises, field-trips, and auto-ethnographic work. In some years, class might consist of one required field trip outside of class time (weekends and/or Reading Week) with additional travel costs that students will be required to pay through ancillary fees. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. [24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5WATER; WATERSDG6, SDG14
ANT472H1Japan in Global Context: Anthropological Perspectives (formerly ANT354Y1 and ANT354H1)This course examines how what we know as Japan and its culture has been constructed through global interactions. Topics include gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social and family life, work and leisure, and Japanese identity amid changing global power relations.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5genderSDG5
ANT491H1Internship in AnthropologyThis course is an opportunity to apply acquired knowledge in anthropology or archeology in a work placement environment. Opportunities may include local community organizations, international development organizations, museum or heritage projects, or media production projects. Only internships that require knowledge and skills in anthropology and/or archeology will be considered. Student must fulfill responsibilities of the internship as well as complete a final research paper. If qualified, the student?s internship supervisor will mark the final paper for the course; if not, an appropriate academic supervisor will be assigned from within the Dept. of Anthropology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
ANT491H1Internship in AnthropologyThis course is an opportunity to apply acquired knowledge in anthropology or archeology in a work placement environment. Opportunities may include local community organizations, international development organizations, museum or heritage projects, or media production projects. Only internships that require knowledge and skills in anthropology and/or archeology will be considered. Student must fulfill responsibilities of the internship as well as complete a final research paper. If qualified, the student?s internship supervisor will mark the final paper for the course; if not, an appropriate academic supervisor will be assigned from within the Dept. of Anthropology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
ANT491Y1Internship in AnthropologyThis course is an opportunity to apply acquired knowledge in anthropology or archeology in a work placement environment. Opportunities may include local community organizations, international development organizations, museum or heritage projects, or media production projects. Only internships that require knowledge and skills in anthropology and/or archeology will be considered. Student must fulfill responsibilities of the internship as well as complete a final research paper. If qualified, the student?s internship supervisor will mark the final paper for the course; if not, an appropriate academic supervisor will be assigned from within the Dept. of Anthropology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology1PRODUCTIONSDG12
ANT491Y1Internship in AnthropologyThis course is an opportunity to apply acquired knowledge in anthropology or archeology in a work placement environment. Opportunities may include local community organizations, international development organizations, museum or heritage projects, or media production projects. Only internships that require knowledge and skills in anthropology and/or archeology will be considered. Student must fulfill responsibilities of the internship as well as complete a final research paper. If qualified, the student?s internship supervisor will mark the final paper for the course; if not, an appropriate academic supervisor will be assigned from within the Dept. of Anthropology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology1PRODUCTIONSDG12
ANTB15H3Contemporary Human Evolution and VariationBasic to the course is an understanding of the synthetic theory of evolution and the principles, processes, evidence and application of the theory. Laboratory projects acquaint the student with the methods and materials utilized Biological Anthropology. Specific topics include: the development of evolutionary theory, the biological basis for human variation, the evolutionary forces, human adaptability and health and disease. Science credit Same as HLTB20H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
ANTB18H3Development, Inequality and Social Change in Latin AmericaThis course addresses Latin American systems of inequality in relation to national and transnational political economy, from colonialism to neoliberalism; how ideas of race, culture, and nation intersect with development thinking and modernization agendas; and how the poor and marginalized have accommodated, resisted, and transformed cultural and political domination.Area courseScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5equality; INEQUALITYSDG5, SDG10
ANTB20H3Ethnography and the Global ContemporaryHow has the global flow of goods, persons, technologies, and capital reproduced forms of inequality? Using ethnography and other media, students examine globalization through topics like migration, race and citizenship, environmental degradation, and increasing violence while also discussing older anthropological concerns (e.g., kinship, religious practices, and authority). This course enhances students’ understanding of ethnography, as a method for studying how actors engage and rework the global forces shaping their lives.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5equality; INEQUALITY; ENVIRONMENTSDG5, SDG10, SDG13
ANTB22H3Primate BehaviourJulie TeichroebThis course will provide students with a general introduction to the behaviour and ecology of non-human primates (prosimians, Old and New World monkeys, and apes), with a particular emphasis on social behaviour. The course will consist of lectures reinforced by course readings; topics covered will include dominance, affiliation, social and mating systems, communication, and reproduction.Science creditScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5PRODUCTION; ECOLOGYSDG12, SDG15
ANTB36H3Anthropology of the End of the WorldA cultural and comparative study of apocalyptic thought, practice, and representation around the world. It explores the conditions that inspire end times thinking and the uses it serves. Cases may include: millenarian movements, Revelation, colonialism, epidemics, infertility, deindustrialization, dystopian science fiction, nuclear war, climate change, and zombies.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; CLIMATESDG9, SDG13
ANTB64H3Are You What You Eat?: The Anthropology of FoodLena MortensenThis course examines the social significance of food and foodways from the perspective of cultural anthropology. We explore how the global production, distribution, and consumption of food, shapes or reveals, social identities, political processes, and cultural relations. Lectures are supplemented by hands-on tutorials in the Culinaria Kitchen Laboratory.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5food; CONSUM; PRODUCTIONSDG2, SDG12
ANTB65H3An Introduction to Pacific Island SocietiesMaggie CummingsIntroduces the cultures and peoples of the Pacific. Examines the ethnography of the region, and the unique contributions that Pacific scholarship has made to the development of anthropological theory. Explores how practices of exchange, ritual, notions of gender, death and images of the body serve as the basis of social organization. Area courseScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ANTC15H3Genders and SexualitiesComplements and extends ANTC14H3 by exploring cultural constructions of male and female in a range of societies and institutions.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5gender; INSTITUTIONSDG5, SDG16
ANTC19H3Producing People and Things: Economics and Social LifeThis course examines economic arrangements from an anthropological perspective. A key insight to be examined concerns the idea that by engaging in specific acts of production, people produce themselves as particular kinds of human beings. Topics covered include gifts and commodities, consumption, global capitalism and the importance of objects as cultural mediators in colonial and post-colonial encounters.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5CONSUM; PRODUCTIONSDG12
ANTC59H3Anthropology of Language and MediaAnthropology studies language and media in ways that show the impact of cultural context. This course introduces this approach and also considers the role of language and media with respect to intersecting themes: ritual, religion, gender, race/ethnicity, power, nationalism, and globalization. Class assignments deal with lecturers, readings, and students' examples. Same as MDSC21H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ANTC61H3Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing in Cultural PerspectiveSocial and symbolic aspects of the body, the life-cycle, the representation and popular explanation of illness, the logic of traditional healing systems, the culture of North American illness and biomedicine, mental illness, social roots of disease, innovations in health care delivery systems.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5health; INNOVATIONSDG3, SDG9
ANTC62H3Medical Anthropology: Biological and Demographic PerspectivesThe examination of health and disease in ecological and socio-cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on variability of populations in disease susceptibility and resistance in an evolutionary context. With its sister course, ANTC61H3, this course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and principles of medical anthropology. Principles of epidemiology, patterns of inheritance and biological evolution are considered. Science creditScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
ANTC68H3Deconstructing EpidemicsColonization, globalization and socio-ecological factors play an important role in origin, maintenance and emergence of old and new infectious diseases in human populations such as yellow fever, cholera, influenza, SARS. Issues of co-morbidity, the epidemiological transition, syndemics and the impact of global warming on the emergence of new diseases are discussed.Science creditScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC)0.5GLOBAL WARMINGSDG13
APS111H1Engineering Strategies & Practice IThis course introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for understanding problem solving and developing communications skills. This first course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to the process of engineering design, to strategies for successful team work, and to design for human factors, society and the environment. Students write team and individual technical reports and give presentations within a discussion group.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEngineering First Year Office0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
APS301H1Technology in Society and the Biosphere IHumanities and Social Science Elective
This course teaches future engineers to look beyond their specialized domains of expertise in order to understand how technology functions within human life, society and the biosphere. By providing this context for design and decision-making, students will be enabled to do more than achieve the desired results by also preventing or significantly reducing undesired consequences. A more preventively-oriented mode of practicing engineering will be developed in four areas of application: materials and production, energy, work and cities. The emphasis within these topics will reflect the interests of the class.
St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGY; CITIES; PRODUCTIONSDG7, SDG11, SDG12
APS305H1Energy PolicyComplimentary Studies Elective
Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor
Introduction to public policy including the role and interaction of technology and regulation, policy reinforcing/feedback cycles; procedures for legislation and policy setting at the municipal, provincial and federal levels; dimensions of energy policy; energy planning and forecasting including demand management and conservation incentives; policy institution, analysis, implementation, evaluation and evolution; Critical analyses of case studies of energy and associated environmental policies with respect to conservation and demand management for various utilities and sectors; policy derivatives for varied economic and social settings, developing countries and associated impacts.
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5ENERGY; ENVIRONMENT; CONSERV; INSTITUTIONSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG16
APS420H1Technology, Engineering and Global DevelopmentAhmed MahmoudHumanities and Social Science Elective

The role of technology and engineering in global development is explored through a combination of lectures, readings, case studies, and analysis of key technologies, including energy, information and communications technologies, water and healthcare.  Topics include a brief history and basic theories of international development and foreign aid, major government and non-government players, emerging alternative models (social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches), major and emerging players in social venture capital and philanthropy, the role of financial markets, environmental and resource considerations/sustainable development, technology diffusion models and appropriate technologies.
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5health; WATER; ENERGY; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; FINANCIAL MARKET; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG3, SDG6, SDG7, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14
APS447H1The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in EngineeringThe primary objective of this course is to help engineering students navigate the ambiguous world of engineering ethics and equity using case studies drawn from the careers of Canadian engineers. In addition to being exposed to a range of ethical theories, the PEO code of ethics and the legal context of engineering ethics, students enrolled in this course will engage in ethical decision-making on a weekly basis.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5equitableSDG4
APS510H1Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy SystemsComplementary Studies elective
A broad range of global energy systems are presented including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure.  Discussions are based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques. The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world. The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies.  The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental sustainability analysis perspectives.
St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5ENERGY; INFRASTRUCTURE; INNOVATION; INDUSTR; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG9, SDG13
APS530H1Appropriate Technology & Design for Global DevelopmentEngineering design within the context of global society, emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology.    A design project will comprise the major component of the course work.  The course will take the approach of “design for X”.   Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc.  This course will extend the students’ understanding of design methodologies to design for “appropriateness in developing regions”.   Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology.   Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project.   The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context.   Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5health; EDUCAT; WATER; SANITATION; ENERGY; INFRASTRUCTURE; URBAN; RURAL; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG3, SDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ARA210H5Arab Culture IThis course introduces the Arab culture in general terms and familiarizes students with some fundamental realities of the Arab world (e.g. family, gender roles, social etiquette, etc.) with a general introduction to values and religious practices. The course is taught in English. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5genderSDG5
ARC100H1Drawing and Representation IAn introduction to the theories and techniques of visual communication and representation in the design disciplines delivered through a series of lectures and thematic drawing projects. The course serves as a hands-on introduction to representational and geometrical techniques in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC181H1Technologies of Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism, and Art IAn introduction to how technology has shaped the disciplines of design and art through a series of case studies that describe paradigmatic episodes at the nexus of architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, and art.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC200H1Drawing and Representation IIA course on the theories and techniques of visual communication and representation in the design disciplines delivered through lectures and thematic drawing projects. The course serves as a hands-on introduction to the description of structures and environments as a means of both production and critique.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5urbanSDG11
ARC200H1Drawing and Representation IIA course on the theories and techniques of visual communication and representation in the design disciplines delivered through lectures and thematic drawing projects. The course serves as a hands-on introduction to the description of structures and environments as a means of both production and critique.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5urbanSDG11
ARC201H1Design Studio II: How to design almost nothingA studio-based introduction to design with emphasis upon the production of form and space and the formation of landscapes. The course serves as a hands-on exploration of the relationships between material, tectonic, and programmatic organizations in the context of social, technological, and environmental concerns.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
ARC201H1Design Studio II: How to design almost nothingA studio-based introduction to design with emphasis upon the production of form and space and the formation of landscapes. The course serves as a hands-on exploration of the relationships between material, tectonic, and programmatic organizations in the context of social, technological, and environmental concerns.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
ARC253H1Close Readings in Urban DesignDetailed examination of case studies in the history of urbanism with close attention to the objects of study. The relationship between design, context, and theory will be explored through analyses of artifacts and texts.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC281H1Structures, Building Systems, and Environments IShannon HilchieAn introduction to structural and environmental design, the technologies of building and landscape systems, and the methods and frameworks through which the built environment is constructed. The calculation of quantitative criteria is taught through first-principles explorations.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ARC302H1Exploring Design PracticesAn introduction to the practice of architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, and visual art through a series of case studies and guest lectures. These classes will be integrated with the lecture series to provide opportunities for students to engage with leading practitioners in design and art.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC354H1History of HousingPetros BabasikasAn exploration of the question of housing since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5urbanSDG1, SDG9, SDG11, SDG16
ARC355H1History of UrbanismRoberto DamianiA consideration of urbanism through an examination of physical, social, economic, and political factors that have shaped cities and regions from the early modern period up to the present.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5housing
ARC356H1Design History of Landscape ArchitectureJane WolffAn opportunity to build a historical and theoretical vocabulary for the designed environment. This course will include case studies at multiple scales, focusing on North American examples from the relatively recent past.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5cities; urbanSDG13
ARC357H1Environmental History of Landscape ArchitectureAn examination of the global history of the interrelations between societies and their environment. This course examines the organisation of landscape and urban systems in a variety of geographic and cultural regions across the globe and over large spans of time. Please note that ARC356H1 Design History of Landscape Architecture is recommended as background for this course.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBAN; environmentSDG11, SDG13
ARC361Y1Architecture Studio IIIThis studio will focus on residential types and the domestic environment through an exploration of the relationship between building types, tectonics, and material assemblies in an urban context.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBAN; environmentSDG11, SDG13
ARC362Y1Architecture Studio IVThis studio will focus on the design of a public program or institution in an urban setting through an exploration of the relationship between building types, tectonics, and material assemblies in an urban context.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBAN; environmentSDG11, SDG13
ARC363Y1Landscape Architecture Studio IIISonja VangjeliThis studio will address urban form, context, and significance as factors in the creation of public space, with a focus on sites at block and neighbourhood scales.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBANSDG11
ARC364Y1Landscape Architecture Studio IVThis studio will examine the reciprocal influences of landscape and urbanism, with respect to form and process, through a focus on landscapes as urban systems at multiple scales.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBANSDG11
ARC367H1Selected Topics in Urban DesignExamination of a selected topic in the design of urbanism. The focus of the course changes depending upon the instructors research specialty or current issues in urban design.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC380Y1Technology Studio IIIThis studio applies knowledge obtained from the prerequisite courses towards project-based design work with the aim of facilitating an understanding of the relationship between emerging digital technologies and production in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism through the development of computational tools and algorithmic design.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBAN; productionSDG11, SDG12
ARC381Y1Technology Studio IVThis studio continues to explore the role of technology in design and promotes innovation in design tool development, building systems, simulation and visualization. Emphasis will be on applying knowledge gained in earlier coursework in a project-based studio setting using computational techniques, physical model making, and 1:1 fabrication and prototyping.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1INNOVATIONSDG9
ARC382H1Structures, Building Systems, and Environments IIBomani KhemetContinued exploration of the principles of structural and environmental design, the technologies of building and landscape systems, and the methods and frameworks in which the built environment is constructed. The calculation of quantitative criteria is taught through first-principles explorations.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ARC383H1Technologies of Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism, and Art IIBuilding upon the themes and topics explored in Technologies of Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism, and Art I, this course will investigate how technology has shaped the disciplines of design and art through a series of case studies that describe paradigmatic episodes at the nexus of architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, and art.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC384H1Simulation and Data VisualizationAn exploration of the various simulation software programs available to designers, this course will introduce the theory of simulation and discuss the history of its use in science generally and in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism specifically.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC386H1Landscape EcologyFadi MasoudAn introduction to the principles of landscape ecology, addressing the application of evolving scientific understanding to contemporary landscape architecture and urban design practice.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBAN; ECOLOGYSDG11, SDG15
ARC387H1Landscape Topography and HydrologyAn introduction to the manipulation of landform and water in the urban context, studied through digital fabrication and metrics.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5WATER; URBAN; WATERSDG6, SDG11, SDG13
ARC453H1Advanced Topics in the History and Theory of UrbanismExamination of an advanced topic in the history and theory of urbanism. The focus of the course changes depending on the instructors research specialty as well as current issues.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC456H1Senior Seminar in History and Theory (Research)Through individual and group efforts, students will address a collective topic of critical importance to the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design within areas of faculty expertise.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC457Y1Senior Seminar in History and Theory (Thesis)This course gives students experience in engaging a multidisciplinary urban problem that spans the design, history and theory, and technology of the design disciplines. It is a team-oriented project-based course in which students will develop a collaborative project.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBANSDG11
ARC461H1Senior Seminar in Design (Research)Through individual and group efforts, students will address a collective topic of critical importance to the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design within areas of faculty expertise.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC462Y1Senior Seminar in Design (Thesis)This course gives students experience in engaging a multidisciplinary urban problem that spans the design, history and theory, and technology of the design disciplines. It is a team-oriented project-based course in which students will develop a collaborative project.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBANSDG11
ARC467H1Advanced Topics in Urban DesignExamination of an advanced topic in the design of urbanism. The focus of the course changes depending upon the instructors research specialty or current issues in urban design.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC482H1Advanced Topics in the Technology of UrbanismExamination of an advanced topic in the technology of urbanism. The focus of the course changes depending upon the instructors research specialty or current issues in landscape architecture.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC486H1Senior Seminar in Technology (Research)Through individual and group efforts, students will address a collective topic of critical importance to the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design within areas of faculty expertise.St. GeorgeFallJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBANSDG11
ARC487Y1Senior Seminar in Technology (Thesis)This course gives students experience in engaging a multidisciplinary urban problem that spans the design, history and theory, and technology of the design disciplines. It is a team-oriented project-based course in which students will develop a collaborative project.St. GeorgeWinterJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1URBANSDG11
ARH360H1Prehistory of the Near East (formerly ANT360Y1)From earliest times through the rise of complex hunter-gatherers, and the food producing revolution to politically complex societies in Southwest Asia.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceAnthropology0.5foodSDG2
BCH340H1Proteins: from Structure to ProteomicsHaley WyattProteins are the main functional units in the cell and are part of almost every biochemical process. They catalyze many metabolic reactions and also play central roles in signaling pathways. Some proteins have crucial structural and mechanical functions. In this course, a detailed overview of protein structure, stability, folding, and protein-ligand interactions will be given with strong emphasis on discussing the basic principles in the field. Biophysical, theoretical, and proteomic methods used to study protein stability and folding and protein-ligand interactions will be presented. Protein misfolding diseases will also be discussed. The course will offer a solid basis in protein biochemistry. It is recommended for those interested in pursuing graduate studies or professional degrees in health or medicine.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceBiochemistry0.5healthSDG3
BCH428H1Genomics of Microbial Communities in Human Health and BeyondThere is a growing appreciation that microbes do not operate in isolation but form parts of larger populations and communities (microbiomes) with unique considerations for human health. Combining lectures, small group discussions, and a computer lab component, this course will cover how genomics can be applied to analyze microbial communities and the transformative discoveries that continue to result.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceBiochemistry0.5healthSDG3
BIO120H1Adaptation and BiodiversityJohn StinchcombePrinciples and concepts of evolution and ecology related to origins of adaptation and biodiversity. Mechanisms and processes driving biological diversification illustrated from various perspectives using empirical and theoretical approaches. Topics include: genetic diversity, natural selection, speciation, physiological, population, and community ecology, maintenance of species diversity, conservation, species extinction, global environmental change, and invasion biology. A lab coat is required and the cost is approximately $16 if students wish to purchase it through the Department. (Lab Materials Fee: $25) St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ENVIORNMENT; CONSERV; BIODIVERITY; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG14
BIO202H5Introductory Animal PhysiologyDiversity of structure and function in animals at the tissue and organ system level. Focus is on morphology and processes that sustain life and maintain homeostasis, including water balance, gas exchange, acquisition and transport of oxygen and nutrients, temperature regulation, electrical and chemical signal transmission, sensory processing, and locomotion. Principles and mechanisms of animal form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories. [24L, 15P, 10T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5WATER; WATERSDG6, SDG14
BIO203H5Introductory Plant Morphology and PhysiologyIntroduction to the morphology and physiology of plants. Students will learn that plants require energy to support metabolism and growth, and that these processes are highly regulated in order to achieve homeostasis. Topics covered include: biology of the plant cell, plant morphology, plant respiration and photosynthesis, transport processes, regulation of growth and development, and plant ecophysiology. Principles and mechanisms of plant form and function are developed in lectures and laboratories. [24L, 10T, 15P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENERGYSDG7
BIO205H5EcologyChristoph RichterAn introduction to the scientific study of ecology, emphasizing the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population growth and regulation, competition, predation, biodiversity, succession, and nutrient cycling. Classic models and studies will be supplemented with both plant and animal examples. [24L, 18P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5BIODIVERSITY; ECOLOGYSDG14, SDG15
BIO207H5Introductory GeneticsThe principles of Mendelian inheritance and modern genetics are illustrated using examples from medical research, evolutionary biology, agriculture and conservation biology. Topics covered include: chromosome theory of inheritance, basic eukaryotic chromosome mapping, gene and chromosome mutation, the lac system, the extranuclear genome, population and quantitative genetics. In tutorials, students will work through problem sets related to lecture material as well as probability and statistical analysis. [36L, 18T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5agriculture; CONSERVSDG2, SDG15
BIO211H5The History of Our Living PlanetThis course provides a survey of major events in the evolution of life and Earth's geological history. It includes overviews of science as a process, geological principles, climate, and evolution. Special focus will be on major events including origin of life, the Cambrian explosion, plant and animal radiations onto land, the Mesozoic evolution of dinosaurs, and the Cenozoic diversification of mammals. This is a biology course for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences as well as other non-Biology Sciences. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5CLIMATESDG13
BIO220H1From Genomes to Ecosystems in a Changing WorldJohn StinchcombeDynamics of genetic and ecological change in biological systems, from genomes to ecosystems. Evolutionary genetic and ecological perspectives on wide-ranging topics including disease, aging, sexual conflict, genetics of human differences, conservation, and global climate change. Applications of evolutionary, ecological, and molecular-genetic principles and processes. Responsibilities of human societies in a changing world. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CLIMATE; CONSERVSDG13, SDG14
BIO251H1Form, Function and Development in PlantsIntroduction to structure, function, and ecology of vegetative and reproductive processes in plants with a focus on flowering plants and gymnosperms. Lectures and labs emphasize photosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, transport processes, patterns of plant growth and development, the role of hormones in development, photomorphogenesis, and plant reproduction. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5nutrition; PRODUCTION; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG12, SDG15
BIO312H5Plant PhysiologyIngo EnsmingerThis course focuses on the principal physiological processes in plants and the regulation of these processes in response to environmental factors with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function from the molecular to the whole-plant level. The course will provide the basis to understand how plants sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. This will enable students to understand why rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and global climate warming impact photosynthesis, plant metabolism and ultimately whole plant and ecosystem performance. Concepts discussed during lectures will be demonstrated in a series of practical labs. [36L, 15P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5CLIMATEL ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO312H5Plant PhysiologyIngo EnsmingerThis course focuses on the principal physiological processes in plants and the regulation of these processes in response to environmental factors with an emphasis on the relationship between structure and function from the molecular to the whole-plant level. The course will provide the basis to understand how plants sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. This will enable students to understand why rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and global climate warming impact photosynthesis, plant metabolism and ultimately whole plant and ecosystem performance. Concepts discussed during lectures will be demonstrated in a series of practical labs. [36L, 15P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO313H5Field Methods and Experimental Design in EcologyThis course will provide Biology Majors and Specialists particularly interested in ecology with integrated, practical exposure to field and laboratory research methods on plant, animal, and microbial communities including study design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results. [36P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIO318Y5Animal BehaviourThis course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. [48L, 72P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology1ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO318Y5Animal BehaviourThis course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. [48L, 72P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology1ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO320H5Sensory and Cognitive BiologyProperties, acquisitions, and transduction of environmental information will be explored in the context of determining behaviour. This course focuses on form and function of visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical senses. Post-acquisition, cognitive processes concerned with learning, memory, and decision-making will also be discussed. A comparative approach will be taken to examine how different animals rely on different sources of information as well as a diverse array of sensory and cognitive mechanisms. Fields considered will include sensory physiology, ecology, comparative cognition, and neuroethology, and all topics will be covered in the context of ecology and evolution". [24L, 10T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
BIO320H5Sensory and Cognitive BiologyProperties, acquisitions, and transduction of environmental information will be explored in the context of determining behaviour. This course focuses on form and function of visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical senses. Post-acquisition, cognitive processes concerned with learning, memory, and decision-making will also be discussed. A comparative approach will be taken to examine how different animals rely on different sources of information as well as a diverse array of sensory and cognitive mechanisms. Fields considered will include sensory physiology, ecology, comparative cognition, and neuroethology, and all topics will be covered in the context of ecology and evolution". [24L, 10T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
BIO324H5Plant BiochemistryThis course examines plants as the biochemical motors and sustainers of life on earth. The major pathways of plant metabolism are surveyed to provide students with an integrated model of plant cells as autonomous biochemical networks. This course further emphasizes the specialized metabolism of economically significant plant species, the biosynthesis of pharmacologically and agriculturally important metabolites, and the role of biotechnology in engineering exotic plant metabolism in industrial settings. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5INDUSTRSDG9
BIO325H5BiomechanicsGlenn MorrisFrom the form of an organism one can read its evolutionary history. This course addresses the use of organ systems to find and process food, escape enemies by locomotion, reproduce by pollination vectors, filter nutrients, exchange gases, coordinate and make decisions. Content includes the mechanics of moving in fluids by swimming and flying, sending and receiving of signals at body surfaces, the microstructure of materials. Forces are seen to have adaptively affected the shape and leverage of skeletons. [48P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5foodSDG2
BIO326H5OrnithologyEcology, evolution, form, function, diversity, and conservation of birds. Practical sessions focus on observation and assessment of local avian populations using field ornithology techniques and approaches. [24L, 30P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5CONSERV; ECOLOGYSDG15
BIO328H5Lectures in Animal BehaviourThis course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. No laboratory or field work is included. [48L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO328H5Lectures in Animal BehaviourThis course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. No laboratory or field work is included. [48L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIO330H5Plant EcologyPeter KotanenA survey of the population and community ecology of plants. Topics include resource acquisition, growth and reproduction, mutualisms, competition, defence, invasions, disturbance, population dynamics, and community structure. Interactions with other plants, diseases, and animals particularly are emphasized. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIO331H5Ecology of CommunitiesThis course will cover the theoretical foundations of community ecology, including the role of species interactions and environment structure on patterns of diversity and implications of community ecology in conservation. It will provide practical experience working with tools used to analyze community structure. Discussion and evaluation of the primary literature is a key component of this course. Students will also complete written assignments. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENT; CONSERV; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
BIO333H5Freshwater EcologyA functional analysis of freshwater ecosystems, with emphasis on lakes. Lectures cover water chemistry; the physical structure of lakes; the different ways that algae, zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish have evolved to succeed in these habitats and interact with one another; and the impact of man on freshwater systems. Students must be available to participate in a mandatory weekend field trip to a lake on one of two weekends in late September or early October. Students not available for one of those weekends should not register for this course. Ancillary fees for this course apply. Please check the Departmental website for full details. [24L, 32P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5WATER; WATER; FISH; ECOLOGYSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
BIO347H5EpigeneticsEpigenetic phenomena play key roles in environmental interactions, development, and in disease. Underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate chromatin structure and gene expression are explored, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, or non-coding RNAs. Examples focus predominantly on eukaryotes (e.g. plants, insects, humans) and highlight how epigenetic marks are set, maintained, and involved in shaping phenotypic outcomes. The course will also enable students to apply knowledge and basic principles to recent scientific literature in this dynamic field. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIO353H5Plant DevelopmentSteven ChatfieldThe course addresses key concepts, with emphasis on unique plant-related aspects. Integrates plant development at the levels of the cell, tissue, organ and organism, with knowledge from diverse fields of Biology. Topics will include embryology, environmental interactions, signaling, developmental transitions, developmental diversity, evolution and development, and tools for discovery research. [24L, 15P, 10T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIO368H5Medicinal Plants and Human HealthThis botanical survey of medicinal plants integrates phytochemistry, ethnobotany, herbalism, pharmacology, and the molecular basis of human disease. It examines traditional herbal medicine and modern phytochemical research as sources of plant-based drugs used in the treatment of disease. The biosynthesis of therapeutic plant compounds and their mechanisms of action in the human body are emphasized. Students will critically examine and debate claims made in the health, herbal, and supplement literature. [36L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5healthSDG3
BIO370Y5MicrobiologyIn-depth discussion of bacterial structure and ultrastructure; physiology and nutrition; growth and cultivation; nature of viruses (bacteriophage and a limited survey of animal viruses and their properties); microbial genetics; immunology; the role of micro-organisms in medicine, industry, agriculture and ecology. [48L, 72P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology1agriculture; NUTRTION; INDUSTR; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG9, SDG15
BIO370Y5MicrobiologyIn-depth discussion of bacterial structure and ultrastructure; physiology and nutrition; growth and cultivation; nature of viruses (bacteriophage and a limited survey of animal viruses and their properties); microbial genetics; immunology; the role of micro-organisms in medicine, industry, agriculture and ecology. [48L, 72P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology1agriculture; NUTRITION; INDUSTR; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG9, SDG15
BIO373H5Environmental MicrobiologySteven ShortA lecture course on the interaction of microorganisms with other organisms and their environment. As the most abundant form of life, microorganisms have an enormous impact on the Earth. Subject areas include microbial evolution and biodiversity, metabolism and biogeochemical cycling, and how molecular biology has revolutionized our understanding of microbial life. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENT; BIODIVERSITYSDG13, SDG14
BIO374H5Modern BiotechnologyThis course is designed to introduce students to biotechnology and its applications in a variety of fields, including medicine, food & beverage, agriculture, forensics, fisheries and environmental protection. The course explores the principles and methods of genetic, tissue and organismal engineering involving species from bacteria to humans. The social and ethical issues associated with biotechnologies such as GMOs, stem cells and cloning will also be discussed. Topics include: Recombinant DNA Technology, Genomics & Bioinformatics, Protein Technology, Microbial Biotechnology, Plant Biotechnology, Animal Biotechnology, Forensic Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology, Aquatic Biotechnology, Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Regulations, and Careers in Biotechnology. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5agriculture; FOOD; ENVIRONMENT; FISHSDG2, SDG13, SDG14
BIO376H5Marine EcologyThis course addresses the diversity of marine life, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in marine ecosystems. Students will explore current methods and theories in marine ecology and consider the societal importance of marine resources with a special emphasis on Canada's coasts. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5MARINE; ECOLOGYSDG14, SDG15
BIO378H5The Biology of Marine Mammals: evolution, physiology, ecology and conservationChristoph RichterThis course provides an introduction to the biological study of marine mammals and their populations. It explores the evolution of marine mammals, their adaptations to aquatic environments, as well as their population and behavioural ecology. The course also investigates threats to marine mammal populations and their national and global conservation. [24L, 24T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENT; MARINE; CONSERV; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIO380H5Human DevelopmentReproduction and embryonic development in humans are emphasized. After a general review of human reproduction, the formation of sperm and eggs is analyzed, followed by an in-depth analysis of fertilization in vivo and in vitro. Early embryonic developmental processes are studied with a view to how the embryo becomes organized so that all of the tissues and organs of the adult body form in the right places at the proper times. The course ends with an in-depth analysis of limb development and organ regeneration. The relevance of the material to such topics as human infertility, contraception, cloning, biotechnology and disease is continually addressed. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
BIO404H5Invertebrate NeurobiologyNeurobiology, the biological study of the nervous system, investigates the electrical and chemical processes animals use to regulate internal events and interface with their environments. Invertebrates have provided crucial neurobiological insights and are often more accessible study systems than vertebrates. This course addresses some key historical contributions, and discusses the future of invertebrate systems, where recent technological advances are opening up new ways to explore invertebrate neurobiology and evolution. Students will do practicals, using computer simulations of neurons, to develop an understanding of neurons and other excitable cells. [24L, 24P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIO406H5Current Topics in Ecology and EvolutionA combination of lectures and tutorials. The course will emphasize group discussion and critiques of current publications in the field. The theme of the course is expected to be topical and current and to vary from year to year, with the interests of the faculty member(s) teaching the course. Course themes are expected to range from structure and function of whole ecosystems (e.g. the collapse of fisheries) to evolutionary ecology (e.g. the evolution of emergent diseases). [12L, 24T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5FISH; ECOLOGYSDG14, SDG15
BIO411H5Topics in Molecular and Cellular PhysiologyAn advanced, student-led seminar course on contemporary subjects in cell physiology. Students will examine, review, criticize and present primary literature on fundamental topics such as ion transport, water transport, membrane excitability, intracellular transport, and secretion applied to a variety of physiological systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how diverse cell types carry out specific physiological functions. [36S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5WATER; WATERSDG14
BIO411H5Topics in Molecular and Cellular PhysiologyAn advanced, student-led seminar course on contemporary subjects in cell physiology. Students will examine, review, criticize and present primary literature on fundamental topics such as ion transport, water transport, membrane excitability, intracellular transport, and secretion applied to a variety of physiological systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how diverse cell types carry out specific physiological functions. [36S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5WATER; WATERSDG14
BIO412H5Climate Change BiologyIngo EnsmingerClimate change is affecting life on earth at all levels from cells to ecosystems. As a result, shifts in the distribution of species, the timing of biological events, and large impacts on natural resources, agriculture, and forestry may be seen. This course explores past climate, predictions of future climate, impacts of climate change on biological systems, and potentials for adaptation. Mitigation of climate change impacts on biological systems will also be discussed. [48L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5agriculture; NATURAL RESOURCES; CLIMATE; FORESTSDG2, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
BIO412H5Climate Change BiologyIngo EnsmingerClimate change is affecting life on earth at all levels from cells to ecosystems. As a result, shifts in the distribution of species, the timing of biological events, and large impacts on natural resources, agriculture, and forestry may be seen. This course explores past climate, predictions of future climate, impacts of climate change on biological systems, and potentials for adaptation. Mitigation of climate change impacts on biological systems will also be discussed. [48L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5agriculture; NATURAL RESOURCES; CLIMATE; FORESTSDG2, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
BIO414H5Advanced Integrative PhysiologyThe integration of cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and muscle physiology will be examined with a problem-based approach. The response of these systems to challenges such as altitude, depth under water, and exercise will be examined. Laboratory activities will give students hands on experience measuring physiological variables of these systems with primarily human subjects, while other examples will be used to examine the diversity of response to environmental challenges throughout the animal kingdom. [24L, 15T, 15P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG13, SDG14
BIO422H5Environmental EpigeneticsOrganisms show a remarkable plasticity that allows them to grow and survive in an ever-changing environment. Epigenetic mechanisms provide a fascinating layer of regulation that integrates the genome and environment. In addition, epigenetic marks can contribute to lasting effects across generations without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. This course explores how plant and animal epigenomes respond to change such as stresses or developmental transitions. Influences on genome function, phenotype, and how epigenetic marks are transmitted will be discussed interactively drawing on recent primary literature and modern technological advances. [12L, 24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIO434H5Social and Developmental Determinants of Human HealthLeanne De SouzaThis course encourages students to explore the relationship between social conditions and health outcomes. Topics may vary across years. Topics include the importance of the early years, interactions between the environment and the genes, epigenetic influences on health, sensitive periods of development, the influence of nutrition on health, the interaction between social policy, medical care, social class and human health. The students direct the learning experience in groups as they engage in case-based and problem-based learning. [24L, 24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5nutrition; HEALTH; ENVIRONMENTSDG2, SDG3, SDG13
BIO475H5VirologySteven ShortVirology examines the biology of viruses infecting all forms of life including humans and other animals, plants, eukaryotic microorganisms, and bacteria. The scope ranges from the molecular biology of virus replication to virus evolution and ecology. Current issues surrounding virology and society are incorporated into the course including vaccines, emerging viruses, and even consideration of practical applications of viruses. [24L, 24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIO475H5VirologySteven ShortVirology examines the biology of viruses infecting all forms of life including humans and other animals, plants, eukaryotic microorganisms, and bacteria. The scope ranges from the molecular biology of virus replication to virus evolution and ecology. Current issues surrounding virology and society are incorporated into the course including vaccines, emerging viruses, and even consideration of practical applications of viruses. [24L, 24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIO477H5The Human Genome and Cancer BiologyThe first part of the course examines the structure and molecular biology of the human genome. Topics will include: the sequencing of the human genome; variation between genomes; and various aspects of functional genomics such as a brief overview of how gene expression is regulated and how genomics is being utilized in health and medicine. Techniques such as high throughput sequencing will be covered. The second part of the course examines the molecular and genetic basis of cancer including the role of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle regulating proteins in the development of this disease. It also looks at cancer from a functional genomics perspective. Lectures and seminars involve presentations and discussion of recently published research articles. [36L, 12S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaBiology0.5healthSDG3
BIOA02H3Life on Earth: Form, Function and InteractionsKarolyn KeirA lecture and laboratory course providing an overview of the anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, population biology, ecology and biodiversity. Note: that both BIOA01H3 and BIOA02H3 must be completed prior to taking any other Biology course.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5BIODIVERSITY; ECOLOGYSDG15
BIOB10H3Cell BiologyThis course is designed to introduce theory and experimental techniques in cell biology. The course examines the structure and function of major animal and plant organelles and integrates this into a discussion of protein biosynthesis, signal-based sorting and intracellular trafficking using the cytoskeleton. Cell motility and cell interactions with the environment will also be examined to provide a solid foundation on the basic unit of life.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIOB34H3Animal PhysiologyAn introduction to the principles of animal physiology rooted in energy usage and cellular physiology. A comparative approach is taken, which identifies both the universal and unique mechanisms present across the animal kingdom. Metabolism, respiration, circulation, water regulation, movement and neural circuits are the areas of principal focus.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENERGY; WATERSDG6, SDG7, SDG14
BIOB35H3Essentials of Human PhysiologyAn exploration of the normal physiology of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on organ systems associated with head and neck, especially nervous, respiratory, muscular, digestive, cardiovascular, and endocrine. The interrelationship among organ systems and how they serve to maintain homeostasis and human health will also be discussed.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
BIOB38H3Plants and SocietyHow do plants feed the world and which plants have the highest impact on human lives? What is the origin of agriculture and how did it change over time? The human population will climb to 10 billion in 2050 and this will tax our planet’s ability to sustain life. Environmentally sustainable food production will become even more integral.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5agriculture; FOOD; ENVIRONMENTSDG2, SDG13
BIOB50H3EcologyAn introduction to the main principles of ecology, the science of the interactions of organisms with each other and with their environment. The course covers community and population ecology, and provides an emphasis on how ecology relates to other areas of biology, and to contemporary human and environmental issues.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
BIOB52H3Ecology and Evolutionary Biology LaboratoryAn introduction to field, lab and computational approaches to ecology and evolution. Laboratories will explore a variety of topics, ranging from population genetics to community ecology and biodiversity. Some lab exercises will involve outdoor field work.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5BIODIVERSITY; ECOLOGYSDG15
BIOC13H3Biochemistry II: Bioenergetics and MetabolismA lecture course that introduces how cells or organisms extract energy from their environment. The major metabolic pathways to extract energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins will be discussed, as well as the regulation and integration of different pathways. An emphasis will be placed on real-world applications of biochemistry to metabolism. ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ENERGY; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG13
BIOC14H3Genes, Environment and BehaviourThis class will provide a survey of the role of genes in behaviour, either indirectly as structural elements or as direct participants in behaviour. Topics to be covered are methods to investigate complex behaviours in humans and animal models of human disease, specific examples of genetic effects on behaviour in animals and humans, and studies of gene-environment interactions.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIOC32H3Human Physiology IAn introduction to Human Physiology covering the function of neurons, the brain, hormones and our immune systems in both healthy and diseased states.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
BIOC34H3Human Physiology IIThis course will cover the physiology of the human respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and digestive systems. Topics include cardiac function, ECG, blood flow/pressure regulation, pulmonary mechanics, gas transfer and transport, the control of breathing, sleep-related breathing disorders, kidney function, ion regulation, water balance, acid-base balance and digestive function/regulation. Students will complete a series of computer-simulated laboratory exercises on their own time.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5WATER; WATERSDG6, SDG14
BIOC35H3Principles in ParasitologyThis course introduces principles in parasitic lifestyles. Topics that will be covered include common parasite life strategies, host-parasite interactions and co-evolution, parasite immune evasion strategies, impacts on public health, and treatment and prevention strategies.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
BIOC37H3Plants: Life on the EdgePlants have evolved adaptations to maximize growth, survival and reproduction under various taxing environmental conditions. This course covers the great diversity of plant structures and function in relation to ecology, focusing mainly on flowering plants.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG12, SDG13, SDG15
BIOC39H3ImmunologyThis course introduces the molecular and cellular basis of the immune system. Topics include self versus non-self recognition, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and the structure and function of antibodies. The importance of the immune system in health and disease will be emphasized and topics include vaccination, autoimmunity, and tumour immunology.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
BIOC40H3Plant PhysiologyAn introduction to plant biology. Topics include plant and cell structure, water balance, nutrition, transport processes at the cell and whole plant level, physiological and biochemical aspects of photosynthesis, and growth and development in response to hormonal and environmental cues.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5nutrition; WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG2, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14
BIOC50H3MacroevolutionAn overview of recent developments in evolutionary biology that focus on large-scale patterns and processes of evolution. Areas of emphasis may include the evolutionary history of life on earth, phylogenetic reconstruction, patterns of diversification and extinction in the fossil record, the geography of evolution, the evolution of biodiversity, and the process of speciation.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5BIODIVERSITYSDG15
BIOC52H3Ecology Field CourseThis course provides students with the opportunity to experience hands-on learning through informal natural history walks, and group and individual research projects, in a small-class setting. The course covers basic principles and selected techniques of field ecology and ecological questions related to organisms in their natural settings. Most of the field work takes place in the Highland Creek ravine.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIOC58H3Biological Consequences of Global ChangeRachel SturgeA lecture and tutorial course that addresses the key environmental factor that will dominate the 21st Century and life on the planet: Global Climate Change. The course will examine the factors that influence climate, from the formation of the earth to the present time, how human activities are driving current and future change, and how organisms, populations, and ecosystems are and will respond to this change. Finally, it will cover human responses and policies that can permit an adaptive response to this change.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENTSDG13
BIOC60H3Winter EcologyCanada is characterized by its long and harsh winters. Any Canadian plant or animal has evolved one of three basic survival strategies: (1) migration (avoidance), (2) hibernation, and (3) resistance. These evolutionary adaptations are investigated by the example of common organisms from mainly southern Ontario.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIOC61H3Community Ecology and Environmental BiologyRachel SturgeAn examination of the theory and methodology of community analysis, with an emphasis on the factors regulating the development of communities and ecosystems. The application of ecological theory to environmental problems is emphasized. We will examine the impacts of various factors, such as primary productivity, species interactions, disturbance, variable environments, on community and metacommunity structure, and on ecosystem function. We will also examine the impacts of climate change on the world's ecosystems.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5URBAN; CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
BIOC62H3Role of Zoos and Aquariums in ConservationRachel SturgeThis lecture and tutorial course explores the strategic and operational aspects of zoos and aquariums in conservation. Emphasis is on contemporary issues, including the balance between animal welfare and species conservation; nutrition, health and behavioural enrichment for captive animals; in situ conservation by zoos and aquariums; captive breeding and species reintroductions; and public outreach/education.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5nutrition; HEALTH; EDUCAT; CONSERVSDG2, SDG3, SDG4, SDG15
BIOC63H3Conservation BiologyRachel SturgeA lecture and tutorial course offering an introduction to the scientific foundation and practice of conservation biology. It reviews ecological and genetic concepts constituting the basis for conservation including patterns and causes of global biodiversity, the intrinsic and extrinsic value of biodiversity, the main causes of the worldwide decline of biodiversity and the approaches to save it, as well as the impacts of global climate change.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CONSERV; BIODIVERSITYSDG15
BIOD19H3Epigenetics in Health and DiseaseA lecture/seminar/discussion class on the emerging field of environmental epigenetics. Course will cover basic epigenetic mechanisms, methods in epigenetic research, epigenetic control of gene function, and the role of epigenetics in normal development and human disease.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5health; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG13
BIOD25H3GenomicsA course considering the principles of genome organization and the utilization of genomic approaches to studying a wide range of problems in biology. Topics to be presented will include innovations in instrumentation and automation, a survey of genome projects, genomic variation, functional genomics, transcription profiling (microarrays), database mining and extensions to human and animal health and biotechnology.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5health; INNOVATIONSDG3, SDG13
BIOD33H3Comparative Animal PhysiologyThis course will examine how various physiological systems and anatomical features are specialised to meet the environmental challenges encountered by terrestrial and aquatic animals. Topics include respiratory systems and breathing, hearts and cardiovascular systems, cardiorespiratory control, animal energetics, metabolic rate, thermoregulation, defenses against extreme temperatures, hibernation and osmotic/ionic/volume regulation. ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
BIOD34H3Conservation PhysiologyThis is a combined lecture and seminar course that will discuss topics such as climate change and plastics/microplastics effects on the physiology of animals, and physiological tools and techniques used in conservation efforts. The course will focus on how physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; CONSERVSDG13, SDG15
BIOD48H3OrnithologyAn overview of the evolution, ecology, behaviour, and conservation of birds. Field projects and laboratories will emphasize identification of species in Ontario.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CONSERV; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
BIOD52H3Biodiversity and ConservationA seminar exploration of current topics in biodiversity and conservation, including genetic, organismal, and community levels. Examples include DNA barcoding, adaptive radiations, phylogenetic trees, and biodiversity hotspots. Skills development in critical thinking and interpretation of the primary literature is emphasized, with coursework involving group presentations, discussions, and written analyses.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CONSERV; BIODIVERSITYSDG15
BIOD63H3From Individuals to Ecosystems: Advanced Topics in EcologyThis lecture/seminar course will discuss advanced topics in behavioural ecology, ecosystem and landscape ecology, and evolutionary ecology, with an emphasis on the impacts of past and present species interactions. Students will work both independently and collaboratively throughout the course to strengthen their research, writing, and presentation skills.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
BIOD66H3Causes and Consequences of BiodiversityMarc CadotteThis course will combine lecture and student paper projects and presentations to explore the evolutionary and ecological processes that generate patterns of biological diversity as well as how species interactions and ecosystem function are affected by diversity. Of key interest will be how invasions, climate change, and habitat destruction affects diversity and function.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; BIODIVERSITYSDG13, SDG15
BIOD96Y3Directed Research in ParamedicineThis course is designed to permit critical analysis of current topics relevant to the broad topic of paramedicine. Students will work independently but under the supervision of an industry leader, practitioner and/or researcher involved in paramedicine, who will guide the in-depth study/research. Students report to the course instructor and paramedicine program supervisor to complete course information and their formal registration. Students must obtain a permission form from the Biological Sciences website that is to be completed, and returned to SW421E. ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)1INDUSTRSDG9
BIOD96Y3Directed Research in ParamedicineThis course is designed to permit critical analysis of current topics relevant to the broad topic of paramedicine. Students will work independently but under the supervision of an industry leader, practitioner and/or researcher involved in paramedicine, who will guide the in-depth study/research. Students report to the course instructor and paramedicine program supervisor to complete course information and their formal registration. Students must obtain a permission form from the Biological Sciences website that is to be completed, and returned to SW421E. ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC)1INDUSTRSDG9
BME350H1Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsAllen VolchukAn introduction to human anatomy and physiology with selected focus on the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and endocrine systems. The structures and mechanisms responsible for proper function of these complex systems will be examined in the healthy and diseased human body. The integration of different organ systems will be stressed, with a specific focus on the structure-function relationship. Application of biomedical engineering technologies in maintaining homeostasis will also be discussed.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5healthSDG3
BME410H1Regenerative EngineeringThe course encompasses the new multidisciplinary area of Regenerative Engineering by integrating various components of Regenerative Medicine, Clinical Engineering, Human Biology & Physiology, Advanced Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering, and Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, bringing all these disciplines into the clinical perspective of translational medicine. The course starts with the key concepts of stem cell biology and their properties at the cellular and subcellular levels working our way to complex tissues and organs. In the first half of the course, 2D and 3D tissue and organ formation will be our main focus. In the second half, we will discuss the integration of medical devices, technologies and treatments into healthcare as well as clinical trial logistics, ethics and processes. The course materials will integrate cutting-edge research in regenerative medicine and current clinical trials by inviting scientists and clinicians as guest lecturers. Students will be given the rare opportunity to incorporate into their written assignments experiment-based learning via participation in workshops, tours of research facilities, seminars and independent projects integrated into the course during the semester.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5healthSDG3
CAS200H1Introduction to Contemporary Asian StudiesDylan ClarkThis course is an introduction to Contemporary Asian Studies. It covers detailed case study material from South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. It introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of political, sociocultural and economic interactions among these regions, as well as the transnational forces shaping internal dynamics throughout Asia. In addition, it examines the ways that forces stemming from Asia are affecting global processes, pushing scholarship to engage questions about colonialism, nationalism, "race," religion, markets, urbanization, migration, and mass mediated culture. This course provides preparation for more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides an introductory gateway for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. May be taken in the first year of studies.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5URBANSDG11
CAS201H1Global Asian Studies: Insights and ConceptsThis course addresses Asia empirically in contemporary global formations and as an idea in the global imagination. It introduces students to concepts and theories central to scholarship on Asia and its transnational formations. It provides foundational theoretical and conceptual material to understand global issues as they play out in the politics, economies, cultures and contemporary social worlds of contemporary Asian sites. Interdisciplinary analytical and research concepts are introduced to provide area studies grounding. This course provides preparation to delve into deeper research on Asia connected to broad questions about the natures of democracy, authoritarianism, market formation, social justice, and the media of cultural expression. It informs students aiming to take more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides one part of the foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. CAS201H1 introduces the theoretical and conceptual frameworks that are explored through further grounded empirical case studies in upper year CAS courses.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CAS202H1Global Asian Studies: Sites and PracticesDylan ClarkThis interdisciplinary course explores a variety of sites and topics in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It explores themes including contemporary and historical articulations of socio-economic development, (post)colonial political formations, urbanization processes, climate change, labour struggles, gender studies, migration, citizenship, and social justice. The course examines the diversity of Asian modernities, cross-regional linkages, and changing approaches to area studies over time. It provides a foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor, preparing students for taking more advanced courses on Asia in the global context.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5gender; LABOUR; URBAN; CLIMATE; JUSTICESDG5, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
CAS310H1Comparative Colonialisms in AsiaThis course analyzes the impact of colonialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia and the various ways in which pre-colonial traditions intersect with and reshape colonial and postcolonial process across the various regions of Asia. The course will examine the conjunctures of economy, politics, religion, education, ethnicity, gender, and caste, as these have played out over time in the making and re-making of Asia as both idea and place. Attention will be paid to postcolonial and indigenous theories, questions of ?the colonial? from the perspective of Asian Studies, and debates about the meaning of postcolonialism for the study of Asia now and in the future.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5educat; GENDERSDG4, SDG5
CAS320H1Comparative Modernities in AsiaSince at least the late 1700s, the effects of capitalism across the globe have profoundly transformed the landscapes of human livelihood, consumption, production and governance in Asia. While colonial empires have declined, new empires have emerged, and a growing number of countries have witnessed the rise of nationalism and independent states, social, political and technological revolutions, and most recently neoliberal globalization. This course theorizes and explores these dramatic changes in a comparative framework. It is aimed at students wishing to better understand the great transformations of modern Asia in a global context.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5CONSUM; PRODUCTION; GOVERNANCESDG12, SDG16
CAS350H1Asian Youth CulturesDylan ClarkIn focusing on youth in Asia, this course brings together two disputed cultural formations of substantial contemporary importance. Both youth and Asia are increasingly invoked on the global stage in support of a wide range of interests. Examining practices of young people and the idea of youth in the context of Asia requires critical attention to the promises and fears that attach to the rise of Asian economies, international demographic transitions, the growth of a global middle-class, increasing consumption disparities, changing immigration patterns, expanding technological skills, global/local environmental concerns, and young people?s shifting political priorities and loyalties. The course may feature a significant amount of social theory, with authors such as Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Louis Althusser, and Stuart Hall.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5CONSUM; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
CAS360H1Asian GendersDylan ClarkThis course will explore ways that gender is mobilized and produced in parts of Asia. It seeks to understand gender and sexuality in their diversity and in attempts to ?fix? or locate it in various bodies and places. Attempts will be made to see how gender is made knowable in terms of sexuality, medicine, nation, class, ethnicity, religion, and other discourses. The course assumes a willingness to read challenging theory ? such as the writings of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Eve Sedgwick ? and asks that students commit to regular attendance.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5genderSDG5
CAS370H1Asian CitiesThis course offers a multidisciplinary perspective of urban life in Asia. The thematic focus will be on how the urban intersects with modernities and postcolonial formations. Drawing on recent scholarship in the social sciences and the humanities, we will examine the realignment of cultural, political, and economic forces associated with Asia?s diverse processes of urbanization.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5CITIES; URBANSDG11
CAS400H1Interdisciplinary Research in Methods in Contemporary Asian StudiesThis seminar addresses Asian worlds ? In Asia, transnationally, and locally ? to cultivate new approaches to global processes and problems. The course explores key Asian sites that open new configurations for studying interactions between economic/environmental development, political change, and migration and cultural politics. It provides an advanced and systematic overview of the research methodologies that students have been exposed to throughout the CAS program. These include historical-archival, ethnographic, visual/media, and statistical/quantitative methods that allow us to map Asian political, economic, and cultural formations, and through them, global challenges. The seminar builds interdisciplinary conversations attentive to both critical problematizing and problem-solving, to qualitative and applied projects. It is the required capstone to the Contemporary Asian Studies major.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceContemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CCT200H5Race, Media and CultureThis course provides an introduction to the intersecting fields of critical race, media, and cultural studies. We will pay particular attention to dynamics of social difference and power and the communication strategies and technologies through which these are navigated, reproduced and interrupted. Students will be introduced to critical and analytical tools for understanding the cultural and media circulation, regulation and reimagination of things like race, sexuality, time, gender, class, indigeneity, space, ethnicity, ability and nationality. These critical tools equip students with the skills to write, design and build ethical innovations in new media and culture. [24L, 11T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; INNOVATION; industrSDG5, SDG9
CCT206H5Law, Technology and CultureThis course will provide a detailed review of copyright, trademark and patent law with a special emphasis on how they apply to digital media. This course will also review the law of contract as it applies to digital industries and investigate the relevant tort law. In addition, other regulatory issues will be discussed such as telecommunications and broadcasting law both from a Canadian and an international perspective. [24L, 11T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; innovationSDG5, SDG9
CCT212H5Hacker CultureBy subverting and re-appropriating technologies, hackers influence both the evolution of computing and the politics of digital media. Hacking contributes to shaping the future of entrepreneurship, free speech, surveillance, and intellectual property. The course will examine the cultural, social, and legal facets of hacking in fields ranging from software production to political activism and the hacker underground. It will be based on social science research on hackers as well as concrete examples of data re-appropriation and technology modification. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5industrSDG9
CCT222H5Political Economy of Communication, Culture, and TechnologyThe course analyzes the relationship between media systems, communication technologies, and power. As an introduction to a political economy approach, this course surveys how media, culture, information and technologies are produced, circulated, and consumed, with attention to both historical developments and contemporary practices in the digital era. The course provides a basic understanding of media systems, technologies, and culture production in relation to the market, the state, and civil society. Students will develop a basic understanding of the political, economic, cultural, and regulatory environment in which media, culture, and technologies are produced, and pay particular attention to the implications of processes such as globalization, digitization, marketization, and commodification for social life. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5CONSUM; PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
CCT250H5Technology and Creative Expression (SH)Advances in technology have provided users ready access to empowering technologies of creative expression. This emergence of prosumer and amateur production technology has both destabilized and revolutionized established practice in digital imaging, time based media, gaming, and design. This course provides a survey of contemporary theories, technologies and critical challenges in a variety of media of creative expression. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT270H5Principles in Game Design (SH)An overview of videogame theory, best practices, emergent trends and technology, with strong participation by industry professionals. This course features a variety of guest speakers addressing different facets of game design, supported by later discussion and analysis. Students will experience a broad overview of principles in game design that may inspire further development and design activities in related game design courses. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT270H5Principles in Game Design (SH)An overview of videogame theory, best practices, emergent trends and technology, with strong participation by industry professionals. This course features a variety of guest speakers addressing different facets of game design, supported by later discussion and analysis. Students will experience a broad overview of principles in game design that may inspire further development and design activities in related game design courses. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT304H5Visual Communication and Digital EnvironmentsTracey BowenThis is a project-based course that focuses on analyzing and evaluating the persuasive impact of the images we use every day to make decisions about our social networks, what we buy, how we live, what we care about, and who we are. Students will learn about rhetorical devices used in visual communications and then work in teams to create a persuasive awareness campaign for an NGO, Government Agency, Healthcare organization or other social interest group as the final project. [24L, 8T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5healthSDG3
CCT304H5Visual Communication and Digital EnvironmentsTracey BowenThis is a project-based course that focuses on analyzing and evaluating the persuasive impact of the images we use every day to make decisions about our social networks, what we buy, how we live, what we care about, and who we are. Students will learn about rhetorical devices used in visual communications and then work in teams to create a persuasive awareness campaign for an NGO, Government Agency, Healthcare organization or other social interest group as the final project. [24L, 8T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5healthSDG3
CCT310H5Popular Culture and SocietyHow does consumerism affect symbolic production, circulation and transactions? Major modern theories of mass communication will be presented (Fiske, Bourdieu, Benjamin, Jenkins, Frankfurt school, and Marxist approaches). Students will explore new structures of mass communication in relation to popular culture systems, and their economic, technological and institutional dimensions. Topics include Disney, Hollywood, celebrity culture, social media, and user generated content in digital environments. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5CONSUM; PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENT; INSTITUTIONSDG12, SDG13, SDG16
CCT314H5Mind, Media and RepresentationThis course applies a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to consider the multiple and often conflicting ways representations in media are produced and consumed. The study of representations is approached from the perspective that they are best understood as both discursive and ideological. Questions to be examined include: What does it mean for historical and contemporary representations to carry economic, ideological and discursive power? To what extent do audiences hold power to resist or negotiate with representations? How might we interrogate the notion that we live in a post-feminist, post-racialized society in which older ideas about gender, race and power no longer apply or need re-thinking? [24L, 5T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; CONSUMSDG5, SDG12
CCT314H5Mind, Media and RepresentationThis course applies a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to consider the multiple and often conflicting ways representations in media are produced and consumed. The study of representations is approached from the perspective that they are best understood as both discursive and ideological. Questions to be examined include: What does it mean for historical and contemporary representations to carry economic, ideological and discursive power? To what extent do audiences hold power to resist or negotiate with representations? How might we interrogate the notion that we live in a post-feminist, post-racialized society in which older ideas about gender, race and power no longer apply or need re-thinking? [24L, 5T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; CONSUMSDG5, SDG12
CCT319H5Media Economics I (DEM)Radha MaharajThis course presents economic principles that explain how markets help organize exchange and production among competing but nevertheless cooperating economic units. Theories of consumer demand, the economic nature and function of business firms, optimal business decision rules of monopoly, oligopoly, and anti-combines regulations, as well as game theory, are presented. Efficiency criteria pertaining to the operation of firms and markets, the role of property rights, and the scope for public policy, are also examined. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; consumSDG5, SDG12
CCT319H5Media Economics I (DEM)Radha MaharajThis course presents economic principles that explain how markets help organize exchange and production among competing but nevertheless cooperating economic units. Theories of consumer demand, the economic nature and function of business firms, optimal business decision rules of monopoly, oligopoly, and anti-combines regulations, as well as game theory, are presented. Efficiency criteria pertaining to the operation of firms and markets, the role of property rights, and the scope for public policy, are also examined. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; consumSDG5, SDG12
CCT321H5Introduction to Finance (DEM)Radha MaharajThis course will provide students with an understanding of investment appraisal from a financial standpoint. It will provide them with the necessary tools to construct the financial component of a business plan and analyze the financial performance of a company. It will examine the practical problems of capital budgeting and highlight the techniques of performing ongoing monitoring of a company's financial health and risks. [36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5consum; productionSDG12
CCT324H5Organizational Studies II (DEM)Olga TabunshchikovaOverview of individual and group behaviour in organizations, including motivation, communication, decision making, influence and group dynamics. Examination of major aspects of organizational design including structure, environment, technology, goals, size, inter-organizational relationships, innovation and change. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5healthSDG3
CCT324H5Organizational Studies II (DEM)Olga TabunshchikovaOverview of individual and group behaviour in organizations, including motivation, communication, decision making, influence and group dynamics. Examination of major aspects of organizational design including structure, environment, technology, goals, size, inter-organizational relationships, innovation and change. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5healthSDG3
CCT333H5Social Innovation(SH)This course introduces students to the strategies and processes of social innovation through usability studies, systems analysis, and artifact prototyping for new products or services for underserved groups. Students will learn various techniques of understanding user needs requirements and design methodologies, and apply this knowledge to create socially innovative prototypes to apply to real world situations. By the end of this course, students will have worked in groups to develop design alternatives for a technological artifact or system of their choosing, gain knowledge of human-centred design strategies and learn how to become change agents through case studies, best practice analyses, and relevant readings. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CCT334H5History and Theory of Game Production (SH)This course will examine the principles, theory and practice behind the production of games. By examining the history and contributions of early founders such as Atari and Activision, all the way to present-day leaders such as Electronic Arts and Sony, students will gain an understanding of how the global video game industry operates. The lectures and practical work will foster an approach to the understanding of game production issues including technology, law, marketplace and audience demand. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5innovationSDG9
CCT335H5Technology and the CityTechnology continues to reshape the physical contours of our built environments as much as it redefines our conceptualization of how we inhabit and interact within them. This course investigates how urban form, space, infrastructure and communication are mediated by new and evolving technologies. [24L,11T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5industr; productionSDG9, SDG12
CCT336H5Comics and Digital Culture (SH)Examining the medium of comics and graphic novels and its evolution in an era of digital production and dissemination. Starting from a foundational understanding of the visual grammar of comics, students create their own graphic narratives and later explore the dynamics of digital dissemination by creating viral and memetic content for an Internet audience. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT340H5Gender, Media and TechnologyThis course brings a gendered lens to the study of media and technology. The course explores the (re)production and (re)presentation of gender through communicative practices in a variety of mediums, including print media, TV, activist media, video games and online platforms. The course develops an understanding of gender ideologies and how media, technologies, and communication help produce gender. The course examines the way gender identities are constructed by mainstream and alternative media; gendered divisions of media and digital labour; the relationship between ICTs and the performance of gender and sexuality; masculinities, gender politics; feminist theory; and the construction and negotiation of gender in relation to mediated environments. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5gender; LABOUR; PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG5, SDG8, SDG13
CCT341H5Introduction to IT ConsultingInformation Technology (IT) Consulting is a growing profession that embodies the use of computer-supported collaborative tools in the execution of business functions. In this course students engage with the principles of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) through an experiential opportunity to work with a real client. Students create an IT Consulting company and take on the role of consultants, learning core skills (soft and hard) necessary for this profession, including client management, communication, ideation, analysis and solution development, project management, presentation skills, and web design. Using case studies we discuss consulting lessons learned and problems to avoid within the context of industry best practices. [24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT352H5History and Practice of Design (SH)This course examines the historical development of communication design from the industrial revolution to the present. The student will focus on the emergence of design practice and theory in changing economic, technological and social contexts. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT355H5Trends in Digital Innovation (DEM)This course focuses on the foundational and emergent information technology systems used in organizations and the roles people, processes, and technology play in information ecologies. Managers of 21st century organizations must familiarize themselves with a variety of software and hardware systems that continually reshape business practices, organizational structures, and social relations. This course allows students to develop a greater understanding of the significance of these technologies in contemporary institutional contexts. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATION; INSTITUTIONSDG9, SDG16
CCT356H5Online Advertising and Marketing (SH)This course investigates the industrial practices and tools of effectively marketing and promoting goods and services online. Topics include analysis of contemporary online advertisement design, the effective use of social media technologies in product marketing, planning online campaigns that reinforce and complement existing marketing and advertising efforts, and understanding key metrics used to evaluate a campaign's effectiveness. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT356H5Online Advertising and Marketing (SH)This course investigates the industrial practices and tools of effectively marketing and promoting goods and services online. Topics include analysis of contemporary online advertisement design, the effective use of social media technologies in product marketing, planning online campaigns that reinforce and complement existing marketing and advertising efforts, and understanding key metrics used to evaluate a campaign's effectiveness. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT360H5Intermediate Web Design (SH)This course builds upon the concepts introduced in Web Culture and Design and expands upon them to include the theory and practical aspects of creating modern, compliant standards for websites. Its focus is primarily on the design and presentation of websites on the client side. Students will learn how to develop websites for consumption on various platforms including desktop browsers, mobile devices, etc. [36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5CONSUMSDG12
CCT381H5Media AudiencesAudiences are social constructions which must be imagined to be actualized. Beginning with an exploration of the nature and role of audiences from early 20th century media, students explore how audiences make meaning of popular media platforms today. How are audiences situated within media texts, what role does this play in how media is generated and circulated, and how do audiences both enact and resist media influence? Broadcast models, interactive models, audience reading, gender, culture, race, and audience feedback are investigated. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5genderSDG5
CCT382H5Prototyping Digital GamesThis course explores the fundamentals of the process of game design through prototyping. It focuses on the contexts and components of game design, such as design iteration and user testing along relevant dimensions such as art style, narrative, and game balance. Students will be introduced to design across different genres and types of digital games, including games for education, serious games, indie, and AAA games. Working in collaborative groups, students will learn and practice the appropriate methodology to design game mechanics, characters, art assets and other appropriate deliverables in order to create a game or high-fidelity prototype. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5educatSDG4
CCT384H5Inclusive Design and Social Responsibility (SH)The course provides an overview of inclusive design, a paradigm that empowers people of all ages and abilities. By analyzing products, buildings and communities from an inclusive perspective and making the needs of people the central focus of the design process this new paradigm seeks to develop form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5inclusive; BUILDINGSSDG4, SDG9
CCT385H5Conceptualizing Media EnvironmentsMarshall McLuhan was one of the first theorists to conceptualize media as environments. Media were no longer conceptualized as instruments or tools but as systems that would capture their audience within. This course investigates the role of media in structuring and conditioning how we inhabit environments. From geology to ecology, from the umwelt to ecosystems, from urban to outer space, from bodies to biospheres, this class looks at media as modes of inhabitation. The intersections of media and environments will thus be problematized in their social, cultural, and political dimensions. Students will be introduced to these systems from a conceptual and a practical perspective through the study of scientific, artistic and design projects. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CCT403H5Finance, Innovation and the Digital FirmStudents will learn about financial aspects of digital industries. They will gain knowledge about how financial and other incentives shape the decisions of agents in the digital marketplace. Such a knowledge helps to identify industry trends aiding their own decisions when participating in Internet related industries. Topics covered include online and traditional media industries, aspects of e-commerce and marketing, open source software and crowd-sourcing. A highly effective way to gain such knowledge is by covering a relevant topic in an academic essay. This way the students will also improve their writing skills, and learn better how to cover financial aspects of their chosen topic in a scholarly manner. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
CCT404H5Integrative Design ProjectPeter SmitThis project-based course aims to demonstrate how collaboration is a critical capability often overlooked. During the course students will integrate their learning and experience and first hand see how, in combination with collaboration it can lead to creatively solving problems in areas as varied as business, health care delivery, urban planning and development. In addition to lectures, students will have the benefit of a series of guest lecturers. A large, group based project will serve to integrate learning and allow students the benefit of experiential learning. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5health; URBANSDG3, SDG11
CCT404H5Integrative Design ProjectPeter SmitThis project-based course aims to demonstrate how collaboration is a critical capability often overlooked. During the course students will integrate their learning and experience and first hand see how, in combination with collaboration it can lead to creatively solving problems in areas as varied as business, health care delivery, urban planning and development. In addition to lectures, students will have the benefit of a series of guest lecturers. A large, group based project will serve to integrate learning and allow students the benefit of experiential learning. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5health; URBANSDG3, SDG11
CCT406H5Capstone Design Project (SH)An applied project-based capstone course in which groups will be paired with an identified client with real-life needs in digital media creation. Students will work in small cross-functional teams to develop and present proposals to client representatives and a panel of industry experts. Students will also be taught the arts of networking, proposal writing and project management. [36P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT412H5Self-Directed Research Project: Advanced Studio Practices (SH)This course facilitates a student-led research project to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. This is an opportunity to develop a critical and practical perspective on selected issues and practices within CCIT. Students design and implement an advanced project on a topic of interest using advanced creative and critical production skills. The aim is to redefine and articulate critical ideas through the process of making creative work. Students must obtain signed permission from a potential supervising faculty member.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT412H5Self-Directed Research Project: Advanced Studio Practices (SH)This course facilitates a student-led research project to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. This is an opportunity to develop a critical and practical perspective on selected issues and practices within CCIT. Students design and implement an advanced project on a topic of interest using advanced creative and critical production skills. The aim is to redefine and articulate critical ideas through the process of making creative work. Students must obtain signed permission from a potential supervising faculty member.MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT418H5Work, Media and TechnologyThe course analyses the political, historical, and technical relationships between media, technology, and work in contemporary capitalism. The course will examine the power and social relationships that structure work in contexts such as media, creative industries, and the platform or "gig" economy. The course will focus on critical theories of work and will engage with case studies of the intersection of work, media and technology. The aim of the course is to build a tool kit for encountering an increasingly casualized and digitally-mediated labour market. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5LABOUR; INDUSTRSDG8, SDG9
CCT424H5Organizational Studies III (DEM)An indepth study of the development of innovative strategies for organizations with an emphasis on digital enterprises. The nature of strategic innovation will be studied and a variety of analytic frameworks introduced. Concepts will be explored through a combination of lectures and case studies. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CCT424H5Organizational Studies III (DEM)An indepth study of the development of innovative strategies for organizations with an emphasis on digital enterprises. The nature of strategic innovation will be studied and a variety of analytic frameworks introduced. Concepts will be explored through a combination of lectures and case studies. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CCT431H5Drones, Robots, Artificial IntelligenceDrones, robots, and artificial intelligence are three interrelated technologies that are changing the most fundamental considerations of how society and sociality should operate. Work, war, consumption, and even love are being reconfigured. This course will address debates concerning the cultural, political, economic, military, and economic considerations surrounding the growing use of these technologies. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5CONSUMSDG12
CCT433H5Sustainable Design (SH)This course immerses students in sustainable design methodologies based upon whole systems analysis, applying the quadruple bottom line of people, profit, planet, and culture to understand and design for environmental issues and social change. During this course, students will apply the process and rhetoric of sustainable systems thinking to the re-design of an object or service applying such methodologies as cradle-to-cradle, 'design-for-environment', pricing based on full cost accounting, greening of the supply chain, and corporate responsibility. Throughout the course, students will examine the need for sustainable design through case studies, best practice analyses, and relevant readings. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5SUSTAINABLE DESIGN; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
CCT450H5Designing Interactive Books (SH)This advanced self-directed project-based course allows students who are already familiar with the principles of page layout and interactive multimedia to design and publish in iBooks. The principles and practice of creative concept development and art direction are actively applied. Students will develop original content in text, digital media, and engage in the creative application of iBooks Author's widgets as a writer, editor, illustrator, and designer. Balancing an industry-ready mindset with an avant-garde spirit, students are also encouraged to investigate this medium as an art form in alternative, experimental directions. [36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT451H5Digital Media: Advanced Audio Production (SH)This course explores how to design and produce a soundtrack for film or television. The foundations of technical theory and nomenclature will be provided, as well as aesthetic guidelines. Practical exercises will explore: voice recording, use of library sound effects, creative sound design, sound editing and processing technology and soundtrack mixing. [36P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT452H5Graphic Design and Popular Culture (SH)This course will continue from where History and Practice of Design leaves off; from the beginning of the Post-Modern period or c.1975. It will study the history of graphic design to the present in roughly chronological order; it will focus on specific topics rather than on movements, schools or chronological events. Topics will highlight how social trends, political forces, technological innovation and continuing folk traditions all contribute to the visual environment we all inhabit today. Topics will emphasize popular culture as a force shaping graphic design while also referring to a theoretical graphic design discourse. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CCT474H5Organizational Innovation and Digital Leadership (DEM)Olga TabunshchikovaThis course investigates innovation strategies in organizations, including characteristics of knowledge intensive firms, open innovation, leading in digital age, design thinking in innovation process with a special emphasis on how they apply to dispersed teams. In addition, other organization in digital age issues will be discussed such as multicultural work place and cohesion, cross-cultural competencies both from a diversity and globalization standpoint. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CCT476H5Foundations of Operations ManagementOperations Management deals with the functions of an enterprise that create value for the customers. The scope of study covers all processes involved in the design, production and physical distribution of goods and services. With global competition continuously increasing, a firm's survival depends upon how well it integrates the operations function into the enterprise's general planning and strategy. It is thus essential for business managers to acquire an understanding and appreciation of operations. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CCT480H5User Experience Analysis - UXAThe course investigates how people interact with interactive digital systems from an evaluation and formal testing perspective, and introduces students to the methods of User Experience Assessment and User Experience Analysis (UXA). This studio-based experiential course examines how interactive systems are implemented and deployed to meet users' needs, with a focus on formal Human Computer Interaction (HCI) evaluation methods. Students will acquire the capacity to evaluate systems and to critically assess different HCI and UX validation methods which are based on industry approaches carried out by User Research Analysis. [36P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CCT483H5Play, Performance and Community in Digital GamesStudents will explore the complex relationship between games and play. Starting with an overview of the major play theories, students will learn how cognitive, philosophical and social theories of play are used to guide and inform game design. The increasingly prominent role of the player in the co-creation and performance of digital games will be examined. Students will also explore the emergences of player communities and consider the various issues that this introduces into design and management process, including important new questions about governance, player and creative freedoms, and immaterial labour. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaInstitute of Communication and Culture0.5LABOUR; GOVERNANCESDG8, SDG16
CDN197H1Inventing CanadaKrista BarclayThis course explores the ways that Canadian history and identity have been commemorated, interpreted and experienced, now and in the past. The course focuses in particular on who has been included or excluded in commemorative efforts over time. Key topics include representations of women, Indigenous peoples, and political figures on screen and through public installations like museum exhibits, plaques and statues. Case studies highlighting a range of interpretive media will encourage students to work with and discuss a range of primary and secondary sources, build critical thinking and academic writing skills. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5womenSDG5
CDN202H1Aspects of Quebec CultureAn exploration of modern Qu‚Äöbec culture as expressed in literature and the performing arts. Through a selection of internationally-known entertainers, we examine form, artistic innovation, communication of information and knowledge, and spectatorship. Novels and plays provide key elements such as tradition and historical context.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CDN221H1Culture and the Media in CanadaAn exploration of the encounter between culture and mass communication in Canadian society. The course considers the role of major cultural institutions such as the CBC, the NFB, and their granting bodies. The emergence of new media and its relationship to mass media is also addressed.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
CDN267H1Canadian NationalismsLisa MarA critical examination of contemporary forms of Canadian nationalism. This interdisciplinary course will interrogate national formations across theoretical works, policy documents, and cultural representations. Students will address the ways that nationalist discourses constitute difference, especially with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5genderSDG5
CDN268H1Canada and GlobalizationEmily GilbertStudents examine the impact of contemporary globalization on Canada, and for Canada?s place in the world. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and addresses globalization from a wide range of perspectives, including mobility, trade, urbanization, health, religion, environmental change, technology, communications, and the arts.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5health; TRADE; URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG10, SDG11, SDG13
CDN280H1Canadian Jewish HistoryThis course focuses on initial settlement patterns of Jews in Toronto and elsewhere, community growth including suburbanization, and contemporary challenges such as anti-Semitism and assimilation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5URBANSDG11
CDN307H1Asian Cultures in CanadaAn exploration of the cultural histories and creative productions of a wide range of Asian communities in Canada. Experts in specific areas - literature, dance, drama, film - will be invited to present their work.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CDN335H1Black Canadian StudiesAn interdisciplinary course that interrogates the constitution of blackness in Canada. Students will study race and ethnic relations, alongside other identity formations such as class, gender and sexuality. Topics to be addressed include media, education, law, immigration and mobility, urbanism, work, political representation and the arts.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5educat; GENDER; URBANSDG4, SDG5, SDG11
CDN367H1Canadian PluralismSiobhan O'FlynnStudents will examine the complexities of social and cultural interaction in the context of changing Canadian demographics. This course compares and contrasts policies regarding indigenous rights, migration, multiculturalism, and citizenship with contemporary cultural narratives in literature, painting and film.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceUniversity College0.5RIGHTSSDG16
CHE113H1Concepts in Chemical EngineeringGraeme NorvalThis course provides first year students with an overview of the chemical industry, the chemical engineering profession, and introduces key concepts for the upcoming years of study.  The chemical industry is the interface between natural resources (minerals, oil, gas, agricultural products, etc.) and the consumers of the higher value products derived therefrom.  This diverse industry has both high volume-low unit value and low volume-high unit value products, and the manufacture of each type of product has its own challenges.  The chemical engineering profession applies the scientific fundamentals through two key concepts: Unit Operations as well as Flux.  The fundamental elements of stoichiometry and reaction kinetics are further extended to cover the concepts of yield, conversion and their specific applications to continuous and batch reactor systems.  Analysis of electrical circuits is introduced, leading to nodal analysis of circuits. The application of resistance in series and capacitance is extended into chemical engineering problems involved, heat transfer, mass transfer and momentum transfer, as well as reaction engineering.  The laboratory will reinforce these key chemical engineering principles.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEngineering First Year Office0.5INDUSTR; CONSUM; NATURAL RESOURCESSDG9, SDG12
CHE204H1Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory IJennifer FarmerThis laboratory course will survey aspects of inorganic, organic and analytical chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. Theory, where applicable, will be interwoven within the laboratories or given as self-taught modules. Topics to be covered are inorganic and organic synthesis and analysis and will include elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice (including Green Chemistry).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.25INDUSTRSDG9
CHE205H1Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory IIJennifer FarmerThis laboratory course will survey aspects of inorganic, organic and analytical chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. Theory, where applicable, will be interwoven within the laboratories or given as self-taught modules. Topics to be covered are inorganic and organic synthesis and analysis and will include elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice (including Green Chemistry).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.25INDUSTRSDG9
CHE208H1Process EngineeringAn introduction to mass and energy (heat) balances in open systems. A quantitative treatment of selected processes of fundamental industrial and environmental significance involving phase equilibria, reaction and transport phenomena under both steady state and unsteady state conditions. Examples will be drawn from the chemical and materials processing industries, the energy and resource industries and environmental remediation and waste management.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENERGY; INDUSTR; WASTE; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG9, SDG12, SDG13
CHE211H1Fluid MechanicsFundamentals of fluid mechanics including hydrostatics, manometry, Bernoulli’s equation, integral mass, linear momentum and energy balances, engineering energy equation, Moody chart, pipe flow calculations, flow measurement instruments and pumps, dimensional analysis, differential analysis of laminar viscous flow, and brief introductions to particle systems, turbulent 1low, non-Newtonian fluids and flow in porous systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENERGYSDG7
CHE213H1Applied Chemistry II - Organic ChemistryTimothy BenderTopics include the structure, bonding and characteristic reactions of organic compounds including additions, eliminations, oxidations, reductions, radical reactions, condensation/hydrolysis and rearrangements. The chemical relationships and reactivities of simple functional groups are discussed with an emphasis placed on reaction mechanisms involving the formation of organic intermediates, chemicals and polymers. An introduction will be given on biologically relevant compounds such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Examples will be discussed which outline the usefulness of these reactions and chemicals within the broader chemical industry.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHE230H1Environmental ChemistryGreg EvansThe chemical phenomena occurring in environmental systems are examined based on fundamental principles of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. The course is divided into sections describing the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural waters and soils. The principles applied in the course include reaction kinetics and mechanisms, complex formation, pH and solubility equilibria and adsorption phenomena. Molecules of biochemical importance and instrumental methods of analysis relevant to environmental systems are also addressed. (formerly EDC230H1S)St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG13, SDG14
CHE260H1Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes. Concepts of energy, heat, work and entropy. First and second laws of thermodynamics. Properties of pure substances and mixtures. Phase equilibrium. Ideal heat engines and refrigerators. Mechanisms of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation. Steady state heat transfer. Solution of conduction equation. Convective heat transfer coefficients. Momentum and heat transfer analogies. Basics of radiative heat transfer..

St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG7
CHE323H1Engineering ThermodynamicsClassical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes are introduced. Topics include: the concepts of energy, work and entropy; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; properties of pure substances and mixtures; the concepts of thermal equilibrium, phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium; and heat engines and refrigeration cycles.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENERGYSDG7
CHE324H1Process DesignMarko SabanThis course presents the philosophy and typical procedures of chemical engineering design projects. The course begins at the design concept phase. Material and energy balances are reviewed along with the design of single unit operations and equipment specification sheets. The impact of recycles on equipment sizing is covered. Safety, health and environmental regulations are presented. These lead to the development of safe operating procedures. The systems for developing Piping and Instrumentation diagrams are presented. Process safety studies such as HAZOPS are introduced. Typical utility systems such as steam, air and vacuum are discussed. Project economics calculations are reviewed.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5health; ENERGY; RECYCL; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG7, SDG12, SDG13
CHE334H1Team Strategies for Engineering DesignIn this course, team strategies including how teams work, how to lead and manage teams, and decision making methodologies for successful teams will be taught in the context of engineering design. The development of problem solving and design steps will be undertaken. This course will be taught with an emphasis on team development and problem solving as it relates to the practice of process safety management in engineering and engineering design. The teams will develop a PFD and P&ID’s, as well as an operating procedure for a portion of the process. Thus, environmental and occupational health and safety becomes the vehicle through which the teamwork is performed.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5health; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG13
CHE354H1Cellular and Molecular BiologyLocke Davenport HuyerThis course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both  prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.  Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells;  and motility and growth.  Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered.  This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHE374H1Economic Analysis and Decision MakingEconomic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals. Cost estimation; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; inflation; equity, bond and loan financing; after tax cash flow; measures of economic merit in the private and public sectors; sensitivity and risk analysis; single and multi-attribute decisions. Introduction to micro-economic. Applications: retirement and replacement analysis; make-buy and buy-lease decisions; economic life of assets; capital budgeting; selection from alternative engineering proposals; production planning; investment selection.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CHE375H1Engineering Finance and EconomicsThis course consists of three modules: 1) managerial accounting, 2) corporate finance and 3) macro economics. The first module, managerial accounting, will consist of an introduction to financial statements and double entry recordkeeping, then delve deeper into aspects of revenue, expenses, assets, debt and equity.The second module, corporate finance, will introduce the concept of risk and return, and the Capital Asset Pricing Model, and then delve deeper into capital budgeting, corporate financing, financial statement analysis and financial valuation. The third model, macro economics, will introduce global aspects of business, including economic, political, societal and technological, then discuss factors such as GDP, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, fiscal debt/surplus and balance of payments, and their impact on the financials of a given country.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5EMPLOYMENTSDG8
CHE391H1Organic Chemistry and BiochemistryThis course examines the sources, structures, properties and reactions of organic chemicals with reference to their interactions with the environment. Industrial organic chemistry, biochemical compounds and relevant biochemical reactions will be discussed.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5INDUSTR; ENVIRONMENTSDG9, SDG13
CHE403H1Professional PracticeIn this course, lectures and seminars will be given by practicing engineers who will cover the legal and ethical responsibility an engineer owes to an employer, a client and the public with particular emphasis on environmental issues.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHE430Y1Chemical Plant DesignMarko SabanStudents work in teams to design plants for the chemical and process industries and examine their economic viability. Lectures concern the details of process equipment and design.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry1INDUSTRSDG9
CHE451H1Petroleum ProcessingGraeme NorvalThis course is aimed at surveying the oil industry practices from the perspective of a block flow diagram. Oil refineries today involve the large scale processing of fluids through primary separation techniques, secondary treating plus the introduction of catalyst for molecular reforming in order to meet the product demands of industry and the public. Crude oil is being shipped in increasing quantities from many parts of the world and refiners must be aware of the properties and specifications of both the crude and product slates to ensure that the crude is a viable source and that the product slate meets quality and quantity demands thus assuring a profitable operation. The course content will examine refinery oil and gas operations from feed, through to products, touching on processing steps necessary to meet consumer demands. In both course readings and written assignments, students will be asked to consider refinery operations from a broad perspective and not through detailed analysis and problem solving.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5INDUSTR; CONSUMSDG9, SDG12
CHE460H1Environmental Pathways and Impact AssessmentReview of the nature, properties and elementary toxicology of metallic and organic contaminants. Partitioning between environmental media (air, aerosols, water, particulate matter, soils, sediments and biota) including bioaccumulation. Degradation processes, multimedia transport and mass balance models. Regulatory approaches for assessing possible effects on human health and ecosystems.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5health; WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG3, SDG13, SDG14
CHE462H1Food EngineeringThe quantitative application of chemical engineering principles to the large-scale production of food. Food processing at the molecular and unit operation levels. The chemistry and kinetics of specific food processes. The application of chemical engineering unit operations (distillation, extraction, drying) and food specific unit operations such as extrusion, thermal processing refrigeration/freezing.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5food; PRODUCTIONSDG2, SDG12
CHE469H1Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion DevicesThe objective of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding the field of electrochemical conversion devices with particular emphasis on fuel cells. The topics will proceed from the fundamental thermodynamic in-system electodics and ionic interaction limitations to mass transfer and heat balance effects,t o the externalities such as economics and system integration challenges. Guest lecturers from the fuel cell industry will be invited to procide an industrial perspective. Participants will complete a paper and in-class presentation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHE471H1Modelling in Biological and Chemical SystemsThis course outlines the methodology for the modelling of biological systems and its applications. Topics will include a review of physical laws, selection of balance space, compartmental versus distributed models, and applications of the conservation laws for both discrete and continuous systems at the level of algebraic and ordinary differential equations. The course covers a wide range of applications including environmental issues, chemical and biochemical processes and biomedical systems.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENVIORNMENT; CONSERVSDG13, SDG14
CHE475H1Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationAn overview on structure, processing and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre-reinforced eco-composites based on renewable resources will be provided. Fundamental principles related to linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic mechanical response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence will be introduced. Novel concepts in comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and materials’ ecological and environmental impact will be discussed. In addition, key material processing methods and testing and characterization techniques will be presented. Structure-property relationships for materials broadly ranging from natural materials, including wood, bone, cell, and soft tissue, to synthetic composite materials for industrial and biomedical applications will be covered.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5RENEWABLE; INDUSTR; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG9, SDG13
CHE488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1F, MIE488H1F, MSE488H1F and CIV488H1S.)
*Complementary Studies Elective
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5EMPLOYMENT; TAXATION; ENVIRONMENTSDG8, SDG10, SDG13
CHE561H1Risk Based Safety ManagementThis course provides an introduction to Process Safety Management. The historical drivers to improve safety performance are reviewed and the difference between safety management and occupational health and safety is discussed. National and international standards for PSM are reviewed. Risk analysis is introduced along with techniques for process hazard analysis and quantification. Consequence and frequency modelling is introduced. Rsik based decision making is introduced, and the course concludes with a discussio of the key management systems required for a successful PSM system.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5healthSDG3
CHE562H1Applied Chemistry IV ‚Äì Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and EngineeringJennifer FarmerThis course serves as an introduction to concepts in polymer chemistry, polymer science and polymer engineering. This includes a discussion of the mechanisms of step growth, chain growth and ring-opening polymerizations with a focus on industrially relevant polymers and processes. The description of polymers in solution as well as the solid state will be explored.  Several modern polymer characterization techniques are introduced including gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis and others.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHE565H1Aqueous Process EngineeringApplication of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5WATER; INDUSTR; PRODUCTION; WASTE; RECYCL; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG9, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14
CHE566H1Elements of Nuclear EngineeringA first course in nuclear engineering intended to introduce students to all aspects of this interdisciplinary field. Topics covered include nuclear technology, atomic and nuclear physics, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactor theory, nuclear power plants, radiation protection and shielding, environment and nuclear safety, and the nuclear fuel cycle.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHE568H1Nuclear EngineeringFundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry0.5healthSDG3
CHI311H5Classical ChineseThis course will examine representative genres of traditional Chinese literatureÑpoetry, prose, fiction and dramaÑwith emphasis on language structure and style. We will also analyze typical masterworks and discuss the intertextuality between these genres, as well as some of the major features of traditional Chinese society in terms of religion, philosophy, the imperial system, gender relations, ethnicity, family, and romance. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5genderSDG5
CHI409H5Influence of Confucianism on Chinese CultureThis advanced level course discusses the cultural influence of Confucianism on Chinese writing, philosophy, religion, education, literature, customs, ethics, society and so forth. The readings covered in this course are mainly in modern Chinese language. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be stressed. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
CHI409H5Influence of Confucianism on Chinese CultureThis advanced level course discusses the cultural influence of Confucianism on Chinese writing, philosophy, religion, education, literature, customs, ethics, society and so forth. The readings covered in this course are mainly in modern Chinese language. Critical reading and essay writing skills will be stressed. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
CHM151Y1Chemistry: The Molecular ScienceAn introduction to the major areas of modern chemistry, including organic and biological chemistry; physical chemistry and chemical physics; and inorganic/materials chemistry. The course is intended for students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program). The combination of CHM151Y1 and CHM249H1 serves as a full year introductory course in organic chemistry with laboratory. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Note: CHM151Y1 has a unique Course Community where the undergraduate experience in chemistry is greatly enhanced through a series of workshops, research seminars, tours, outreach opportunities and social activities. Two hour biweekly Course Community meetings, during laboratory class hours will alternate weeks with the CHM151Y1 lab classes. The lab time is reserved for CHM151Y1 activities every week of each semester.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM151Y1Chemistry: The Molecular ScienceAn introduction to the major areas of modern chemistry, including organic and biological chemistry; physical chemistry and chemical physics; and inorganic/materials chemistry. The course is intended for students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program). The combination of CHM151Y1 and CHM249H1 serves as a full year introductory course in organic chemistry with laboratory. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Note: CHM151Y1 has a unique Course Community where the undergraduate experience in chemistry is greatly enhanced through a series of workshops, research seminars, tours, outreach opportunities and social activities. Two hour biweekly Course Community meetings, during laboratory class hours will alternate weeks with the CHM151Y1 lab classes. The lab time is reserved for CHM151Y1 activities every week of each semester.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM198H1Biosensor Technology and Applications for the Non-ScientistMichael ThompsonThis breadth course introduces uses of and key ideas behind biosensor technology. Sensors will be familiar to all, playing key roles in our everyday lives, for example in touch screens or in automotive technology. Biosensor devices are fabricated from an electrical transducer which is intimately connected to a biochemical probe such as an enzyme or antibody. The idea is that a detectable electrical signal can be obtained when a target molecule or ion binds to the probe. Such a device offers many applications. These range from the detection of biological markers in blood and serum to test for genetic and infectious disease, to the selective monitoring of biomolecules for public safety, or in biotechnology or other industrial processes. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM201H5The Science of Human HealthMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5healthSDG3
CHM209H1Science of the Modern KitchenThe properties of different food types will be discussed, as well as how they can be manipulated in the kitchen to transform taste and texture. Concepts will be considered through the lens of the scientific method, and many of the ingredients and practices of modernist cuisine will be examined. This course is intended for students with no science background.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5foodSDG2, SDG12
CHM210H1Chemistry of Environmental ChangeJennifer MurphyExamines the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth?s natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics relate to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5WATER; URBAN; WASTE; ENVIRONMENT; WATER; POLLUTSDG6, SDG11, SDG13
CHM211H5Fundamentals of Analytical ChemistryA rigorous introduction to the theory and practice of analytical chemistry. Development and applications of basic statistical concepts in treatment and interpretation of analytical data; direct and indirect precipitations; volumetric methods; acid-base, complexometric, redox and precipitation titrations; introduction to instrumental methods; potentiometry and absorption spectroscopy. Applications in biomedical, forensic and environmental areas will be considered. [24L, 48P, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM217H1Introduction to Analytical ChemistryIntroduction to the science of chemical measurement, from sampling through analysis to the interpretation of results, including how water, food products, pharmaceuticals, and dietary supplements are analysed for content, quality, and potential contaminants. Also how to interpret experimental measurements, compare results and procedures, and calibrate analytical instrumentation. Through closely integrated lectures, laboratories, and tutorials, this highly practical course introduces a variety of analytical techniques including volumetric methods, potentiometry, uv/visible and infrared spectrophotometry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and chromatography. Additional information can be found at http://www.chem.utoronto.ca/coursenotes/CHM217/. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5food; water; waterSDG2, SDG6, SDG14
CHM220H1Physical Chemistry for Life SciencesIntroduction to thermodynamics; kinetics; phase equilibrium, properties of mixtures, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry; introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. This course is recommended for students in life and health science programs that involve a small amount of chemistry. Students enrolled in any chemistry specialist program (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program), are strongly encouraged to take CHM222H1 and CHM223H1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
CHM222H1Introduction to Physical ChemistryJeremy SchofieldTopics: introductory thermodynamics, first and second law and applications; chemical equilibrium. The course is intended for students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM247H1Introductory Organic Chemistry IIAndrew DicksReactions of organic compounds. Principles of mechanism, synthesis, and spectroscopy, continuing from CHM138H1. This course is recommended for students in life and health science programs that involve a small amount of chemistry. Students enrolled in any chemistry specialist program (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program) are strongly encouraged to take CHM249H1. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5health; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG13
CHM249H1Organic ChemistryAn introductory course in organic chemistry, based around the themes of structure, bonding, reaction mechanism and synthesis. Reactions are discussed with a view to understanding mechanism and how they are useful in the multi-step synthesis of medicinally and industrially important compounds. An introduction to the spectroscopy of organic molecules is also given, as well as discussion of topics relating to the biological behaviour of organic molecules and medicinal chemistry. Students are also introduced to green chemistry approaches from an experimental perspective. This course continues from CHM151Y1 or CHM138H1 and is designed for students enrolled in any chemistry specialist or major program. This course is highly recommended for students in the Biological Chemistry Specialist program. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM310H1Environmental ChemistryJonathan AbbattThis course considers carbon-containing molecules in the environment from a variety of perspectives: the carbon cycle, climate change and ocean acidification; fossil fuels and alternative energy sources; and the partitioning and degradation pathways of organic chemicals.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5ENERGY; climate; environment; oceanSDG7, SDG13, SDG14
CHM317H1Introduction to Instrumental Methods of AnalysisScope of instrumental analytical chemistry; Fourier transform IR absorption spectroscopy; molecular luminescence; emission spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; sensors; gas and high performance liquid chromatography; instrument design principles and applications in industry and the environment. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTR; enVIRONMENTSDG9, SDG13
CHM331H5Inorganic Chemistry II: Advanced Inorganic ChemistryUlrich FeklChemistry of metallic elements. Organometallics. Main group and transition elements. Rings, cages and clusters. Lanthanides and Actinides. Applications of IR, UV-VIS and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Symmetry. Inorganic synthesis. Non-aqueous solvents. Structure and bonding. Catalysis and industrial processes. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM343H1Organic Synthesis TechniquesSophie RousseauxThis laboratory course showcases modern organic synthesis techniques and introduces chemical research principles. It provides excellent preparation for a CHM499Y1 project in organic chemistry. Associated lectures teach theory and problem-solving approaches from a practical perspective and through industrial case studies. Green chemistry decision-making is a central theme of both the lecture and laboratory components. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM348H1Organic Reaction MechanismsPrinciples and methods of analyzing and predicting organic chemical reactivity: advanced stereochemistry, conformational analysis, molecular orbitals, reaction kinetics, isotope effects, linear free energy relationships, orbital transformations, systematization of mechanisms. The laboratory section is used to illustrate the operation of the principles, including examples of data acquisition for mechanistic analysis and theoretical computations. Regular original reports on methods and outcomes are an important part of the laboratory. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5ENERGYSDG7
CHM410H1Analytical Environmental ChemistryHui PengAn analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues and the determination of physical/chemical properties including vapour pressure, degradation rates, partitioning. Lab experiments involve application of theory. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5WATER; environment; water; pollutSDG6, SDG13, SDG15
CHM415H1Topics in Atmospheric ChemistryJonathan AbbattThis course builds upon the introductory understanding of atmospheric chemistry provided in CHM210H. In particular, modern research topics in the field are discussed, such as aerosol chemistry and formation mechanisms, tropospheric organic chemistry, the chemistry of climate including cloud formation and geoengineering, biosphere-atmosphere interactions, the chemistry of remote environments. Reading is from the scientific literature; class discussion is emphasized.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5CLIMATE; environmentSDG13
CHM416H1Separation ScienceThis course provides theoretical and practical background useful for engaging in cutting-edge chemical separations in chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering, research, and industry. The course covers general separations concepts and principles, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and its various modes, including partition chromatography, ion chromatography, enantiomer chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and affinity chromatography. Other topics include materials and instrumentation, gas chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, electrophoresis and related techniques, and a host of miscellaneous separation (e.g., TLC, FFF, CF) and extraction (e.g., LLE, SPE, SPME) modalities. Classes are supplemented with online/virtual laboratory exercises.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM416H5Separations, Chromatography and MicrofluidicsSeparation science will be explored by building on a survey of fundamental physical principles to understand processes of extraction, and technologies such as solid phase microextraction, supercritical fluid extraction, immunoaffinity extraction and molecularly imprinted polymers. Plate and rate theory will be developed to consider various forms of gas and liquid chromatographic methods, including hyphenated techniques that bridge to information detectors such as mass spectrometers. New opportunities for chromatography and separations by movement to small scale size will be considered by focusing on microfluidics, electro-osmotic flow and chip based microdevice applications. Applications examples will focus on problems in life sciences, forensics and environmental chemistry. [24L,12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM432H1Organometallic Chemistry and CatalysisStructure, bonding, and reactions of organometallic compounds, with emphasis on basic mechanisms, and industrial processes. Addition, metalation, elimination, important catalytic cycles, electrophilic, and nucleophilic reactions are considered on a mechanistic basis. Topics on modern organometallic chemistry and catalysis are covered.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CHM447H1Bio-organic ChemistryMark NitzMechanisms in biochemical systems: Examples of biological catalysis are considered in terms of chemical mechanisms and their extensions, overcoming barriers catalytic groups in active sites, stereochemical applications, energy transfer, kinetic patterns, inhibitors, drug design, cofactors, ribozymes, proteosomes. Related current issues are noted and discussed. The format includes lectures integrated with in-class discussions. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry0.5ENERGYSDG7
CHM499Y1Introduction to Chemistry ResearchAn experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a teaching faculty or research faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. Five mandatory 90-minute professional development workshops cover aspects of academic writing, poster presentations, reading scientific literature, and job applications/interviews. Each student is required to attend a total of six one-hour research colloquia during the Fall and Winter Sessions. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding Winter Session with the deadline being the Friday before Reading Week: the application form is available at the Department of Chemistry website. Students are notified with the results of their application by the last week of March. Only students being admitted are required to contact chemistry faculty to discuss available research projects. Projects are in the areas of environmental, analytical, physical, inorganic, materials, polymer, organic and biological chemistry. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHM499Y1Introduction to Chemistry ResearchAn experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a teaching faculty or research faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. Five mandatory 90-minute professional development workshops cover aspects of academic writing, poster presentations, reading scientific literature, and job applications/interviews. Each student is required to attend a total of six one-hour research colloquia during the Fall and Winter Sessions. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding Winter Session with the deadline being the Friday before Reading Week: the application form is available at the Department of Chemistry website. Students are notified with the results of their application by the last week of March. Only students being admitted are required to contact chemistry faculty to discuss available research projects. Projects are in the areas of environmental, analytical, physical, inorganic, materials, polymer, organic and biological chemistry. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceChemistry1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHMB55H3Environmental ChemistryAn investigation of aspects of chemical substances and processes as they occur in the environment, including both naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals.This course will include an introduction to atmospheric chemistry, aqueous chemistry, some agricultural and industrial chemistry, and chemical analysis of contaminants and pollutants.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; ENVIRONMENT; POLLUTSDG9, SDG13, SDG14
CHMD16H3Environmental and Analytical ChemistryStudents will learn about analytical techniques used in environmental chemistry, including: gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Environmental sampling and ecotoxicology will also be covered. Students will carry out laboratory analyses and receive hands-on training with analytical instrumentation commonly used in environmental chemistry.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CHMD59H3Modelling the Fate of Organic Chemicals in the EnvironmentThis course introduces quantitative approaches to describe the behaviour of organic chemicals in the environment. Building upon a quantitative treatment of equilibrium partitioning and kinetically controlled transfer processes of organic compounds between gaseous, liquid and solid phases of environmental significance, students will learn how to build, use and evaluate simulation models of organic chemical fate in the environment. The course will provide hands-on experience with a variety of such models.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CIN201Y1Film Cultures I: Art and IndustryExamines the practices, theories, and debates surrounding the emergence of cinema through to the development of studio system filmmaking in the first half of the 20th Century. Topics include: film's relation to the other arts, formalist and realist traditions, technological innovations, audiences and reception, and cultural industries.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute1INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
CIN201Y1Film Cultures I: Art and IndustryExamines the practices, theories, and debates surrounding the emergence of cinema through to the development of studio system filmmaking in the first half of the 20th Century. Topics include: film's relation to the other arts, formalist and realist traditions, technological innovations, audiences and reception, and cultural industries.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute1INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
CIN207H5East Asian CinemaElizabeth WijayaThis course is an introduction to East Asian cinema from the 1960s to the present, including films from Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, Japan, and Korea. With an emphasis on formal aesthetic analysis of short and feature-length films, we will examine film waves, genres, film festivals, and interconnected film industries. Throughout the course, we will consider not only the production, exhibition, and reception spaces of East Asian cinema but also critically examine its definitions and borders. [24L, 12T, 36P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5INDUSTR; PRODUCTIONSDG9, SDG12
CIN215H5Bollywood in ContextIndia has arguably the most popular and prolific film industry in the world. This course contextualizes the relatively recent 'Bollywood' phenomenon within the history of Indian commercial cinema and key aspects of modern Indian culture, emphasizing the popular cinema's role in constructing historically changing ideas of national and gendered identity. It also challenges the assumptions of film theories developed in relation to Hollywood or European cinema by introducing film theory concepts that address South Asian image-cultures (such as darshan, frontality, melodrama, and interruption). [24L, 12T, 36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5genderSDG5
CIN230H1The Business of FilmExamines cinema as a commercial enterprise, emphasizing production, distribution, and exhibition and the political economy of North American film culture. This is a Breadth Category 3 course but has been specially-designed to fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning requirement for Cinema Studies Specialists and Majors.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute0.5PRODUCTIONSDG13
CIN322H1Cult CinemaThis course examines "cult" and "exploitation" cinema. It examines the growing popularity of cult/exploitation films as an emerging cinematic subculture that valorizes disreputable or "trash" cinema. A number of sub-genres within exploitation film, including teen films, educational/instructional films, sexploitation, and Blaxploitation, will be explored. The social politics of appropriating texts through ironic reading strategies will also be considered.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute0.5educatSDG4
CIN336H1Queer Film and MediaThis course focuses on queer film, television, and/or digital media. Approaches may include cultural, historical, analytical, critical, and theoretical methods. This course may focus on the representation of queer people in film in media, or film and/or media made by queer people, or both.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute0.5queerSDG5
CIN374Y1American Filmmaking in the Studio EraIndustrial, economic, ideological, and aesthetic dimensions of the American studio era.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute1INDUSTRSDG9
CIN374Y1American Filmmaking in the Studio EraIndustrial, economic, ideological, and aesthetic dimensions of the American studio era.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute1INDUSTRSDG9
CIN403H5Queerscapes, Screenscapes, Escapes: Gender and Sexuality Across East and Southeast Asian Cinemas"Queerness is not yet here." JosŽ Esteban Mu–oz begins Cruising Utopia with the provocation that queerness is a mode of desire that allows for an escape from the conditions of the present. How does queer studies contribute to the building of and the continued hope for a more just world? Through cinema, theory, and philosophy, this course makes the claim that investigating queerness in the world marks a critical move away from restrictive modes of identification and holds open life's horizons of possibility. Course texts emphasize queer cinemas of Asia and their transnational connections. 24S, 24PMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5gender; QUEERSDG5
CIN472H1Advanced Study in History and NationSeminars in historiography and questions of national cinema. Past seminars include: ?Film Historiography,? ?Early Cinema,? ?Reviewing Hollywood Classicism,? ?Women Pioneers,? ?Local Film Cultures: Toronto Sites and Scenes,? and ?Debating Transnational Cinema."St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCinema Studies Institute0.5womenSDG5
CITA01H3Foundations of City StudiesA review of the major characteristics and interpretations of cities, urban processes and urban change as a foundation for the Program in City Studies. Ideas from disciplines including Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Planning, Political Science and Sociology, are examined as ways of understanding cities.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; URBANSDG11
CITB01H3Canadian Cities and PlanningAfter reviewing the history of urban and regional planning in Canada, this course considers alternative ideologies, models of public choice, the role of the planner, the instruments of planning, tools for the analysis of planning, and planning in the context of the space economy.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; URBANSDG11
CITB03H3Social Planning and Community DevelopmentThis course provides an overview of the history, theory, and politics of community development and social planning as an important dimension of contemporary urban development and change.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
CITB04H3City PoliticsThis course is the foundations course for the city governance concentration in the City Studies program, and provides an introduction to the study of urban politics with particular emphasis on different theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding urban decision-making, power, and conflict.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; GOVERNANCESDG11, SDG16
CITB08H3Economy of CitiesAn introduction to economic analysis of cities, topics include: theories of urban economic growth; the economics of land use, urban structure, and zoning; the economics of environments, transportation, and sustainability; public finance, cost-benefit analysis, the provision of municipal goods and services, and the new institutional economics.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ECONOMIC GROWTH; CITIES; URBAN; ENVIRONMENT; LAND USE; INSTITUTIONSDG8, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15, SDG16
CITC01H3Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East ScarboroughThis course engages students in a case study of some of the issues facing urban communities and neighbourhoods today. Students will develop both community-based and academic research skills by conducting research projects in co-operation with local residents and businesses, non-profit organizations, and government actors and agencies.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
CITC03H3Real Estate and the CityOperation of property markets; cities as markets in land and structures; stocks of property and flows of accommodation service; location of industry, offices and retailing within the city; rental and owner-occupied housing; depreciation and maintenance; cyclical behaviour in metropolitan property markets; impacts of local government; property taxation.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; TAXATION; CITIESSDG9, SDG10, SDG11
CITC07H3Urban Social PolicyIn recent years social policy has been rediscovered as a key component of urban governance. This course examines the last half-century of evolving approaches to social policy and urban inequality, with particular emphasis on the Canadian urban experience. Major issues examined are poverty, social exclusion, labour market changes, housing, immigration and settlement.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5poverty; EQUALITY; LABOUR; INEQUALITY; URBAN; GOVERNANCESDG1, SDG5, SDG8, SDG11, SDG16
CITC09H3Introduction to Planning History: Toronto and Its RegionRichard WhiteAn introduction to the study of the history of urban planning with particular emphasis on the investigation of the planning ideas, and the plans, that have shaped Toronto and its surrounding region through the twentieth century. The course will consider international developments in planning thought together with their application to Toronto and region.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
CITC12H3City Structures and City Choices: Local Government, Management, and PolicymakingThis course examines the structure of local government, how local Government is managed, how policy decisions are made. Viewing Canadian cities in comparative perspective, topics include the organization and authority of the mayor, council, civic bureaucracy, and special-purpose bodies, and their roles in the making and implementation of public policies; ethical and conflict-of-interest dilemmas; collective bargaining; and provincial oversight of municipal affairs.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIESSDG11
CITC14H3Environmental PlanningKelly SnowThis course introduces students to questions of urban ecology and environmental planning, and examines how sustainability and environmental concerns can be integrated into urban planning processes and practices.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CITC15H3Taxing and Spending: Public Finance in Canadian CitiesThe course examines Canadian local public finance in comparative perspective and discusses the implications of municipal finance for urban public policy, planning, and the provision of municipal services. Topics include local government revenue sources and expenditures, the politics of municipal budgeting and intergovernmental fiscal relations, and how public finance influences urban form.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; URBANSDG11
CITC16H3Planning and Governing the MetropolisMost of the world's population now lives in large urban regions. How such metropolitan areas should be planned and governed has been debated for over a century. Using examples, this course surveys and critically evaluates leading historical and contemporary perspectives on metropolitan planning and governance, and highlights the institutional and political challenges to regional coordination and policy development.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; INSTITUION; GOVERNANCESDG11, SDG16
CITC18H3Urban Transportation Policy AnalysisChristopher HigginsDemand forecasting; methodology of policy analysis; impacts on land values, urban form and commuting; congestion; transit management; regulation and deregulation; environmental impacts and safety.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG11, SDG13
CITD12H3Planning and Building Public Spaces in TorontoThis course is designed to develop career-related skills such as policy-oriented research analysis, report writing, and presentation and networking skills through experiential learning approaches. The policy focus each year will be on a major current Toronto planning policy issue, from ‘Complete Streets’ to improvements to parks and public space infrastructure, to public transit-related investments. Students work closely in the course with planners and policymakers from the City of Toronto, policy advocates, and community organizers.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5INFRASTRUCTURESDG9
CIV102H1Structures and Materials - An Introduction to Engineering DesignAn introduction to the art and science of designing structures. Topics include: 1) material bodies that sustain or resist force, work, energy, stress and strain; 2) the properties of engineering materials (strength, stiffness, ductility); 3) simple structural elements; 4) engineering beam theory; 5) stability of columns; 6) the practical problems which constrain the design of structures such as bridges, towers, pressure vessels, dams, ships, aircraft, bicycles, birds and trees; and 7) design methods aimed at producing safe, functional, efficient and elegant structures.
 
St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG7
CIV201H1Introduction to Civil EngineeringA field-based course introducing students to current and historical civil engineering works in the urban and natural environments, highlighting the role of the Civil Engineer in developing sustainable solutions. It will run the Tuesday through Thursday immediately following Labour Day, with follow-up assignments coordinated with the course CIV282 Engineering Communications I. Students must have their own personal protective equipment (PPE). One night will be spent at the University of Toronto Survey Camp near Minden, Ontario.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.2LABOUR; URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG8, SDG11, SDG13
CIV220H1Urban Engineering EcologySusan AndrewsCore Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5food; WATER; ENERGY; INDUSTR; CITIES; URBAN; WASTE; INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENT; WATER; POLLUT; BIODIVERSITY; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG7, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CIV250H1Hydraulics and HydrologyThe hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; ENERGY; CLIMATE; WATER; LAND USESDG6, SDG7, SDG13, SDG15
CIV280H1Management of ConstructionAn introduction to the management of construction projects including: the nature of the industry, project delivery alternatives, legal and ethical considerations, the Safety Act and construction regulations, labour relations, construction contracts, risk distribution, project planning and scheduling, estimating and bidding, controlling of time, cost and quality, accounting leading to financial statements, dispute resolution, as well as new and evolving concepts in managing construction.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5LABOUR; INDUSTRSDG8, SDG9
CIV300H1Terrestrial Energy SystemsIan SinclairCore Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGY; OCEANSDG7, SDG14
CIV300H1Terrestrial Energy SystemsIan SinclairCore Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGY; OCEANSDG7, SDG14
CIV331H1Transport I - Introduction to Urban Transportation SystemsMatthew RoordaThis course introduces the fundamentals of transportation systems and the application of engineering, mathematical and economic concepts and principles to address a variety of transportation issues in Canada. Several major aspects of transportation engineering will be addressed, including transportation planning, public transit, traffic engineering, geometric design, pavement design and the economic, social and environmental impacts of transportation. The course focuses on urban transportation engineering problems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG11, SDG13
CIV340H1Municipal EngineeringDavid TaylorMunicipal service systems for water supply and wastewater disposal, land development, population forecasting, and demand analysis. Water supply: source development, transmission, storage, pumping, and distribution networks. Sewerage and drainage, sewer and culvert hydraulics, collection networks, and storm water management. Maintenance and rehabilitation of water and wastewater systems, and optimization of network design. Design projects.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; WASTE; WATERSDG6, SDG12
CIV342H1Water and Wastewater Treatment ProcessesPrinciples involved in the design and operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities are covered, including physical, chemical and biological unit operations, advanced treatment and sludge processing.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER;SDG6
CIV355H1Urban Operations ResearchThis course focuses on quantitative methods and techniques for the analysis and modelling of urban transportation and service systems. Major topics include probabilistic modelling, queuing models of transport operations, network models, mathematical programming and simulation. The application of these methods to modeling various components of the urban transportation system (including road, transit and pedestrian facilities) and to the planning and design of logistically-oriented urban service systems (e.g., fire and police departments, emergency medical services, etc..) is emphasized.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5URBANSDG11
CIV375H1Building ScienceThe fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5SUSTAINABLE DESIGNSDG12
CIV380H1Sustainable Energy SystemsJeffrey SiegelThis course will provide students with knowledge of energy demand and supply from local to national scales. Topics include energy demands throughout the economy, major energy technologies, how these technologies work, how they are evaluated quantitatively, their economics and their impacts on the environment. In addition, the ever changing context in which these technologies (and emerging technologies) are being implemented will be outlined. Systems approaches including life cycle assessment, will be refined and applied to evaluate energy systems. A particular focus will be placed on analysis of energy alternatives within a carbon constrained economy.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGY; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG13
CIV401H1Design and Optimization of Hydro and Wind Electric PlantsThe application of turbo-machinery including the design and operation of typical wind and hydroelectric plants from first principles to the various types of turbo-machines choices. Fundamental fluid mechanics equations, efficiency coefficients, momentum exchanges, characteristic curves, similarity laws, specific speed, vibration, cavitation of hydraulic turbines, pump/turbines; variable speed machines including transients and hydraulic stability. An introduction to overall system configuration and both component and system optimization.  Case studies.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5SOLAR; HYDROELECTRICSDG7
CIV420H1Construction EngineeringThis course considers the engineering aspects of construction including earthmoving, equipment productivity, fleet balancing, formwork design, shoring, hoisting, aggregate production, equipment operating costs, and modular construction. Several construction projects will be reviewed to demonstrate methods and processes. Students will be expected to visit construction sites, so safety boots and hard hats are required.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
CIV440H1Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCore Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5health; ENERGY; PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG7, SDG12, SDG13
CIV460H1Engineering Project Finance and ManagementAlexander HayThis course deals with the structuring, valuing, managing and financing of infrastructure projects. The financing portion builds on material covered in Engineering Economics. Key topics include; structuring projects, valuing projects, the rationale for project financing (types of funds and financing), project viability and financial modeling, risk analysis, externalities and social cost benefit analyses. Financing of large scale projects by the public and private sectors as well as through public/private partnerships is treated in detail. Project management concepts, issues, and procedures are introduced. A series of case studies analyzing both successful and unsuccessful projects are examined.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5INFRASTRUCTURESDG9
CIV510H1Solid Mechanics IIThis course provides a continuing study of the mechanics of deformable solids. Stress and equilibrium conditions, strain and compatibility conditions, stress-strain relations and yield/failure criteria are considered in the context of civil engineering materials. Two-and three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed, with an introduction to the use of tensor notation. Advanced topics in bending, shear and torsion of beams are also covered, as is elementary plate bending theory. The course concludes with a further development and application of energy methods including virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, and related approaches.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGYSDG7
CIV514H1Concrete TechnologyR HootanMaterial aspects of concrete production will be dealt with in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability. The process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing concrete will be the framework within which topics such as: the use of admixtures, choice of cements, environmental influences, methods of consolidation and testing techniques will be studied.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
CIV516H1Public Transit Operations and PlanningThis course covers a broad range of topics in urban transit operations and planning, with special emphasis on best-practice strategies of modern transit systems. The course will help students: Learn the history of transit and its relationship to urban development, emerging challenges, transit role in society, and new trends and issues; Understand and analyze the factors that affect transit performance and demand; Identify and analyze transit operational and planning problems; Identify possible solutions at the operational level (mostly short-term and line-based) and the strategic level (mostly long-term and network-based), and assess alternative solutions; Understand the relative performance of various transit modes (both conventional and new modes) and their domains of application; and gain knowledge of best-practice transit systems planning and emerging innovations.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5INNOVATION; URBANSDG9, SDG13
CIV523H1Geotechnical DesignThis course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a  project.  The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction.   In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control.  The highway will require a soil cut.  One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils.  A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service.  A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER;SDG9, SDG11
CIV531H1Transport PlanningThis course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A “systems” approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENT; LAND USESDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CIV536H1Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and HealthThis is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5health; CITIES; URBAN; POLLUTSDG3, SDG11, SDG14
CIV541H1Environmental BiotechnologyElodie PasseportPrinciples involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability.  The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; ENERGY; WASTE; ENVIRONMENT, SDG6, SDG7, SDG13
CIV549H1Groundwater Flow and ContaminationMechanics of saturated and unsaturated fluid flow in porous media. Confined and unconfined flow. Flow to wells. Analytical and numerical solutions of groundwater flow equations. Non-reactive and reactive contaminant transport on groundwater systems. Analytical and numerical solutions of contaminant transport equations. Flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. Assessment of environmental impacts of waste disposal operations. Remediation of contaminated groundwater.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; WASTE; ENVIRONMENTSDG6, SDG12, SDG13
CIV550H1Water Resources EngineeringGlobal and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; URBAN; WATERSDG6, SDG11
CIV575H1Studies in Building ScienceThis course examines the basic principles governing the control of heat, moisture and air movement in buildings and presents the fundamentals of building enclosure design. With this background, students are required to research advanced topics related to emerging areas of Building Science, and to write and present to the class an individual comprehensive paper related to their research. Lectures for this course will be jointly offered with those of CIV375H1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5BUILDINGSSDG9
CIV576H1Sustainable BuildingsJeffrey SiegelBuilding systems including the thermal envelope, heating and cooling systems, as well as water and lighting systems are examined with a view to reducing the net energy consumed within the building. Life-cycle economic and assessment methods are applied to the evaluation of various design options including considerations of embodied energy and carbon sequestration. Green building strategies including natural ventilation, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar water heaters, green roofs and geothermal energy piles are introduced. Following the application of these methods, students are introduced to efficient designs including LEED designs that lessen the impact of buildings on the environment. Exemplary building designs will be presented and analyzed.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL; BUILDINGS; CONSUM; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG12, SDG13
CIV577H1Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesJason HawkinsDeveloping infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; ENERGY; INFRASTRUCTURE; BUILDINGS; CITIES; URBAN; WATERSDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG11
CIV578H1Design of Building EnclosuresA brief summary of the science involved in controlling heat, moisture and air movement in buildings is presented at the outset of the course.  With this background, methods of designing enclosures for cold, mixed, and hot climates are examined.  Design principles related to the design of walls, windows and roofs are presented and applied.  In particular, topics related to the control of rain penetration, air movement, and interstitial condensation are studied in detail.  Emphasis is placed on developing designs based on fundamentals which can be verified with computer modelling solutions. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5SOLAR; BUILDINGS; CLIMATESDG7, SDG9, SDG13
CIV580H1Engineering and Management of Large ProjectsI. Daniel PosenThis technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.
Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CLA319H5Women and Gender in AntiquityCarrie FultonA study of gender in the ancient Mediterranean, with a focus on female and male sexuality and socialization; their economic, religious, and political roles; and aspects of daily life. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; WOMENSDG5
CLAA04H3The Ancient Mediterranean WorldAn introduction to the main features of the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean world from the development of agriculture to the spread of Islam. Long term socio-economic and cultural continuities and ruptures will be underlined, while a certain attention will be dedicated to evidences and disciplinary issues.Same as HISA07H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5agricultureSDG2
CLAC05H3Environment, Society and Economy in Ptolemaic and Roman EgyptThis course provides a review of the environmental, social and economic features of Egypt from 332 BC to 642 AD. Same as (IEEC52H3), HISC10H3.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CME321H1Geotechnical Engineering IAn introduction to elements of geotechnical analysis and design. Basic site investigation techniques and quantitative descriptions of soil properties and behaviour. Permeability, seepage analysis, and internal stability of granular soil; granular filter design for internal hydraulic stability. Compaction of granular soil; engineered fills for earth dams, road bases, and backfills. Soil shear strength at constant volume; ultimate limit state design of retaining walls, shallow footings, natural slopes and constructed embankments. Groundwater flow analysis and slope stability analysis using commercial software. Physical laboratories for basic soil identification, model groundwater flow analysis, direct shear strength tests, and reinforced earth models. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5WATER; WATERSDG6
CME358H1Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)Evan BentzThis two-week August field camp provides students with the opportunity to further their understanding of the vital interactions between the natural and the built environments.  Through fieldwork, students gain hands-on experience in the use of various field instruments used by Civil and Mineral Engineers.  The essentials of land surveying and the use of surveying instruments including Global Positioning Systems are taught as students carry out a series of field exercises that include route surveys, topographic surveys and construction surveys.  Survey calculations, sources of error, corrections and adjustments are also introduced.  In order to better understand our impact on the natural environment, students also perform several additional exercises.  These may include the measurement of river flows, remote sensing of soil and rock, remediation of a borrow pit, and the evaluation of the renewable energy potential of the wind and solar radiation. Note: This course requires payment of an extra fee for room and board.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5ENERGY; RENEWABLE; SOLAR; ENVIRONMENTSDG7, SDG13
CME368H1Engineering Economics and Decision MakingThe incorporation of economic and non-monetary considerations for making decision about public and private sector engineering systems in urban and other contexts. Topics include rational decision making; cost concepts; time value of money and engineering economics; microeconomic concepts; treatment of risk and uncertainty; and public project evaluation techniques incorporating social and environmental impacts including benefit cost analysis and multi-objective analysis.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG11, SDG13
CME525H1Tunneling and Urban ExcavationIntroduces fundamental concepts of underground tunneling and its impact on surrounding urban environment.  Topics: role of geology on the choice of tunneling methodology; classical and mechanized tunneling excavation methods; interaction between tunnel and surrounding structures; tunnel support methodologies; innovation and current research in tunneling and underground construction.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCivil and Mineral Engineering0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENTSDG11, SDG13
CRI210H1Criminal JusticeAn introduction to the Canadian criminal justice system. The institutions established by government to respond to crime and control it; how they operate, and the larger function they serve; including the role of the police, the trial process, courts and juries, sentencing, imprisonment and community corrections.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5INSTITUTION; JUSTICESDG16
CRI215H1Introduction to Sociolegal StudiesThe course covers several major issues that will help prepare students for advanced courses in the criminology major: the meaning of law, the production of laws and legal institutions, law in action, comparative legal traditions, and the methodology of sociolegal studies.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5INSTITUIONSDG16
CRI322H1Inequality and Criminal JusticeThis course examines the intersections between social inequality and the criminal justice system in Canada and internationally. The course explores how factors such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and religion influence perceptions of and experiences with crime and criminal justice.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5gender; EQUALITY; INEQUALITY; JUSTICESDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CRI345H1History of Criminal JusticeThe course offers a historical perspective on the development of the legal doctrines, professions and institutions that define criminal justice in Canada and the broader common law world today. Topics include the shift from medieval trial by ordeal and torture to the modern reliance on expert witnesses and forensic science; the emergence of the adversarial trial; the growth of the legal profession; the birth of policing; the rise of the penitentiary; and the changing fortunes of the death penalty. The course focuses primarily on the period from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will be introduced to historical debates and ways of thinking and writing about law and crime. We will explore how culture, politics, economics and social life are essential to how we understand the foundational elements of criminal justice, including concepts of truth, guilt, legitimacy, fairness and violence.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5INSTITUTION; JUSTICESDG16
CRI364H1Indigenous Peoples & Criminal JusticeKerry TaylorAn introduction to issues affecting Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system identified by Indigenous scholars, activists and allies. Topics include: effects of colonization, legal discrimination and disenfranchisement, Treaties and land claims, criminalization, Indigenous activism, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI364H1Indigenous Peoples & Criminal JusticeKerry TaylorAn introduction to issues affecting Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system identified by Indigenous scholars, activists and allies. Topics include: effects of colonization, legal discrimination and disenfranchisement, Treaties and land claims, criminalization, Indigenous activism, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI365H1Crime and MindLegal, psychological and sociological understandings of issues in the criminal justice system, through a consideration of topics including: criminal intent, the Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder defence, the use of battered woman syndrome as part of a self-defence, infanticide, issues of transcultural psychiatry, and jury screening for bias.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI370H1Youth JusticeKerry TaylorThe course will examine what is known about offending by youths and the various purposes that have been attributed to youth justice systems. The course will focus, in large part, however, on the nature of the laws and youth justice systems that have been designed in Canada and elsewhere to respond to offending by youths.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI380H1Crime, Gender and Sex Theory, research and policy related to the ways in which gender shapes criminal behaviour, the administration of criminal justice, and the criminal law. How notions of different types of masculinity and femininity are embedded in and influence both the operation of the criminal justice system as well as criminal behaviours. The regulation of gender and sexuality through the criminal law and through crime.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5gender; JUSTICESDG5, SDG16
CRI383H1Immigration, Ethnicity and CrimeKerry TaylorThe connection between immigration and crime, the effect of immigration on crime rates, discrimination against immigrants, the representation of immigrants in crime statistics, public perception of risk and security, and criminal justice policy changes which affect immigration. We consider research conducted in North America and Europe.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI385H1Representing Crime and AuthorityCultural constructions of crime, disorder, dangerousness and risk are integral parts of the criminal justice system. A critical analysis of how criminal justice personnel, the media, and academic criminologists construct their authority through symbols and images, in order to ?explain? and manage crime, and how these representations are regarded in public discourse.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
CRI431H1Mental Health, Morality & Legal Controls A critical exploration of contemporary debates in criminology, and legal and moral philosophy concerning the diagnostic and criminal justice labeling of mental disorders such as psychopathy and paedophilia, and their representation in popular culture.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies0.5health; JUSTRICESDG3, SDG16
CSB199H1Biotechnology and SocietyFrom the manipulation of genes of plants for improved food production through to human tissue engineering and stem cell research, biotechnology is increasingly playing a major role in our world. Society, however, is often challenged by the rapid advances in our knowledge in these areas, and how to best apply these technologies in a manner that is socially responsible and economically viable. In this seminar course, students will research and describe various applications of biotechnology using information obtained from reputable sources, and lead discussions on the benefits and concerns that arise from this research. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5food; PRODUCTIONSDG2, SDG12
CSB202H1Further Exploration in BiotechnologyKenneth YipProvides non-science students with an additional opportunity to explore biotechnology and its applications in agriculture, the environment, and human health including: genetically modified organisms, drug discovery and aging. Most lectures are viewed online before class and students work in groups during class on problem sets and case studies designed to stimulate further learning, enhance evidence-based reasoning, and promote reflection on the role of biotechnology in society. This course does not count towards CSB programs. CSB201H1 is not a prerequisite for this course.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5agriculture; HEALTH; ENVIRONMENTSDG2, SDG3, SDG13
CSB325H1Endocrine PhysiologyThe regulation of physiological processes by hormones and other signalling molecules in non-human chordates. An integrated genes-to-environment approach is used to examine aspects of hormonal evolution, physiological information flow, behaviour and neuroendocrinology, and xenobiotic endocrine disruptors. Students will have the opportunity to research areas of their own interest via group interaction in a series of tutorial sessions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CSB348H1Laboratory in Comparative Animal PhysiologyLaboratory exercises will include traditional and guided inquiry approaches to investigate and gain an understanding of the regulation of physiological systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Students will experience the nature of physiological investigation while being exposed to a range of the current experimental approaches animal physiologists use to design, test and evaluate hypotheses, and communicate their findings. This course will emphasize the fundamental characteristics humans share with all animal life and the physiological adaptations that have permitted species to exploit alternative environmental niches. This course requires participation and includes group work, written assignments, and oral presentations. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CSB447H1Living Without Oxygen: Microbes to MammalsIn-depth examination of the unique cellular adaptations of different organisms and tissues to survival in low oxygen environments. Cellular, physiological and biochemical strategies, and systemic and whole organism responses will be investigated to uncover broad-ranging common strategies employed by diverse organisms to live without oxygen and in other stressful environments.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CSB459H1Plant Molecular Biology and BiotechnologyThis course introduces students to major features of gene expression and signal transduction in plants. Topics include strategies for generating transgenic plants and regulating gene expression, as well as the importance of signal transduction in plant growth and survival. How plants sense and respond at the molecular level to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and disease will be discussed. The application of this basic scientific information in biotechnological strategies for improving agronomic traits will also be addressed.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCell and Systems Biology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
CSC197H1What, Who, How: Privacy in the Age of Big Data CollectionThe rapid advance of technology has brought remarkable changes to how we conduct our daily lives, from how we communicate, consume news and data, and purchase goods. As we increase our online activity, so too do we increase the amount of personal data that we're sharing, often without realizing it. The questions of exactly what data is being collected, who is collecting and accessing this data, and how this data is being used, have significant implications for both individuals and our larger social and political institutions. Organized by a wide variety of case studies drawn from current events, we'll study how personal data can be collected and tracked, how personal and social factors may influence our own decisions about whether and how much to share our data, and what broader political and legal tools are used to either protect or subvert individual privacy. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5CONSUM; INSTITUIONSDG12, SDG16
CSC197H1What, Who, How: Privacy in the Age of Big Data CollectionThe rapid advance of technology has brought remarkable changes to how we conduct our daily lives, from how we communicate, consume news and data, and purchase goods. As we increase our online activity, so too do we increase the amount of personal data that we're sharing, often without realizing it. The questions of exactly what data is being collected, who is collecting and accessing this data, and how this data is being used, have significant implications for both individuals and our larger social and political institutions. Organized by a wide variety of case studies drawn from current events, we'll study how personal data can be collected and tracked, how personal and social factors may influence our own decisions about whether and how much to share our data, and what broader political and legal tools are used to either protect or subvert individual privacy. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5CONSUM; INSTITUIONSDG12, SDG16
CSC199H1Intelligence, Artificial and HumanWhat is human intelligence? How close are we to replicating it? How productive/reductive is the brain-computer analogy? What ethical challenges are posed by AI on workers, society, and the environment? Can we put a hold on "progress"? Is Silicon Valley the seat of a new techno-religion? What can they teach us about today's research priorities? What insight (or inspiration) can we get from works of science fiction about the future of human-AI interaction? Through reading discussion, written assignment, and workshops, this seminar will present students with the opportunity to integrate their computer science interests with philosophy, history, and literature. There is an equivalent course offered by St. Michael?s College. Students may take one or the other but not both. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5WORKERSDG8
CSC300H1Computers and SocietyThis course offers a concise introduction to ethics in computing, distilled from the ethical and social discussions carried on by today's academic and popular commentators. This course covers a wide range of topics within this area including the philosophical framework for analyzing computer ethics; the impact of computer technology on security, privacy and intellectual property, digital divide, and gender and racial discrimination; the ethical tensions with Artificial Intelligence around future of work and humanity, the emerging role of online social media over voice, inclusion, and democracy; and the environmental consequences of computing.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5genderSDG5
CSC300H1Computers and SocietyThis course offers a concise introduction to ethics in computing, distilled from the ethical and social discussions carried on by today's academic and popular commentators. This course covers a wide range of topics within this area including the philosophical framework for analyzing computer ethics; the impact of computer technology on security, privacy and intellectual property, digital divide, and gender and racial discrimination; the ethical tensions with Artificial Intelligence around future of work and humanity, the emerging role of online social media over voice, inclusion, and democracy; and the environmental consequences of computing.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5genderSDG5
CSC318H1The Design of Interactive Computational MediaUser-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles, and metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design, and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography, layout, colour, sound, video, gesture, and usability enhancements. Classes of interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSC318H1The Design of Interactive Computational MediaUser-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles, and metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design, and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography, layout, colour, sound, video, gesture, and usability enhancements. Classes of interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSC318H5The Design of Interactive Computational MediaUser-centered design of interactive systems. Methodologies, principles, metaphors, task analysis, and other topics. Interdisciplinary design; the role of industrial design and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Classes of direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Additional topics in interactive computational media. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams. Enrolment limited, but non-computer scientists welcome. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaMathematical and Computational Sciences0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSC427H5Computer SecurityNetwork attacks and defenses, operating system vulnerabilities, application security (e-mail, Web, databases), viruses, spyware, social engineering attacks, privacy and digital rights management. The course will cover both attack techniques and defense mechanisms. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaMathematical and Computational Sciences0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSC454H1The Business of SoftwareMario GrechThe software and internet industries; principles of operation for successful software enterprises; innovation and entrepreneurship; software business definition and planning; business models, market and product planning; product development, marketing, sales, and support; financial management and financing of high-technology ventures; management, leadership, and partnerships. Students will all write business plans in teams.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
CSC454H1The Business of SoftwareMario GrechThe software and internet industries; principles of operation for successful software enterprises; innovation and entrepreneurship; software business definition and planning; business models, market and product planning; product development, marketing, sales, and support; financial management and financing of high-technology ventures; management, leadership, and partnerships. Students will all write business plans in teams.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceComputer Science0.5INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
CSCD03H3Social Impact of Information TechnologyBrian HarringtonThe trade-offs between benefits and risks to society of information systems, and related issues in ethics and public policy. Topics will include safety-critical software; invasion of privacy; computer-based crime; the social effects of an always-online life; and professional ethics in the software industry. There will be an emphasis on current events relating to these topics.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Computer & Mathematical Sci (UTSC)0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSCD03H3Social Impact of Information TechnologyBrian HarringtonThe trade-offs between benefits and risks to society of information systems, and related issues in ethics and public policy. Topics will include safety-critical software; invasion of privacy; computer-based crime; the social effects of an always-online life; and professional ethics in the software industry. There will be an emphasis on current events relating to these topics.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Computer & Mathematical Sci (UTSC)0.5INDUSTRSDG9
CSCD54H3Technology Innovation and EntrepreneurshipThis course examines high-Tech innovation and entrepreneurship, principles of operation of successful high-tech enterprises, customer identification and validation, product development, business models, lean startup techniques, and financing of high-technology ventures. Students will work in teams to develop their own innovative product idea, and will produce a sound business plan to support their product.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Computer & Mathematical Sci (UTSC)0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CSCD90H3The Startup SandboxIn this capstone course, students will work in teams to develop a viable product prototype following the methodologies and techniques covered in CSCD54H3. Students will produce written reports, short videos pitching their idea, and a final presentation showcasing their proposed innovation, as it would be pitched to potential investors. The course instructor and TAs will provide close supervision and mentorship throughout the project.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Computer & Mathematical Sci (UTSC)0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
CSCD90H3The Startup SandboxIn this capstone course, students will work in teams to develop a viable product prototype following the methodologies and techniques covered in CSCD54H3. Students will produce written reports, short videos pitching their idea, and a final presentation showcasing their proposed innovation, as it would be pitched to potential investors. The course instructor and TAs will provide close supervision and mentorship throughout the project.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Computer & Mathematical Sci (UTSC)0.5INNOVATIONSDG9
DRE366H5Women in TheatreTopics in the history of women in English-language theatre. Topics will vary from year to year, depending on available faculty. May include a practical workshop component. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5womenSDG5
DRM342H1The Contemporary Avant-GardeThe turn of the 21st century advanced a social, political, and aesthetic shift reminiscent of that during the post-Industrial Revolution/pre-WWII epoch that launched the historical avant-garde. This class, while exploring significant artistic and sociopolitical developments of the historical avant-garde, will primarily concentrate on the experimental theatre and performance of the past 15 years?a contemporary avant-garde that ?hinge[s] on a networked spatiality, rather than on linear teleology? and reflects a growing collective investment on part of audiences and artists alike in the work of a work of art. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies 0.5INDUSTRSDG9
DRM420H1Arts and Politics: Bertolt Brecht, Giorgio Strehler, Robert Wilson and Robert LepageBertolt Brecht played a specific role in the paradigm shift of the art which began at the end of the 19th century. He advanced this change by trying to connect art to its social and political functions and structure with the positive acceptance of the industrial revolution and by trying to transform it with the help of the new technological media.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies 0.5INDUSTRSDG9
DTS200Y1Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies IWhat is the relationship between place and belonging, between territory and memory? How have the experiences of migration and dislocation challenged the modern assumption that the nation-state should be the limit of identification? What effect has the emergence of new media of communication had upon the coherence of cultural and political boundaries? All of these questions and many more form part of the subject matter of Diaspora and Transnational Studies. This introductory course ex-amines the historical and contemporary movements of peoples and the complex issues of identity and experience to which these processes give rise as well as the creative possibilities that flow from movement and being moved. The area of study is comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing from the social sciences, history, the arts and humanities. Accordingly, this course provides the background to the subject area from diverse perspectives and introduces students to a range of key debates in the field, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies1PRODUCTIONSDG12
DTS200Y1Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies IWhat is the relationship between place and belonging, between territory and memory? How have the experiences of migration and dislocation challenged the modern assumption that the nation-state should be the limit of identification? What effect has the emergence of new media of communication had upon the coherence of cultural and political boundaries? All of these questions and many more form part of the subject matter of Diaspora and Transnational Studies. This introductory course ex-amines the historical and contemporary movements of peoples and the complex issues of identity and experience to which these processes give rise as well as the creative possibilities that flow from movement and being moved. The area of study is comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing from the social sciences, history, the arts and humanities. Accordingly, this course provides the background to the subject area from diverse perspectives and introduces students to a range of key debates in the field, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies1PRODUCTIONSDG12
DTS201H5Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies IAn interdisciplinary introduction to the study of diaspora, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination. Material will be drawn from Toronto as well as from diasporic communities in other times and places. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
DTS202H5Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies IIA continuation of DTS201H5. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of diaspora, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination. Material will be drawn from Toronto as well as from diasporic communities in other times and places. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
DTS410H1Diasporic FoodwaysFood links people across space and time. As it spirals outward from parochial sites of origin to articulate with new sites, actors and scales, it assumes new substance and meaning in new locales. This movement of food gives rise to new ?foodways? t help us to understand the past in terms of temporally connected sites of intense interaction. Food also plays a strong role in shaping translocal identities. As peoples have moved in the world, food has played a central role in (re)defining who they are, reproducing myth and ritual, and bounding diasporic communities. This course seeks to address questions surrounding the dynamics of the food ?we? eat, the ways in which ?we? eat, the meaning ?we? give to eating, and the effect of eating in a transnational world. Recognizing that culinary culture is central to diasporic identifications, the focus is on the place of food in the enduring habits, rituals, and everyday practices that are collectively used to produce and sustain a shared sense of diasporic cultural identity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies0.5foodSDG2
DTS411H1Transnational JusticeThis course explores the intersection between local conceptions of justice and their transnational and institutional circulations. It interrogates competing meanings of justice and examines the varied practices of actors engaged in justice making domains. From international human rights, to transitional justice and truth and reconciliation, to international legal and traditional justice formulations, the course offers students an opportunity to learn about and critically reflect on the processes and purposes through which justice conceptions are structured, implemented and being contested in the contemporary period. Topics include: theories of transnationalism, transnational justice, social injustice, law and culture, universalism, racism and social inequality.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies0.5equality; INEQUALITY; INSTITUION; JUSTICE; RIGHTSSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
DTS413H1Global SexualitiesSexuality is a complex interplay of desires, attractions, interests, and modes of behavior and has diverse meanings in different societies and cultures. In this course, we will examine the notion of sexuality as well as gender identity and expression from an interdisciplinary perspective that is rooted in ethnography. A cross-cultural study of sexuality and gender identity within global and transnational contexts will provide students with an understanding of how the intersections of culture, community, as well as social and political factors affect individuals? sexual choices and understandings of gender. A particular focus in this course will be experiences of sexuality and gender within diasporic communities.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies0.5genderSDG5
DTS414H1Money on the MoveIn the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, industry and finance matured together, pushing people into motion around the world. The instruments of long-distance trade, like insurance, credit and debt, connected cities and continents in new and sometimes unsettling ways. The free movement of goods and cash was mirrored by restrictions on migration to some parts of the world and by forced or coerced migration to others. This course explores the history of the rise of global capitalism at a human scale, exploring how financialization, industrialization and imperialism overlapped and intertwined, and how the remaking of the world in the image of capital weighed on human lives.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies0.5INDUSTR; TRADE; CITIESSDG9, SDG11
EAS195H1Shan Shui Landscape: A Cultural Historical StudyThis course looks into the history of cultural production of Chinese Shan Shui (lit., mountain and water) landscape representations from an environmental humanities perspective. As an artistic motif, Shan Shui travels between past and present and across various mediums as well as literary and artistic genres. What exactly are we invited to see and contemplate on in the Shan Shui? Are Shan Shui works about ?nature,? spirit, Qi, or the human world? The course seeks to inquire into these and other questions through examining the concepts, arts, and transformations of selected Shan Shui works in imperial and contemporary China. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5environmentSDG2, SDG13
EAS199H1Thinking through Art in Chinese CultureThis seminar explores different visions and methods of art (textual and visual) as a way of thinking about living, knowing, and willing in Chinese culture. Examination of various theoretical texts on arts and literature, as well as works of art themselves, will provide students with knowledge and research skills on arts in Chinese culture, and an expanded sense of Chinese intellectual history. Questions explored in the course will include: How should we understand the concept of Chinese art beyond representation? How did Chinese literati pursue a sense of beauty through their poetry and painting? How is beauty apprehended in natural and constructed landscapes? What are the political and social functions of art education in Chinese culture? How do Chinese artists fit into a global cultural context? (No prior knowledge of East Asian languages or cultures is necessary.) Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5educatSDG4
EAS219H1Cultural History of Food in East AsiaThis course introduces historical, literary, and anthropological issues related to the consumption of food in East Asia. Through a wide variety of reading materials, it focuses on the relationship between various foodways and trade, ritual, religion, medicine, and cultural identity.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5food; TRADE; CONSUMSDG2, SDG10, SDG12
EAS273H1Modern Chinese CitiesYue MengThis course offers a critical review of the history and historiography of modern Chinese cities. Focusing on the development of specific Chinese cities, the course emphasizes understanding the socio-cultural production of space as well as analytical reading of landscape, urban imagery, and urban writings. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5CITIES; URBAN; PRODUCTIONSDG11, SDG12
EAS311H1A History of Japanese MonstersThis course examines the historical development of Japanese monsters, from roughly the 7th - 8th centuries to modern times. We focus on how the changing understanding of monsters in society has embodied certain fissures in Japanese culture, especially with regard to gender and class.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5genderSDG5
EAS347H1Everyday Life in Modern JapanThis course analyzes the history of modern Japan from the perspective of a ?critique everyday life? (la vie quotidienne; nichij? seikatsu). Analyzing the uneven transformation of Japan?s feudal society into a capitalist commodity economy, the course discusses how everyday life in Japan was produced and reproduced in ways that are specific to capitalist society, but that also open onto questions of a revolution of everyday life, an everyday life after capitalism. Focusing on different moments in Japan?s modern history (including its past colonial empire), the course looks at, reads, and listens to diverse representations of everyday life in Japan, especially in the worlds of work and labour, consumption and social reproduction. How are these worlds represented politically, as well as aesthetically? Specific topics include: literature and music, architecture and housing, war and forced labour, population control and sexual reproduction, and radio, leisure-time, and state propaganda.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5LABOUR; CONSUM; PRODUCTIONSDG8, SDG12
EAS439H1The Global Bildungsroman: Narratives of Development, Time, and ColonialismThis course studies Bildungsroman, the story of an individual's coming of age, in the context of twentieth-century political, cultural, and social developments of imperialism, anti-colonialism, human rights discourse, and globalization. Our focus will be novels from the (post)colonial world and theoretical essays on the Bildungsroman form. The course aims to provide a model for rethinking literary history and genres within a global context. Authors may include Yi Kwangsu, Wu Zhouliu, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Kang Younghill, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Camara Laye, amongst others.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEast Asian Studies0.5RIGHTSSDG16
ECE313H1ENERGY SYS. & DIST. GENERATIONSt. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENERGYSDG7
ECE314H1Fundamentals of Electrical Energy SystemsIntroduction to 3-phase systems, single line diagrams and complex power flow. Energy conversion via switch-mode power electronic circuits: DC/DC converters, DC/AC converters. Energy conversions via magnetic devices: Faraday's law for time varying fields, characterization of hysteresis and eddy current losses in magnetic materials, modelling of magnetic circuits, transformer and inductor modelling and design. Introduction to electromechanical energy conversion: Lorentz Force, concepts of energy, co-energy, forces between ferromagnetic materials carrying flux, simple magnetic actuators.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENERGYSDG7
ECE349H1Introduction to Energy SystemsEstablished and emerging sources of electrical energy: hydroelectric, thermal, wind, and solar. Three-phase AC systems and complex power. Mechanisms for electrical-electrical energy conversion: power electronic systems for DC-DC conversion, single-phase DC-AC and three-phase DC-AC conversion, transformers for single-phase and three-phase AC-AC conversion. Electro-mechanical energy conversion via the synchronous machine. Fundamentals of AC electrical energy networks: frequency regulation, voltage regulation, and protection.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGY; SOLAR; HYDROELECTRICSDG7
ECE363H1Communication SystemsAn introductory course in analog and digital communication systems. Analog and digital signals. Probability and random processes. Energy and power spectral densities; bandwidth. Distortionless analog communication; amplitude, frequency and phase modulation systems; frequency division multiplexing. Sampling, quantization and pulse code modulation (PCM). Baseband digital communication; intersymbol interference (ISI); Nyquist’s ISI criterion; eye diagrams. Passband digital communications; amplitude-, phase- and frequency-shift keying; signal constellations. Performance analysis of analog modulation schemes in the presence of noise. Performance analysis of PCM in noise.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG7
ECE424H1Microwave CircuitsLosses in conductors and dielectrics; RF and microwave transmission lines; transients on transmission lines; matching networks; planar transmission lines (microstrip, stripline, coplanar waveguide); design with scattering parameters; 3- and 4-port RF devices (power dividers/combiners, couplers, isolators & circulators); coupled lines and devices; microwave active circuits (RF amplifiers, mixers, and receiver front ends); RF and microwave filters. The hands-on laboratories engage students in the design, simulation, fabrication, and test of practical passive and active microwave circuits using industry-standard RF/microwave simulation tools and measurement systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECE427H1Photonic DevicesThis course introduces concepts for analyzing and designing photonic devices that serve a wide range of applications, such as communications, sensing, and energy harvesting.  Topics to be covered include light propagation in uniform and periodic media; optical waveguides; power splitters and couplers; wavelength filters; interferometers and resonators; amplifiers and lasers; photonic integration.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENERGYSDG7
ECE437H1VLSI TechnologyThe introduction to VLSI fabrication techniques, integrated circuit designs and advanced semiconductor devices will give a proper perspective of the past, present and future trends in the VLSI industry. Following the evolution of MOS and bipolar devices, digital and analog CMOS, BiCMOS, deep submicron CMOS, SOI-CMOS, RF-CMOS and HV-CMOS technologies will be studied. Special attention will be given to the physical scaling limits such as short channel effects. In addition, CAD tools and design methodology for the development of advanced semiconductor devices and integrated circuits will be introduced in the laboratory environment. These include the simulation of device fabrication, device characteristics, device modeling, circuit layout, design verification. Finally, advanced technology such as GaN HEMTs, graphene devices, carbon nano-tube devices, power devices, heterojunctions, InP and GaSb HBTs will also be studied.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5INDUSTR; ENVIRONMENTSDG9, SDG13
ECE444H1Software EngineeringThe software development process. Software requirements and specifications. Software design techniques. Techniques for developing large software systems; CASE tools and software development environments. Software testing, documentation and maintenance.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ECE463H1Electric DrivesElectro-mechanical mechanisms for force and torque production in rotating machines. DC machine theory and DC machine dynamics, synchronous machines and their dynamics, stepper motors. Introduction to space vectors and vector control of AC machines.  Steady state and variable speed operation of the induction machine via V/f control.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
ECE472H1Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipThe economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals are discussed. Cost concepts; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; the time value of money and compound interest; inflation; capital budgeting; equity, bond and loan financing; income tax and after-tax cash flow in engineering project proposals; measures of economic merit in the public sector; sensitivity and risk analysis. Applications: evaluations of competing engineering project alternatives; replacement analysis; economic life of assets; lease versus buy decisions; break-even and sensitivity analysis. Entrepreneurship and the Canadian business environment will be discussed.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ECE472H1Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipThe economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals are discussed. Cost concepts; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; the time value of money and compound interest; inflation; capital budgeting; equity, bond and loan financing; income tax and after-tax cash flow in engineering project proposals; measures of economic merit in the public sector; sensitivity and risk analysis. Applications: evaluations of competing engineering project alternatives; replacement analysis; economic life of assets; lease versus buy decisions; break-even and sensitivity analysis. Entrepreneurship and the Canadian business environment will be discussed.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ECE568H1Computer SecurityAs computers permeate our society, the security of such computing systems is becoming of paramount importance. This course covers principles of computer systems security. To build secure systems, one must understand how attackers operate. This course starts by teaching students how to identify security vulnerabilities and how they can be exploited. Then techniques to create secure systems and defend against such attacks will be discussed. Industry standards for conducting security audits to establish levels of security will be introduced. The course will include an introduction to basic cryptographic techniques as well as hardware used to accelerate cryptographic operations in ATM’s and webservers.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECE568H1Computer SecurityAs computers permeate our society, the security of such computing systems is becoming of paramount importance. This course covers principles of computer systems security. To build secure systems, one must understand how attackers operate. This course starts by teaching students how to identify security vulnerabilities and how they can be exploited. Then techniques to create secure systems and defend against such attacks will be discussed. Industry standards for conducting security audits to establish levels of security will be introduced. The course will include an introduction to basic cryptographic techniques as well as hardware used to accelerate cryptographic operations in ATM’s and webservers.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECO102H1Principles of MacroeconomicsNathanael VellekoopAn introduction to economic analysis and its applications from a macroeconomic (economy-wide) perspective. Topics covered include international trade and finance, role of money and the banking system, monetary and fiscal policy. Note: graphical and quantitative analysis are used extensively.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5TRADESDG10
ECO105Y1Principles of Economics for Non-SpecialistsFundamentals for consumers, businesses, citizens. Microeconomics focuses on cost/benefit analysis: gains from trade, price coordination, competition/monopoly, efficiency/equity tradeoffs, government/market failures, environmental policies, income/wealth distributions. Macroeconomics focuses on: GDP growth, unemployment, inflation, monetary/fiscal policies, business cycles, exchange rates, government deficits/debt, globalization. Emphasizes economic literacy, fewer mathematical tools than ECO101H1, ECO102H1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1wealth distribution; EMPLOYMENT; TRADE; CONSUM; ENVIRONMENTSDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13
ECO105Y1Principles of Economics for Non-SpecialistsFundamentals for consumers, businesses, citizens. Microeconomics focuses on cost/benefit analysis: gains from trade, price coordination, competition/monopoly, efficiency/equity tradeoffs, government/market failures, environmental policies, income/wealth distributions. Macroeconomics focuses on: GDP growth, unemployment, inflation, monetary/fiscal policies, business cycles, exchange rates, government deficits/debt, globalization. Emphasizes economic literacy, fewer mathematical tools than ECO101H1, ECO102H1.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1wealth distribution; EMPLOYMENT; TRADE; CONSUM; ENVIRONMENTSDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13
ECO200Y1Microeconomic TheoryTheory of markets and prices. Determination of prices through the interaction of the basic economic units, the household as consumer and as supplier of inputs and the business firm as producer and as employer of inputs. The pricing system as the mechanism by which social decisions and allocation of goods are made in a market economy.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO200Y1Microeconomic TheoryTheory of markets and prices. Determination of prices through the interaction of the basic economic units, the household as consumer and as supplier of inputs and the business firm as producer and as employer of inputs. The pricing system as the mechanism by which social decisions and allocation of goods are made in a market economy.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO200Y5Microeconomic TheoryAn intermediate treatment of the basic tools of economic analysis. Applications may include: choice under uncertainty, oligopoly, industrial organization, pricing, resource allocation, externalities, public goods, income distribution and welfare economics. [48L, 24T] *ECO200Y5 is not open to Commerce students during Fall/WinterMississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1income distribution; INDUSTRSDG1, SDG9
ECO200Y5Microeconomic TheoryAn intermediate treatment of the basic tools of economic analysis. Applications may include: choice under uncertainty, oligopoly, industrial organization, pricing, resource allocation, externalities, public goods, income distribution and welfare economics. [48L, 24T] *ECO200Y5 is not open to Commerce students during Fall/WinterMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1income distribution; INDUSTRSDG1, SDG9
ECO202Y1Macroeconomic Theory and PolicyTheory of output, employment and the price level; techniques for achieving economic stability; central banking and Canadian financial institutions and markets; foreign exchange markets and the exchange rate. This course is not intended for students enrolled in the BCom program; please see ECO209Y1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1EMPLOYMENT; INSTITUIONSDG8, SDG16
ECO202Y1Macroeconomic Theory and PolicyTheory of output, employment and the price level; techniques for achieving economic stability; central banking and Canadian financial institutions and markets; foreign exchange markets and the exchange rate. This course is not intended for students enrolled in the BCom program; please see ECO209Y1.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1EMPLOYMENT; INSTITUIONSDG8, SDG16
ECO202Y5Macroeconomic Theory and PolicyMacroeconomics studies the economy as a whole. The issues it covers include: Why are some countries much richer than others? Why do most Canadians live much better than their ancestors? Why are there recessions in economic activity? What are the causes of inflation and unemployment? What are the consequences of opening up trade and investment with the rest of the world? This course develops a series of models to answer these and similar questions. [48L, 24T] *ECO202Y5 is not open to Commerce students in Fall/WinterMississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1EMPLOYMENT; TRADESDG8, SDG10
ECO202Y5Macroeconomic Theory and PolicyMacroeconomics studies the economy as a whole. The issues it covers include: Why are some countries much richer than others? Why do most Canadians live much better than their ancestors? Why are there recessions in economic activity? What are the causes of inflation and unemployment? What are the consequences of opening up trade and investment with the rest of the world? This course develops a series of models to answer these and similar questions. [48L, 24T] *ECO202Y5 is not open to Commerce students in Fall/WinterMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1TRADESDG10
ECO204Y1Microeconomic Theory and Applications (for Commerce)The use of microeconomics to analyze a variety of issues from marketing and finance to organizational structure. Consumer preferences and behaviour; demand, cost analysis and estimation; allocation of inputs, pricing and firm behaviour under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and public policy, including competition policy. Business cases are used to connect theory and practice and to highlight differences and similarities between economics and accounting, marketing and finance. This course is restricted to students in the Commerce programs.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO204Y1Microeconomic Theory and Applications (for Commerce)The use of microeconomics to analyze a variety of issues from marketing and finance to organizational structure. Consumer preferences and behaviour; demand, cost analysis and estimation; allocation of inputs, pricing and firm behaviour under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and public policy, including competition policy. Business cases are used to connect theory and practice and to highlight differences and similarities between economics and accounting, marketing and finance. This course is restricted to students in the Commerce programs.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO204Y5Microeconomic Theory and Applications (for Commerce)The course uses microeconomics to analyze a variety of issues from marketing and finance to organizational structure. Topics include consumer preferences and behaviour; demand, cost analysis and estimation; allocation of inputs, pricing and firm behaviour under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and public policy, including competition policy. Business cases are used to connect theory and practice and to highlight differences and similarities between economics and accounting, marketing and finance. This course is restricted to students in the B.Com. program.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO204Y5Microeconomic Theory and Applications (for Commerce)The course uses microeconomics to analyze a variety of issues from marketing and finance to organizational structure. Topics include consumer preferences and behaviour; demand, cost analysis and estimation; allocation of inputs, pricing and firm behaviour under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and public policy, including competition policy. Business cases are used to connect theory and practice and to highlight differences and similarities between economics and accounting, marketing and finance. This course is restricted to students in the B.Com. program.MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO206Y5Microeconomic TheoryA rigorous mathematical treatment of the basic tools of economic analysis regarding consumer and producer theory. Applications may include but are not limited to: choice under uncertainty, oligopoly, industrial organization, pricing, resource allocation, intertemporal consumption, labour supply, externalities, public goods, income distribution and welfare economics. This course is a requirement for certain Specialist Programs and is strongly recommended for students contemplating graduate school. [48L, 24T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO206Y5Microeconomic TheoryA rigorous mathematical treatment of the basic tools of economic analysis regarding consumer and producer theory. Applications may include but are not limited to: choice under uncertainty, oligopoly, industrial organization, pricing, resource allocation, intertemporal consumption, labour supply, externalities, public goods, income distribution and welfare economics. This course is a requirement for certain Specialist Programs and is strongly recommended for students contemplating graduate school. [48L, 24T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1CONSUMSDG12
ECO209Y1Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (for Commerce)Macroeconomic issues relevant for commerce students. Analytical tools are used to examine policy issues: Canadian government budgets, Bank of Canada monetary policy, exchange rate policy, foreign trade policy and government regulation of financial intermediaries. This course is restricted to students in the Commerce programs.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1TRADESDG10
ECO209Y1Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (for Commerce)Macroeconomic issues relevant for commerce students. Analytical tools are used to examine policy issues: Canadian government budgets, Bank of Canada monetary policy, exchange rate policy, foreign trade policy and government regulation of financial intermediaries. This course is restricted to students in the Commerce programs.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics1TRADESDG10
ECO225H1Data Tools for EconomistsThis course explores unstructured data sources such as text files, webpages, weather data, social media posts, satellite imagery, and traffic data and how economists harness these types of data. It offers a practical introduction to: creating datasets from these types of sources (for example, via web scrapping and machine learning), linking data sources, and managing and visualizing these data (for example, via geospatial visualization). St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5WEATHERSDG13
ECO225H1Data Tools for EconomistsThis course explores unstructured data sources such as text files, webpages, weather data, social media posts, satellite imagery, and traffic data and how economists harness these types of data. It offers a practical introduction to: creating datasets from these types of sources (for example, via web scrapping and machine learning), linking data sources, and managing and visualizing these data (for example, via geospatial visualization). St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5WEATHERSDG13
ECO231H1Economics of Global TradeThis course is intended primarily for students in the International Relations program. This course offers an introduction to the economic causes and consequences of international trade in goods, services, labour, innovation and capital. Attention will be devoted to the economic impact of policies that affect these flows, such as protectionism and outsourcing.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5LABOUR; INNOVATION; TRADESDG8, SDG9, SDG12
ECO302H5World Economic History Prior to 1870This course will focus on the economic success and failure of several key countries and regions from the start of the second millennium up to the early twentieth century. Topics include: pre-modern growth in China & India vs. Europe, the first industrial revolution, exploitation and international trade in the British Empire, the standards-of-living debate, the second industrial revolution. [24L, 12T] This course is part of the Certificate in Global Perspectives.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5INDUSTR; TRADESDG8, SDG9
ECO303H5World Economic History After 1870This course will focus on the economic success and failure of several key countries and regions during the twentieth century. Topics include: globalization, causes and consequences of interwar instability, a history of modern development (Japan, the Asian Tigers, India & China vs. Latin America), new institutional economics & new economic geography: African atrophy. [24L, 12T] This course is part of the Certificate in Global Perspectives.MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
ECO310H1Empirical Industrial OrganizationVictor AguirregabiriaThe quantitative analysis of firms' strategies in real-world industries, using tools from applied microeconomics and statistics. Topics include: studies of monopoly, oligopoly, imperfect competition, and the estimation of demand and cost functions that underpin these markets.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECO313H1Environmental Economics and PoliciesThis course demonstrates how a rigorous application of microeconomic techniques can inform our responses to various environmental problems. Topics may include: air and water pollution and renewable resource management.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5WATER; RENWABLE; ENVIRONMENT; WATER; POLLUTSDG6, SDG7, SDG13, SDG14
ECO314H1Energy and the EnvironmentAdonis YatchewThis course surveys important features of energy markets and related environmental challenges. One of the central objectives is to provide an understanding of the key economic tools needed to analyse these markets. A related objective is the development of a framework for understanding the public discourse on energy and the environment. Topics include: the hydrocarbon economy (oil, natural gas and coal), electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, renewable energy, conservation, carbon taxes and ?cap-and-trade?.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5ENERGY; RENEWABLE; TRADE; ENVIRONMENT; GLOBAL WARMING; CONSERVSDG7, SDG13, SDG14
ECO320Y5An Economic Analysis of LawRobert BarberThis course examines the economic basis for the Law. The topics covered include economic analyses of property rights, liability rules, contract law, tort law, corporate law, law and financial markets, and bankruptcy law. The appropriate economic measures of damages in tort and contract cases will be discussed. Other topics include tax law, and the choice between regulation and the common law. [48L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1FINANCIAL MARKET; RIGHTSSDG10, SDG16
ECO320Y5An Economic Analysis of LawRobert BarberThis course examines the economic basis for the Law. The topics covered include economic analyses of property rights, liability rules, contract law, tort law, corporate law, law and financial markets, and bankruptcy law. The appropriate economic measures of damages in tort and contract cases will be discussed. Other topics include tax law, and the choice between regulation and the common law. [48L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1FINANCIAL MARKET; RIGHTSSDG10, SDG16
ECO321H1Canadian Economic History prior to 1850This course applies the tools of economics - theoretical and empirical - to study Canada's historical growth experiences. Topics include: the variation in well-being among Indigenous peoples (both pre and post contact), migration and indentured servitude, colonial money, child labour and education, and the rise of factories. The impact of colonial institutions on Canada?s economic success is studied in a comparative context.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5educat; LABOUR; INSTITUIONSDG4, SDG8, SDG16
ECO322H1Canadian Economic History, 1850-1960Canadian economic history between 1850 and 1960, with a focus on the debate over the ability of the market mechanism to optimize economic development. Topics covered include: tariff policies, Confederation, the transcontinental railroad, opening the West, the Great Depression, monetary policy and the Bank of Canada, regional growth and dominion-provincial relations.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5educatSDG4
ECO324H5Economic DevelopmentEconomic development and transformation of the low-income countries of Latin America, Africa and Asia. Theory and policy analysis relating to the following economic issues in these countries: higher rates of economic growth, the role of the government in resource allocation, the industrial-agricultural sector interface, inward versus outward looking trade strategies, and the international debt problem. The following problems will also be addressed: food supply, domestic savings, tax revenue, foreign exchange, foreign direct investment, high rates of inflation, benefit-cost analysis and economic planning. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5food; ECONOMIC GROWTH; INDUSTR; TRADESDG2, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10
ECO326H5Advanced Economic Theory - MicroThis course is an advanced analysis of macroeconomic theory, including the behaviour of consumers under uncertainty; issues in poverty, inequality and social welfare; game theory and its applications to economics and political economy. This course is recommended for students contemplating graduate studies. [24L, 12T] This course is part of the Certificate in Advanced Economics.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5poverty; EQUALITY; INEQUALITY; CONSUMSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG12
ECO332H1Economics of the FamilyA use of microeconomics to study the behaviour of the family, including marriage, divorce, intra-family allocations, investment in children and gender roles.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5genderSDG5
ECO333H1Urban EconomicsJonathan HallSpatial economic theory and urban public policy: firms and individuals in partial and general equilibrium, land development and land-use controls, urban transportation, efficiency and equity in spending and taxing.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5URBANSDG11
ECO339H1Labour Economics: Employment, Wages and Public PolicyElizabeth DhueyUsing tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course introduces students to the study of labour markets, focusing on employment and wage determination, and the application of labour economics to public policy. Topics may include: labour supply, labour demand, estimating the impact of welfare programs, minimum wages, and other labour market interventions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5EMPLOYMENT; LABOUR; WAGESDG8
ECO341H1The Economic History of the 20th Century: Trade, Migration, Money and Finance before 1945Tailored to advanced students in Economics, Commerce, International Relations and History. The focus is on growth and fluctuations in Europe and North America between roughly 1870 and 1939, with a particular emphasis on international trade and payments, migration, investment, and monetary arrangements.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5TRADESDG10
ECO342H1Twentieth Century Economic History: Institutions, Growth and InequalityTailored to advanced students in Economics, Commerce, International Relations and History. The focus is on institutions, growth and inequality in countries across the world.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5equality; INEQUALITY; INSTITTUIONSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
ECO343H5Labour Economics and Public PolicyThis course uses both applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis to examine labour markets in Canada. The course is especially focused on the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labour supply and demand, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inter- and intra-generational equality, and peer effects. At the end of the course, students should have a firm grasp of key policy issues involving Canada's labour market and be able to critique the quality of other empirical studies. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5educat; EQUALITY; LABOUR; WAGE; PRODUCTIONSDG4, SDG8, SDG12
ECO344H5Labour Economics and Market FrictionsDavid PriceThis course studies the economic behaviour of employers and employees as they interact in the labour market. The class extends beyond basics of labour supply and demand to consider cases when markets are not always perfectly competitive. The course will cover such topics as segmented labour markets, unionization and collective bargaining, unemployment, monopsony, and discrimination. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5EMPLOYMENT; LABOURSDG8
ECO345H5Macroeconomics and the Labour MarketThis course aims to provide students with an overview of recent macroeconomic research on the labour market. Discussion includes theoretical models as well as empirical evidence. Topics include: search frictions, labour market flows, sorting, inequality, occupational mobility, human capital accumulation, and intergenerational mobility. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5equality; LABOUR; INEQUALITYSDG4, SDG8, SDG10
ECO349H1Money, Banking and Financial MarketsThis course studies the interaction of the monetary and banking sectors with financial markets and the broader economy. It builds especially on tools developed in intermediate macroeconomics, but also focuses on the institutional structure of the Canadian monetary sector, including the role and operation of the Bank of Canada.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKET; INSTITUIONSDG10, SDG16
ECO349H1Money, Banking and Financial MarketsThis course studies the interaction of the monetary and banking sectors with financial markets and the broader economy. It builds especially on tools developed in intermediate macroeconomics, but also focuses on the institutional structure of the Canadian monetary sector, including the role and operation of the Bank of Canada.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKET; INSTITUIONSDG10, SDG16
ECO349H5Money, Banking & Financial MarketsThis course explores a wide range of topics on the theories of money and banking. The strategy of the course is to develop a series of models to examine the importance of money, banks, and other financial institutions in the way economies work. The topics examined in this framework include: the role of money and the financial system, effects of inflation, bond and stock markets, banks, control of the money supply, and international monetary systems. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKET; INSTITUIONSDG10, SDG16
ECO349H5Money, Banking & Financial MarketsThis course explores a wide range of topics on the theories of money and banking. The strategy of the course is to develop a series of models to examine the importance of money, banks, and other financial institutions in the way economies work. The topics examined in this framework include: the role of money and the financial system, effects of inflation, bond and stock markets, banks, control of the money supply, and international monetary systems. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKET; INSTITUIONSDG10, SDG16
ECO358H1Financial Economics INathanael VellekoopAn introduction to economics of financial assets and financial markets. Topics: inter-temporal choice, expected utility theory, security valuation, selected asset pricing models, market efficiency, and the term structure of interest rates - essential materials for an understanding of the role and operation of financial markets.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKETSDG10
ECO358H5Financial Economics IThis course provides an introduction to capital markets and asset pricing. We will cover the role of financial markets, project valuation, expected utility and risk aversion, financial risk, general equilibrium pricing, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing Theory, derivatives, option pricing, term structure of interest rates, foreign exchange markets, and market efficiency. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKETSDG10
ECO359H1Financial Economics II: Corporate FinanceAgency and incomplete information problems inherent in financial transactions; the role of contractual arrangements in overcoming them. Financial constraints on investment decisions of firms; the financial system in economic growth; the legal system in the functioning of financial markets. A look at theoretical and empirical literature covering these issues.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5ECONOMIC GROWTH; FINANCIAL MARKETSDG8, SDG10
ECO362H5Economic Growth: Theory and EvidenceDifferences in income per capita levels and growth rates across countries are large. Understanding the causes behind these differences is a fundamental question in economics. The main objective of this course is to apply economic theory to understand and interpret empirical observations on economic development and growth. By the end of this course students will have a basic knowledge of the main facts characterizing economic development and growth over time and across countries, as well as the ability of theoretical models to account for these facts. The topics that will be covered in the course include the role of physical and human capital accumulation in growth and income differences, the reallocation of factors across sectors (structural transformation) and aggregate productivity, the importance of the misallocation of resources across heterogeneous firms in aggregate productivity. Key empirical applications include the growth performance of industrialized countries since World War II and the productivity slowdown observed in recent decades, the stagnation of living standards in many developing countries, and the role of automation and artificial intelligence in growth and development. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5ECONOMIC GROWTH; INDUSTRSDG8, SDG9
ECO364H1International Trade TheoryAn examination of the causes and consequences of international trade. The first half develops traditional models of comparative advantage. The second half examines more recent theoretical and empirical work on trade & wages, the political economy of trade, outsourcing, and firm heterogeneity.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5WAGE; TRADESDG8, SDG10
ECO364H1International Trade TheoryAn examination of the causes and consequences of international trade. The first half develops traditional models of comparative advantage. The second half examines more recent theoretical and empirical work on trade & wages, the political economy of trade, outsourcing, and firm heterogeneity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5WAGE; TRADESDG8, SDG10
ECO364H5International Trade TheoryAn analysis of the nature, effects and policy implications of international trade theory; the theories of comparative costs and reciprocal demands, factor reward equalization, international tariffs and customs unions. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5TRADESDG10
ECO364H5International Trade TheoryAn analysis of the nature, effects and policy implications of international trade theory; the theories of comparative costs and reciprocal demands, factor reward equalization, international tariffs and customs unions. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5TRADESDG10
ECO370Y5The Economics of OrganizationsRobert BarberThe determinants of the boundary between organizations and markets. Problems of centralization vs. decentralization, authority, coordination and motivation within organizations. Incentives, ownership and property rights. The nature of the employment relationship: explicit and implicit contracts, compensation, relative performance evaluation, career paths, job assignments and promotion. [48L, 24T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1EMPLOYMENT; RIGHTSSDG8, SDG16
ECO370Y5The Economics of OrganizationsRobert BarberThe determinants of the boundary between organizations and markets. Problems of centralization vs. decentralization, authority, coordination and motivation within organizations. Incentives, ownership and property rights. The nature of the employment relationship: explicit and implicit contracts, compensation, relative performance evaluation, career paths, job assignments and promotion. [48L, 24T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1EMPLOYMENT; RIGHTSSDG8, SDG16
ECO373Y5The Environment: Perspectives from Economics and Ecology(Formerly ECO373H5) The course examines the basic principles of environmental economics and ecology and the interaction between ecological and economic factors. It assesses alternative criteria and objectives for environmental policy. Problems associated with the implementation of environmental policy are analyzed and examined through case studies. [48L, 10T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1ENVIORNMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
ECO373Y5The Environment: Perspectives from Economics and Ecology(Formerly ECO373H5) The course examines the basic principles of environmental economics and ecology and the interaction between ecological and economic factors. It assesses alternative criteria and objectives for environmental policy. Problems associated with the implementation of environmental policy are analyzed and examined through case studies. [48L, 10T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1ENVIORNMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
ECO380H5Managerial Economics I: Competitive StrategyThis is a course in applied microeconomics. This course will use a series of real world examples, together with theoretical insights from game theory, to answer questions like, why are some industries more profitable than others? Why are some firms profitable while others are not? How can firms create, capture and maintain their profits in the face of competition? The first part of the course will be devoted to the building blocks of strategy, including industry analysis, positioning, and sustainability of competitive advantage. Next we will use game theoretical tools to analyze strategic interaction among firms, such as strategic pricing, entry and competitive bidding. Lastly, the course will cover the scope of the firm and technologic competition. Students shall learn from the course, the ability to identify and categorize major strategic problems, and suggest and evaluate candidate strategies. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECO380H5Managerial Economics I: Competitive StrategyThis is a course in applied microeconomics. This course will use a series of real world examples, together with theoretical insights from game theory, to answer questions like, why are some industries more profitable than others? Why are some firms profitable while others are not? How can firms create, capture and maintain their profits in the face of competition? The first part of the course will be devoted to the building blocks of strategy, including industry analysis, positioning, and sustainability of competitive advantage. Next we will use game theoretical tools to analyze strategic interaction among firms, such as strategic pricing, entry and competitive bidding. Lastly, the course will cover the scope of the firm and technologic competition. Students shall learn from the course, the ability to identify and categorize major strategic problems, and suggest and evaluate candidate strategies. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5INDUSTRSDG9
ECO381H5Managerial Economics II: Personnel Economics*ECO380H5 Managerial Economics I: Competitive Strategy is NOT a prerequisite for this course. This course examines selected material on compensation and incentives in hierarchical organizations. Topics include recruitment and hiring, training, turnover, downsizing, motivating workers, teams, allocating authority and task assignment. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5WORKERSDG8
ECO383H5Introduction to Empirical Methods of MicroeconomicsFormerly: Economics of Education) For students who would like to learn more about economics data analysis - this course provides an intuitive introduction to empirical methods in microeconomics. The class begins with a self-contained and intuitive treatment of modern methods used in microeconomic data analysis. We then go on to study some interesting current empirical research, focusing on the education field, to see how those methods are applied. The course should prepare you to read current empirical research in microeconomics -- without any preparation, empirical papers can seem rather impenetrable. This course serves as a complement to and a foundation for 'Applied Econometrics I' (ECO375H5). [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5educatSDG4
ECO385H5Economics of InformationThis course analyses how markets function when market participants have asymmetric information. We will show how asymmetric information may lead to market breakdown and how an appropriately designed contract can help alleviate the adverse effect of asymmetric information on market efficiency. We will cover three types of models: moral hazard, screening and signaling. There are a wide variety of applications, including labour contracts, price discrimination, insurance markets, and marketing. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5LABOURSDG8
ECO400Y5Economics InternshipThrough a part time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply economics content and skills. Placements are made throughout the GTA in both the private and public sectors. Successful candidates gain an opportunity to enhance their University experience through on-site work placements providing the possibility to develop skill sets within a business setting. Monthly class meetings plus year-end and presentation are required. Normally, the 200 hours will be completed by attending the work placement one full day each week from September to April. Students interested in a finance-industry placement are strongly recommended to arrange their course schedule to allow for a two day a week work placement in one semester. This arrangement increases the possibility of placement and enhances the experience although careful course planning is essential. [48L] Apply to Course Coordinator: Corrine Bent-Womack Room #KN 3246 Innovation Complex Email: corrine.bent.womack@utoronto.caMississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
ECO400Y5Economics InternshipThrough a part time, unpaid, 200-hour work placement, fourth year students apply economics content and skills. Placements are made throughout the GTA in both the private and public sectors. Successful candidates gain an opportunity to enhance their University experience through on-site work placements providing the possibility to develop skill sets within a business setting. Monthly class meetings plus year-end and presentation are required. Normally, the 200 hours will be completed by attending the work placement one full day each week from September to April. Students interested in a finance-industry placement are strongly recommended to arrange their course schedule to allow for a two day a week work placement in one semester. This arrangement increases the possibility of placement and enhances the experience although careful course planning is essential. [48L] Apply to Course Coordinator: Corrine Bent-Womack Room #KN 3246 Innovation Complex Email: corrine.bent.womack@utoronto.caMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics1INNOVATION; INDUSTRSDG9
ECO401H1Topics in Economic PolicyThis course covers basic issues in the theoretical and empirical evaluation of public policy. Sample topics include: income redistribution through taxation and the provision of social insurance and public goods, the mitigation of externalities, and welfare analysis in behavioural models.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5taxationSDG10
ECO402H1Topics in Health EconomicsThis course explores a variety of topics in health economics, providing students with an overview of current and historical institutional characteristics of the market for, and public policy towards, health care. Students will apply theoretical and empirical tools to current domestic and international issues in health policy. No previous background in health economics is required.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5health; INSTITUTIONSDG3, SDG16
ECO403H1Topics in Development Economics and PolicyThis course covers a variety of topics pertaining to economic development and associated policies. Depending on the course instructor, the focus may be on theories and policies related to poverty alleviation, human capital formation, financial markets, international trade, governance or economic growth.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5poverty; ECONOMIC GROWTH; TRADE; FINANCIAL MARKET; GOVERNANCESDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
ECO407H1Competing Views in Macroeconomic Theory and PolicyProvides students with a systematic analysis of competing perspectives on key areas of macroeconomic theory and policy. Special attention paid to competing views regarding key fiscal, monetary, and trade policy issues as applied to Canada.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5TRADESDG10
ECO411H5Human Capital and Education in the Economy(Formerly ECO412Y5) This course addresses empirical and theoretical issues in education economics. Topics will include the interaction of human capital with growth and inequality, teacher incentives and teacher quality, early childhood education, and the racial achievement gap. We will also discuss the tools economists use to measure the causal effects of policies, and consider how statistics often presented in policy debates may be biased. After this course, students should be comfortable reading research papers in economics. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5educat; EQUALITY; INEQUALITYSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
ECO414H1Energy and RegulationAdonis YatchewThis course provides a general treatment of the economics of energy markets and the use of regulation in addressing environmental and other issues arising in these markets. A central theme is the search for an appropriate balance between market forces and regulatory/government intervention. Familiarity with tools of microeconomics and statistics/econometrics is essential. Topics include: oil, natural gas, coal and electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, networks, feed-in-tariffs, carbon taxes, ?cap-and-trade? and incentive regulation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5ENERGY; TRADE; ENVIRONMENT; GLOBAL WARMINGSDG7, SDG10, SDG13
ECO433H5Family EconomicsIntroduces students to the study of the family within the modern economics. Topics include: market production vs. home production; gender wage differentials in labour markets; monogamy, polygamy and marriage markets; non-altruistic behaviour within families; fertility and the demand for children; divorce; and the life cycle of the family. Concepts are applied to current topics within the development and labour literatures. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5gender; LABOUR; WAGE; PRODUCTIONSDG5, SDG8, SDG12
ECO436H5Measuring Well BeingThe course concerns itself with measuring societal economic well being. The historical development of the subject is considered together with the conceptual issues (and objections) associated with representing the welfare of economic agents. Different notions of welfare (Poverty, Inequality, Polarization, Equality of Opportunity) and the various empirical techniques for examining them are critically explored and applied using existing datasets. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5poverty; WELL BEING; EQALITY; INEQUALITYSDG1, SDG3, SDG5, SDG10
ECO436H5Measuring Well BeingThe course concerns itself with measuring societal economic well being. The historical development of the subject is considered together with the conceptual issues (and objections) associated with representing the welfare of economic agents. Different notions of welfare (Poverty, Inequality, Polarization, Equality of Opportunity) and the various empirical techniques for examining them are critically explored and applied using existing datasets. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5poverty; WELL BEING; EQALITY; INEQUALITYSDG1, SDG3, SDG5, SDG10
ECO446H1Advanced Public EconomicsAdvanced topics in public economics and economic analysis of Canadian public policy. Through a mix of lectures and independent research, students will acquire theoretical and empirical tools for public policy analysis. Topics may include: income inequality and redistribution; fiscal federalism; taxation of corporate profits; and policies to deal with public goods and externalities.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEconomics0.5equality; INEQUALITY; TAXATIONSDG5, SDG10
ECO461H5The Economics of Financial Risk Management(Formerly ECO460Y5) This course focuses on how to use derivative securities to manage financial risks. It includes a discussion of why firms should hedge financial market risk, identification and quantification of financial risks; the value-at-risk (VaR) measure of risk; credit risk and capital allocation and difference between speculation and hedging. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEconomics0.5FINANCIAL MARKETSDG10
EDS100H5Introduction to Education StudiesThis course explores broad social and cultural issues in education. It will address questions about how we advance knowledge, who controls how and what we learn and what role education has in how societies are shaped, changed and reproduced. Students will evaluate the influence education can have on who we are, how we wish to live and what we aspire to as citizens in a global and digital community. This investigation will also consider how language, race, gender, class and culture intersect with teaching and learning. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educat; GENDERSDG4, SDG5
EDS100H5Introduction to Education StudiesThis course explores broad social and cultural issues in education. It will address questions about how we advance knowledge, who controls how and what we learn and what role education has in how societies are shaped, changed and reproduced. Students will evaluate the influence education can have on who we are, how we wish to live and what we aspire to as citizens in a global and digital community. This investigation will also consider how language, race, gender, class and culture intersect with teaching and learning. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educat; GENDERSDG4, SDG5
EDS200H5Child, Adolescent and Adult Development in EducationCarly PruskyThis course focuses on the physical skills, cognitive abilities, and socioemotional experiences that shape an individualÕs capacity to learn throughout the lifespan (i.e., infancy to late adulthood). It will address how learning is a lifelong process and how we are continually educating ourselves in different ways by incorporating strategies that best suit our lifespan stage. Critical research and theorists will be discussed to enhance the topics presented. Students are required to complete an 8-hour field experience, and obtain a valid vulnerable sector police check in advance of placement. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS220H5Equity and Diversity in EducationThis course focuses on raising awareness and sensitivity to equity and diversity issues facing teachers and students in diverse schools and cultural communities. It includes a field experience which entails observation of, and participation in, equity and diversity efforts in a community organization.[36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS250H5Indigenous EducationThis course is open to all students from any discipline. Designed to increase opportunities to learn about education through a First Nation, M≈Ωtis and Inuit perspective, the course will increase knowledge and awareness about pedagogies, learning approaches and educational experiences related to indigenous people living in Canada. In line with indigenous ways of knowing, this course will be structured with learning that involves reflecting on personal actions by looking at ways that indigenous models of education support social and community well-being. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS275H5Mass Media and Debunking the Myths of EducationCarly PruskyThis course explores prevailing myths about education. It invites students to critically examine consensus and controversy in the media while unpacking some of the research underpinning commonly held beliefs about curriculum, students, teachers, and education systems. The ability to interpret and assess the merits of news, fake news, research, and social media content is an increasingly important skill in a data rich world. This course will have a strong emphasis on critical reading, analysis and evaluation. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS285H5The Future of Ed Tech: Active Learning Classrooms and Artificial IntelligenceThis course will explore research on emerging digital models, platforms, apps and policies that seek to further customize, enhance and bring greater equity to education through technology. From the initiation of open courseware, to the inception of virtual reality, artificial intelligence, ALC classrooms, makerspaces and the Òshared economyÓ, this course will foster a culture of digital innovation to investigate, accelerate, test and study new possibilities and advancements in the field of educational technology. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educat; INNOVATIONSDG4, SDG9
EDS300H5Learning DesignThis course provides an opportunity to study and practice the fundamental skills involved in designing learning opportunities, in schools and a variety of other settings. The skills required to organize and deliver engaging educational experiences, i.e., lesson and unit planning, will be practiced through a range of pedagogical and practical applications. A case studies approach will be taken, incorporating a field experience where students will apply their learning. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS310H5Education in a Global ContextThis course allows students to actively explore issues associated with education and culturally proficient teaching/training from both an Ontario and global perspective. The course addresses two phenomena: the marked and deliberate increase in the number of international students at all levels of Ontario's educational system, and the global dispersal of Ontario-trained teachers. A practical experience focusing upon working with international students in a support role will provide a concrete experience to test their classroom content. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS325H5Supplemental Instruction in Higher Education: The Impact of Peer-Facilitated Study Groups (FSG)Looking for an opportunity to become a facilitator of small group learning in a subject discipline in which you have expertise? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in higher education. Particular focus will be on the history and evolution of SI and the rationale for its use in different university contexts. EDS325H5 course participants will complete a mandatory internship that involves developing and delivering 8-10 peer led study sessions through the Facilitated Study Group (FSG) Program run by the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre. Class work will embed relevant pedagogical tools, resources and research to support the development, delivery and success of FSG sessions. Current research investigating the impact of Supplemental Instruction on student success will also be explored. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured a LAUNCH Leader position with the LAUNCH peer-mentorship program. [24L, 12S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS325H5Supplemental Instruction in Higher Education: The Impact of Peer-Facilitated Study Groups (FSG)Looking for an opportunity to become a facilitator of small group learning in a subject discipline in which you have expertise? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in higher education. Particular focus will be on the history and evolution of SI and the rationale for its use in different university contexts. EDS325H5 course participants will complete a mandatory internship that involves developing and delivering 8-10 peer led study sessions through the Facilitated Study Group (FSG) Program run by the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre. Class work will embed relevant pedagogical tools, resources and research to support the development, delivery and success of FSG sessions. Current research investigating the impact of Supplemental Instruction on student success will also be explored. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured a LAUNCH Leader position with the LAUNCH peer-mentorship program. [24L, 12S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS345H5Design Thinking Incubator: From Problem to PrototypeThis course is open to all students on campus and provides an intellectual toolset for finding innovative solutions to complex problems. Students will learn to apply education theory to design thinking models in order to identify and solve real-world challenges facing their chosen discipline, whether in business, education, healthcare, etc. An iterative approach for testing, refining, and improving their idea will be used to create a working prototype of their proposed solution. This will demonstrate the idea's sustainability, scalability and viability, while taking into account ethical and legal implications. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5health; EDUCATSDG3, SDG4
EDS377H5Why the First Year of University Matters: The Impact of Peer MentoringDale MullingsThis course explores contemporary issues in higher education with a focus on experiences, issues and challenges commonly encountered by undergraduate students during their first year of university. Interdisciplinary in its focus, topics of exploration include an examination of adult and student development theories, models of student engagement and an investigation into mindset, levels of persistence, habits of mind and personality characteristics that impact student success. An internship component is required. Students taking the course will assume a peer-mentoring role to apply and contextualize theories and skills learned in the course. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured a peer-mentoring position with the First Year Peer Mentoring program. [12S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS399H5Research Opportunity ProgramThis ROP provides the opportunity for students to join a research team and assist on projects currently underway in Education Studies. The work will include preparing an impact study, conducting interviews and using a data-informed approach to investigate the impact of a range of programs and educational interventions. The work will involve conducting pre and post surveys, leading qualitative observational data collection, and producing an analysis. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EDS399H5Research Opportunity ProgramThis ROP provides the opportunity for students to join a research team and assist on projects currently underway in Education Studies. The work will include preparing an impact study, conducting interviews and using a data-informed approach to investigate the impact of a range of programs and educational interventions. The work will involve conducting pre and post surveys, leading qualitative observational data collection, and producing an analysis. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5educatSDG4
EEB197H1Biodiversity and the CityChelsea RochmanMost of us are urban creatures, but we as people are not the only urban creatures. In this seminar we will explore the diversity of animal and plant species comprising the ecological community that we call ?Toronto?. We will learn their names, whether they are endemic (from here originally) or newcomers, general aspects of their biology that suit them to living in an urban environment, how natural selection shapes the traits similarly and differently for species in urban versus wilderness settings, and what happens when the wild and the domesticated members of the community meet one another. For non-science students in all years and disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5URBAN; ENVIRONMENT; BIODIVERSITYSDG11, SDG13
EEB198H1Genes and BehaviourMarla SokolowskiIn this course you will experience the new paradigm in behaviour genetic research. You will learn why the concept of a nature-nurture dichotomy is pass‚Äö and that it has been replaced by a new understanding gained from animal and human research in the areas of gene by environment interaction and epigenetics. We will discuss how our genome listens to our environment and the effect this has on our health and behaviour. We will learn why our early experiences are critical for the development of our brains and our bodies. Together this new body of knowledge will help us understand how individual differences in behaviour and health arise. For non-science students in all years and disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5health; ENVIRONMENTSDG3, SDG13
EEB199H1Humans, Evolution and EcologyLearn about the evolution and ecology of humans and other species. Through discussion, scientific literature research, seminal readings, written reports and presentations you will discover scientific answers to questions such as (topics vary among years): How did life originate? Why are there so many species? Where did humans come from? Will humans become extinct? How can we explain human DNA and human brain size? Need we worry about climate change? What is causing the sixth extinction crisis? Are there ecological limits to human population size? What will life be like in the Anthropocene? Are humans still evolving? For non-science students in all years and disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CLIMATE; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
EEB199H1Humans, Evolution and EcologyLearn about the evolution and ecology of humans and other species. Through discussion, scientific literature research, seminal readings, written reports and presentations you will discover scientific answers to questions such as (topics vary among years): How did life originate? Why are there so many species? Where did humans come from? Will humans become extinct? How can we explain human DNA and human brain size? Need we worry about climate change? What is causing the sixth extinction crisis? Are there ecological limits to human population size? What will life be like in the Anthropocene? Are humans still evolving? For non-science students in all years and disciplines. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CLIMATE; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
EEB202H1Plants and SocietyThe importance of plants to society. Topics include: plant biology, domestication of crop plants, plant breeding and genetic engineering, biological invasions, conservation, biodiversity and genetic resources, ecological implications of advances in modern plant science, macroevolution of plants, forest utilization. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CONSERV; FOREST; BIODIVERSITYSDG15
EEB208H1Ecosystems and the Human FootprintChelsea RochmanAn introduction to the diversity of Earth?s aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., coral reefs, lakes, tropical rainforests); the history of industrialization and human population growth; how the human footprint impacts ecosystems (e.g., ecosystem function, biological diversity); and strategies to maintain, recover and restore ecosystems. This is a course for non-science students in all years and disciplines. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5INDUSTR; FORESTSDG9, SDG15
EEB225H1Biostatistics for Biological SciencesA statistics course designed especially for life science students, using examples from ecology and evolution where appropriate. Students learn to choose and use statistics that are appropriate to address relevant biological questions and hypotheses. Lectures and computer labs will be used to cover the following methods: sampling and experimental design, data exploration, correlation, regression, ANOVA, Chi-square, and non-parametric tests.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB255H1Essentials of Biodiversity Science and Conservation BiologyShelby Riskin?Classical? and ?new? concepts in biodiversity and conservation. Topics may include: evolution and ecology in the past (Holocene) and future (Anthropocene); levels and kinds of biodiversity; valuing biodiversity through ecological economics; causes of endangerment; predicting extinction; genetic and demographic theory; habitat protection and captive breeding; conservation policies and endangered species acts; designing future biodiversity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CONSERV; BIODIVERSITY; ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB268H1Plant and Microbial DiversityIntroduction to the biology of algae, fungi, and land plants. Lectures and labs emphasize the diversity of organisms with a focus on life cycles, ecology, and evolution. (Lab Materials Fee: $25)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB319H1Population EcologyMartin KrkosekAbundance and distribution of populations; population growth and regulation; fluctuations, stochasticity and chaos; meta-population persistence and extinction; age and stage-structured populations; interactions within and between species; optimal harvesting; spread of infectious diseases. Labs include experiments and computer simulations. (Lab materials fee: $25)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB321H1Community EcologyBenjamin GilbertNature and analysis of community structure; disturbance and community development; species interactions; community assembly processes. Computer exercises in weekly labs provide training in sampling, simulation, and data analysis.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB322H1Behaviour and Behavioural EcologyA broad introduction to animal behaviour emphasizing concepts from ethology and behavioural ecology, including foraging, predation, mating systems, parental care and behaviour genetics. Field and laboratory studies are undertaken. (Lab Materials Fee: $25; Lab Manual Fee: $10)St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB324H1Evolutionary EcologyEmpirical and theoretical approaches to key areas of research including natural selection, sexual selection, and life histories. Other topics may include phenotypic plasticity, speciation, co-evolution, and quantitative genetics.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB325H1Evolutionary MedicineHow evolutionary principles can help us better understand health and disease. Concepts from evolutionary biology (e.g., life history theory, coevolution, genomic conflict, constraints and trade-offs) will be applied to key problems in medicine and public health, including antibiotic resistance, aging, cancer, autoimmune disease, and pathogen virulence. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5health; TRADESDG3, SDG10
EEB328H1Physiological EcologyAn advanced treatment of the physiological mechanisms controlling plant and animal distribution and ecological success. Topics of focus include photosynthesis and resource balance, water and nutrient relations, temperature effects, and adaptations to abiotic stress. A fee of approximately $15 may be charged for field trip transportation.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5WATER; WATER; ECOLOGYSDG6, SDG15
EEB362H1MacroevolutionExplores patterns and processes of large-scale evolutionary change, played out over large geographic expanses and extended periods of time. Integrates information from paleontology, phylogenetics, field studies, functional biology, and experiments to link emergent evolutionary patterns to underlying evolutionary processes. Topics include: speciation, phylogenetic inference, adaptive vs. non-adaptive evolution, evolutionary constraints, diversification and extinction, evolutionary innovations, historical biogeography, and the relationship between evolutionary history and ecology. Tutorials will illustrate common analytical approaches to macroevolutionary investigation and provide in-depth exploration of landmark studies in macroevolution.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5INNOVATION; ECOLOGYSDG9, SDG15
EEB365H1Topics in Applied Conservation BiologyApplied conservation biology including management (at the level of species/populations, environments/landscapes, and ecosystems) and how to conserve and maintain biodiversity and ecosystem function (including species and ecosystem distribution modelling).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ENVIORNMENT; CONSERV; BIODIVERSITYSDG13, SDG15
EEB382H1Diversity of FishesSystematics, morphology, ecology, behaviour, biogeography, and conservation of fishes. Identification of major groups of fish; what makes each group biologically special and how those unique traits might contribute to conservation concerns. Labs focus on exercises designed to highlight how ichthyologists actually do research. (Lab materials fee: $25)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CONSERV; FISH; ECOLOGYSDG14, SDG15
EEB384H1Diversity of Amphibians and ReptilesLectures and laboratories examine the natural history, morphology, behaviour, ecology, evolutionary relationships, and biogeography of amphibians (frogs and toads, salamanders, caecilians) and non-avian reptiles (turtles, the tuatara, lizards, snakes, and crocodilians). Ancillary fee of $25 to cover cost of arranging a live animal lab featuring living Ontario reptiles and amphibians. Students are also required to purchase a $25 lab manual.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB386H1Diversity of BirdsSantiago Claramunt TammaroAvian ecology, behaviour, conservation, and functional morphology and evolution of avian flight. Labs focus on avian anatomy and song analysis, and an outdoor activity introduces students to basic avian identification and compiling a field journal.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CONSERV; ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB397Y1Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyAn intermediate research project requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open to highly self-motivated students who are in their Third Year and have a strong interest in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and may be required to present the results at a poster session and/or participate in an oral presentation. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to register for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: cannot enrol if already taken the fourth year research project course EEB498Y1/EEB499Y1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB397Y1Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyAn intermediate research project requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open to highly self-motivated students who are in their Third Year and have a strong interest in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and may be required to present the results at a poster session and/or participate in an oral presentation. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to register for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: cannot enrol if already taken the fourth year research project course EEB498Y1/EEB499Y1.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB428H1Global Change EcologyAn examination of organism, population, and ecosystem responses to long-term environmental change occurring at the global scale, with emphasis on human caused perturbation to climate and the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrolic cycles and their ecological effects.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG13, SDG15
EEB433H1Global Issues in Aquatic EcosystemsHelene CyrAdvanced study of ecological principles and applied issues in freshwater and marine systems. Lectures and student-led discussions will cover physical, chemical, and biological interactions, from microbes to marine mammals. Topics may include carbon and nutrient cycling, food webs & trophic downgrading, ocean acidification, hydrothermal vents & connectivity in the oceans, lake management.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5food; WATER; OCEAN; MARINESDG2, SDG14
EEB440H1Ecology and Evolution of Plant-Animal InteractionsMajor concepts in ecology and evolution from the perspective of plant-animal interactions. The richness of interactions between plants and animals is explored including antagonistic interactions (e.g., herbivory, carnivorous plants), mutualistic interactions (e.g., pollination, seed dispersal, ant-plant associations), and interactions involving multiple species across trophic levels. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB455H1Genes, Environment and BehaviourMarla SokolowskiAn examination of the Gene-Environment Interplay perspective as sources of individual differences in behaviour, from both mechanistic and evolutionary viewpoints. Both historical and recent studies are used to illustrate important concepts in the field. Student-led discussions address the evidence base for these concepts.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EEB488H1Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyShelby RiskinThis course is taken concurrently by students who are enrolled in EEB498Y1 Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and uses a combination of seminars, discussions, and presentations (including presentations by students) designed to cover issues commonly encountered when conducting research in ecology and evolutionary biology. Topics may include experimental design, effective use of statistics, scientific writing and publishing, public communication, ethics, and career development. Students will be required to attend weekly departmental seminars. This half-course runs from September to April and lectures meet in alternate weeks. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB488H1Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyShelby RiskinThis course is taken concurrently by students who are enrolled in EEB498Y1 Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and uses a combination of seminars, discussions, and presentations (including presentations by students) designed to cover issues commonly encountered when conducting research in ecology and evolutionary biology. Topics may include experimental design, effective use of statistics, scientific writing and publishing, public communication, ethics, and career development. Students will be required to attend weekly departmental seminars. This half-course runs from September to April and lectures meet in alternate weeks. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB491H1Seminar in Biodiversity and Conservation BiologySeminar course in biodiversity and conservation biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature, with a focus on recent developments in biodiversity science and conservation biology. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5CONSERV; BIODIVERSITYSDG15
EEB495H1Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyJoanna RifkinSeminar course in ecology and evolutionary biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB495H1Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyJoanna RifkinSeminar course in ecology and evolutionary biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB497H1Research Studies in Ecology & Evolutionary BiologyAn independent studies half-course allowing students to produce a literature review, which is supervised by a faculty member in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Highly motivated fourth-year students will work closely with a supervisor and be required to write up the results of their research in a final research paper. Students should contact a potential supervisor well before classes begin in the fall, winter, or summer session. Information on how to apply for the course is available on the EEB website. Students cannot take more than two independent research courses of EEB 497H1, 498Y1, and 499Y1, and the second project must be with a different supervisor. Students who apply to EEB497H1 in the fall session can also apply to enrol concurrently in EEB488H1Y. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB497H1Research Studies in Ecology & Evolutionary BiologyAn independent studies half-course allowing students to produce a literature review, which is supervised by a faculty member in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Highly motivated fourth-year students will work closely with a supervisor and be required to write up the results of their research in a final research paper. Students should contact a potential supervisor well before classes begin in the fall, winter, or summer session. Information on how to apply for the course is available on the EEB website. Students cannot take more than two independent research courses of EEB 497H1, 498Y1, and 499Y1, and the second project must be with a different supervisor. Students who apply to EEB497H1 in the fall session can also apply to enrol concurrently in EEB488H1Y. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB498Y1Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyAn advanced research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is normally open only to highly self-motivated students who are in their Fourth-Year and have adequate background in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and are also required to present the results at a poster session and/or oral presentation. The time commitment is approximately 8 hours per week. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to register for the course is available on the EEB website. Students in this course are also concurrently enrolled in EEB488H1Y Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB498Y1Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyAn advanced research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is normally open only to highly self-motivated students who are in their Fourth-Year and have adequate background in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and are also required to present the results at a poster session and/or oral presentation. The time commitment is approximately 8 hours per week. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to register for the course is available on the EEB website. Students in this course are also concurrently enrolled in EEB488H1Y Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB499Y1Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology IIAllows students to do another independent project, supervision of which must be different from EEB497H1/EEB498Y1. Operates in the same manner as EEB498Y1. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EEB499Y1Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology IIAllows students to do another independent project, supervision of which must be different from EEB497H1/EEB498Y1. Operates in the same manner as EEB498Y1. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology1ECOLOGYSDG15
EESA01H3Introduction to Environmental ScienceThe scientific method and its application to natural systems. The physical and biological processes which drive ecosystem functions. Anthropogenic changes in ecosystem functions at local and global scales. Emphasis on the degradation of the atmosphere, soil, water and biological resources caused by human activity. Renewable and non-renewable resource sustainability. Laboratories will include hands-on field and lab related practical experience.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; RENEWABLE; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG7, SDG13
EESA06H3Introduction to Planet EarthThis general interest course explores the composition, structure and origin of the Earth and the tectonic, chemical and biological processes that have evolved over the last 4.5 billion years. It explains how planet "works" as a complex system. It provides a fundamental basis for understanding many of the environmental challenges faced by human societies especially natural hazards, water shortages, and climate change, and the importance of natural resources to our economy.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATERL NATURAL RESOURCES; CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG12, SDG13
EESA07H3WaterThis course consists of a survey of the planet's water resources and the major issues facing the use of water. Topics include: Earth, the watery planet; water, the last great resource; Canada's waters; Ontario's waters; water and man; water contamination; and protecting our waters. Case studies such as the Walkerton tragedy will be studied. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG6, SDG13
EESA09H3WindA survey of the science, history and applications of wind. Topics include storms including hurricanes, tornadoes and mid-latitude cyclones, global circulation, local circulations, measurement of winds, impact of winds on land surfaces, wind power, winds and pollution, historical and literary winds, and contemporary wind research. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required. ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5SOLAR; ENVIRONMENT; POLLUTSDG7, SDG13, SDG14
EESA10H3Human Health and the EnvironmentSilvija StefanovicBecause of pollution, our surroundings are becoming increasingly hazardous to our health. The past century has seen intense industrialization characterized by the widespread production and use of chemicals and the intentional and unintentional disposal of a wide range of waste materials. This course explores the relationship between the incidence of disease in human populations and the environmental pollution. Emphasis will be placed on understanding where and what pollutants are produced, how they are taken up by humans and their long term effects on health; the role of naturally-occurring carcinogens will also be examined. The course will include a view of risk assessment and toxicology using case studies. No prior knowledge of environmental or medical science is required.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5health; INDUSTR; PRODUCTION; WASTE; ENVIRONMENT; POLLUTSDG3, SDG9, SDG12, SDG13
EESA11H3Environmental PollutionThis course illustrates the environmental effects of urban expansion, changing methods of agriculture, industrialization, recreation, resource extraction, energy needs and the devastation of war. Drawing on information from a wide spectrum of topics - such as waste disposal, tourism, the arctic, tropical forests and fisheries - it demonstrates what we know about how pollutants are produced, the pathways they take through the global environment and how we can measure them. The course will conclude with an examination of the state of health of Canada's environments highlighting areas where environmental contamination is the subject of public discussion and concern. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5agriculture; HEALTH; ENERGY; INDUSTR; URBAN; WASTE; ENVIRONMENT; POLLUT; FISH; FORESTSDG2, SDG3, SDG7, SDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
EESB02H3Principles of GeomorphologyMandana MerianoThe physical and chemical processes responsible for the development of regolith at the surface of the earth and the mechanics of entrainment, transport and deposition of mass by rivers, wind, glaciers, water waves, gravitational stresses, etc., which control the evolution of surface morphology.Field excursions and laboratory exercises will allow students to apply theory to natural systems and to understand the dynamics of one man-modified geomorphic system.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; SOLAR; WATERSDG6, SDG7
EESB03H3Principles of ClimatologyThis is an overview of the physical and dynamic nature of meteorology, climatology and related aspects of oceanography. Major topics include: atmospheric composition, nature of atmospheric radiation, atmospheric moisture and cloud development, atmospheric motion including air masses, front formation and upper air circulation, weather forecasting, ocean circulation, climate classification, climate change theory and global warming.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; GLOBAL WARMING; WEATHER; OCEANSDG13, SDG14
EESB04H3Principles of HydrologyCarl MitchellThe water and energy balances; fluxes through natural systems. Process at the drainage basin scale: precipitation, evaporation, evapotranspiration and streamflow generation. The measurement of water fluxes, forecasting of rainfall and streamflow events. Human activity and change in hydrologic processes.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENERGY; WATERSDG6, SDG7
EESB05H3Principles of Soil ScienceMarney IsaacA study of the processes of pedogenesis and the development of diverse soil profiles, their field relationships and their response to changing environmental conditions.An examination of the fundamental soil properties of importance in soil management. An introduction to the techniques of soil examination in the field, soil analysis in the laboratory and the basic principles of soil classification.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESB15H3Earth HistoryPlanet Earth is at least 4,400 million years old and a geological record exists for at least the last 3,900 million years in the form of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The changing dynamics of convection deep within the Earth's mantle and associated super-continent assembly and breakup along with meteorite impacts, are now recognized as the major controls on development of the planet's atmosphere, oceans, biology, climate and geo-chemical cycles. This course reviews this long history and the methods and techniques used by geologists to identify ancient environments.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; OCEANSDG13, SDG14
EESB16H3Feeding Humans - The Cost to the PlanetExamines the origins and systems of production of the major plants and animals on which we depend for food. Interactions between those species and systems and the local ecology will be examined, looking at issues of over harvesting, genetic erosion, soil erosion, pesticide use, and impacts of genetically modified strains.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5food; PRODUCTION; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG12, SDG15
EESB18H3Natural HazardsMandana MerianoThis course is an investigation of the geological background and possible solutions to major hazards in the environment.Environmental hazards to be studied include: landslides, erosion, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts, flooding, glaciation, future climate change, subsidence, and the disposal of toxic wastes. This may be of interest to a wide range of students in the life, social, and physical sciences; an opportunity for the non-specialist to understand headline-making geological events of topical interest. No prior knowledge of the Earth Sciences is required.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WASTE; CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENTSDG12, SDG13
EESB20H3Sedimentology and StratigraphySedimentary basins hold the bulk of Earth’s rock record and are fundamental in the study of past environments, tectonic evolution, climates, and biosphere. This course will explore different basin types and the nature of their infills. The course will also emphasize the economic resources within sedimentary basins and paleoenvironmental significance.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENTSDG13
EESC03H3Geographic Information Systems and Remote SensingThis course focuses on the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) for solving a range of scientific problems in the environmental sciences and describing their relationship with - and applicability to - other fields of study (e.g. geography, computer science, engineering, geology, ecology and biology). Topics include (but are not limited to): spatial data types, formats and organization; geo-referencing and coordinate systems; remotely sensed image manipulation and analysis; map production.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG12, SDG13, SDG15
EESC04H3Biodiversity and BiogeographyAdam MartinTheoretical and practical aspect of the evolution of organismal diversity in a functional context; examination of species distributions and how these are organized for scientific study. Emphasis will be on the highly diverse invertebrate animals. Topics include biomes, dispersal, adaptation, speciation, extinction and the influence of climate history and humans.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATE; BIODIVERSITYSDG13, SDG15
EESC07H3GroundwaterGroundwater represents the world's largest and most important fresh water resource. This basic course in hydrogeology introduces the principles of groundwater flow and aquifer storage and shows how a knowledge of these fundamental tools is essential for effective groundwater resource management and protection. Special emphasis is placed on the practical methods of resource exploration and assessment; examples of the approach are given for aquifers under environmental stress in southern Ontario, the US and Africa.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG13, SDG14
EESC13H3Environmental Impact Assessment and AuditingMandana MerianoTo familiarize students with the relevant legislation, qualitative and quantitative approaches and applications for environmental impact assessments and environmental auditing. The focus will be on the assessment of impacts to the natural environment, however, socio-economic impacts will also be discussed. Environmental auditing and environmental certification systems will be discussed in detail. Examples and case studies from forestry, wildlife biology and land use will be used to illustrate the principles and techniques presented in the course. Students will acquire "hands-on" experience in impact assessment and environmental auditing through case studies.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENT; FOREST; LAND USESDG13, SDG15
EESC16H3Field Camp IMany environmental problems can only be assessed by collecting geological and other environmental data in the field. This course will provide students with the necessary skills for fieldwork investigations in a range of environments. The camp is held annually either in May or late August. Locations for the camp include Costa Rica, Rockies, Arizona, and Appalachians.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC18H3LimnologyNorth America is endowed with eight of the twelve largest lakes in the world. The origin and geological history, cycles of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and structures of ecosystems of the North American Great Lakes will be used as examples of large lacustrine systems. Fundamental concepts of limnology will be related to features found in the Great Lakes. Topics include: lake origins, lake classification, lake temperature structure and heat budgets, seasonal water circulations, productivity, plankton ecology, food-web dynamics, exotic species invasions, eutrophication-related phenomena and water quality/fisheries management. Specific anthropogenic influences will be illustrated using case studies from the local environment, and students will be allowed to pursue their own interests through a series of short seminars.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5food; WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATER; FISH; ECOLOGYSDG2, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
EESC19H3OceanographyThe world's oceans constitute more than 70% of the earth's surface environments. This course will introduce students to the dynamics of ocean environments, ranging from the deep ocean basins to marginal seas to the coastal ocean. The large-scale water circulation is examined from an observationally based water mass analysis and from a theoretical hydro-dynamical framework. The circulation of marginal seas, the role of tides, waves and other currents are studied in terms of their effects upon the coastal boundary.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; OCEAN; WATERSDG6, SDG13, SDG14
EESC20H3GeochemistryThe course will cover fundamental aspects of chemical processes occurring at the Earth's surface. Terrestrial and aquatic geochemical processes such as: mineral formation and dissolution, redox, aqueous-solid phase interactions, stable isotopes, and organic geochemistry in the environment will be covered.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC24H3Advanced Readings in Environmental ScienceKaren SmithAn advanced supervised readings course that can be taken in any session. Students will follow structured independent readings in any area of Environmental Science. A description of the objectives and scope of the individual offering must be approved by the Supervisor of Studies. Two papers are required in the course; the supervisor and one other faculty member will grade them. The course may not be used as a substitute for EES Program requirements.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC24H3Advanced Readings in Environmental ScienceKaren SmithAn advanced supervised readings course that can be taken in any session. Students will follow structured independent readings in any area of Environmental Science. A description of the objectives and scope of the individual offering must be approved by the Supervisor of Studies. Two papers are required in the course; the supervisor and one other faculty member will grade them. The course may not be used as a substitute for EES Program requirements.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC30H3Environmental MicrobiologyThis course examines the diversity of microorganisms, their adaptations to special habitats, and their critical role in the ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. The course covers microbial phylogeny, physiological diversity, species interactions and state of the art methods of detection and enumeration.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC31H3Glacial GeologyThe last 2.5 million years has seen the repeated formation of large continental ice sheets over North America and Europe. The course will review the geologic and geomorphologic record of past glacial and interglacial climates, the formation and flow of ice sheets , and modern day cold-climate processes in Canada's north. The course includes a one-day field trip to examine the glacial record of the GTA.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATESDG13
EESC33H3Environmental Science Field CourseMatthew WellsA field course on selected topics in aquatic environments. Aquatic environmental issues require careful field work to collect related hydrological, meteorological, biological and other environmental data. This hands-on course will teach students the necessary skills for fieldwork investigations on the interactions between air, water, and biota.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG13, SDG14
EESC34H3Sustainability in PracticeThis course is intended for students who would like to apply theoretical principles of environmental sustainability learned in other courses to real world problems. Students will identify a problem of interest related either to campus sustainability, a local NGO, or municipal, provincial, or federal government. Class meetings will consist of group discussions investigating key issues, potential solutions, and logistical matters to be considered for implementation of proposed solutions. Students who choose campus issues will also have the potential to actually implement their solutions. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, as well as a final report and presentation.Same as ESTC34H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESC36H3PetrologyThis course surveys the processes that produce the chemical and mineralogical diversity of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks including: the distribution, chemical and mineral compositions of rocks of the mantel and crust, their physical properties, and their relation to geological environments. Descriptive petrology for various rocks will also be covered.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD02H3Contaminant HydrogeologySilvija StefanovicNatural hydrochemical processes; the use of major ions, minor ions, trace metals and environmental isotopes in studying the occurrence and nature of ground water flow. Point and non-point sources of ground water contamination and the mechanisms of contaminant transport.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; WATERSDG13, SDG14
EESD06H3Climate Change Impact AssessmentClimate change over the last 150 years is reviewed by examining the climate record using both direct measurements and proxy data. Projection of future climate is reviewed using the results of sophisticated climate modeling. The climate change impact assessment formalism is introduced and applied to several examples. Students will acquire practical experience in climate change impact assessment through case studies.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATESDG13
EESD07H3Field Camp IIThis field camp will familiarize students with several geological settings and modern environments. The camp is held annually either in May or late August. Locations for the camp include Costa Rica, Rockies, Arizona, and Appalachians.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD09H3Research Project in Environmental ScienceAdam MartinThe design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD09H3Research Project in Environmental ScienceAdam MartinThe design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD10Y3Research Project in Environmental ScienceAdam MartinThe design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects. Permission of the co-ordinator must be obtained.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD10Y3Research Project in Environmental ScienceAdam MartinThe design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects. Permission of the co-ordinator must be obtained.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD13H3Environmental Law, Policy and EthicsGraham RempeThis course reviews the laws and policies governing the management of natural resources in Canada. It examines the role of law and how it can it can work most effectively with science, economics and politics to tackle environmental problems such as climate change, conservation, and urban sprawl at domestic and international scales.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5URBAN; NATURAL RESOURCES; CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; CONSERVSDG11, SDG13, SDG14
EESD15H3Fundamentals of Site RemediationSilvija StefanovicThis course consists of a study of the ways in which hazardous organic and inorganic materials can be removed or attenuated in natural systems. The theory behind various technologies, with an emphasis on bioremediation techniques and their success in practice. An introduction to the unique challenges associated with the remediation of surface and ground water environments, soils, marine systems, and contaminated sediments.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; ENVIRONMENT; MARINE; WATERSDG13, SDG14
EESD16H3Project Management in Environmental StudiesStudents will select a research problem in an area of special interest. Supervision will be provided by a faculty member with active research in geography, ecology, natural resource management, environmental biology, or geosciences as represented within the departments. Project implementation, project monitoring and evaluation will form the core elements for this course. Same as ESTD16H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; ENVIRONMENT; ECOLOGYSDG12, SDG13, SDG15
EESD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester. Same as ESTD17Y3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1socioeconomic; ENVIRONMENTSDG1, SDG13
EESD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester. Same as ESTD17Y3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1socioeconomic; ENVIRONMENTSDG1, SDG13
EESD18H3Environmental Studies Seminar SeriesThis course will be organized around the DPES seminar series, presenting guest lecturers around interdisciplinary environmental themes. Students will analyze major environmental themes and prepare presentations for in-class debate. Same as ESTD18H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
EESD19H3Professional Development Seminars in GeoscienceMandana MerianoThis course consists of 12 lectures given by senior industry professionals to prepare students for a post-graduate career in environmental consulting. Lectures will convey the full range of consulting activities, including visits to environmental investigation sites in the Toronto area. Technical writing and oral communication skills will be stressed in assignments.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; ENVIORNMENTSDG9, SDG13
EESD20H3Geological Evolution and Environmental History of North AmericaThis course reviews the geological and environmental evolution of the North American continent over the past 4 billion years by exploring the range of plate tectonics involved in continental growth and how those processes continue today. It will explore major changes in terrestrial and marine environments through geologic time and associated organisms and natural resources of economic importance, and will conclude with an examination of recent human anthropogenic influences on our environment especially in regard to urban areas and associated problems of waste management, resource extraction, geological hazards, and the impacts of urbanization on watersheds and water resources. The course will include a weekend field trip to examine the geology and urban environmental problems of The Greater Toronto Area. It provides students in environmental science with a fundamental knowledge of the importance of environmental change on various timescales and the various field methods used to assess such changes.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5WATER; URBAN; WASTE; NATURAL RESOURCES; ENVIRONMENT; MARINE; WATERSDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14
EESD21H3Geophysical and Climate Data AnalysisThis course offers an advanced introduction to geophysical data analysis. It is intended for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students interested in data analysis and statistics in the geophysical sciences and is mainly laboratory (computer) based. The goal is to provide an understanding of the theory underlying the statistical analysis of geophysical data, in space, time and spectral domains and to provide the tools to undertake this statistical analysis. Important statistical techniques such as regression, correlation and spectral analysis of time series will be explored with a focus on hypothesis formulation and interpretation of the analysis. Multivariate approaches will also be introduced. Although some previous knowledge of probability and statistics will be helpful, a review will be provided at the beginning of the course. Concepts and notation will be introduced, as needed.Jointly offered with EES1132H.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5CLIMATESDG13
EMU245H1Psychological Foundations of Music EducationThis course provides an advanced study of the psychological bases of music education. Students will critically reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of prevailing psychological theories in the context of music teaching and learning. Through seminar presentations, research, and the examination of scholarly literature, students will explore the field of music psychology. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of MusicFaculty of Music0.5educatSDG4
EMU401H1Calls to Action through Music EducationThis course takes the Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as the Foundation for Curriculum and Pedagogy in Music Education. Students will lead seminars on topics related to their research interest and examine current issues facing Indigenous Peoples through the lens of Reconciliation.
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of MusicFaculty of Music0.5educatSDG4
EMU461H1Music Education in Cultural PerspectiveA seminar exploring music's social nature, with special attention to the ways culture influences music perception, cognition, and value, and the way musical practices in turn influence culture and social relations. Issues addressed include: music education as intercultural education; music, gender, and power; the educational implications of cultural relativity; music education as an agent of social reproduction and/or transformation; social relations implicit in various musical and instructional practices; and music education's moral significance. Emphasis is placed on practical pedagogical applications of world music. St. GeorgeFallFaculty of MusicFaculty of Music0.5educat; GENDERSDG4, SDG5
ENG259H5Literature and Environmental CriticismStanka RadovicThis course is an introduction to the field of ecocriticism: the study of literary writing about nature and of literature's role in thinking about environment. Students will read work by prominent theorists of the field and by major literary writers such as Shakespeare, Marvell, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Thoreau, Emerson, Whitman, Dickens, Hardy, Pratt, Lawrence, Frost, and Atwood. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENG259H5Literature and Environmental CriticismStanka RadovicThis course is an introduction to the field of ecocriticism: the study of literary writing about nature and of literature's role in thinking about environment. Students will read work by prominent theorists of the field and by major literary writers such as Shakespeare, Marvell, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Thoreau, Emerson, Whitman, Dickens, Hardy, Pratt, Lawrence, Frost, and Atwood. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENG269H5Queer WritingIntroducing a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer tradition in literature and theory, this course may explore texts from a variety of historical periods, from the classical to the contemporary. It will focus on a variety of genres, potentially including poetry, drama, fiction, criticism, and popular culture. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5queerSDG5
ENG273Y1Queer WritingIntroducing a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer tradition in literature and theory, this course explores classical, modern, postmodern, and contemporary literature, criticism, art, film, music, and popular culture.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEnglish1queerSDG5
ENG273Y1Queer WritingIntroducing a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer tradition in literature and theory, this course explores classical, modern, postmodern, and contemporary literature, criticism, art, film, music, and popular culture.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEnglish1queerSDG5
ENG275H5Feminist Approaches to LiteratureThis course will consider the implications, for literary studies and for literary writing, of modern traditions of feminist and gender theory. Students will encounter the work of major feminist thinkers - e.g., Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Alice Walker, Julie Kristeva, and Judith Butler - and texts by major women writers. The course will explore feminist approaches to literature, including those that borrow from post-structural, psychoanalytic, and contemporary gender, race, and queer theories. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5gender; WOMEN; QUEERSDG5
ENG275H5Feminist Approaches to LiteratureThis course will consider the implications, for literary studies and for literary writing, of modern traditions of feminist and gender theory. Students will encounter the work of major feminist thinkers - e.g., Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Alice Walker, Julie Kristeva, and Judith Butler - and texts by major women writers. The course will explore feminist approaches to literature, including those that borrow from post-structural, psychoanalytic, and contemporary gender, race, and queer theories. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5gender; WOMEN; QUEERSDG5
ENG305H5Swift, Pope, and their ContemporariesSelected works in prose and verse by Swift and Pope studied alongside works by their contemporaries. Topics may include the legitimacy of satire, the role of criticism, and the growing importance of writing by women. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5womenSDG5
ENG307H5Women Writers before AustenA study of mystical writings, poems, plays, novels, letters, periodical essays, polemical works, and books for children by such writers as Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Mary Sidney, Emilia Lanyer, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Fanny Burney, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Topics may include patronage and publishing; nationality, class, and gender; and generic conventions. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5gender; WOMENSDG5
ENG307H5Women Writers before AustenA study of mystical writings, poems, plays, novels, letters, periodical essays, polemical works, and books for children by such writers as Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Mary Sidney, Emilia Lanyer, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Fanny Burney, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Topics may include patronage and publishing; nationality, class, and gender; and generic conventions. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5gender; WOMENSDG5
ENG343H5World DramaStudents will read/watch screenings of drama in English and in translation from around the world, including Africa, East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Latin America, and South America. Topics may include traditional forms (Kathakali dance, Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Nigerian masquerades) adapted for the modern stage; agit-prop and political drama; object performance; the place of drama within a global media ecology; and drama as a site of intercultural and transcultural appropriation, negotiation, and exchange. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
ENG352H5Canadian DramaCanadian plays, with emphasis on major playwrights and on developments since 1940, but with attention also to the history of the theatre in Canada. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5RIGHTSSDG16
ENG352H5Canadian DramaCanadian plays, with emphasis on major playwrights and on developments since 1940, but with attention also to the history of the theatre in Canada. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama0.5RIGHTSSDG16
ENG382Y1Literary TheoryThis course explores contemporary literary theory, but may include related readings from earlier periods. Schools or movements studied may include structuralism, formalism, phenomenology, Marxism, post-structuralism, reader-response theory, feminism, queer theory, new historicism, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, critical race studies, and ecocriticism.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEnglish1queerSDG5
ENG382Y1Literary TheoryThis course explores contemporary literary theory, but may include related readings from earlier periods. Schools or movements studied may include structuralism, formalism, phenomenology, Marxism, post-structuralism, reader-response theory, feminism, queer theory, new historicism, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, critical race studies, and ecocriticism.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEnglish1queerSDG5
ENGA01H3What Is Literature?This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5educatSDG4
ENGB35H3Children's LiteratureAn introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood. Pre-1900 course.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ENGC01H3Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island (Canada)This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ENGC01H3Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island (Canada)This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ENGC02H3Major Canadian AuthorsAn examination of three or more Canadian writers. This course will draw together selected major writers of Canadian fiction or of other forms. Topics vary from year to year and might include a focused study of major women writers; major racialized and ethnicized writers such as African-Canadian or Indigenous writers; major writers of a particular regional or urban location or of a specific literary period.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5women; URBANSDG5, SDG11
ENGC07H3Canadian DramaA study of major Canadian playwrights with an emphasis on the creation of a national theatre, distinctive themes that emerge, and their relation to regional and national concerns. This course explores the perspectives of Québécois, feminist, Native, queer, ethnic, and Black playwrights who have shaped Canadian theatre.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5queer; RIGHTSSDG5
ENGC15H3Introduction to Theory and CriticismA study of selected topics in literary criticism. Schools of criticism and critical methodologies such as New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, New Historicism, and postcolonialism will be covered, both to give students a roughly century-wide survey of the field and to provide them with a range of models applicable to their own critical work as writers and thinkers. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
ENGC21H3The Victorian NovelA study of major novels in the Victorian period. Authors studied might include Charles Dickens, the Bronte sisters, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy. Central to the study of the novel in the period are concerns about social and political justice, historical awareness, personal perspective and narration, and the development of realism.Pre-1900 courseScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5JUSTICESDG5
ENGC45H3Queer Literature and TheoryThis course focuses on queer studies in a transhistorical context. It serves as an introduction to queer theory and culture, putting queer theory into conversation with a range of literary texts as well as other forms of media and culture. This course might explore contemporary LGBTQ2+ literature, media and popular culture; the history of queer theory; and literary work from early periods to recover queer literary histories.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5queerSDG5
ENGC51H3Contemporary Arab Women WritersA study of Arab women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. Their novels, short stories, essays, poems, and memoirs invite us to rethink western perceptions of Arab women. Issues of gender, religion, class, nationalism, and colonialism will be examined from the perspective of Arab women from both the Arab world and North America. ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5gender; womenSDG5
ENGC59H3Literature and the EnvironmentThis course introduces students to ecocriticism (the study of the relationship between literature and environment). The course is loosely structured around several focused topics: Land, Sustainability, Resilience, Natural and Unnatural Disasters, Diversity and Discomfort, Public and Private Spaces, Nostalgia, Activism. Students will be introduced to environmental pedagogies and alternative ways of knowing, including embodied learning. We will spend quite a bit of time outdoors especially during the first six weeks of the course.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5RESILIEN; environmentSDG11, SDG13
ENGD05H3Diasporic-Indigenous Relations on Turtle IslandIn this course we consider the possibilities opened up by literature for thinking about the historical and ongoing relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people on the northern part of Turtle Island (the Iroquois, Anishinabek and Lenape name for North America). How does literature written by both diasporic and Indigenous writers call upon readers to act, identify, empathize and become responsible to history, to relating, and to what effect? Students will have the opportunity to consider how literature can help address histories of colonial violence by helping us to think differently about questions about land, justice, memory, community, the environment, and the future of living together, in greater balance, on Turtle Island.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENT; JUSTICESDG13, SDG16
ENGD50H3Fake Friends and Artificial Intelligence: the Human-Robot Relationship in Literature and CultureThis course will explore the portrayal of the human-robot relationship in conjunction with biblical and classical myths. The topic is timely in view of the pressing and increasingly uncanny facets of non-divine, non-biological creation that attend the real-world production and marketing of social robots. While the course looks back to early literary accounts of robots in the 1960s, it concentrates on works written in or after the 1990s. The course aims to analyze how a particular narrative treatment of the robot-human relationship potentially alters our understanding of its mythical intertext and, by extension, notions of divinity, humanity, gender, animality, disability, and relations of kinship and care.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5gender; PRODUCTIONSDG5
ENGD95H3Creative Writing as a ProfessionA practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC)0.5EMPLOYMENTSDG8
ENV100H1Introduction to Environmental StudiesAn investigation of the relationship between human beings and their natural and built environments. This interdisciplinary course will draw from the sciences, social sciences and the humanities to explore major social, cultural, economic, regulatory, ethical, ecological and technological aspects of environmental issues.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV100Y5The EnvironmentThis introductory environmental science course examines large-scale features of Earth, natural hazards, Earth's climate and weather systems, energy and mineral resources, human population growth, extinction and biodiversity, environmental toxins, vanishing soils and expanding deserts, forests, urban environmental management, and food resources. Interdisciplinary interaction among Science, Social Science, and Humanities is a major theme. [72L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography1food; energy; urban; climate; environment; weather; forest; biodiversitySDG2, SDG7, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ENV100Y5The EnvironmentThis introductory environmental science course examines large-scale features of Earth, natural hazards, Earth's climate and weather systems, energy and mineral resources, human population growth, extinction and biodiversity, environmental toxins, vanishing soils and expanding deserts, forests, urban environmental management, and food resources. Interdisciplinary interaction among Science, Social Science, and Humanities is a major theme. [72L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography1food; energy; urban; climate; environment; weather; forest; biodiversitySDG2, SDG7, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ENV198H1Idleness and the Environment: What Does Sustainable Work Mean?In a fast-paced, high-tech world?and one that must rapidly decarbonize to address the climate crisis?the relationship between labour and environment is rapidly changing. This course explores the intersection of work and the environment, considering how ideas about leisure and idleness might offer new pathways for a more sustainable future. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5LABOUR; climate ; environmentSDG8, SDG13
ENV199H1Debating & Understanding Current Environmental IssuesThe course examines current environmental issues for which there is no easy answer or consensus position. For instance, to help solve climate change should we generate more electricity from nuclear power-plants, which have no greenhouse gas emissions? Or instead, should we phase out nuclear plants because of possible accidents, costs and radioactive wastes? The seminar examines the scientific and political aspects of such issues and debates the pros and cons of each. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5WASTE; climate; greenhouse gas; environmentSDG12, SDG13
ENV200H1Assessing Global Change: Science and the EnvironmentRomila VermaThe perspective which scientists bring to the understanding and resolution of environmental concerns having global implications: atmospheric systems and climate change, the biosphere and conservation of biodiversity. This living things and their environment breadth course is intended to fulfill the environmental literacy requirement for students in the BA programs of the School of the Environment or the living things and their environment breadth course requirement for Commerce, Humanities and Social Science studentsSt. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5CLIMATE; ENVIRONMENT; conserv; biodiversitySDG13, SDG15
ENV201H5Environmental ManagementTenley Conway(Formerly GGR234H5) Environmental management builds on topics discussed in ENV100 and GGR111/112, by focusing on conceptual frameworks and specific tools that can be used to formulate environmental management goals and support decision-making. Case studies will be used throughout to highlight different approaches, focusing primarily on Canadian examples. Topics include ecosystem and adaptive management, environment impact assessments, and the role of stakeholders. [24L, 9T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5environment, sustainable growth, industr*, environment, conserv* SDG8, SDG9, SDG13
ENV205H5Sustainable TourismTourism has long been an important industry around the world, but increasingly questions are being raised regarding the social and environmental sustainability of tourism. This course will look at the impacts (both negative and positive) that tourism has on the natural environment, society, and local economies. It will explore how tourism relates to mobility, globalization, recreation and outdoor activity, planning, the environment, cultural identities, protected areas, and wildlife conservation. This course begins with an introduction to tourism more generally and then focuses in on critical perspectives and the development of eco-tourism, cultural tourism, and volunteer tourism. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5INDUSTR; environment; conservSDG9, SDG13, SDG15
ENV205H5Sustainable TourismTourism has long been an important industry around the world, but increasingly questions are being raised regarding the social and environmental sustainability of tourism. This course will look at the impacts (both negative and positive) that tourism has on the natural environment, society, and local economies. It will explore how tourism relates to mobility, globalization, recreation and outdoor activity, planning, the environment, cultural identities, protected areas, and wildlife conservation. This course begins with an introduction to tourism more generally and then focuses in on critical perspectives and the development of eco-tourism, cultural tourism, and volunteer tourism. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5INDUSTR; environment; conservSDG9, SDG13, SDG15
ENV221H1Multidisciplinary Perspectives on EnvironmentOne of two foundation courses for the School?s undergraduate program. Introduces students to ways in which different disciplines contribute to our understanding of environment. Instructors and guest lecturers are drawn from the sciences, social sciences and the humanities and will present subject matter, assumptions, conceptualizations and methodologies of their disciplines.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV222H1Interdisciplinary Environmental StudiesBuilding upon ENV221H1, shows how environmental studies is working to knit different disciplinary perspectives into one interdisciplinary body of knowledge; interplay of science and values in definition and framing of issues; roles of markets, politics and ethics in developing solutions; local to global scale; historical and current timeframes.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV223H1Fundamental Environmental SkillsThe practical, interdisciplinary and controversial nature of environmental issues, as well as the uncertainty that surrounds measures to address them demand mastery of a particular range of skills by environmental students. This course teaches the fundamental research, analysis and presentation skills required for effective environmental work. This course is for students enrolled in the Environmental Studies Major program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV234H1Environmental Biology: Structure and Function of EcosystemsHelene CyrThis multidisciplinary course draws on elements from geology, soil science, and ecology to understand past and present environments and human impacts on landscapes and ecosystems. Emphasis on the structure, functioning and connectivity of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Field trips and labs. Mandatory day-long field trip on a Friday or Saturday in late September or early October (students choose which day; a small fee may be charged for transportation.) (Lab Materials Fee: $25)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5ENVIORNMENT; ecologySDG13, SDG15
ENV237H1Physics of the Changing Environment ADebra WunchThe course will cover basic physics of environmental processes and of measurement techniques in the atmosphere, the ocean, lake-land-forest systems, and other biological systems. It will place its work in the context of climate change and other aspects of environmental change. This course is solely intended for students who have NOT completed a previous first year physics core course, who are in one of the following programs: Environmental Science Major or Minor, Environmental Geosciences Specialist or Earth and Environmental Systems Major.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and SciencePhysics0.5CLIMATE; environment; ocean; forestSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV238H1Physics of the Changing Environment BDebra WunchThe course will cover basic physics of environmental processes and of measurement techniques in the atmosphere, the ocean, lake-land-forest systems, and other biological systems. It will place its work in the context of climate change and other aspects of environmental change. This course is solely intended for students who have completed a previous first year physics core course, who are in one of the following programs: Environmental Science Major or Minor, Environmental Geosciences Specialist or Earth and Environmental Systems Major.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and SciencePhysics0.5CLIMATE; environment; ocean; forestSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV261H1Is the Internet Green?Miriam DiamondThe Internet has deeply penetrated most aspects of society and yet we are remarkably unreflective about its impacts and sustainability. This course challenges students to critically evaluate evidence regarding the environmental and social impacts of the Internet and how the Internet contributes (or not) to goals of environmental sustainability. (ENV261H1 is intended as a Breadth Requirement course in the Social Sciences.)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV307H1Urban SustainabilityThis course critically examines the concept of urban sustainability in theory and application. Case studies of ongoing urban sustainability programs in the developed and developing world help students assess the successes and failures of these programs. The course also examines the current state of research and implementation efforts toward urban sustainability. Toronto's urban sustainability and sustainable needs will be investigated through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) during the course (previous experience with GIS is not required).St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5URBANSDG11
ENV310H5The Sustainability ImperativeBarbara MurckThe United Nations Commission on Environment and Development popularized the term sustainable development in its 1987 report, Our Common Future. How far have we come since then, as a global community, in implementing sustainability as a model for development? In this course we will examine the history, measurement, and present-day models and applications of sustainability and sustainable development in both the public and private spheres. Sustainability is an integrative concept that addresses social, cultural, political, and economic factors within the constraints of the biophysical environment. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; environmentSDG8, SDG13
ENV310H5The Sustainability ImperativeBarbara MurckThe United Nations Commission on Environment and Development popularized the term sustainable development in its 1987 report, Our Common Future. How far have we come since then, as a global community, in implementing sustainability as a model for development? In this course we will examine the history, measurement, and present-day models and applications of sustainability and sustainable development in both the public and private spheres. Sustainability is an integrative concept that addresses social, cultural, political, and economic factors within the constraints of the biophysical environment. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; environmentSDG8, SDG13
ENV311H5Environmental Issues in the Developing WorldBarbara MurckThe Earth is one, but the world is not. We all depend on one biosphere for sustaining our lives. Yet each community, each country, strives for survival and prosperity with little regard for its impact on others. These are the opening words from the report of the UN World Commission on Environment and Development, which first popularized the concept of sustainable development. In this course we examine 'environment' and 'development' and 'human well-being' as inseparable challenges. We consider global, regional, and local environmental problems from the perspectives of developing nations, and investigate the economic, social, and political roots of these problems. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; environmentSDG8, SDG13
ENV316H1Laboratory and Field Methods in Environmental ScienceNjal RollinsonThis course focuses on methods of sampling and analyzing natural air, water and solid Earth materials for physical, chemical and biological properties that are relevant to current environmental issues. It will integrate approaches from chemistry, physics, geology and biology, and cover techniques in field sampling, laboratory analyses and analyses of large environmental data sets. Basic concepts related to quality control will be emphasized throughout the course: sample collection and storage methods, calibration of field and lab instruments, analyses in complex matrices, errors (accuracy, precision), and detection limits. This course is for students enrolled in the Environmental Science Major program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director. A fee of $25 will be charged for lab supplies, lab instrument charges and technical services.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5WATER; environment; waterSDG13, SDG14
ENV320H5Managing Our WasteGarbage archaeologist William Rathje once said, "Garbage isn't generic junk. It's elements of our behavior all thrown together." The history of human civilization is reflected in what societies have thrown away over the ages. But in recent decades both the quantity and types of waste generated by human activities have changed radically. In this course we will address the philosophical, social, and management challenges associated with waste in Canadian and international contexts, as well as examining some of the technological and scientific aspects of specific waste management problems. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WASTESDG12
ENV322H1International Environmental PolicyJessica GreenExamines the ways in which states negotiate and implement international agreements addressing global environmental issues, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Focus is upon factors which determine the efficacy of multilateral environmental agreements and the prospects for stronger global environmental governance.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5CLIMATE; environment; governanceSDG13, SDG16
ENV323H1Ontario Environmental PolicyRussell HouldinIntroduces students to public policy and institutional foundations of public policy in Canada, with an emphasis on environmental policy in Ontario. Provides an insiders perspective on how environmental policy has been developed in Ontario.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENT; instituionSDG13, SDG16
ENV330H1Waste Not: Faith-Based EnvironmentalismThis course explores religious environmentalism, its proponents and opponents, and its core values within the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Religious environmentalists have used teachings from sacred texts as exemplars of sustainability. Some, however, claim that these texts teach domination, anthropocentrism and hierarchical values. Looking at a range of worldviews, we focus on the topics of wastefulness, consumption, and simplicity. Readings about barriers, motivations, and values that inform environmental behaviour are complemented with field trips to places of worship where we will hear religious leaders speak about the environmental initiatives undertaken in their communities and see sacred spaces.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5CONSUM; waste; environmentSDG12, SDG16
ENV330H5Experimental Design in Environmental ScienceThis hands-on course introduces students to field methods and integrative problem solving in environmental sciences. Topics will include sampling methods and protocols employed in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric assessment and monitoring, as well as experimental design, data analysis and presentation. Practical sessions will involve outdoor field experiences on campus and neighboring areas.[12L, 24P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV332H5Practicum in Environmental Project ManagementAdam ThornThis course, offered in collaboration with campus administrative offices of the University of Toronto Mississauga and various community partners, provides Environment Students with practical collaborative work experience in preparation for upper-year field courses and internships. Students will work in teams to develop skills in communication, project management, interdisciplinary teamwork, problem identification, report writing and formal presentations while working on an environmental project on campus or in the local community. This course is strongly recommended for Specialist and Major students in any of the Environment Programs. [24S, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV333H1Ecological WorldviewsStephen ScharperApproaches to environmental concerns are often marked by assumptions that reflect distinct worldviews positing particular understandings of the role of the human with respect to nature. This course explores sundry economic, political, scientific, religious, and moral worldviews pertaining to the environment, including environmental ethics, Gaia, ecofeminism, scientific cosmology, and indigenous perspectives.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV334H1Environmental Biology: Applied EcologyHelene CyrApplied issues in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, with an emphasis on land-use change and its impacts on watersheds. Topics include: ecology of agro-ecosystems and other human-managed ecosystems, bio-indicators of anthropogenic impacts, ecosystem restoration, and adaptive management. Group projects address local management/restoration issues.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5WATER; environment; water; ecologySDG6, SDG13, SDG15
ENV335H1Environmental DesignEnvironmental design, in the context of this course, refers to design strategies that account for the ability of supporting ecosystems to continue to meet human needs and those of other lifeforms without diminishing biological diversity or environmental quality. This course takes a hands-on approach to investigating several environmental design issues: climate-responsive design, energy consumption, health and comfort, natural lighting and ventilation, and water management. Students will build up a design of a net-zero carbon residential building through several instructive design exercises during the semester, including hands-on measurement and calculation activities.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5health; water; energy; consum; climate; environment; waterSDG3, SDG6, SDG7, SDG13
ENV337H1Human Interactions with the EnvironmentThe impact of 7 billion people on the planet is enormous and challenges future generations. What are these impacts today and in future? What solutions and tools can avert societal collapse? Using an integrated and interdisciplinary systems approach, we explore problems and solutions to the earth?s limits to growth.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV341H1Environment and Human HealthClare WisemanExamination of the linkages between human health and environment. Addresses basic principles and scientific knowledge relating to health and the environment and uses case studies to examine current environmental health issues from a health sciences perspective.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
ENV346H1Terrestrial Energy SystemsIan SinclairVarious earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large-scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENERGY; oceanSDG7, SDG14
ENV347H1The Power of Economic IdeasRussell HouldinThis course examines the power of economic ideas in effecting environmental change. Topics include the relation of ecological economics to mainstream economics, as well as the role of financial incentives to move the environmental agenda forward.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV350H1Energy Policy and EnvironmentThe course addresses: (1) physical, technological and economic aspects of energy and electricity systems and their associated environmental impacts; (2) current international, Canadian and Ontario energy policy; (3) technological, economic and political factors influencing policy which could significantly reduce environmental impacts of energy use.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENERGY; environmentSDG7, SDG13
ENV361H1Social Media and EnvironmentalismThis course examines the impacts of the internet on environmental thinking and policy-making. Topics include the use of social media as a tool for community-building and collaborative design, the sharing economy, online protest movements, mass surveillance and its implications, and the impact of misinformation on climate denialism. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5CLIMATE; ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV393H5Environmental AssessmentAdam ThornThe course focuses on the methodologies for measuring and predicting the impact of development on the bio-physical and socio-economic environments. Topics include environmental assessment, law and institutions, environmental mediation; Phase I, II, III environmental site assessment; monitoring; mitigation; evaluation; and risk assessment. The types of impact assessment (IA) methods examined vary from year to year (e.g. economic IA, ecological IA, social IA). [24L, 6P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENT; INSTITUTIONSDG13, SDG16
ENV422H1Environmental LawGraham RempeAn introduction to environmental law for students in Environmental Studies; legal methods available to resolve environmental problems and the scope and limits of those methods; common law and statutory tools as well as environmental assessment legislation; the problem of standing to sue and the limits of litigation.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV425H5Managing Urban EcosystemsTenley ConwayThis course examines the ways people interact with and manage urban ecosystems. Socio-ecological systems, green infrastructure, environmental justice, ecosystems services, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and sustainability will be discussed in the context of urban ecosystems. Throughout the course, issues associated with bridging the gaps between the social and natural sciences, unique characteristics of urban ecosystems, and the role of individual decision-makers will be considered. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; urban; climate; environment; justiceSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
ENV430H5Environmental Law and PolicyLaurel BescoThis course introduces students to the challenges and opportunities of environmental law and policy. Students will learn how legal systems can address increasingly complex environmental challenges. This course will include an in-depth look at the toolbox of legal and policy instruments that decision makers have at their disposal to tackle major environmental problems. The focus is primarily Canada though international examples will also be touched upon. Case studies and examples will be used to connect theoretical and legal principals to real world situations. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV432H1Urban EcologyThe ecology of urban areas through consideration of the biological and physical environments, in particular how the human-constructed environment alters pre-existing biophysical conditions and interactions. Encompasses a comparative perspective to study the development of these emerging ecosystems of increasing importance given global urbanization. One or two Saturday field trips (a fee of approximately $15 may be charged for field trip transportation.)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEcology and Evolutionary Biology0.5URBAN; environment; ecologySDG3, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ENV435H5Resource Management, Circular Economy, and SustainabilityThis course is an in-depth analysis of resource management principals and practices. The course begins with critical examination of the standard resource management practices, specifically public and private decision-making, using the lens of sustainability which includes systems, integrative, and critical thinking and inter-disciplinary approaches. Next, the concepts of industrial ecology and circular economy are introduced, and resource management principals, models, and practices in circular economy are examined using the lens of sustainability. The course uses real-world examples of circularity to reinforce course concepts. Students' projects include the evaluation of the current state of circular economy in different sectors such as food and agriculture, forestry, manufacturing, and transportation. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaUniversity of Toronto Mississauga0.5agriculture; food; industr; industrial ecology; forest; ecologySDG2, SDG9, SDG12, SDG15
ENV440H1Professional Experience CourseRegular academic seminars complement off-campus work on an environmental project. The course enables students to gain practical experience of the needs and demands of professional environmental agencies. Students are given a choice of placements in a variety of sectors (such as government, NGOs, industry). Eligible students who wish to do a work placement in the upcoming summer or fall session are must submit an application form to the Placement Coordinator by mid-January of each year. Please contact the School of the Environment?s Placement Coordinator, David Powell, at ug.office.env@utoronto.ca, or consult the School?s undergraduate courses webpage for access to the application form, instructions and application deadline.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5INDUSTR; environmentSDG9, SDG13
ENV451H1Current Environmental TopicsThis capstone course for the School?s core programs will explore current environmental topics, with the goal of integrating the multi- and interdisciplinary strands of each student's learning to date. This course is for students enrolled in one of the School's BA programs, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV452H1Environmental Science SeminarNjal RollinsonScientists from within and external to the university share and discuss challenges, findings and opportunities. Specific topics (and speakers) vary from year to year but may draw from rehabilitation techniques, contaminants in our environment, environmental health, impacts on landscapes and communities, biodiversity, water, and modelling of environmental processes. This course is for students enrolled in the School of the Environment, Environmental Science Major BSc program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5health; water; environment; water; biodiversitySDG3, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV461H1The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of SustainabilityJohn RobinsonSustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research and teaching. Arguably, it is such living lab approaches that offer the largest potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to work across disciplines and fields of study, and with non-academic partners. This course will put students to work on operational sustainability projects identified by the staff working in or with the Sustainability Office at the University of Toronto. Students will be organized into groups, each of which will be assigned one project, to be overseen by one or more U of T staff members. The bulk of the course will consist of regular meetings with the staff ?clients?, with instructors, and in small groups to undertake a group project. Each group will produce a mid-term and final report, and give a mid-term and final presentation. Each student will also submit two 360 reviews of the group process. A crucial aspect of this course is the ability of students to work collaboratively together in a group environment, and to work effectively with a university staff person acting as a ?client? for their work. Students will be provided with a Handbook outlining information on working in groups and the focus of the class in the second week will be on this issue. The first 360 peer review will serve to provide information on how well each group is working. Students are encouraged to discuss and resolve group process issues in the weekly group meetings, and in their regular meetings with the instructor and TA. The second 360 review will occur at the end of the term. The results of the two 360 reviews will be used, where appropriate, to adjust individual marks from the group averages.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5health, water, environment, biodiversitySDG3, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV462H1Energy and Environment: Economics, Politics, and SustainabilityAdonis Yatchew This is an interdisciplinary course that examines key ideas in economics, politics and security that are essential to understanding energy and environmental issues. The course will cover energy markets, energy security, and the increasing role that sustainability plays in setting policies. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENERGY; environmentSDG7, SDG13
ENV491Y1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV491Y1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment1ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV492H1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV492H1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV493H1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV493H1Independent Studies ProjectA research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSchool of Environment0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ENV495H5Restoration Ecology IRestoration ecology is an emerging cross-disciplinary field of study that concerns human activities undertaken to promote the recovery, health, integrity and sustainability of degraded ecosystems. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of ecological restoration, addressing topics such as assessing ecosystem health, resilience, resistance and stability; community structure and biodiversity; invasive species; ecosystem processes and functions; societal aspects of ecological restoration (e.g., the relationship between social, economic and environmental sustainability). Many types of ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial, tropical and temperate) will be studied, largely through case-study investigations. Occasional field exercises on campus will be scheduled during regular class meeting times. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5health; water; resilien; environment; marine; biodiversity; ecology; water;SDG3, SDG6, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV496H5Restoration Ecology IIThe follow-up course to Restoration Ecology I, ENV496 will build on its theoretical foundations to focus on student involvement in a variety of restoration projects planned or underway by Credit Valley Conservation and other groups in Mississauga and the greater Credit Valley watershed. The emphasis here is on planning and implementation of restoration projects; good scientific design; understanding policies and procedures; identifying and working with stakeholders, etc. Occasional field exercises may be scheduled during regular class meeting times. [12L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; water; conserv; ecologySDG6, SDG14, SDG15
ERS101H5Planet EarthWe discuss the age and origin of the Earth, the nature of its deep interior, the origin of mountains, oceans, earthquakes and volcanoes, and show how these features are related in a unifying theory known as Plate Tectonics, that explains how the evolution of the Earth's surface is driven by internal processes. Practicals will include laboratory exercises devoted to the understanding and recognition of minerals, rocks and geological structures. [24L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5OCEANSDG14
ERS111H5Earth, Climate & LifePaul AshwellLife as we know it is completely dependent on our planet. The Earth is an integrated system, where the ocean, atmosphere, life and planet interact with and affect one another. The evolution of the smallest organisms has drastically changed EarthÕs climate, and small changes in EarthÕs climate have a profound effect on the distribution of life. Understanding how organisms feed, breath, grow, and reproduce are integral to mitigating large-scale climate changes and organic cycles, and how this will affect the Earth as a system. Processes such as plate tectonics produces an ever changing surface, and has been a major control on how and when life evolved and flourished. After introducing how the Earth works, topics discussed will include how life on Earth has evolved, how large-scale geological processes affect climate and life and how ecosystems have changed in response to weather and climate change. We will also discuss the effect that our species has had on this planet; from the sudden shifts in stability of EarthÕs systems, to feedback cycles, to use of resources and sustainability. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5CLIMATE; weather; oceanSDG13, SDG14
ERS211H5Sedimentology and StratigraphyJessica SlomkaSedimentology and stratigraphy concerns the origin, formation, accumulation, alteration, and preservation of sediments in the geological record. This course will focus on the reconstruction, correlation, and interpretation of ancient carbonate and siliciclastic paleoenvironments and facies based on the analysis of sedimentary structures, depositional environments, stratigraphic successions, and fossils. The interplay between biological and geological factors responsible for sedimentary deposits will form the core of the course, including the physical transport and biological accumulation of sediments, the effects of climate-driven sea-level change on sediment deposition, the importance of resource management and sustainability. This course will include a laboratory component with hand samples, thin sections, and physical models, in addition to a field trip, allowing for first-hand experience with describing and interpreting sedimentological units. [36L, 24P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5CLIMATE; environ,entSDG13
ERS225H5Field MethodsFieldwork is at the heart of being a geologist. Skills gained during fieldwork are key as part of a GeologistÕs toolbox, and are highly regarded in a career. This course introduces fieldwork to students during a week-long fieldtrip in late August looking at outcrops of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks around Ontario. Skills taught will include basic geological observation, description and interpretation, the collection of field notes, geological measurements and presentation of the data. Enrolment approval into the course is by application only; Registration in ACORN is required; priority will be given to Earth Science Specialists, or Environmental Geoscience Specialists. Please see the UTM CPS Earth Science Fieldtrip page for more information. [66P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ERS301H5GeochemistryPaul AshwellSince the creation of the Solar System and Earth 4.5 billion years ago, EarthÕs natural processes have differentiated the chemical elements, generating distinct differences in composition between the oceans and the atmosphere, and EarthÕs crust, mantle and core. These differences allow Earth Scientists to understand and quantify these processes, as well as track the rocks and deposits formed out of these processes. This course will focus on the application of geochemistry to understand Earth processes, such as the generation of magma and volcanic eruptions, the formation of ore bodies and Earth surface processes. We will utilize the state-of-the-art equipment available at UTM, including Scanning Electron Microscopy and ICP-OES, to analyze rock samples to determine their origin based on their chemistry, giving students valuable skills in sample preparation and experimental practices. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5OCEANSDG14
ERS312H5OceanographyJessica SlomkaThe worldÕs oceans cover approximately 70% of the Earth Surface and Canada has extensive coastlines along three major ocean basins. This course will provide an understanding of chemical, biological, physical and geologic aspects of the oceans. Emphasis will be placed on the geological and geophysical processes that form and shape the ocean basins and continental margins. In addition, this course will offer an insight into the paleoceanographic evolution of our planet and present day environmental threats such as pollution, habitat destruction, acidification and ocean warming. Even though this course does not include specific lab or tutorial sessions, three relevant exercises will be included. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENT; ocean; pollutSDG13
ERS315H5Environmental GeologyJessica SlomkaThis course will focus on Earth processes as they relate to human activities. Topics include sustainability global climate change on short and long timescales; groundwater flow and contamination/human engineering of Earth processes; geological aspects of pollution and waste disposal; and environmental impact of extracting/using minerals, energy, soil, and other Earth resources. A field trip will give students a first-hand experience in aspects of human/planet interaction. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5WATER; energy; waste; climate; environment; water; pollutSDG13
ERS401H5Earth ResourcesThe formation and global distribution of precious and industrial mineral deposits are introduced. Exploration methods and mining practices are discussed in terms of environmental effects and issues. Basic aspects of the economics and strategic importance of mineral reserves are also covered. Weekly field trips are included. [24L, 48P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5INDUSTR; environment
ERS404H5Volcanology and Geothermal SystemsVolcanic eruptions are one of the most dangerous and volatile geological hazard. In the 20th Century, almost 100,000 people are believed to have been killed in volcanic eruptions, with another 4.7 million directly affected by them, but, at the end of the 20thcentury, over 500 million people lived within the hazard zone of a volcano worldwide; cities such as Tokyo, Mexico City, Naples and Seattle are besieged by the threat of nearby volcanoes. Volcanoes also provide fertile soils, near-unlimited geothermal power generation potential and are an intricate part of the Earth system. This course aims to study the mechanism through which volcanoes form, erupt and evolve, their impact on our society and the benefits they provide in the form of geothermal energy. his will be accomplished through discussion, lab and scenario based learning exercises that will take place over one weekend (approx. 16 hours). [48P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5ENERGY; geothermal; citiesSDG15
ERS412H5Climate Through TimeThe goals of this course are to discuss the geologic record of climate change and present an overview of the methods used to reconstruct the earth's climate history and the techniques used to determine the timing of environmental changes. Topics to be addressed will include paleoclimatic reconstruction, climate and climatic variation, dating methods, and climate proxies. In addition, periods of past climate change will be highlighted with particular emphasis on climate change during the recent past. This will be put into perspective with modern day and future global change [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences0.5CLIMATE; ENVIORNMENT
ESC101H1Praxis IPraxis I is the cornerstone course of the Engineering Science Foundation Design sequence and introduces the foundational models and tools of engineering design, communication, teamwork, and professionalism that underlie design education within Engineering Science. In Praxis I students work both individually and in small teams to develop their knowledge and skills in through a combination of active lectures, structured interactive studios, and hands-on practical sessions. The design projects in Praxis I are scoped to the individual student and the broader University community. Each student and team is responsible for both defining and resolving their own opportunities. Praxis I also supports students as they transition into their engineering studies and into the Engineering Science learning community. This support integrates conceptual models, concrete techniques, and University resources, and addresses both academic and non-academic concerns. All courses within the Foundation Design sequence use engineering design to provide a context in which students integrate their knowledge, develop their emerging engineering identity, and codify their individual approach to engineering practice.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5educatSDG13
ESC203H1Engineering and SocietyRobert IrishThrough this course, students will examine the relationship between engineering and society, emphasizing a humanities and social sciences perspective. Building on the Praxis courses, students will develop and apply an understanding of ethics and equity to broader sociotechnical systems and challenges. Using models of critical thinking, active learning activities and discussion seminars, students will develop an understanding of the social and environmental impacts of technology. Students will further develop their communication, teamwork and professional skills through persuasive writing, facilitation and formal debate. Upon completion of the course, students will have an appreciation for the complex interaction between human society and technology, and will be able to analyze and evaluate the social, technological, political, and ethical dimensions of technology.
Humanities and Social Science elective.
St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESC470H1Energy Systems Capstone DesignA half-year capstone design course in which students work in teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. The course focus is on context-appropriate energy systems design and simulation, incorporating generation, transmission and storage of energy from across a range of traditional and alternative energy sources. Students identify, frame, and design solutions to problems that align with that focus, and the resulting designs are assessed on their engineering quality and design credibility. In addition, each student engages in individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. Students are supported by a teaching team comprising both design and domain experts.       St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENERGYSDG14
ESC472H1Electrical and Computer Capstone DesignA half-year capstone design course in which students work in small teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. Each team is expected to design a complex engineered system, implemented (a) fully in software, (b) fully in hardware or (c) in a mixture of hardware and software, using concepts drawn from the ECE Major curriculum and resulting in a functional prototype. Teams are expected to integrate their design, technical, and complementary knowledge, to design for safety, and to consider relevant interdisciplinary factors such as economic, health, environmental, social, and similar concerns.
In addition, each student will complete an individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. This reflection is intended to prepare the student for the next stage of their engineering career
St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringDivision of Engineering Science0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS103H1Geology in Public IssuesGeologic hazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, tsunamis. The distribution and politics of natural resources, including petroleum and ore deposits. Nuclear power and nuclear waste disposal. Global change: the geologic record of hot and cold climates, and how the earth survives. ESS103H1 is primarily intended as a science Distribution Requirement course for Humanities and Social Science, it will be taught in odd years.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5WASTE; natural resources; climateSDG13
ESS104H1Controversies in Earth ScienceThe evolution of ideas about the origin and development of the earth from the Athenians to the 20th Century, with attention on the age of earth; on the evolution and disappearance of species; on the origin of oceans, continents and mountains; on climate change; and on the courage of scientists in confronting the religious and political views of their time. ESS104H1 is primarily intended as a science Distribution Requirement course for Humanities and Social Science students. Taught in even years.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5CLIMATE; oceanSDG13, SDG14
ESS105H1Our home planetCharly (Carl-Georg) BankThe nature and evolution of the Earth; plate tectonics; rocks and minerals; volcanism; geological time; fossils; geology of Ontario; environmental issues; and human interactions with the planet. ESS105H1 is primarily intended as a science Distribution Requirement course for Humanities and Social Science studentsSt. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS199H1Earth, Portrait of a PlanetKimberly TaitModern Earth Sciences touches on virtually all aspects of modern life, from the atmosphere to large scale natural disasters. This course will explore how earth sciences has shaped our society and our understanding of the earth as a system. Potential course topics include (but are not limited to) the great climate change crisis and what we know about climate change in the past to the literally earth moving ideas of plate tectonics (and the associated natural disasters). The course will involve reading of scientific literature, student-led discussions, oral presentations and research projects. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5CLIMATESDG13
ESS205H1Confronting Global ChangeThe emergence of society as a major geological force is considered in terms of the evolving debate about the consequences of human activity for the habitability of our planet. Major issues such as climate change, environmental pollution, and depletion of natural resources are examined.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; climate; environment; pollutSDG12, SDG13, SDG14
ESS205H1Confronting Global ChangeThe emergence of society as a major geological force is considered in terms of the evolving debate about the consequences of human activity for the habitability of our planet. Major issues such as climate change, environmental pollution, and depletion of natural resources are examined.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; climate; environment; pollutSDG12, SDG13, SDG14
ESS262H1Earth System ProcessesMiriam DiamondAn introduction to how our planet works, focusing on physical processes that govern the nature and composition of Earth with an emphasis on the dynamic nature of the planet. Topics include surface processes (e.g., weathering and erosion, ocean and atmospheric circulation, weather and climate), crustal processes (e.g., plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, biogeochemical cycles), and earth-environment interactions (e.g., natural hazards, resource development, and sustainability).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5CLIMATE; environment; weather; oceanSDG13, SDG14
ESS311H1Earth System Chemistry 2: Aqueous GeochemistryAn introduction to aqueous environmental geochemistry emphasising the importance of chemical equilibria, mass transport, and microbiological activity in regulating the chemical composition of natural and contaminated systems.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS312H1HydrogeologyGroundwater flow, the role of groundwater in geologic processes, and physical, chemical and biological constraints on contaminant source transport and attenuation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5WATER; WATERSDG14
ESS322H1Igneous PetrologyAn overview of the nature and origin of igneous rocks, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of textures and mineral assemblages as they reflect rock-forming processes. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of magma, origin, and evolution of different magmatic series in specific igneous/tectonic environments, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of igneous rocks, and the assimilation, fractionation & crystallization processes.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS345H1Computational GeologyA practical introduction to programming. This course will teach an operational knowledge on how to write and execute self written computer programs. Course topics touch upon using a computer without a graphical interface, using an integrated development environment, programming, documenting, debugging, reading and writing data, graphical output, how to navigate existing documentation and internet resources, and last but not least how to effectively ask for help. Students will work individually and in small groups in an inverted classroom setting on earth science related problem sets. Previous programming experience is not required, however curiosity, independence and perseverance are mandatory.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS361H1Atmosphere-Biosphere InteractTheory on the exchange of energy and matter (carbon, water) between the land surface and atmosphere, with a focus on the implications of ecosystem-level processes for regional micrometeorology. Examples will be taken from research on contemporary as well as palaeoclimate systems. Case studies to include how changes in vegetation type alter surface radiation balance, hydrological cycling and heat transfer in soils. There is no formal textbook for this course. Lecture material will be augmented with assigned readings from the scientific literature.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5WATER; energy; climate; waterSDG6, SDG7, SDG13, SDG14
ESS362H1OceanographyAn introduction to the physical, geological, chemical, and biological processes governing the world?s oceans. The course emphasizes critical thinking, environmental issues, and interrelationships among scientific disciplines.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5ENVIORNMENT; oceanSDG13, SDG14
ESS431H1Basin AnalysisDetailed study of each of the major sedimentary environments. Typical facies assemblages, cyclic sedimentation. Autogenic and allogenic processes. The principles of sequence stratigraphy. The history of the sequence concept; systems tracts and bounding surfaces. Sequence models. What causes sequences: mechanisms of change in base level and accommodation: ? tectonism, climate change, eustatic sea-level change.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5CLIMATE; ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESS461H1Palaeoenvironmental StudiesJorg BollmannThe use of proxy data (terrestial and aquatic microfossils) to infer past environmental conditions. The nature and extent of Quaternary environmental change is considered in the context of assessing current issues such as acidification, metal pollution, eutrophication and global climate change. Paleoenvironmental techniques are applied in the laboratory.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5CLIMATE; environment; polluSDG13, SDG14
ESS462H1Global Biogeochemical CyclesA seminar course focusing on the exchange of matter (i.e. elements, minerals) between the Earth?s atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere. Course-related topics include global biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, silicon, iron, and zinc (amongst other elements) and will include both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Examples and case studies will be viewed from the paleo-, contemporary and potential future global change perspectives. The overall content of course readings will be determined by student interest, as students have the freedom to choose topics (readings) of personal interest. Offered in alternate years.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5OCEAN; marineSDG14
ESS464H1Biological Perspectives on Earth System EvolutionA seminar course focussing on ways that the Earth's biosphere (terrestrial and marine) has altered the overall functioning of the Earth System over geological time, including (1) influence of terrestrial vegetation on surface processes such as palaeosol development, river geomorphology, erosion, and cycling of major biogeochemical nutrients on land, (2) influence of the marine biosphere on the concentration of O2 and CO2 in the atmosphere, including the origin of the stratospheric ozone layer, and (3) the interactive influence of the terrestrial and marine biosphere on atmospheric moisture transport, production of latent relative to sensible heat fluxes, and the development of the planetary boundary layer. Offered in alternate years.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5PRODUCTION; marineSDG12, SDG14
ESS481H1Advanced Topics in Earth SciencesThis course is offered on an irregular basis, typically in the winter term. Students are advised to consult the departmental notices with respect to course times and content, but should expect an in-depth study of modern earth science questions, for example mineralogy and material science, advanced petrology, or exploration geochemistry. Course instructors will often, but not always, be recruited from Industry. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceEarth Sciences0.5INDUSTRSDG9
EST201H1Intermediate Estonian Language and Culture IIThrough an exploration of Estonian culture both in Estonia and the diaspora, students will further develop their skills in speaking, reading and writing in Estonian. Students will learn about the main characteristics of Estonian society ? its history, way of life, the Estonian economy and business environment, and Estonian current affairs. Students will discuss recent trends and challenges in the development of Estonian society. The course will combine both classroom and web-based learning. It is open to students with elementary fluency in Estonian, both spoken and written.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceSlavic Languages and Literatures0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTB01H3Introduction to Environmental StudiesThis course introduces the Environmental Studies major and the interdisciplinary study of the environment through a team-teaching format. Students will explore both physical and social science perspectives on the environment, sustainability, environmental problems and their solutions. Emphasis will be on critical thinking, problem solving, and experiential learning.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTB02H3Whose Land? Indigenous-Canada-Land RelationsIntroduces students to the geography of Indigenous-Crown-Land relations in Canada. Beginning with pre-European contact and the historic Nation-to-Nation relationship, the course will survey major research inquiries from the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Students will learn how ongoing land and treaty violations impact Indigenous peoples, settler society, and the land in Canada. Same as GGRB18H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5women; girlSDG5
ESTC34H3Sustainability in PracticeThis course is intended for students who would like to apply theoretical principles of environmental sustainability learned in other courses to real world problems. Students will identify a problem of interest related either to campus sustainability, a local NGO, or municipal, provincial, or federal government. Class meetings will consist of group discussions investigating key issues, potential solutions, and logistical matters to be considered for implementation of proposed solutions. Students who choose campus issues will also have the potential to actually implement their solutions. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, as well as a final report and presentation.Same as EESC34H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTC35H3Environmental Science and Technology in SocietyIn this course students will engage critically, practically and creatively with environmental controversies and urgent environmental issues from the standpoint of the sociology of science and technology (STS). This course will contribute to a better understanding of the social and political construction of environmental science and technology.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTC36H3Knowledge, Ethics and Environmental Decision-MakingMost environmental issues have many sides including scientific, social, cultural, ethical, political, and economic. Current national, regional and local problems will be discussed in class to help students critically analyze the roots of the problems and possible approaches to decision-making in a context of pluralism and complexity.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTD16H3Project Management in Environmental StudiesStudents will select a research problem in an area of special interest. Supervision will be provided by a faculty member with active research in geography, ecology, natural resource management, environmental biology, or geosciences as represented within the departments. Project implementation, project monitoring and evaluation will form the core elements for this course.Same as EESD16H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; environment; ecologySDG12, SDG13, SDG15
ESTD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester.Same as EESD17Y3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1socioeconomic; environmentSDG1, SDG13
ESTD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester.Same as EESD17Y3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)1socioeconomic; environmentSDG1, SDG13
ESTD18H3Environmental Studies Seminar SeriesThis course will be organized around the DPES seminar series, presenting guest lecturers around interdisciplinary environmental themes. Students will analyze major environmental themes and prepare presentations for in-class debate.Same as EESD18H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
ESTD19H3RiskA practical introduction to the concept of 'risk' as utilized in environmental decision-making. Students are introduced to risk analysis and assessment procedures as applied in business, government, and civil society. Three modules take students from relatively simple determinations of risk (e.g., infrastructure flooding) towards more complex, real-world, inclusive considerations (e.g., ecosystem impacts of climate change).ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5inclusive; infrastructure; climate; environmentSDG4, SDG9, SDG13
ESTD19H3RiskA practical introduction to the concept of 'risk' as utilized in environmental decision-making. Students are introduced to risk analysis and assessment procedures as applied in business, government, and civil society. Three modules take students from relatively simple determinations of risk (e.g., infrastructure flooding) towards more complex, real-world, inclusive considerations (e.g., ecosystem impacts of climate change).ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Physical & Environmental Sci (UTSC)0.5inclusive; infrastructure; climate; environmentSDG4, SDG9, SDG13
ETH401H1Seminar in EthicsThe seminar will expose advanced undergraduates to cutting edge research in ethics. It meets bi-weekly over the entire academic year. Participants will attend research presentations at the Centre for Ethics (topics have included bioethics, indigenous rights, equality and education, free speech, and workplace democracy). They will also meet individually with the instructor (the Centre?s Director) to plan an independent research project related to the theme of the course. In the winter term, students will present their research and discuss it with the other students in the seminar. (Note that this is an "H1Y" course -- a half-credit course taught throughout both Fall and Winter terms.)St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Ethics0.5educat; equality; rightsSDG4, SDG16
ETH401H1Seminar in EthicsThe seminar will expose advanced undergraduates to cutting edge research in ethics. It meets bi-weekly over the entire academic year. Participants will attend research presentations at the Centre for Ethics (topics have included bioethics, indigenous rights, equality and education, free speech, and workplace democracy). They will also meet individually with the instructor (the Centre?s Director) to plan an independent research project related to the theme of the course. In the winter term, students will present their research and discuss it with the other students in the seminar. (Note that this is an "H1Y" course -- a half-credit course taught throughout both Fall and Winter terms.)St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for Ethics0.5educat; equality; rightsSDG4, SDG16
EUR200Y1Europe: Nation-State to Supranational UnionAn analysis of the development of European political regimes from 1789 until the 2004 and 2007 enlargements of the European Union to include the countries of the former Soviet bloc. This course identifies the decisive forces and factors affecting the operation of constitutions and institutions within the countries which came to form the European Union: nationalism, multi-nationalism, internationalism and supranationalism.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies 1INSTITUTIONSDG16
EUR200Y1Europe: Nation-State to Supranational UnionAn analysis of the development of European political regimes from 1789 until the 2004 and 2007 enlargements of the European Union to include the countries of the former Soviet bloc. This course identifies the decisive forces and factors affecting the operation of constitutions and institutions within the countries which came to form the European Union: nationalism, multi-nationalism, internationalism and supranationalism.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies 1INSTITUTIONSDG16
EUR498H1Special Topics in European Studies: European UnionWhat is the European Union? Which are its core institutions and how do they work? What is the scope of its directives and programs, and how do they fit in with the member-states? policies? What is the role of the EU as an international actor? This course on Special Topics in European Studies aims at answering all these questions. The course will start with an introduction to integration in Europe, the development of the EU, and some theories and approaches to its study. It will then review the main political, economic, and judiciary institutions in the EU. Last, it will examine some important policy areas and challenges at the European level, including migration and asylum, social cohesion, counterterrorist initiatives, scenarios after Brexit, relations between the EU and its neighbours, and foreign policy. Special care will be given to explaining the political interaction between the EU institutions and the member-states, on the one hand, and the EU?s Directives and policy frameworks and the members? policies, on the other hand.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceCentre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies 0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
FAH196H1Marco Polo's WorldJennifer PurtleThis course explores the visual and material worlds of the Italian traveller Marco Polo, which are described in his Travels. Together we will read sections of this text and explore their meaning with respect to the objects and monuments of Marco Polo?s time from the regions to which he travelled. By studying cartography, art, architecture, and urban form in the expansive medieval world of Marco Polo, the course will introduce us to the global world of the Middle Ages. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5URBANSDG11
FAH198H1Shocking Artists, Shocking ArtArt causes scandals for many reasons, provoking a range of consequences, including censorship, cuts to government funding of the arts or even destruction of the work in question. In this course we will consider a number of kinds of art scandal arising from exhibition in public galleries and urban spaces, including those that have to do with legal issues such as plagiarism and vandalism; aesthetic objections on the part of the public, ranging from perceived obscenity to simple resentment of abstract art; racism; sacrilege; and political subversion, amongst others. We will consider the work of artists including Chris Ofili, Joep van Lieshout, Paul McCarthy, Damien Hirst, Michael Snow, Sally Mann, Banksy, Rachel Whiteread, Richard Prince, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, Carl Andre, Maya Lin, and Jeff Koons, amongst others. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5URBANSDG11
FAH230H1Renaissance Art and ArchitectureA selective survey of the major art centres and types of artistic and architectural production in Italy and northern Europe, from the early fifteenth century to the mid-sixteenth. Themes include the relations--artistic, economic and ideological--between northern and southern Europe during this period, the changing role of art in religious life, the emergence of secular themes, and the legacies left by Renaissance art to modern life and culture.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
FAH265H1Monuments of the Islamic WorldThis course explores the architecture of the Islamic world from the 7th - 12th centuries through the lens of its major monuments throughout the central Islamic lands, North Africa and Spain. Through an emphasis upon the Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid and Seljuk periods, the course explores the range of cultural, political, social and religious aspects related to the development of the built environment. It also considers the impact of Islam's encounter with late antiquity and aims to position the rise of Islamic architecture within the context of this encounter. Additionally, the architecture is contextualized through a study of the urban history of select early and medieval Islamic cities.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5CITIES; urban; environmentSDG11, SDG12, SDG13
FAH272H1Modern Architecture from 1750 to the PresentJoseph ClarkeAn introduction to the buildings, issues and ideas from Neoclassicism to the present.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5BUILDINGSSDG9
FAH273H1Canada Buildings and LandscapesAn introduction to the traditions and patterns of building in Canada taking into account the unique landscapes, resources and history that comprise what is now a unified political entity. Lectures will pay special attention to the complexity of architecture throughout Canada including issues of land rights, natural resources, immigration, settlements and urban design, transportation, and heritage issues. A special feature of this class will be the opportunity to study Toronto first-hand through class projects. No previous architectural history study is required.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5BUILDINGS; urban; natural resources; rightsSDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG16
FAH279H5Baroque Art and ArchitectureAn introduction to art and society in Europe, ca. 1600 to ca. 1800 CE. Tensions between the Catholic Church and Protestantism; the rise of powerful, competing courts; the growth of increasingly complex urban centres; and the entry of the "wider public" into the art market all create new roles for representation in Europe. Developments in painting, prints, sculpture, architecture, urban planning, and festivals are considered. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5URBANSDG11
FAH281H5An Introduction to Islamic Art and ArchitectureThis course surveys art and architecture of the Islamic worlds, beginning with the emergence of Islam in the seventh century. It examines works of art ranging from the monumental (palaces, mosques, shrines) to the portable (textiles, jewelry, books), spanning the Islamic world from Spain to Central and East Asia. A range of materials and artistic techniques will be considered, as will several religious and secular contexts and different patterns in patronage and workshop production. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
FAH282H5Gardens, Homes, and Palaces in the Muslim WorldRuba Kana'anHow did Muslims live in the pre-modern world, and, how did they interact with their surrounding environment? This course introduces examples of homes, palaces, and gardens dating from the 8th to the 18th centuries. The course includes examples from the Arab world, Turkey, Iran, and South Asia. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
FAH307H1Ancient Art, Migration, and the Barbarian ?Other?This course surveys the cultural, artistic and social interactions between the Graeco-Roman world and the so-called ?Barbarians? beyond its eastern and northern confines. Chronologically, it spans from the Greek Geometric and Archaic periods (9th - 6th c. BCE) to the disintegration of the Western Roman Empire and the emergence of Early Medieval Europe (6th- 7th c. CE). The course will address issues of artistic production, material culture, ritual and cult in relation to the mobility of peoples and groups, objects and individuals.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
FAH325H1Urban IslamBy challenging essentialist questioning of Islamic urbanism, this course considers the inter-animated and complex web of forces that drive cities forward by identifying repertoires of underlying logic. Through a deep and historically situated reading of Medieval Mecca, Medina, Damascus, Jerusalem, Baghdad, Cairo, and Cordoba, we will map and encode history on the urban scale to reveal what makes a city "Islamic." Visual mapping skill cultivation for communication purposes (both digital and analogue) will be taught throughout to enhance understandings of urban complexity in rich historical contexts.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
FAH338H1Art and Consumers in the Renaissance (1400-1700)It has long been said that the material culture of the Renaissance generated the first stir of consumerism with a variety of artifacts produced from 1400 to 1700 in Italy. This course explores the material culture of Renaissance consumerism and discusses the production and function of works in different art media.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5CONSUM; productionSDG12
FAH356H5Colonial Latin American Art and ArchitectureThis lecture course will examine processes of cultural transfer and transformation in the planning of cities, churches, and viceregal palaces from the early days of contact through the Baroque in the Viceroyalties of Mexico and Peru and in Brasil. The persistence of indigenous beliefs and forms will be tracked in painting, sculpture, and architecture alongside the emergence of unique genres (i.e., castas, feather paintings), building types, and forms based on the particular makeup of a colonial society. [24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5CITIESSDG11
FAH371H1Architecture and Urbanism in Baroque EuropeArchitecture studied through its various building types and in its urban context. Themes include architecture and power under Absolutism, and the rise of the modern city.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5URBANSDG11
FAH375H5All Our Relations: Indigenous Land Stewardship and ArtThis class embraces land- and earth-based skills as tools in the production and maintenance of revitalization efforts in Indigenous culture and knowledge. Throughout the course students will lead the development, production and maintenance of a Community Medicine Garden initiative to be located in the heart of the UTM campus. Topics include environmental liberation, food sovereignty, kinship, gardening as resistance, matriarchy, land stewardship, landscaping with regional indigenous plants, Indigenous feminisms, place-based knowledge and knowledge sharing. Activities will include: film screenings, community feasts, public readings, drumming circles, and guests speakers with Traditional Indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, environmental activists, and local grassroots community-based partners. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies0.5environmentSDG13
FAH388H1Art History Theories and PracticesInvestigates the development of art and architectural history as an academic discipline and method of analysis including discussion of varied approaches such as formalism, connoisseurship, post-colonialism, feminism, queer studies, psychoanalysis, and material studies. The course explores the relationship of art history to other disciplines including archaeology, literary criticism, film studies, and anthropology. Suggested for all Specialists and students considering graduate study in art history.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceArt History0.5queerSDG5
FCS194H1Urban Youth Languages of the WorldAre there such phenomena as urban youth ?languages?? How do they evolve and what commonalities or divergences are there? In this course, we will survey a range of urban youth languages that have emerged in African, North American and European contexts ? with specific focus on their structural (linguistic) and social typicalities. Discussions and presentations will focus on the sociolinguistic concepts of language contact, bi/multilingualism, lexical innovation/renovation, language mixing, etc. in relation to youth language practices. We will be comparing major varieties of these language practices within and between the continents, and also be assessing their prospects and implications for language change. This course is taught in English. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceFrench0.5urbanSDG11
FOR200H1Conservation of Canada's ForestsPatrick JamesForest conservation issues in Canada; development of forest management philosophy in Canadian and temperate forest regions; and concepts of sustainability. Techniques for more sustainable forest management: structural retention; forest certification; old growth; value-added and non-traditional forest products. Field trip fee: $20.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forestSDG14, SDG15
FOR201H1Conservation of Tropical and Subtropical ForestsMd. HalimThe world's major tropical and subtropical forest biomes; prospects for conservation and sustainable management; consequences of different forest development strategies; tropical deforestation and selective logging; agroforestry; biodiversity and non-timber forest products; the fuelwood crisis; large carnivore conservation; ecological, economic and social perspectives.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forest; biodiVERSITYSDG14, SDG15
FOR300H1Forest Products in Sustainable ForestryBenjamin KuttnerTraditional and non-traditional forest products; wood structure; properties and material attributes; functional characteristics and logistics of wood product industry. Contribution of innovative product development to conservation; adding value; residue use; biorefinery; under-utilized species; wood protection. Forest product certification; eco-labelling; life cycle analysis.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5INDUSTR; conserv; forestSDG8, SDG14, SDG15
FOR302H1Societal Values and Forest ManagementThe course will provide diverse perspectives about societal values and forests, such as Indigenous perspective, ecosystem services and human well-being, climate change and carbon sequestration, and forest management systems, such as community-based forest management and adaptive management systems; and will develop an understanding of the need of integrative approach to address the social, cultural, economic, and scientific issues associated with forest management.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CLIMATE; forestSDG13, SDG15
FOR303H1Human Dimensions of Global ForestsHan XiaoGlobal forest resources; relationships between societies and forests, consumption, trade and valuation of timber and non-timber products; ecosystem services, climate change and forestry, tropical deforestation and softwood lumber dispute.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5TRADE; consum; climate; forestSDG10, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
FOR305H1Biology of Trees and ForestsAn overview of the biology of trees and the ecological principles that govern the structure and function of forests. Topics in tree biology will include tree identification, wood anatomy, tree architecture, resource acquisition and allocation, tree growth and mortality. Topics in forest ecology will include resource competition, stand development, species succession, and the cycling of nutrients and energy. This course will include a substantial field and lab component.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5ENERGY; forest; ecologySDG7, SDG15
FOR310H1Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest ManagementSocio-economic, technical, political and environmental issues associated with the utilization of forest biomass (e.g., harvesting residues, thinnings, salvage, short rotation woody crops) for a source of renewable energy.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5ENERGY; renewable; environment; forestSDG7, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
FOR400Y1Advanced Seminar in Forest ConservationExamination of current and emerging critical issues affecting sustainable management and conservation of global forests. Seminars led by students, faculty and visiting speakers.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR400Y1Advanced Seminar in Forest ConservationExamination of current and emerging critical issues affecting sustainable management and conservation of global forests. Seminars led by students, faculty and visiting speakers.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design1CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR401H1Research Paper/Thesis in Forest ConservationIndividual in-depth student research projects on significant forest conservation and forest biomaterial issues, based on field and/or laboratory research, or literature survey. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR401H1Research Paper/Thesis in Forest ConservationIndividual in-depth student research projects on significant forest conservation and forest biomaterial issues, based on field and/or laboratory research, or literature survey. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR403H1Directed ReadingsProvides opportunities for students to carry out individual in-depth study of current forest conservation and forest biomaterials issues, under the direction of a faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR403H1Directed ReadingsProvides opportunities for students to carry out individual in-depth study of current forest conservation and forest biomaterials issues, under the direction of a faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5CONSERV; forestSDG15
FOR410H1Bioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologySally KrigstinTechnological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels and chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels and valuable chemicals for other applications will be discussed.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5ENERGY; forestSDG7, SDG15
FOR416H1Green Urban InfrastructureDanijela Puric-MladenovicTrees in and around the city are key to providing multiple engineered and ecological services that only recently have been brought into the responsible fiscal planning of every municipality around the globe. Reviews the role of trees and woodlands in providing environmental, social and economic benefits to urban and peri-urban residents and to the broader environment. Examines approaches to the characterization of urban forest ecosystems, and their planning and management.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; urban; environment; forestSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14
FOR419H1Forest Fire Behaviour and ManagementUnderstanding forest fire activity is important for predicting fire's impact on forests and the wildland-urban interface, as well as understanding the impacts of climate change. Basic principles of forest fuel moisture exchange, fire occurrence and fire behaviour are explored. Emphasis is placed on application of these models to real fire management problems.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Design0.5URBAN; climate; forestSDG11, SDG13, SDG14
FOR421H1GREEN URBAN INFRASTRUCTUREDanijela Puric-MladenovicSt. GeorgeFallFaculty of Applied Science & EngineeringCross Disciplinary Programs Office0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; urbanSDG9, SDG11
FRE304H1Contemporary French Women's Prose FictionAn analysis of selected prose texts of the last hundred years written by major French women authors, emphasizing themes and textual strategies used to represent the female subject, her relationship to language, and the role of ethnicity, class, and gender in the construction of identity.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceFrench0.5gender; womenSDG5
FRE379H1Sociolinguistics of FrenchLaura KastronicThe relationship between language use and social factors such as socio-economic status, social context and gender of speaker. Theoretical notions are derived through the analysis of specific data, focusing on Canadian French and other varieties spoken in the Americas.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceFrench0.5genderSDG5
FRE391H5Women of the Francophone WorldAn in-depth examination of the representation of women in a selection of novels and films from Francophone countries, which will include a combination of works by French, Quebecois, Guadeloupean, Algerian, and Senegalese authors and directors. The course will focus on historical and socio-cultural francophone contexts and will include a discussion of Feminism and of the impact of political systems and ideologies on the lives of women. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies0.5womenSDG5
FREC54H3Paris through the AgesThis course is designed to provide students with an introduction to Paris’ great monuments, buildings, streets, and neighbourhoods through art history (painting, sculpture, and architecture), music, and literature from the Middle ages to the beginning of the 20th century.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughLanguage Studies (UTSC)0.5BUILDINGSSDG9
FSC320H5Forensic PsychopathologyPathology is the study of disease and psychopathology is the study of mental illness. In Forensic Psychopathology, then, we make inquiries about mental illness in the context of forensic practices. In this course, we will explore multiple topics in the field providing the student with a general insight into its history, scientific merits, and practical relevance. We will survey prevailing theories on mental health, illness, and treatment. Investigate psychiatric diagnoses such as (juvenile) Conduct Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy, hereunder their application and relevance in risk assessment, behavior prediction, and offender rehabilitation. We will also discuss methodological, ethical, and legal issues in the field, for example, the scientific validity of psychiatric diagnostics, the ethical implications of using psychiatric assessments in forensic institutions, and the legal responsibility of mentally ill offenders. [24L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; institutionSDG3, SDG16
FSC330H5Best Practices in Forensic ScienceThis course will guide students through the common fundamentals of quality assurance, health & safety, resiliency and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) training and report writing in forensic science professions. [24L,12S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; resilienSDG3, SDG11
FSC330H5Best Practices in Forensic ScienceThis course will guide students through the common fundamentals of quality assurance, health & safety, resiliency and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) training and report writing in forensic science professions. [24L,12S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5health; resilienSDG3, SDG11
FSC401H5Forensic PathologyThis is a general introduction of the scientific and medical basis of forensic pathology. The scientific aspects of death investigation will be emphasized including cause, manner, and time of death. Emphasis will be placed in developing skills to critically examine the published forensic scientific and medical literature. Also included are human rights death investigation, and custodial death. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5RIGHTSSDG16
FSC483H5Collaborative Research InternshipAs the alternative capstone experience, this course provides students the opportunity to work in a cross-disciplinary collaborative environment to address case-based research questions. Students MUST apply for this course, and topics will be made available at the time of application. Course Application & Procedures: https://www.utm.utoronto.ca/forensic/applicationsMississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
FSTA01H3Foods That Changed the WorldThis course introduces students to university-level skills through an exploration of the connections between food, environment, culture, religion, and society. Using a food biography perspective, it critically examines ecological, material, and political foundations of the global food system and how food practices affect raced, classed, gendered, and national identities. ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; gender; environmentSDG2, SDG5, SDG13
FSTB01H3Methodologies in Food StudiesJeffrey PilcherThis course, which is a requirement in the Minor program in Food Studies, provides students with the basic content and methodological training they need to understand the connections between food, culture, and society. The course examines fundamental debates around food politics, health, culture, sustainability, and justice. Students will gain an appreciation of the material, ecological, and political foundations of the global food system as well as the ways that food shapes personal and collective identities of race, class, gender, and nation. Tutorials will meet in the Culinaria Kitchen Laboratory.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; health; gender; justiceSDG2, SDG3, SDG5, SDG16
GASB05H3Media and GlobalizationThis course examines the role of technological and cultural networks in mediating and facilitating the social, economic and political processes of globalization. Key themes include imperialism, militarization, global political economy, activism, and emerging media technologies. Particular attention is paid to cultures of media production and reception outside of North America.Same as MDSB05H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5PRODUCTIONSDG11
GASB57H3Sub-Continental Histories: South Asia in the WorldA survey of South Asian history. The course explores diverse and exciting elements of this long history, such as politics, religion, trade, literature, and the arts, keeping in mind South Asia's global and diasporic connections.Same as HISB57H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5TRADESDG10
GASB74H3Asian Foods and Global CitiesThis course explores the social circulation of Asian-identified foods and beverages using research from geographers, anthropologists, sociologists, and historians to understand their changing roles in ethnic entrepreneur-dominated cityscapes of London, Toronto, Singapore, Hong Kong, and New York. Foods under study include biryani, curry, coffee, dumplings, hoppers, roti, and tea.Same as HISB74H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; citieSDG2, SDG11
GASC20H3Gendering Global AsiaThis course offers students a critical and analytical perspective on issues of gender history, equity, discrimination, resistance, and struggle facing societies in East and South Asia and their diasporas.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
GASD02H3Senior Seminar: Topics in Global Asian SocietiesThis course offers a capstone experience of issues which confront Asian and diasporic societies. Themes include gender, environment, human rights, equity, religion, politics, law, migration, labour, nationalism, post-colonialism, and new social movements. It is conducted in seminar format with emphasis on discussion, critical reading, and writing of research papers.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5gender; labour; environment; rightsSDG5, SDG8, SDG13, SDG16
GASD54H3Aqueous History: Water-Stories for a FutureThis upper-level seminar will explore how water has shaped human experience. It will explore water landscapes, the representation of water in legal and political thought, slave narratives, and water management in urban development from the 16th century. Using case studies from South Asia and North America we will understand how affective, political and social relations to water bodies are made and remade over time. Same as HISD54H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5WATER; urban; waterSDG6, SDG11
GASD59H3Law and Society in Chinese HistoryA seminar course on Chinese legal tradition and its role in shaping social, political, economic, and cultural developments, especially in late imperial and modern China. Topics include the foundations of legal culture, regulations on sexuality, women's property rights, crime fictions, private/state violence, laws of ethnicities, prison reforms and modernization.Same as HISD59H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; cities; rightsSDG5, SDG11, SDG16
GASD59H3Law and Society in Chinese HistoryA seminar course on Chinese legal tradition and its role in shaping social, political, economic, and cultural developments, especially in late imperial and modern China. Topics include the foundations of legal culture, regulations on sexuality, women's property rights, crime fictions, private/state violence, laws of ethnicities, prison reforms and modernization.Same as HISD59H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; cities; rightsSDG5, SDG11, SDG16
GER195H1Cities, Real and Imagined (E)Cities have been described as places of desire and places of fear. They pulse with life, bringing together people from different class, gender, and ethnic backgrounds, simultaneously giving rise to a sense of freedom and oppression, a sense of belonging and alienation. This course will explore the city as a physical reality that shapes our lives, but is also a projection of our deepest imaginings. Through readings of philosophical and sociological texts by influential theorists of the city, we will consider various ancient and modern conceptions of urban space and subjectivity. Alongside these theoretical readings, we will also examine literary and filmic representations of the city as a space of desire, memory and power. All readings and class discussions are in English. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGermanic Languages & Literatures0.5cities; urbanSDG11
GGR101H1Histories of Environmental ChangeThe course will focus on the processes that drive environmental change and how past societies have responded to the constraints that these impose. The emphasis is on the current interglacial, the Holocene, and how increasing population and technology has affected human-environment interactions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR107H1Environment, Food and PeopleSarah WakefieldExamines the relations between food, nature, and society. Food is fundamental to human existence, and central to most cultures; it also has significant and widespread effects on the physical and social environments. Food is used as a lens to explore human-environment interactions locally and globally. Serves as an introduction to environmental and human geography.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5food; environmentSDG2, SDG13
GGR111H5Human GeographyThe course introduces human geography through an exploration of the evolution of geography to modern traditions, the measurement of geographic space and phenomena and the spatial interactions of people with the environment. Students gain an understanding of geographic principles through lectures and course material and develop fieldwork skills through practical sessions and field exercises.This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR111H5Human GeographyThe course introduces human geography through an exploration of the evolution of geography to modern traditions, the measurement of geographic space and phenomena and the spatial interactions of people with the environment. Students gain an understanding of geographic principles through lectures and course material and develop fieldwork skills through practical sessions and field exercises.This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR112H1Geographies of Globalization, Development and InequalityEconomic development and underdevelopment are taking shape in an increasingly interconnected global context. This course examines geographic approaches to "Third World" development, economic globalization, poverty, and inequality. It pays particular attention to the roles of rural-urban and international migration in shaping specific landscapes of development.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5poverty; equality; inequality; urban; ruralSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
GGR112H5Physical GeographyTingting ZhuThis physical geography course provides a broad introduction to the Earth System, involving the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere and their interactions, at local to planetary spatial scales. It examines natural and anthropogenic origins of environmental change. Key methods and techniques used by physical geographers to study the Earth System are covered in lectures, readings, practical sessions and field work. Fieldwork is integral to all sub-disciplines of geography, and a major component of this course. There is no substitute for direct, hands-on exploration of the natural world. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR112H5Physical GeographyTingting ZhuThis physical geography course provides a broad introduction to the Earth System, involving the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere and their interactions, at local to planetary spatial scales. It examines natural and anthropogenic origins of environmental change. Key methods and techniques used by physical geographers to study the Earth System are covered in lectures, readings, practical sessions and field work. Fieldwork is integral to all sub-disciplines of geography, and a major component of this course. There is no substitute for direct, hands-on exploration of the natural world. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG5, SDG13
GGR124H1Cities and Urban LifeOffers an introduction to North American cities and urbanization in a global context. It explores social, cultural, political and economic forces, processes, and events that shape contemporary urbanism. The course adopts the lens of 'fixity' and 'flow' to examine how the movement of people, ideas, goods, and capital, as well as their containment in the infrastructure and space of the city, give rise to particular urban forms.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; cities; urbanSDG9, SDG11
GGR124H1Cities and Urban LifeOffers an introduction to North American cities and urbanization in a global context. It explores social, cultural, political and economic forces, processes, and events that shape contemporary urbanism. The course adopts the lens of 'fixity' and 'flow' to examine how the movement of people, ideas, goods, and capital, as well as their containment in the infrastructure and space of the city, give rise to particular urban forms.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; cities; urbanSDG9, SDG11
GGR197H1Nature, Conservation and JusticeNeera SinghEvery day we read about climate change, species extinction, environmental degradation and the need for nature conservation. It is increasingly becoming apparent that the environmental problems that we face today arise from a deeper crisis relating to human ways of viewing and connecting to nature. This course asks how we can rework human ways of relating to nature, while querying the idea of ?nature? and questioning the dominant approaches to nature conservation. It asks how can concerns for nature and for other species be balanced with that for human livelihoods and well-being? How can inequalities with regards to the distribution of environmental goods and bads be reduced? How are citizens and communities in the different parts of the world struggling against environmental injustice and to protect their local environments? How do these place-based movement demand justice and what visions do they articulate for a more just and sustainable world? How do indigenous worldviews offer conceptual resources for rethinking nature and our ways of relating to nature? The course will explore these questions using lectures, class discussion, videos and student presentations. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5CLIMATE; environment; conserv; justiceSDG13, SDG14, SDG16
GGR198H1Political SpacesIs space political? In what ways? What are the implications of thinking about politics geographically? How do political conflicts both invoke and transform space and place? What kinds of alternative political relationships to space and alternative mappings can we imagine? This course will attempt to answer those questions while exploring a wide range of possible contexts in which political spaces are evident. These may include: conflicts over the intimate spaces of the body, identity, and the home; the racialization and gendering of space; the politics of cities and urbanization; the boundaries of public and private space; struggles over land, property, resources and ?nature?; the political geographies of labour, citizenship and migration; globalization of economic markets and alternative economic political and social cartographies; borders, geopolitics, and the territorial politics of empire; and the geographic projects of colonialism, post-coloniality, modernity, and modernization. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5gender; labour; cities; urbanSDG5, SDG8, SDG11
GGR199H1Race, Conflict, and the Urban LandscapeThis course will focus on how racial conflict affects the size, shape, composition, and landscape of cities. It will emphasize Canadian and American cities, but other international examples will be discussed for comparison. Ethno-racial conflict has been, and continues to be, an important force on cities throughout the world. Course topics will include housing and employment discrimination, ethno-racial uprisings, and inequality. The course will be a discussion-oriented blend of academic readings, popular journalism, and film. It will serve as an introduction to concepts that are dealt with in greater depth in second, third, and fourth year geography courses. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5equality; employment; inequality; cities; urbanSDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG11
GGR201H1GeomorphologyIntroduction to the principles of geomorphology; earth materials; major features of crustal morphology; landforming processes of water, wind, waves and ice; human impact on earth surface processes. One hour laboratory session approximately every other week; a local field trip.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5WATER; solar; waterSDG6, SDG7
GGR201H5Introduction to GeomorphologyThis course provides an introduction to the principles and concepts of geomorphology, the study of the processes that shape the surface of the earth. The course adopts a process-oriented approach to the study of the variety of landforms found in the natural environment. Topics are mainly taken from a Canadian perspective and include energy flows through the land, weathering and erosion (fluvial, coastal, chemical, aeolian, and glacial), hillslope materials, drainage basin morphology, periglacial environments, and human modification of the landscape. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENERGY; environment; weatherSDG7, SDG13
GGR202H5Geography of CanadaCanada continues to be one of the world's great storehouses of basic resources: fish, wood, minerals, grains, livestock, water, recreational space and more. Human impact, to the point of extinction, has varied across the country. The geography of regional change in Canada, over several centuries, is basic to this social science course. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; fishSDG6, SDG14
GGR202H5Geography of CanadaCanada continues to be one of the world's great storehouses of basic resources: fish, wood, minerals, grains, livestock, water, recreational space and more. Human impact, to the point of extinction, has varied across the country. The geography of regional change in Canada, over several centuries, is basic to this social science course. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; fishSDG6, SDG14
GGR203H1Introduction to ClimatologyIntroduction to the large scale processes responsible for determining global and regional climate and atmospheric circulation patterns, as well as the small scale processes responsible for determining the microclimates of specific environments.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5CLIMATE; enviromentSDG13
GGR205H1Introduction to Soil ScienceSarah PeirceIntroduction to soil science dealing with the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils; soil formation and development; the classification of soils, and the application of soil science to environmental, agricultural and forestry issues. Field trip cost: $20.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENT; forestSDG13, SDG15
GGR206H1Introduction to HydrologyIntroduction to the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on the physical processes, including precipitation, interception, evaporation, runoff, ground water and soil water. Basic hydrological models will be practiced. Field trip cost: $20.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5WATER; waterSDG6
GGR207H5Cities, Urbanization and DevelopmentAlan WalksThis course will introduce students to urban social processes, urban form and urban history. A particular emphasis will be placed on global urbanization, internal spatial and social structure of cities, as well as past and contemporary urban problems. [36L, 12T ]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
GGR207H5Cities, Urbanization and DevelopmentAlan WalksThis course will introduce students to urban social processes, urban form and urban history. A particular emphasis will be placed on global urbanization, internal spatial and social structure of cities, as well as past and contemporary urban problems. [36L, 12T ]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
GGR209H5Economic GeographyTara VinodraiAn introduction to the interaction of the economic, social and political institutions that determine the quality of life in a particular place. Subjects covered range from economic efficiency and social equity to the location dynamics of value chains. The emphasis of the course is on Canadian examples. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
GGR210H5Social GeographiesPaul BockingSocial geography is concerned with the ways in which social relations, identities and inequalities are produced across space. This course examines social geography in the North American context with a specific focus on identity/difference and inequalities in cities. We will explore cities as sites of both cosmopolitan inclusion and exclusion. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CITIESSDG11
GGR214H5Global Weather and ClimateLaura BrownThe climates of the globe are created from the kinds of weather systems which usually occur. This course surveys the weather systems of the globe and the geography which helps to transform them into regional climates. It uses just enough physics to show you how it all works and how we can make informed assessments about ideas on climatic change. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CLIMATE; weatherSDG13
GGR217H1Urban Landscapes and PlanningKatharine RankinConsiders the role of planning in shaping the urban landscape through historical and contemporary examples that illustrate the interplay of modernist and post-modernist approaches to city building. Traces the origins, competing rationalities and lingering effects of planning in the production of urban space. Broaches possibilities for engaging planning critically to address challenges of social and environmental justice in cities today.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5CITIES; urban; production; environment; justiceSDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG16
GGR217H5Fundamentals of HydrologyHydrology is the study of the quantity, quality, storage, and transfer of the world's freshwater. The presence of water on and in the continents and atmosphere sustains the terrestrial biosphere, including human life. This course focuses on the central concepts of hydrology by taking a systems approach to the movement and storage of water on and in a watershed. Based on the framework of the water cycle, the course emphasizes the physical processes that control the stores and transfers of water and energy in the Earth system. This course serves as a gateway to the more advanced treatment of hydrology in upper levels, as well as providing a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the science of water for students in other streams of physical geography, environmental science, earth science, and biology. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; energy; environment; waterSDG6, SDG7, SDG13
GGR217H5Fundamentals of HydrologyHydrology is the study of the quantity, quality, storage, and transfer of the world's freshwater. The presence of water on and in the continents and atmosphere sustains the terrestrial biosphere, including human life. This course focuses on the central concepts of hydrology by taking a systems approach to the movement and storage of water on and in a watershed. Based on the framework of the water cycle, the course emphasizes the physical processes that control the stores and transfers of water and energy in the Earth system. This course serves as a gateway to the more advanced treatment of hydrology in upper levels, as well as providing a solid understanding of the fundamentals of the science of water for students in other streams of physical geography, environmental science, earth science, and biology. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; energy; environment; waterSDG6, SDG7, SDG13
GGR221H1New Economic SpacesProvides an introduction to economic geography and economic geography theory from the 1970s on, illustrating the different ways that geographers have conceptualized the restructuring of resource industries, manufacturing and services. The crisis of Fordism and the rise of new production models will be given particular attention, along with the reorganization of finance, the rise of cultural industries and the globalization of commodity chains. New regimes of governance of the economy will also be considered.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INDUSTR; production; governanceSDG9, SDG12, SDG16
GGR223H1Environment, Society and ResourcesFocuses on society-environment relations and different approaches to resource governance and management. This includes exploration of the spatial, social, and political economic origins and implications of humans' changing relations to nature. Drawing on debates from environmental governance and political ecology literatures, the course also investigates the ways that different actors and institutions have framed and sought solutions to environmental and resource challenges.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENT; ecology; institution; governanceSDG13, SDG15, SDG16
GGR227H5Ecosystems and Environmental ChangeTingting ZhuThis course introduces the rapidly advancing fields of ecosystem science through the exploration of how ecosystems respond to climate change, pollution, and intensive natural resource management. The impacts from anthropogenic stressors on ecosystem functioning are often complex, with interactions occurring among plants, microorganisms, and physical and chemical environments. Lecture topics and case studies focus primarily on important representative Canadian ecosystems that also play vital roles in the resource sector including forests, agricultural land, wetlands and aquatic ecosystems. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; climate; environment; pollut; forestSDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR227H5Ecosystems and Environmental ChangeTingting ZhuThis course introduces the rapidly advancing fields of ecosystem science through the exploration of how ecosystems respond to climate change, pollution, and intensive natural resource management. The impacts from anthropogenic stressors on ecosystem functioning are often complex, with interactions occurring among plants, microorganisms, and physical and chemical environments. Lecture topics and case studies focus primarily on important representative Canadian ecosystems that also play vital roles in the resource sector including forests, agricultural land, wetlands and aquatic ecosystems. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; climate; environment; pollut; forestSDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR240H1Geographies of Colonialism in North AmericaThis course considers the creation and consolidation of settler colonies in the region known to many as North America. With an eye to the colonial present, the course focuses on the period from the 15th century to the early 20th century. Cultural texts and place-specific cases are used to ground themes and processes that also bear on the wider field of historical geography, including narratives of discovery and possession; ecological imperialism and environmental transformation; the (re)settlement of land and colonial government; enslavement and industrialization; frontiers, borders, and resource extraction; and some of the Indigenous geographies that preceded, were transformed by and transformed, and exceeded the reach of colonial power.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INDUSTR; environmentSDG9, SDG13
GGR251H1Geography of InnovationExplores how new technologies and industries are generated and sustained, or failed to be. Focuses on the dynamics of leading technological sectors such as electronics, automobiles and biotechnology in their geographical and historical contexts. We critically scrutinise the iconic Silicon Valley along with other major innovative regions/nations, and investigate the key role of universities and finance in driving innovation and entrepreneurship. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INNOVATION; industrSDG9
GGR252H1Marketing GeographyGeography matters in the success of both public and private sector organisations. Using mostly retail examples contemporary location problems are addressed. The geographies of demand and supply are analysed and trade area and site selection techniques are applied. The relevance of the planning context and utility of geovisualisation techniques such as GIS are also briefly considered.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5TRADESDG10
GGR252H5Retail GeographyJoseph LeydonCommercial activities are a significant and visible part of our social system. We are what we consume, and our consumption priorities describe our society. Consumption practices are mediated through the action of retailers and the preference of consumers. The course examines the organization of the retail economy and considers relationships between retail practices and environmental, ethical and social justice concerns. Likewise it explores how social, environmental and ethical beliefs of consumers influence their purchasing practices, the connections between consumer behaviour and the practices of retailers and the possibilities for developing a retail economy that better aligns with societal concerns for social justice, ethical production and environmental sustainability. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CONSUM; production; environment; justiceSDG12, SDG13, SDG16
GGR254H1Geography USAAfter a short historical overview of the making of America, this course focuses on contemporary issues in American society, economy, politics, race, regional distinctions and disparities, urban development.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5URBANSDG11
GGR265H5(Under)development and Health in sub-Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan (SSA) is one of the most diverse and intriguing regions in the world. In this course students will be introduced to contemporary development and health issues by examining historical experiences, social, political, economic and environmental processes. This approach will help highlight the vast diversity and address some of the many questions about the region including: What processes underlie famine and food insecurity? What are the underlying causes of the conflict and genocide in some regions? What processes explain spatial disparities in health, or regional and gender differences in HIV rates and the outbreak of rare diseases like Ebola? The course will rely on case studies to provide an understanding of the complexity in each topic. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5food; health; gender; environmentSDG2, SDG3, SDG5, SDG13
GGR265H5(Under)development and Health in sub-Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan (SSA) is one of the most diverse and intriguing regions in the world. In this course students will be introduced to contemporary development and health issues by examining historical experiences, social, political, economic and environmental processes. This approach will help highlight the vast diversity and address some of the many questions about the region including: What processes underlie famine and food insecurity? What are the underlying causes of the conflict and genocide in some regions? What processes explain spatial disparities in health, or regional and gender differences in HIV rates and the outbreak of rare diseases like Ebola? The course will rely on case studies to provide an understanding of the complexity in each topic. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5food; health; gender; environmentSDG2, SDG3, SDG5, SDG13
GGR301H1Fluvial GeomorphologySarah PeirceElements of drainage basin morphology and hydrology, classification of rivers, stream patterns and hydraulic geometry. Elements of open channel flow, sediment transport and the paleohydrology of river systems. River channel adjustments to environmental change, human impact and the management/design of river habitats. Exercises include experimentation in a laboratory flume. Usually offered every other year. Field trip cost: $20.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR304H5DendrochronologyTrevor PorterTree rings are a powerful natural archive for addressing research questions across a range of spatial and temporal scales, owing to the fact that they are annually resolved, long-lived (e.g., multi-century) and cover a large portion of the Earth's surface. Tree-rings reflect changes in their local environment, and they are sensitive to factors that limit biological processes such as light, soil moisture, temperature and disturbance. Environment changes are 'encoded' in the physical properties of tree-rings (e.g., ring-width, wood density or isotopes). This course will provide students with the theoretical background and technical skills needed to cross-date, measure, analyse and interpret tree-ring data, and use this information to address practical research questions. [12L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5URBAN; environmentSDG11, SDG13
GGR305H1BiogeographySarah PeirceIdentifies patterns in and explains processes behind plant and animal distributions through space and time. Topics covered include ecological and evolutionary dynamics, disturbance, dispersal, migration, continental drift, speciation, extinction, paleoenvironments and island biogeography. We also examine terrestrial and marine biomes, the meaning of biodiversity, conservation challenges, and recent biogeographic changes associated with human impact.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5URBAN; environment; marine; conserv; biodiversitySDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR305H5BiogeographyAnalysis of past and present plant and animal distributions, and of the environmental and biological constraints involved. The course emphasizes the impact of continental drift, Quaternary climatic changes and human interference on contemporary patterns. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR307H5Environmental Soil ScienceSoils play critical roles in sustaining life. They support plants and agriculture, serve as home to a plethora of organisms, recycle organic matter and nutrients, provide materials for construction, art, and medicine, preserve paleoecological and archaeological records, regulate global climate through the exchange of greenhouse gasses, and filter contaminants in water and waste. This course introduces fundamentals of soil formation, physical, chemical and biological characteristics, and classification schemes. It explores the role of, and how humans interact with, soils in Canadian forests, wetlands, agricultural systems, and industrial and urban settings. Aspects of carbon, nutrient, and pollutant biogeochemistry in soils are explored in detail. This course fulfills 2 field days. [24L, 36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5agriculture; water; industr; urban; waste; recycl; climate; greenhouse gas; environment; water; pollut; forestSDG2, SDG6, SDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR308H1Canadian Arctic and Subarctic EnvironmentsSarah PeirceWe will explore the climate geomorphology, soils, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, limnology and food web structures of the Arctic and Subarctic. Current stresses of climate change and pollution are discussed along with scientific and political solutions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5food; climate; environment; pollutSDG2, SDG13, SDG14
GGR313H5Gender and the CityIn this course students will be introduced to approaches in social geography that examine the links between gender and urban environments. Specific topics and issues to be covered include, for example, poverty, work, sex trade, human trafficking and safety. Topics will be explored across multiple scales including bodies, home, neighbourhood and community. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5poverty; gender; trade; women; urbanSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
GGR313H5Gender and the CityIn this course students will be introduced to approaches in social geography that examine the links between gender and urban environments. Specific topics and issues to be covered include, for example, poverty, work, sex trade, human trafficking and safety. Topics will be explored across multiple scales including bodies, home, neighbourhood and community. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5poverty; gender; trade; women; urbanSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
GGR314H1Global WarmingL D D HarveyA comprehensive examination of the greenhouse warming problem, beginning with economic, carbon cycle, and climate model projections; impacts on and adaptive responses of agriculture, forests, fisheries, and water resources; options and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5agriculture; water; climate; greenhouse gas; global warming; water; fish; forestSDG2, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR315H5Physical HydrologyThis course centres on the advanced treatment of the physical principles involved in the occurrence and movement of water on and beneath the Earth's surface. Watershed-scale hydrologic systems are investigated, along with basic principles of fluid mechanics. Open channel hydraulics, soil water, and groundwater processes are investigated. The importance of understanding water movement in the environment by exploring the relationship of hydrology to other environmental sciences is stressed. This course fulfills 2 field days. [24L, 36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; environment; waterSDG6, SDG13
GGR317H5The Cryosphere: Canada's Frozen EnvironmentsLaura BrownSnow and ice dominate the Canadian landscape. There is virtually no area in Canada that escapes the influence of snow and ice. We skate on frozen ponds, ski down snow covered mountains, drive through snow blizzards and watch how ice jams in rivers cause rivers to swell and floods to occur. The duration and the thickness of snow and ice increase rapidly northwards, and glaciers are found in mountainous areas and in large parts of the Arctic region. Given that snow and ice impact heavily on the Canadian way of life, this course seeks to understand the dynamics of snow and ice in a hydrological context. This course will examine snow properties, snow cover distribution, glacier hydrology, melt runoff, and ice in its many forms (lake ice, river ice, sea ice, and ground ice). This course will also examine some of the recent observed changes occurring in the cryosphere regions of Canada. This course includes an off campus field trip. This course fulfills 2 field days. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR318H5Political GeographyPolitical geography is concerned with the spatial expression of political entities and events. It involves analysis at a variety of scales ranging from the local to the global. The control and manipulation of territory and the imposition of political boundaries and political ideas are central to this analysis. The course provides discussion on nation building, the emergence of the state system, theories on the state, and the role of the state as provider of services and regulator of activities, and electoral geography and governance. This course fulfills 1 field day. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5GOVERNANCESDG16
GGR320H1Geographies of Transnationalism, Migration, and GenderThis course examines recent changes in global migration processes. Specifically, the course addresses the transnationalization and feminization of migrant populations and various segments of the global labor force. The coursework focuses on analyzing classical paradigms in migration studies, as well as emerging theoretical approaches to gender and migration. In addition, it traces the shifting empirical trends in gendered employment and mobility patterns. It uses in-depth case study material to query the frameworks employed in migration studies and to understand the grounded implications of gendered migration. It pays particular attention to the interventions made by feminist geographers in debates about work, migration, place, and space.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5gender; employmentSDG5, SDG8
GGR324H1Spatial Political EconomyThis course aims to explore how economic agents act and interact in space and how this creates subdivisions within the global, national and regional political economy. In a largely conceptual and interdisciplinary manner, the course investigates the role of institutions in the relational economy and the spatial construction of the political economy. Institutions are viewed as formal or informal stabilizations of economic interaction. Questions which guide the analysis are related to how institutions are established, how they evolve, how they impact economic action, and how they are changed through political and economic action at different spatial scales. Through this, the course introduces a relational and spatial perspective to the analysis of economic action and institutions. This perspective is based on the assumption that economic action is situated in socio-institutional contexts, evolves along particular paths and, at the same time, remains fundamentally contingent. Topics to be discussed include the social construction of economic space, industrial organization and location, the establishment and maintenance of economic networks, as well as processes of firm formation, learning and knowledge creation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INDUSTR; indtitutionSDG9, SDG16
GGR325H5Business and Industrial GeographyPierre DesrochersThis course uses economic principles and geographical analysis to help you understand the global economic map of the early 21st century. It aims to show the way in which economic activities are organized within and across countries and how this affects people and communities. Both broad patterns of economic organization and specific case studies will be discussed. Topics covered range from the impact of public policy on regional growth to a case study of the financial services industries. In short, the course attempts to answer the following question about the global economic map: "What is where, and why? and so what?". [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5INDUSTRSDG9
GGR326H1Remaking the Global EconomyExamines links between global economic integration and geographically uneven economic development. Focuses on debates and empirical studies on global production networks (GPNs), and associated issues such as offshoring, outsourcing, and upgrading. Blends analysis of both theory and practice of business firms and regional development. Seeks to develop an in-depth understanding of the key actors driving contemporary global economic transformation, within the 'transnational space' constituted and structured by transnational firns, state institutions, and ideologies.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5PRODUCTION; institutionSDG12, SDG16
GGR327H1Geography and GenderIntroduction to the work of feminist geographers. The course will explore the relationship between gender and space, emphasizing spatial cognition, architecture, and layout of the city.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5genderSDG5
GGR328H1Labour GeographiesExplores changes in the nature of work and the structure and geography of labour markets. Topics will include globalization, lean production, flexibility and risk, industrial relations, workfare, the body at work, and gender and work.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5gender; labour; industr; productionSDG5, SDG8, SDG9, SDG12
GGR329H1The Global Food SystemExplores the changing global geographies of food by tracing international movements of food through both mainstream and 'alternative' supply chains. The implications for sustainability, food security, community autonomy and health are investigated.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5food; healthSDG2, SDG3
GGR329H5Environment and the Roots of GlobalizationPierre DesrochersA critical discussion of how geographical factors, such as landscape, flora and fauna, might help explain why history unfolded differently on different continents. How geography might have impacted the development of agriculture, complex technologies, writing, centralized government and how, in the process, it has shaped the current world economic map. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5agriculture; environmentSDG2, SDG13
GGR332H1Social Geographies of Climate ChangeAnalyses the social and behavioural geographies of climate change, including: climate change communication (how we interpret and communicate climate science); climate change prevention strategies, from the macro to micro scale; and possibilities for climate change adaptation. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5CLIMATESDG13
GGR333H5Energy and SocietyPierre DesrochersA broad survey of humankind's ability to control and manipulate energy. Forms of energy and use; energy eras and transitions; past and present economic and policy debates. Understanding of technical terms, physical principles, creation of resources and trade-offs will be emphasized as a basis for discussions about current energy options. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENERGY; tradeSDG7, SDG10
GGR334H1Water Resource ManagementRomila VermaManaging demand and supply; linkages between water quality and human health. Case studies from the industrial world and from developing countries, rural and urban. Implications of population growth and climate change for water resource management.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5health; water; industr; urban; rural; climate; waterSDG3, SDG6, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13
GGR335H5GIS and Remote Sensing IntegrationYuhong HeThe integration of GIS and remote sensing is at the center of a larger trend toward the fusion of different kinds of geospatial data and technologies. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the various ways in which GIS and remote sensing have been integrated and used for environmental applications at a range of spatial and temporal scales. A part of the course will be devoted to application projects employing remote sensing and/or GIS data analysis in natural resources and environmental assessments. [24L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; environmentSDG12, SDG13
GGR336H1Urban Historical Geography of North AmericaThis course explores the emergence and reproduction of class and racial social spaces, the development of new economic spaces, and the growing importance of the reform and planning movements. Emphasis is on metropolitan development between 1850 and 1950.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5URBANSDG11
GGR337H1Environmental Remote SensingJane LiuPrinciples of optical, active and passive microwave remote sensing; satellite orbit and sensor characteristics; image processing and analysis techniques and software; and environmental remote sensing applications.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR337H5Environmental Remote SensingThis introductory course emphasizes mastering fundamental remote sensing concepts and utilizing remotely sensed data for monitoring land resources and environmental change. Topics include surface-energy interactions, sensor systems, image interpretation, and applications for examining soil, vegetation and water resources. Upon completion of this course, students should have the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue more advanced work in digital image processing and remote sensing applications. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; energy; environment; waterSDG6, SDG7, SDG13
GGR339H1Urban Geography, Planning and Political ProcessesJason SpicerInvestigates North American urban political geography, exploring conflicts over immigration, environment, gentrification, homelessness, labour market restructuring, ?race? and racism, urban sprawl, nature and environment, gender, sexuality, security, and segregation. Explores competing visions of city life and claims on urban space. The course investigates how these struggles connect to economic, social and environmental politics at larger spatial scales, and considers different theoretical frameworks that geographers have developed to make sense of both the persistence of old problems and the emergence of new ones. Field trip cost: $20.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5gender; labour; urban; environmentSDG5, SDG8, SDG11, SDG13
GGR340H1Health GeographyAn exploration of the aspects of health in which place or location matters. Particular attention will be paid to the role of environments (physical, social, etc.) in explaining differences in health between places, the structuring of health-related behaviour in place, and the development of health policy for places.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
GGR341H1Changing Geography of Latin AmericaChristian AbizaidSeeks to develop a general understanding of present-day Latin America by focusing on human-environment interactions, past and present. Case studies are used to understand the diversity of Latin American landscapes (physical and cultural), and how they are changing within the context of globalization.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR342H1The Changing Geography of Southeast AsiaZach AndersonExamines changes in the social, political and economic geography of Southeast Asian countries. Examples drawn from Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines as these emerging newly industrialized countries enter the 21st century. Emphasis on political-economy, urbanization and environment since 1950.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INDUSTR; urban; environmentSDG9, SDG11, SDG13
GGR344H1Political Economy of Germany and the EUThe goal of this course is to explore the structure and geography of the German political economy in the context of EU integration and economic globalization. This includes providing an understanding of the economic and political system (and its regional manifestations), which was once (and is now again) viewed as a successful socially-balanced alternative to the market-liberal structures in Anglo-Saxon economies. Drawing upon the varieties-of-capitalism approach, the main themes in the course address the institutional conditions for growth. In a comparative perspective, the course explores topics, such as the role of collective agents, corporate governance and finance, collective bargaining, inter-firm co-operation and regional networks, social security systems, and population structure and immigration. In order to understand the heterogeneous challenges to the ?German model?, the conditions are explored under which regional economies develop. This includes an analysis of the reunification process, and of the economic and political situation in the new L„nder. Further, the question is raised as to how the ?German model? can adapt to challenges related to globalization, climate change and economic crises.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5CLIMATE; institution; governanceSDG13, SDG16
GGR347H1Efficient Use of EnergyExamines the options available for dramatically reducing our use of primary energy with no reduction in meaningful energy services, through more efficient use of energy at the scale of energy-using devices and of entire energy systems. Topics covered include energy use in buildings, transportation, industry, and agriculture. Offered alternate years from GGR348H1.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5agriculture; energy; industr; buildingSDG2, SDG7, SDG9
GGR348H5The Great Lakes - A Sustainable Natural Resource?Harvey ShearThis course will provide students with a history of the biophysical evolution of the Great Lakes Basin, its history of human population growth and industrial and urban development and the consequences of that development on the ecological health of the Basin. There will be a discussion of basic lake ecology, with emphasis on the unique characteristics of the Great Lakes. The course will examine the various stresses past, present and future (climate change, new chemicals) that have or could impact upon the Basin. The complex governance issues in the Basin (two countries, eight states, one province, hundreds of municipalities, First Nations) will be considered, along with the management programs put in place to deal with the effects of human activity on the ecosystem. The sustainability of the Great Lakes basin will also be discussed in the context of present and future stresses. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5health; industr; urban; natural resouces; climate; ecology; governanceSDG3, SDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15, SDG16
GGR349H1Managing Urban NaturesRecent calls to action by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the World Wildlife Fund indicate we are at a crossroads in responding to accelerating global warming and biodiversity loss. Cities are often at the forefront of these transformations, both in feeling their effects but also initiating responses. How might we reimagine our cities in a way that promotes thriving and equitable ecosystems? What tools exist in the policy landscape to initiate needed changes? What innovative responses are emerging to confront the challenges of increased flooding, rising temperatures, habitat fragmentation, and food insecurity? How might we reimagine an urban commons? With a primary focus on Canadian cities, in this course we explore the ways divergent conceptualizations of urban-nature have informed policies and practices drawing largely from critical, political ecology, and Indigenous perspectives; the policy landscape that informs current urban planning; and new and innovative approaches that help us to reshape and reimagine our relationships to urban nature, including initiatives led by municipalities, non-government organizations and citizens groups.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5food; equitable; cities; urban; climate; global warming; biodiversity; ecologySDG2, SDG4, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
GGR349H5Cities in TransitionThe internal geography of contemporary cities is in the midst of a series of transitions related to new settlement patterns, immigration, workplace location, transportation and communication technologies, globalization, and shifts in urban governance. This course will examine these transitions and their effects on the social and political geography of the city. Themes include gentrification, spatial mismatch, concentrated poverty, political fragmentation, and the emergence of new urban forms and of the post-modern city. [36L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5poverty; cities; urban; governanceSDG1, SDG11, SDG16
GGR353H5Disease and DeathThis course will provide a geographical perspective on patterns of mortality, morbidity and access to health care among populations. It will outline current theoretical and empirical underpinnings in health geography and emphasize the links between health and place. The course covers some traditional themes in health geography including spatial dissuasion of diseases and access to health care. Using illustrations from evolving fields such as Global Health, Aboriginal Health, and Immigrant Health the course delves into the important theme of health inequalities. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5healthSDG3
GGR359H1Comparative Urban PolicyThis course considers urban public policy. Urban policy is not natural or inevitable response to urban problems. It is actively produced (and contested) by an array of voices, institutions, and social forces. Actualized urban policies are thus best understood and evaluated as products of these influences. The first half of the course will cover broad theoretical matters pertaining to the production of urban policy. The second half of the course will focus more intensively on one problem?urban decline?and explore the actualized approaches that have been brought to bear to manage it. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5URBAN; production; institutionSDG11, SDG12, SDG16
GGR361H5City Planning and DevelopmentAlan WalksThis course outlines important concepts and historical milestones involved in the planning and development of cities. It involves examination of urban sprawl, urban intensification efforts, and of the evolution of urban form and the interplay of private and public forces that shape the built-form of Canadian cities. This course fulfills 2 field days. [36L, 12T].MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
GGR362H5Exploring Urban NeighbourhoodsJoseph LeydonWith a majority of the world's population living in urban areas, nearly all of the problems and possibilities of society and human-environment relations are becoming urban questions. The city is the setting in which broad social, cultural, political, and economic processes unfold, mediated and shaped by local context. Our focus in this course is the internal structure of the city. We examine the ways in which local experiences and conditions of urban life are shaped by social differentiation and processes of change. Our examination includes considerations of race, class, gender, and ethnicity in the context of urban life as a way of exploring how identity and place shape one another. We consider different theoretical frameworks that researchers utilize to make sense of both the persistence of old problems and the emergence of new ones. Instruction will adopt a blended approach in which students will connect the concepts covered in class discussion through field work based exploration of local urban neighbourhoods. This course fulfills 5 field days. [24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5gender; urban; environmentSDG5, SDG11, SDG13
GGR363H5Global Migration and HealthKathleen WilsonInternational migration is an important global issue. Hundreds of millions of individuals currently live outside their country of origin. Most migrants leave their country of origin in search of better economic and social opportunities while others are forced to flee crises including political unrest, violence, and natural disasters. Migration poses numerous challenges for individuals, families, communities and governments including those related to health and access to health care services. This course examines contemporary international migration from a geographic perspective with a specific focus on the complex relationships among global (im)migration, health, and broader social determinants of health. Topics covered may include: migration theories, immigration trends and policies, integration and citizenship, social determinants of health, and health care policy. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5healthSDG3
GGR365H5Trade and GlobalizationThis course uses economic and geographical principles to help students understand the advent of the current period of globalization. In this context, globalization refers to international trade liberalization which results in increased contacts across borders, migration, trade, and investment. Topics covered will include the history of globalization, the environment, sweatshops, development and inequalities. By the end of the course, students should have gained a deeper understanding of current controversies surrounding international trade and globalization. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5TRADE; environmentSDG10, SDG13
GGR370H5The Geography of TransportationTransportation is an integral aspect of our daily lives and plays a key role in shaping the economy and the environment. Through this course, students will explore the geography of transportation. Topics will include, mobility and accessibility, transportation networks and flows, Geographic Information Systems in Transport (GIS-T), planning and policy, environmental and human health impacts, and other current issues. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
GGR370H5The Geography of TransportationTransportation is an integral aspect of our daily lives and plays a key role in shaping the economy and the environment. Through this course, students will explore the geography of transportation. Topics will include, mobility and accessibility, transportation networks and flows, Geographic Information Systems in Transport (GIS-T), planning and policy, environmental and human health impacts, and other current issues. [24L, 12P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
GGR374H5Water Quality and Stream EcosystemsFlowing water courses (streams and rivers) are unique ecosystems from lake, terrestrial, and wetland environments, and are integral in regulation of land-borne solutes to larger water bodies. This course provides a holistic treatment of the stream ecosystem, with particular emphasis on nutrient and contaminant transformation, in-stream hydraulics and morphology, the hyporheic, parafluvial, and riparian zones, as well as hillslope hydrological processes responsible for transfer of water to the stream. Variability in stream biota, community interactions, and ecosystem-level processes are also discussed. Weekly field and lab exercises provide the student with hands-on experience with the lecture material. This course fulfills 4 field days. [24L, 36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; environment; waterSDG6, SDG13
GGR376H5Spatial Data Science IIThis course builds on quantitative methods introduced in GGR276, and aims to provide a broad study of advanced statistical methods and their use in a spatial context in physical, social, and environmental sciences. The course covers theories, methods, and applications geared towards helping students develop an understanding of the important theoretical concepts in spatial data analysis, and gain practical experience in application of spatial statistics to a variety of physical, social and environmental problems using advanced statistical software. [24L, 24P]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR377H5Global Climate ChangeThe main focus of this course is upon the climatic aspects of environmental change which affect Great Lakes water levels, disappearing glaciers, sea level rise, desertification and dwindling water resources in an ever more populous world. These changes to the earth surface environment are explored in the context of themes and issues which were introduced in first year, with a view to answering an important question: whether policy action on climate change must wait for more science, or whether action is merely delayed by failure to appreciate science. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; solar; climate; environment; waterSDG6, SDG7, SDG13
GGR383H5Contaminants in the EnvironmentThis course discusses various types of contaminants (metal, organic pollutants, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, flame-retardants, micro-plastics, nano-materials) and their impact on the environment. Lectures will cover sources, transport and fate of these contaminants in various environmental media (air, water), degradation mechanisms, uptake into biological systems, and toxicity. Case studies such as pollutants in Arctic ecosystems and the potential risks they pose to the health of indigenous people will be examined. Class discussions of current scientific articles will complement lectures. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5health; water; environment; water; pollutSDG3, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14
GGR384H5Climatology of Canadian LandscapesLaura BrownThis course will focus on the natural surface climates of Canada. Topics covered will include Alpine and forest environments; ocean and wetland regions; and both artic and subarctic climates. Surface energy processes will be examined, and how the behavior of energy exchange varies by climate region. This course fulfills 4 field days. [24L, 36P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENERGY; climate; environment; ocean; forestSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGR386H1Special Topics in Geographic Information SystemsContent in any given year varies by instructor. Students must meet the prerequisites set by the department (see the Geography website for details in May). Can be used towards GIS, Human Geography, and Environmental Geography programs.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR387H1Special Topics in Environmental GeographySarah WakefieldContent in any given year varies by instructor. Students must meet the prerequisites set by the department (see the Geography website for details in May). Can be used towards Environmental Geography and Human Geography programs.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR387H5Food and GlobalizationPierre DesrochersA broad overview of the historical development of the global food economy and a survey of recent trends and controversies. Topics discussed range from basic food staples, food markets and trade liberalization to food security, environmental sustainability and alternative agricultural systems. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5food; trade; environmentSDG2, SDG10, SDG13
GGR390H1Field MethodsIntroduction to field methods in geomorphology, vegetation mapping/analysis, soils, hydrology, and climatology. The course includes exercises and a group project during a one-week field camp, a little preparation during the preceding summer, and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation (field trip costs: $300). This course meets the field requirement for Physical & Environmental Geography programs. The field camp normally runs for one week at the end of August. Students must register with the Department by April. Consult with the department in case of conflict or concerns. Course may be limited by size. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR406H1Geomorphology and the AnthropoceneIn this seminar course, we will explore the nature of geomorphology and the Anthropocene (the proposed geological time interval during which human activities have greatly impacted the global environment) using a combination of lectures, readings, and discussions. We will consider the ways in which hillslope, fluvial, coastal, aeolian, and other domains have been altered or influenced by humans and consider the role of geomorphology as a science for understanding and examining the changes in landscape form and processes.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR406H5Environmental BiogeochemistryEnvironmental biogeochemistry provides an introduction to the biological, chemical, and geological processes that regulate the flow of energy and matter in the environment. This seminar course explores the processes underlying biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon and nutrients, and examines how these key cycles have been altered during the Anthropocene, an era of unprecedented human-induced environmental and climate change. Topics covered include biogeochemical processes in atmospheric, ocean, freshwater and terrestrial compartments; emerging techniques (eg., stable-isotopes and paleo-proxies) used in biogeochemistry; and how disruptions to biogeochemical processes are at the root of many environmental issues such as eutrophication, climate change, ozone depletion, ocean acidification and toxic metal contamination. [36L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; energy; climate; environment; ocean; waterSDG6, SDG10, SDG13, SDG14
GGR406H5Environmental BiogeochemistryEnvironmental biogeochemistry provides an introduction to the biological, chemical, and geological processes that regulate the flow of energy and matter in the environment. This seminar course explores the processes underlying biogeochemical cycles of major elements such as carbon and nutrients, and examines how these key cycles have been altered during the Anthropocene, an era of unprecedented human-induced environmental and climate change. Topics covered include biogeochemical processes in atmospheric, ocean, freshwater and terrestrial compartments; emerging techniques (eg., stable-isotopes and paleo-proxies) used in biogeochemistry; and how disruptions to biogeochemical processes are at the root of many environmental issues such as eutrophication, climate change, ozone depletion, ocean acidification and toxic metal contamination. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; energy; climate; environment; ocean; waterSDG6, SDG10, SDG13, SDG14
GGR407H5EcohydrologyEcohydrology explores the feedback between biological, hydro-logical and biogeochemical processes that help shape ecosystem form and function. These feedbacks are central to the regulation of the global climate and water resources. With pronounced and rapid human modification to the landscape and climate system this field of study is increasingly relevant to formulate mitigation strategies. This seminar and research course explores the feedback processes most crucial to climate change and water resources. Topics include ecosystem control on the water balance, the role of peat-lands in ameliorating climate change, hydro-logic controls on species diversity, and the role of the watershed in mitigating human pollutants. Students are expected to conduct independent and collaborative study. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5WATER; climate; water; pollutSDG6, SDG13, SDG14
GGR414H1Advanced Remote SensingJane LiuBuilding on GGR337H1 Environmental Remote Sensing with advanced theories and techniques for land cover mapping, vegetation biophysical and biochemical parameter retrievals, optical and thermal remote sensing of urban environment, and application of satellite remote sensing to terrestrial water and carbon cycle estimation. Basic radiative transfer theories as applied to vegetation will be given in some detail as the basis for various remote sensing applications. Optical instruments for measuring vegetation structural parameters will be demonstrated in the field.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5WATER; urban; environment; waterSDG6, SDG11, SDG13
GGR415H5Geographies of Indigenous HealthKathleen WilsonIndigenous people of Canada - the First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples - have very rich and diverse histories. However, common to most are large disparities in health compared to the non-Indigenous population. This seminar course will examine the health conditions of Indigenous peoples in Canada including a focus on the geographic, historic, and contemporary factors leading to health disparities and inequalities. The course will also examine health and well-being through an Indigenous worldview. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5healthSDG3
GGR416H1Environmental Impact AssessmentEnvironmental impact assessment (EIA) as a mechanism for avoiding or mediating the potential costs of development. The course focuses on the theory and practice of EIA in Canada in general and Ontario in particular. Using a broad definition of environment, various components of EIA are addressed, with an emphasis on principles, legal and institutional frameworks, stages in the process, and specific analytical techniques.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENT; institutionSDG13, SDG16
GGR418H5GeopoliticsJoseph LeydonThe course focus is classical and contemporary geopolitical theories. We examine different and competing ideas and consider how and if geographic logic of the international (or global) political order has changed. Discussion will initially focus on the historical progression of geopolitical reasoning and then will proceed to discuss imperial rivalries, concepts of hegemony and world order and the geopolitics of the Cold War and the post-Cold War eras. The final section of the course will consider theoretical struggles surrounding the geopolitics in the early 21st. century and the challenges posed by critical geopolitics, social movements, environmental changes and feminist theory. Throughout, the primary concern is how the effects of scale, space and power in global politics is understood and experienced. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR419H1Environmental JusticeNeera SinghExamines how environmental problems affect people, communities and societies differentially and how marginalized communities and people often bear the brunt of environmental costs, while contributing little to their creation. It uses readings and case studies from across the globe to address the production of environmental injustice and the struggle for environmental justice.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5PRODUCTION; environment; justiceSDG12, SDG13, SDG16
GGR424H1Transportation Geography and PlanningIntroductory overview of major issues in interurban and intraurban transportation at the local, national and international scale. Topics include urban transportation, land use patterns and the environment, causes of and cures for congestion, public transit, infrastructure finance, and transport planning and policy setting.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; urban; environment; land useSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
GGR430H1Geographies of MarketsFocuses on actually-existing markets and their geographically-mediated formation and assemblage. Explores how markets are produced, stabilized, reshaped and fall apart at multiple geographic scales. We examine issues such as the debates on states versus markets, embeddedness of markets, neoliberalism and moral justification of markets, varieties of capitalism, regionally variegated capitalism, post-socialist market transitions, and the dynamic evolution of market institutions and economic landscapes.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
GGR434H1Building Community ResilienceExamines concepts of resilience as a way of building the capacity of communities to (a) respond to predicted disruptions/shocks associated with climate change, global pandemics, anticipated disruptions in global food supply, energy insecurity, and environmental degradation; and (b) nurture the development of alternative spaces that support the emergence of more life-sustaining structures and practices. Includes explicit attention to equity and public health, and explores issues such as: participatory governance of social-ecological systems, the nature of social change, complexity science, the role of social movements, indigenous and political ecology perspectives.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5food; health; energy; resilien; climate; environment; ecology; governanceSDG2, SDG3, SDG7, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15, SDG16
GGR438H1Environment and DevelopmentExamines the implications of development ? as an economic and social project ? for how the environment is used, by whom, and to what ends. Draws on literatures in political ecology and critical development geography. Topics include: interpretations of scarcity and degradation, questions of consumption, and the greening of development. Examines expansion of and struggles over new forms of green infrastructure in urban and rural settings. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5INFRASTRUCTURE; urban; rural; consum; environment; ecologySDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
GGR440H5Drone Remote SensingIndustries from agriculture through to defense and mining are investing in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) technology to support operational and strategic objectives. This course will cover the adoption of UAV technologies as a remote sensing tool and the impact of logistical, regulatory, and technical hurdles on UAV technology now and in the future. Through the course, students will gain the knowledge requirements to operate a UAV following Transport Canada guidelines and develop skills in processing UAV imagery into information assets that support applications where high resolution, spatial accuracy, and high detail is required. [24L, 12P]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5agriculture; industrSDG2, SDG9
GGR458H1Selected Topics in Urban GeographyThis course focuses on a special topic in urban geography and covers it with more depth than would otherwise be the case in a survey-oriented class. The aim is to utilize this single topic as a vehicle to understanding how urban geographical ideas are produced more widely. Check the department website for the theme (updated each year).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5URBANSDG11
GGR461H5Advanced Urban PlanningThis course will build on the material taught in GGR361H5, City Planning. This course will delve deeper into the scholarship related to urban planning and urban development more broadly such as planning for multicultural cities, ethics in planning and planning ethics, contemporary scholarly theories of planning (collaborative planning theory etc.), planning for more equal cities and planning for sustainability. [36L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
GGR484H5The Climate of the ArcticLaura BrownHigh latitude environments are becoming the focus of increasing scientific attention because of their role in global environmental change. The implications of changes occurring to the sea ice and snowcover are far reaching and can have impacts on physical, biological and human systems both within and beyond the region. This course will provide a comprehensive examination of climates of high latitudes. Topics that will be covered include the Arctic energy budget and atmospheric circulation, the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic, the ocean-sea ice-climate interactions and feedbacks, modeling the Arctic climate system as well as an evaluation of recent climate variability and trends. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography0.5ENERGY; climate; environment; oceanSDG7, SDG13, SDG14
GGR497H1Independent ResearchIndependent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Environmental Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCE's and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGR497H1Independent ResearchIndependent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Environmental Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCE's and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceGeography and Planning0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGRA02H3The Geography of Global ProcessesDanielle Tessaro-SpenceGlobalization from the perspective of human geography. The course examines how the economic, social, political, and environmental changes that flow from the increasingly global scale of human activities affect spatial patterns and relationships, the character of regions and places, and the quality of life of those who live in them.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGRA03H3Cities and EnvironmentsAn introduction to the characteristics of modern cities and environmental issues, and their interconnections. Linkages between local and global processes are emphasized. Major topics include urban forms and systems, population change, the complexity of environmental issues such as climate change and water scarcity, planning for sustainable cities.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5WATER; cities; urban; climate; environment; waterSDG6, SDG11, SDG13
GGRB02H3The Logic of Geographical ThoughtMany of today's key debates - for instance, on globalization, the environment, and cities - draw heavily from geographical thinking and what some have called the "spatial turn" in the social sciences. This course introduces the most important methodological and theoretical aspects of contemporary geographical and spatial thought, and serves as a foundation for other upper level courses in Geography.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; environmentSDG11, SDG13
GGRB05H3Urban GeographyThis course will develop understanding of the geographic nature of urban systems and the internal spatial patterns and activities in cities. Emphasis is placed on the North American experience with some examples from other regions of the world. The course will explore the major issues and problems facing contemporary urban society and the ways they are analysed.Area of Focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; urbanSDG11
GGRB13H3Social GeographyThe reciprocal relations between spatial structures and social identities. The course examines the role of social divisions such as class, 'race'/ethnicity, gender and sexuality in shaping the social geographies of cities and regions. Particular emphasis is placed on space as an arena for the construction of social relations and divisions.Area of Focus: Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5gender; citiesSDG5, SDG11
GGRB18H3Whose Land? Indigenous-Canada-Land RelationsIntroduces students to the geography of Indigenous-Crown-Land relations in Canada. Beginning with pre-European contact and the historic Nation-to-Nation relationship, the course will survey major research inquiries from the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Students will learn how ongoing land and treaty violations impact Indigenous peoples, settler society, and the land in Canada.Area of Focus: Environmental GeographySame as ESTB02H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5women; girl; environmentSDG5, SDG13
GGRB21H3Political Ecology: Nature, Society and Environmental ChangeThis foundational course explores different conceptions of 'the environment' as they have changed through space and time. It also analyzes the emergence of different variants of environmentalism and their contemporary role in shaping environmental policy and practice.Area of Focus: Environmental GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENT; ecologySDG13, SDG15
GGRB28H3Geographies of DiseaseMichelle MajeedExamines the geographical distribution of disease and the spatial processes in which diseases are embedded. Themes include spatial theories of health and disease and uneven development and health. Special attention will be given to the geographical dimension of the HIV pandemic.Area of Focus: Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
GGRC10H3Urbanization and DevelopmentExamines global urbanization processes and the associated transformation of governance, social, economic, and environmental structures particularly in the global south. Themes include theories of development, migration, transnational flows, socio-spatial polarization, postcolonial geographies of urbanization.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; environment; governanceSDG11, SDG13, SDG16
GGRC12H3Transportation GeographyTransportation systems play a fundamental role in shaping social, economic and environmental outcomes in a region. This course explores geographical perspectives on the development and functioning of transportation systems, interactions between transportation and land use, and costs and benefits associated with transportation systems including: mobility, accessibility, congestion, pollution, and livability.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; environment; pollut; land useSDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
GGRC13H3Urban Political GeographyGeographical approach to the politics of contemporary cities with emphasis on theories and structures of urban political processes and practices. Includes nature of local government, political powers of the property industry, big business and community organizations and how these shape the geography of cities.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; cities; urbanSDG9, SDG11
GGRC24H3Socio-Natures and the Cultural Politics of 'The Environment'Explores the processes through which segments of societies come to understand their natural surroundings, the social relations that produce those understandings, popular representations of nature, and how 'the environment' serves as a consistent basis of social struggle and contestation.Areas of focus: Environmental Geography; Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG9, SDG11
GGRC28H3Indigenous Peoples, Environment and JusticeNicole LatulippeEngages Indigenous perspectives on the environment and environmental issues. Students will think with Indigenous concepts, practices, and theoretical frameworks to consider human-environment relations. Pressing challenges and opportunities with respect to Indigenous environmental knowledge, governance, law, and justice will be explored. With a focus primarily on Canada, the course will include case studies from the US, Australia, and Aotearoa New ZealandScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENT; justice; governanceSDG13, SDG16
GGRC32H3Essential Spatial AnalysisThis course builds on introductory statistics and GIS courses by introducing students to the core concepts and methods of spatial analysis. With an emphasis on spatial thinking in an urban context, topics such as distance decay, distance metrics, spatial interaction, spatial distributions, and spatial autocorrelation will be used to quantify spatial patterns and identify spatial processes. These tools are the essential building blocks for the quantitative analysis of urban spatial data.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
GGRC33H3The Toronto RegionThis course examines issues of urban form and structure, urban growth and planning in the Toronto region. Current trends in population, housing, economy, environment, governance, transport, urban design and planning practices at the local level and the regional scale will be examined critically.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBAN; environment; governanceSDG11, SDG13, SDG16
GGRC34H3Crowd-sourced Urban GeographiesSignificant recent transformations of geographic knowledge are being generated by the ubiquitous use of smartphones and other distributed sensors, while web-based platforms such as Open Street Map and Public Participation GIS (PPGIS) have made crowd-sourcing of geographical data relatively easy. This course will introduce students to these new geographical spaces, approaches to creating them, and the implications for local democracy and issues of privacy they pose.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
GGRC40H3Megacities and Global UrbanizationThe last 50 years have seen dramatic growth in the global share of population living in megacities over 10 million population, with most growth in the global south. Such giant cities present distinctive infrastructure, health, water supply, and governance challenges, which are increasingly central to global urban policy and health.Area of focus: Urban GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5health; water; infrastructure; cities; urban; water; governanceSDG3, SDG6, SDG9, SDG11, SDG16
GGRC44H3Environmental Conservation and Sustainable DevelopmentDanielle Tessaro-SpenceDeals with two main topics: the origins of environmental problems in the global spread of industrial capitalism, and environmental conservation and policies. Themes include: changes in human-environment relations, trends in environmental problems, the rise of environmental awareness and activism, environmental policy, problems of sustainable development.Area of focus: Environmental GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; industr; environment; conservSDG8, SDG9, SDG13, SDG15
GGRC50H3Geographies of EducationExplores the social geography of education, especially in cities. Topics include geographical educational inequalities; education, class and race; education, the family, and intergenerational class immobility; the movement of children to attend schools; education and the ‘right to the city.’Areas of focus: Urban or Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5educat; cities; urbanSDG3, SDG11
GGRD08H3Research Seminar in Environmental GeographyDesigned for final-year Human Geography Majors, this seminar is devoted to analysis and discussion of advanced theoretical and methodological issues in Environmental Geography. Specific content will vary from year to year. Seminar format with active student participation.Area of focus: Environmental GeographyScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
GGRD09H3Feminist GeographiesSharlene MollettHow do gender relations shape different spaces? We will explore how feminist geographers have approached these questions from a variety of scales - from the home, to the body, to the classroom, to the city, to the nation, drawing on the work of feminist geographers.Area of focus: Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
GGRD10H3Health and SexualityExamines links between health and human sexuality. Particularly explores sexually transmitted infections. Attention will be given to the socially and therefore spatially constructed nature of sexuality. Other themes include sexual violence, masculinities and health, reproductive health, and transnational relationships and health. Examples will be taken from a variety of countries.Area of focus: Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
GGRD14H3Social Justice and the CityExamines links between politics of difference, social justice and cities. Covers theories of social justice and difference with a particular emphasis placed on understanding how contemporary capitalism exacerbates urban inequalities and how urban struggles such as Occupy Wall Street seek to address discontents of urban dispossession. Examples of urban social struggles will be drawn from global North and South.Areas of focus: Urban or Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5CITIES; urban; justiceSDG11, SDG16
GGRD49H3Land and Land Conflicts in the AmericasThe politics of land and territorial struggles are central themes in national and international development policies, and social movements in the Western Hemisphere. Similarly, settler colonialism, as an active spatial formation, is constituted in both the past and present throughout the Americas. The course will take a hemispheric approach to understanding the historical and contemporary geographies of land and natural resource conflicts in the Americas. Students will become familiar with geographic debates and conceptualizations of land and land conflicts, and will participate in field visits aimed to ground theoretical understandings in land practices and movements in Toronto.Areas of focus: Environmental or Social/Cultural GeographyScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC)0.5NATURAL RESOURCES; environmentSDG12, SDG13
HAJ453H1AIDS: A Global PerspectiveSeminars explore the global AIDS crisis, adopting the medical-anthropological perspective of Paul Farmer's Infections and Inequalities. Varying epidemiological profiles of AIDS are placed in broader social, cultural, and political-economic frameworks. The impact of globalization and structural inequality on local cultures and lifestyles provides an essential backdrop to the discussions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHuman Biology Program0.5equality; inequalitySDG5, SDG10
HIS104H5A History of HereThis course focuses on the University of Toronto, its region, and the land on which it operates. Paying particular attention to the UniversityÕs relationship with Indigenous peoples and with critical attention to both primary and secondary sources, it explores local and institutional archives, questioning and complicating narratives of institutional pride that tend to attach themselves to the University and its campuses.(24L, 12T)MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
HIS110Y1Connected Histories from Dakar to JakartaIn 1325, the twenty-year old Moroccan, Ibn Battuta, began an unprecedented series of journeys by land and sea that stretched between the contemporary capitals of Senegal and Indonesia. His routes wove together large parts of Africa, Central & South Asia, and East & Southeast Asia. For more than a thousand years before Battuta began his journey, other travelers had transported ideas, products, and scripts across each of these routes, connecting the histories of the peoples living throughout this vast landmass. Human migration, economic trade, and religious conversion had linked the lands and the seas, making possible for Ibn Battuta to traverse these territories, and to visit the religious homelands of Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and their expanse across the Africa and Asia. Nearly a thousand years after Ibn Battuta?s travels, human migration, economic trade, and religious conversion continue to affect and connect the cultures, ecology, and economies of these communities. This course investigates how the creation, disruption, and maintenance of the economic, linguistic, and religious communities in the millennium before and after Ibn Battuta?s travels affected the lives and livelihoods of peoples of Africa and Asia, where 80% of the world?s population resided, then and today.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1TRADE; ecologySDG10, SDG15
HIS110Y1Connected Histories from Dakar to JakartaIn 1325, the twenty-year old Moroccan, Ibn Battuta, began an unprecedented series of journeys by land and sea that stretched between the contemporary capitals of Senegal and Indonesia. His routes wove together large parts of Africa, Central & South Asia, and East & Southeast Asia. For more than a thousand years before Battuta began his journey, other travelers had transported ideas, products, and scripts across each of these routes, connecting the histories of the peoples living throughout this vast landmass. Human migration, economic trade, and religious conversion had linked the lands and the seas, making possible for Ibn Battuta to traverse these territories, and to visit the religious homelands of Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and their expanse across the Africa and Asia. Nearly a thousand years after Ibn Battuta?s travels, human migration, economic trade, and religious conversion continue to affect and connect the cultures, ecology, and economies of these communities. This course investigates how the creation, disruption, and maintenance of the economic, linguistic, and religious communities in the millennium before and after Ibn Battuta?s travels affected the lives and livelihoods of peoples of Africa and Asia, where 80% of the world?s population resided, then and today.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1TRADE; ecologySDG10, SDG15
HIS192H1A History of Queer AsiaA first-year seminar on the history of queerness, in all its complexity and diversity, in the no less complex and diverse settings of East, South, and Southeast Asia. Our journey will encompass empires and Indigenous peoples, rulers and rebels, and range from early recorded history down to the twentieth century. Focus will be placed on primary sources and introducing students to the evolving definitions of "queerness" itself. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5queerSDG5
HIS195H1Drunk HistoryHistories of wine or beer or vodka often focus either on the production of these alcoholic beverages and their role in national economies, or the ways that drinking is part of celebrations. But drunkenness enters the historical record in other ways, too--not just as a social lubricant but as a social ill, one associated with intimate violence or violence to the self and with mass protest. From worries about the Gin Craze to the rise of temperance movements and eventually the passing of Prohibition, from tax policies to policing, this class will consider the many ways that drunkenness has been accepted, denounced, and legislated about in societies around the world. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
HIS205H1Topics in Women's HistoryThis course introduces students to the diverse experiences of women from a comparative perspective. Students will study how women?s strategies have shaped the major cultural, economic, political and social processes in the world and how these processes have affected women?s experiences in their particular societies. By studying women?s history from both local and global perspectives, students will engage critically with claims that women?s history is universal. The local focus of the course will rotate between Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, depending on the expertise of the instructors.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5womenSDG5
HIS210H5Introduction to Digital HumanitiesAndrew BrownWhat is Digital Humanities? We explore the field's debates, platforms, tools, projects, and critical perspectives, as well as its current core practices: digital exhibits, digital mapping, text analysis, information visualization, and network analysis. We discuss the relationship between technology and knowledge production in historical and critical perspective. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
HIS210H5Introduction to Digital HumanitiesAndrew BrownWhat is Digital Humanities? We explore the field's debates, platforms, tools, projects, and critical perspectives, as well as its current core practices: digital exhibits, digital mapping, text analysis, information visualization, and network analysis. We discuss the relationship between technology and knowledge production in historical and critical perspective. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
HIS212H5The History of CapitalismThis course historicizes capitalism and all of the subcategories that derive from this mode of production: labour, management, the commodity chain, marketing, advertising, finance, exchange value, and the multinational corporation, to name but a few. Students will be introduced to classic texts as well as to more recent work that uses historical methods to study the social, cultural, environmental, gendered, and ethical aspects of economic life under capitalism. The course takes a global perspective, and the focus will range from examining the historical development of capitalism in Canada, the United States, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; labour; production; environmentSDG5, SDG8, SDG12, SDG14
HIS213H5A History of the PresentThis course takes as its starting point current world events of global significance. We focus on 3-4 flashpoints/crises/events shaping contemporary global politics and culture, and move back in time to understand how current events have been shaped by longer histories of power, inequality, conflict and contestation. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5equality; inequalitySDG5, SDG10
HIS218H1Environmental HistoryRebecca WoodsA lecture-based course designed to introduce students to key moments and concepts in the field of environmental history since c. 1400. This course will track the reciprocal influence of humans and the non-human world since the so-called "Columbian Exchange," emphasizing the ways in which the non-human world-from plants, animals, and disease organisms to water, topography, and geography- have shaped human endeavours. At the same time, students will engage with many of the ways in which human beings have shaped the world around us, from empire and colonization, to industrial capitalism, nuclear power, and modern wildlife conservation.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5WATER; industr; emvironment; water; conservSDG6, SDG9, SDG13, SDG14
HIS231H1Revolution and Emancipation in the Colonial CaribbeanThis course explores the history of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century caribbean, from the Haitian Revolution to the U.S. occupation of Cuba and Puerto Rico. Students learn about the first struggles for political independence; the struggle to abolish the slave trade; slave emancipation; indentureship and struggles to define freedom after emancipation.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5TRADESDG10
HIS241H1Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914An introduction to modern European history from Napoleon to the outbreak of World War I. Important political, economic, social, and intellectual changes in France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and other countries are discussed: revolution of 1848, Italian and German unification, racism and imperialism, the evolution of science, art, and culture, labour protest, and the coming of war.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5LABOURSDG8
HIS245H1European Colonialism, 1700- 1965This course will introduce students to the history of European colonialism. It will analyze the nature of colonial rule, the impact of empire on both colonies and metropoles, and delve into questions of power, gender and culture. It considers slavery and abolition, imperial networks, colonial capital, colonial competition, colonial cultures, the twilight of colonial rule, and a variety of settings.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS262H1Canada: A Short History of HereHeidi BohakerDesigned for non-history students, this introductory survey fulfills the Society and Its Institutions breadth requirement. It is open to all who want to know more about Canada. Make sense of politics today and develop a deeper understanding of Canadian society and its institutions through study of the major events and demographic trends that have shaped the development of this country. Topics will include First Nations/newcomer relations (including treaties and the Truth & Reconciliation report), French/English relations (including Quebec separatism), regionalism, the North, economic history, constitutional developments, and the development of Canadian identity, including common symbols associated with Canada. No essay requirement. Instead, enhance your critical reading and thinking skills through short writing assignments and weekly discussions of tutorial readings. *This course will not count towards History program requirements or as a prerequisite for upper level courses*St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
HIS272H5US History, 1877-presentElspeth BrownHow did the US move from the Civil War to a world power? What have been the tensions between national ideals of "liberty for all" and US market expansion? Topics covered include: Jim Crow South; immigration and urbanization; Populism and the Progressivism; consumerism; many wars; post-45 social movements; Reaganism and after. [24L, 12T]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5URBAN; consumSDG11, SDG12
HIS272H5US History, 1877-presentElspeth BrownHow did the US move from the Civil War to a world power? What have been the tensions between national ideals of "liberty for all" and US market expansion? Topics covered include: Jim Crow South; immigration and urbanization; Populism and the Progressivism; consumerism; many wars; post-45 social movements; Reaganism and after. [24L, 12T]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5URBAN; consumSDG11, SDG12
HIS282Y1History of South AsiaRitu BirlaAn introductory survey addressing major themes in the history of South Asia, examining South Asian political economy, social history, colonial power relations and the production of culture. Emphasis is on the period after 1750, particularly the study of colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonial citizenship and modernity.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1goveRNANCESDG16
HIS282Y1History of South AsiaRitu BirlaAn introductory survey addressing major themes in the history of South Asia, examining South Asian political economy, social history, colonial power relations and the production of culture. Emphasis is on the period after 1750, particularly the study of colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonial citizenship and modernity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1goveRNANCESDG16
HIS315H5Indigenous Peoples and Immigrants in CanadaThis course examines the intertwined social, cultural, economic, and political histories of Indigenous peoples and immigrants in Canada. It explores the influence on lived experience of a wide variety of phenomena and ideas including community, place, indigeneity, ethnicity, gender, colonialism, empire, and mobility from the distant to the present. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS323H5The Rwandan Genocide: History, Violence, and IdentityThis course examines the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, situated within larger historical frameworks of the nature of precolonial polities, the impact of colonialism, and the crises of postcolonial state building. Through a close examination of primary sources and historical arguments, this course will explore history and memory, violence and trauma, identity and belonging, justice and reconciliation. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5JUSTICESDG16
HIS325H5Modern African HistoryLooking at the last one hundred years of modern African history, this course will examine the consolidation of colonial societies; transformations in gender, sexuality and identity politics; the roots of ethnic patriotisms, racial ideologies and African nationalisms; the role of violence in colonial and postcolonial governance; and the contemporary in historical perspective. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; governanceSDG5, SDG16
HIS330H5Politics and Political Change in Latin AmericaExamines major movements and cultures in Latin American politics from independence to present day. Topics include: nineteenth-century militarism; revolutionary socialism in Cuba and Nicaragua; military dictatorships in Argentina, Brazil and Chile; and recent grassroots and transnational political movements. Emphasizes the integral roles of gender, race and the United States in the region's political processes. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS340H1The Ottoman Empire, 1800-1922The course examines the history of the Ottoman Empire from the beginning of the 19th c. until its dissolution in the course of World War I. Topics include Ottoman reforms, relations between the Empire?s populations and the state, the diplomatic interactions known as ?the Eastern Question,? the Young Turk revolution, gender, and intellectual, cultural and artistic developments. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS346H1Rice, Sugar, and Spice in Southeast Asia: a History of Food in the RegionThis course examines the importance of food products in the livelihoods of the inhabitants of Southeast and in the world economy. It traces the circulation of these products within the Southeast Asian region in the pre-modern period, into the spice trade of the early modern era, and the establishment of coffee and sugar plantations in the late colonial period, and the role of these exports in the contemporary global economy. St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5food; tradeSDG2, SDG10
HIS349H1History of Britain: Struggle for PowerAn introduction to the history of modern England with emphasis on the search for identity with reference to the nation, the crown, class, gender, age, political parties, race and ethnicity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS352H1A History of Women in Pre-colonial East AfricaThis course examines the lived experience of women in societies, communities and polities of varying sizes across territories that cover eight contemporary East African states. It encompasses the period from 1000 B.C to the end of the nineteenth century. Topics covered are clustered under four broad themes: a) Ecology, work in commodity production, wealth and exchange relations; b) ?Institutional? power, ideology and structures; c) ?Creative? power particularly in the areas of healing, resistance/contestation and transformation; and d) Violence, war and vulnerability. The course challenges present day gender and identity categories applied to Africa?s deep past and highlights critical nuances of gender, identity and power dynamics in Africa.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5gender; womenSDG5
HIS361H1The Holocaust, from 1942Follows on HIS338H1. Themes include: resistance by Jews and non-Jews; local collaboration; the roles of European governments, the Allies, the churches, and other international organizations; the varieties of Jewish responses. We will also focus on postwar repercussions of the Holocaust in areas such as justice, memory and memorialization, popular culture and politics.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5JUSTICESDG16
HIS363H1Dynamics of Gender in Canadian HistoryHeidi BohakerA lecture course which deals thematically with gender issues in Canadian history (including familial roles, changing patterns of work and employment, and participation in the public sphere).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5gender; employmentSDG5, SDG8
HIS371H1Canadian Political HistoryThis course examines the history of Canadian politics from the late colonial period to the recent past. Lectures and tutorials will focus attention on specific political issues (responsible government, Confederation, war, welfare, battles over voting rights, campaigns for social change, etc) but also consider the deeper structural, social, economic, and cultural dynamics that shaped politics over time. The course takes a broad view of politics (elections and parties but also social movements, interest groups, bureaucracy). A key theme is the nature of political power in a democratic polity.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5RIGHTSSDG16
HIS372H5The United States in the 20th CenturyMajor developments in the economic, social, political, and cultural life of the United States during the past century as it grew from a burgeoning industrial nation to the leading Superpower. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5INDUSTRSDG9
HIS374H5Gender and Sexuality in the US, 1945-presentThis class historicizes the intersectional analysis of gendered and sexed bodies after 1945. We explore topics such as normative gender expectations; reproductive freedom; masculinities; second-wave feminism; race, class and poverty; conservative backlash; media and gender/sexuality; LGBTQ social movements; trans histories. In terms of methods, I look forward to introducing students to experiments in digital history. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5poverty; genderSDG1, SDG5
HIS378H5East Asian CitiesAn examination of the historical transformation of East Asian cities from the imperial to modern times. The course focuses especially on how cities have been planned, depicted, experienced. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5CITIESSDG11
HIS378H5East Asian CitiesAn examination of the historical transformation of East Asian cities from the imperial to modern times. The course focuses especially on how cities have been planned, depicted, experienced. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5CITIESSDG11
HIS382H5Nationalism in Modern South AsiaThis course foregrounds and examines the relationship between nationalism and popular movements 'from below', against the backdrop of variables such as class, community, gender and religion. In this regard, it relates the broader themes and question under review to the social history of varied groups such as peasants, the working class, tribals, lower castes and women in the era of colonialism, the national-liberation movement and the postcolonial nation-state. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; womenSDG5
HIS383Y1Women in African HistoryThis course subjects our increasing knowledge about African women?s history from the mid-19th century to the present to critical analysis. It goes beyond restoring women to history and seeing African women as victims impacted upon and struggling against colonialism and neo-colonialism. It examines how African women?s lived experiences have been represented, packaged, and delivered to different audiences.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1womenSDG5
HIS383Y1Women in African HistoryThis course subjects our increasing knowledge about African women?s history from the mid-19th century to the present to critical analysis. It goes beyond restoring women to history and seeing African women as victims impacted upon and struggling against colonialism and neo-colonialism. It examines how African women?s lived experiences have been represented, packaged, and delivered to different audiences.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory1womenSDG5
HIS385H5Orientalism and OccidentalismThis course reflects on Edward W. Said's seminal Study Orientalism. The first part focuses on the debates around academic representations of the Orient before and after Said's intervention: his critics, alternative perspectives and methodological elaborations. The second part dissects the ways in which Orientalism inhabits political forms of belonging such as romantic nationalism or Islamic fundamentalism, as well as colonial constructions of liberalism, race, gender and sexuality. The third part examines the ramifications of Orientalist knowledge production in the media and in visual culture. The course also raises questions of strategic reversals of Orientalism, and to what extent Occidentalism can be considered the non-Western equivalent to Western constructions of Otherness. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; productionSDG5, SDG12
HIS386H5Gender and History in South AsiaThis course seeks to understand the manifold ways in which gender has shaped South Asian history, with a particular emphasis on the period from the colonial era to contemporary times. The themes will include the relationship between gender, kinship, society and politics on the one hand and race, imperialism, nationalism, popular movements and religion on the other. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS388H1France Since 1830A study of French society, politics and culture from the Paris Commune to the 1990s. Special attention is paid to watersheds like the Dreyfus Affair and the Vichy regime, to issues of regionalism/nationalism, cultural pluralism, women's rights, intellectual and cultural trends, and decolonization.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5women; rightsSDG5, SDG16
HIS388H5Histories of Modern Hinduism in South AsiaThis course examines the social, cultural and political history of Hinduism since 1800. Themes include Hindu socio-reform and political movements, public and popular engagements with Hinduism, and the role of religious institutions, sites, beliefs and rituals in crafting contestatory Hindu 'publics' and ideologies. It emphasizes the nexus between gender, class, caste, region and the language of religion in shaping national and transnational political and cultural identities. [24L]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; institutionSDG5, SDG16
HIS390H5Revolutions and Nations in Latin AmericaExamines social revolutions in Guatemala, Bolivia, Cuba and Nicaragua. It emphasizes the historical linkages between these revolutions and national identity, and stresses the roles of gender, race and the United States in revolutionary processes. This course considers as well the counterrevolutionary politics of the 1970s and 1980s in Central America and the Southern cone. [24L]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS396H1The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business in AmericaThis course examines the rise of big business in America and its relationship to social and economic changes in United States in the so-called Progressive Era (roughly 1880-1920). We will focus on several themes: the evolution and characteristics of big business; rise of organized labor; evolution of business-government relations; social and economic reform movements; and the changing status of immigrants, African Americans, and women (both white and African-American). In short, we will be studying a pivotal moment in the transformation of modern American society.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5women; industrSDG5, SDG9
HIS406H1Advanced Topics in Gender HistoryAn in-depth examination of issues in gender history. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS409H5The Life Cycle in Medieval and Early Modern EuropeThis course examines the daily lives of medieval and early modern Europeans as they moved through birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, marriage, adulthood, old age and death. Special attention is given to the ways in which gender, social status and local custom shaped thoughts and experiences throughout the life cycle. [24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS409H5The Life Cycle in Medieval and Early Modern EuropeThis course examines the daily lives of medieval and early modern Europeans as they moved through birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, marriage, adulthood, old age and death. Special attention is given to the ways in which gender, social status and local custom shaped thoughts and experiences throughout the life cycle. [24S]MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5genderSDG5
HIS422H1Early Modern English Popular Culture, 1500-1800Jennifer MoriDeals with issues of orality, literacy, gender, class, cultural bricolage and vernacular epistemology ? the constituents of popular, as opposed to elite knowledge - through the study of folklore, magic, religion, drink, sex, riot and festivity in early modern England. Some background in medieval and/or early modern history or literature is highly recommended. Extensive work will be undertaken with primary printed sources.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS423H1Social History of Medicine in the 19th& 20th CenturiesIntroduces students to current issues in the social history of medicine and some of the major developments in the modern history of the discipline. The format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as the history of the doctor-patient relationship, changes in physicians' social status, changing attitudes toward the body, and the evolution of various medical and surgical specialites including obstetrics and gynecology. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5ECOLOGYSDG15
HIS446H1Gender and Slavery in the Atlantic WorldThe course examines the relationship between gender and the experience of slavery and emancipating several Atlantic world societies from the 17th-19th centuries. Areas to be covered are the Caribbean, Brazil, the U.S. South, West and South Africa and Western Europe.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5genderSDG5
HIS454H5Race, Gender and Nation in Modern Latin AmericaThis seminar examines the interconnected histories of race, gender and nation in Latin America. It studies the significance of race/racism and gender/patriarchy in the construction of national societies in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Subtopics include: slavery and Indian servitude; acculturation and eugenics; immigration and urbanization; machismo and marianismo; and current Indian and women's movements. [24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5gender; women; urbanSDG5, SDG11
HIS470H1History, Rights, and Difference in South AsiaRitu BirlaAddressing South Asian history after 1750, this course examines ideas of rights, contract, and the rule of law in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Attention is paid to the intellectual history of rights and the central place of colonial and postcolonial questions within that history. Topics include rights and questions concerning indigenous culture, caste and customary practice, gender and capitalist development.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5gender; rightsSDG5, SDG16
HIS477H1Topics in the Social and Cultural History of Victorian BritainExamination of the impact of industrialism on Victorian society and values. Concentration on Victorian social critics including Engels, Owen, Maynew, Dickens and Morris.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5INDUSTRSDG9
HIS484H1The Car in North American HistoryThis seminar examines the history of the car in North America from the perspective of technology, business, landscape and popular culture. Particular attention is paid to issues of production, consumption, geography, and daily life, and to the importance of class race, gender, region, and age in shaping the meaning and experience of car culture.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5gender; consum; productionSDG5, SDG12
HIS490H5Religion and Society in Latin AmericaAn interdisciplinary seminar that examines religion and its historical role in shaping culture, society, and politics in Latin America. It considers both the formal institutional practice of religion as well as informal and popular religiosities. A framing theme of the course is the complex relationship between Church and State - and more broadly, between religion and politics - in the region. [24S]MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies0.5INSTITUTIONSDG16
HIS498H1Independent StudiesHistory Majors only. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for per-requisites and specific registration instructions.St. GeorgeFallFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
HIS498H1Independent StudiesHistory Majors only. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. See department website for per-requisites and specific registration instructions.St. GeorgeWinterFaculty of Arts and ScienceHistory0.5PRODUCTIONSDG12
HIS498Y5Internship in HistoryElspeth BrownThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, a limited number of advanced history students may enrol for field experience relating to expertise they have gained in the program. Placements are made at local libraries, historic sites and foundations, media outlets, public and private institutions. Five previous history courses and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 are required. For application to admission contact the Department of Historical Studies before June 1.MississaugaFallUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies1INSTITUTIONSDG16
HIS498Y5Internship in HistoryElspeth BrownThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, a limited number of advanced history students may enrol for field experience relating to expertise they have gained in the program. Placements are made at local libraries, historic sites and foundations, media outlets, public and private institutions. Five previous history courses and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 are required. For application to admission contact the Department of Historical Studies before June 1.MississaugaWinterUniversity of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies1INSTITUTIONSDG16
HISA05H3Themes in World History IIAn introduction to history that focuses on a particular theme in world history, which will change from year to year. Themes may include migration; empires; cultural encounters; history and film; global cities.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5CITIESSDG11
HISA07H3The Ancient Mediterranean WorldAn introduction to the main features of the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean world from the development of agriculture to the spread of Islam. Long term socio-economic and cultural continuities and ruptures will be underlined, while a certain attention will be dedicated to evidences and disciplinary issues. Same as CLAA04H30.50 pre-1800 creditAncient World AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5agricultureSDG2
HISA08H3Africa in the World: An IntroductionStephen RockelAn interdisciplinary introduction to the history and development of Africa with Africa's place in the wider world a key theme. Students critically engage with African and diasporic histories, cultures, social structures, economies, and belief systems. Course material is drawn from Archaeology, History, Geography, Literature, Film Studies and Women's Studies.Africa and Asia AreaSame as AFSA01H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5womenSDG5
HISA09H3Capitalism: A Global HistoryThis course explores the rise of capitalism – understood not simply as an economic system but as a political and cultural one as well – from roughly the 14th century to the present day. It aims to acquaint students with many of the more important socio-economic changes of the past seven hundred years and informing the way they think about some of the problems of the present time: globalization, growing disparities of wealth and poverty, and the continuing exploitation of the planet’s natural resources.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5poverty; natural resourcesSDG1, SDG12
HISB14H3Edible History: History of Global FoodwaysAn exploration of how eating traditions around the world have been affected by economic and social changes, including imperialism, migration, the rise of a global economy, and urbanization. Topics include: immigrant cuisines, commodity exchanges, and the rise of the restaurant. Lectures will be supplemented by cooking demonstrations.Transnational AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; urbanSDG2, SDG11
HISB23H3Latin America and the WorldThis class will examine Latin America’s social and cultural history from the ancient Aztecs and Incas to the twentieth-century populist revolutions of Emiliano Zapata and Evita Perón. It will also focus on Latin America’s connections to the wider world through trade, migration, and cuisine.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5TRADESDG10
HISB31H3History of the United States since the Civil WarThis course offers a survey of U.S. history from the post-Civil War period through the late 20th century, examining key episodes and issues such as settlement of the American West, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, popular culture, social movements, race relations, and foreign policy. United States and Latin America AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5INDUSTR; urbanSDG9, SDG11
HISB41H3Making of Modern CanadaStudents will be introduced to historical processes central to the history of Canada's diverse peoples and the history of the modern age more generally, including the industrial revolution, women's entry in social and political "publics," protest movements, sexuality, and migration in the context of international links and connections. Canadian AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; industrSDG5, SDG9
HISB50H3Africa in the Era of the Slave TradeAn introduction to the history of Sub-Saharan Africa, from the era of the slave trade to the colonial conquests. Throughout, the capacity of Africans to overcome major problems will be stressed. Themes include slavery and the slave trade; pre-colonial states and societies; economic and labour systems; and religious change.Africa and Asia AreaSame as AFSB50H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5LABOUR; tradeSDG8, SDG10
HISB57H3Sub-Continental Histories: South Asia in the WorldA survey of South Asian history. The course explores diverse and exciting elements of this long history, such as politics, religion, trade, literature, and the arts, keeping in mind South Asia's global and diasporic connections. Africa and Asia Area Same as GASB57H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5TRADESDG10
HISB74H3Asian Foods and Global CitiesThis course explores the social circulation of Asian-identified foods and beverages using research from geographers, anthropologists, sociologists, and historians to understand their changing roles in ethnic entrepreneur-dominated cityscapes of London, Toronto, Singapore, Hong Kong, and New York. Foods under study include biryani, curry, coffee, dumplings, hoppers, roti, and tea.Same as GASB74H3 Africa and Asia AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5food; citiesSDG2, SDG11
HISC10H3Environment, Society and Economy in Ptolemaic and Roman EgyptThis course provides a review of the environmental, social and economic features of Egypt from 332 BC to 642 AD. Same as (IEEC52H3), CLAC05H3 0.50 pre-1800 credit Ancient World AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
HISC45H3Immigrants and Race Relations in Canadian HistoryMikhail BjorgeAn examination of aspects of the history of immigrants and race relations in Canada, particularly for the period 1840s 1960s. The course covers various immigrant and racialized groups and explores how class, gender and race/ethnicity shaped experiences and racial/ethnic relations.Canadian AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5genderSDG5
HISC46H3Canada and the WorldA look at Canada's evolution in relation to developments on the world stage. Topics include Canada's role in the British Empire and its relationship with the U.S., international struggles for women's rights, Aboriginal peoples' sovereignty and LGBT equality, socialism and communism, the World Wars, decolonization, the Cold War, humanitarianism, and terrorism. Canadian AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; equality; rightsSDG5, SDG16
HISC52H3Ethiopia: Seeing HistoryThis course uses a focus on material history and visual culture to explore Ethiopia from the fourth through the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on the Christian Church, the monarchy, links with both the Mediterranean world and the Indian subcontinent, and the relationship of individuals to their social, economic, artistic and geographic environments.Same as AFSC52H3 and VPHC52H3 0.50 pre-1800 creditAfrica and Asia AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
HISC55H3War and Society in Modern AfricaConflict and social change in Africa from the slave trade to contemporary times. Topics include the politics of resistance, women and war, repressive and weak states, the Cold War, guerrilla movements, resource predation. Case studies of anticolonial rebellions, liberation wars, and civil conflicts will be chosen from various regions.Same as AFSC55H3Africa and Asia AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; tradeSDG5, SDG10
HISC58H3Delhi and London: Imperial Cities, Mobile PeopleDelhi and London were two major cities of the British Empire. This course studies their parallel destinies, from the imperial into the post-colonial world. It explores how diverse cultural, ecological, and migratory flows connected and shaped these cities, using a wide range of literary, historical, music, and film sources.Transnational AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5CITIESSDG11
HISD25H3Oral History and Urban ChangeAn applied research methods course that introduces students to the methods and practice of Oral history, the history of Scarborough, the field of public history and community-based research. A critical part of the class will be to engage in fieldwork related to designing and conducting oral history interviews. Canadian AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5URBANSDG11
HISD48H3The World Through Canadian EyesHow have Canadians historically experienced, and written about, the world? In what ways have nationalism, imperialism, and ideas about gender and race given meaning to Canadian understandings of the world? Students will consider these questions by exploring the work of Canadian travel writers, missionaries, educators, diplomats, trade officials, and intellectuals.Canadian AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5educat; gender; tradeSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
HISD54H3Aqueous History: Water-stories for a FutureThis upper-level seminar will explore how water has shaped human experience. It will explore water landscapes, the representation of water in legal and political thought, slave narratives, and water management in urban development from the 16th century. Using case studies from South Asia and North America we will understand how affective, political and social relations to water bodies are made and remade over time. Same as GASD54H3ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5WATER; urban; waterSDG6, SDG11
HISD59H3Law and Society in Chinese HistoryA seminar course on Chinese legal tradition and its role in shaping social, political, economic, and cultural developments, especially in late imperial and modern China. Topics include the foundations of legal culture, regulations on sexuality, women's property rights, crime fictions, private/state violence, laws of ethnicities, prison reforms and modernization.Same as GASD59H30.5 pre-1800 credit Africa and Asia AreaScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; cities; rightsSDG5, SDG11, SDG16
HISD59H3Law and Society in Chinese HistoryA seminar course on Chinese legal tradition and its role in shaping social, political, economic, and cultural developments, especially in late imperial and modern China. Topics include the foundations of legal culture, regulations on sexuality, women's property rights, crime fictions, private/state violence, laws of ethnicities, prison reforms and modernization.Same as GASD59H30.5 pre-1800 credit Africa and Asia AreaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5women; cities; rightsSDG5, SDG11, SDG16
HISD65H3The Good in Islam: Ethics in Islamic ThoughtWhat is good and evil? Are they known by human reason or revelation? How is happiness achieved? How is the human self-cultivated? This course will explore the diverse approaches that Muslim thinkers took to answering these perennial questions. Beginning with early Islam (the Qur’an and Prophet Muhammad), we will examine ethical thought in various intellectual traditions (e.g.: Islamic law, philosophy, mysticism, literature). Finally, we will analyze contemporary ethical dilemmas (e.g.; Muslim political, sexual, and environmental ethics). Transnational areaScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughDept. of Historical & Cultural Studies (UTSC)0.5ENVIORNMENTSDG13
HLTA02H3Foundations in Health Studies ISuzanne SicchiaThis the first part of a sequence of two courses designed to introduce theory, contemporary topics, and analytical techniques related to the study of health issues. Examples of topics include: social determinants of health, basic anatomy, introduction to child development, introduction to the life course and aging, disease, health economics and policy, and applicable research methods.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTA03H3Foundations in Health Studies IIThis the second part of a sequence of two courses designed to introduce theory, contemporary topics, and analytical techniques related to the study of health issues. Examples of topics include: social determinants of health, basic anatomy, introduction to child development, introduction to the life course and aging, disease, health economics and policy, and applicable research methods.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB11H3Basic Human NutritionAn introductory course to provide the fundamentals of human nutrition to enable students to understand and think critically about the complex interrelationships between food, nutrition, health and environment.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5food; nutrition; health; environmentSDG2, SDG3, SDG13
HLTB15H3Introduction to Health Research MethodologyJessica WongThe objective of this course is to introduce students to the main principles that are needed to undertake health-related research. Students will be introduced to the concepts and approaches to health research, the nature of scientific inquiry, the role of empirical research, and epidemiological research designs.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB16H3Introduction to Public HealthThis course will present a brief history about the origins and development of the public health system and its role in health prevention. Using a case study approach, the course will focus on core functions, public health practices, and the relationship of public health with the overall health system.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB22H3Biological Determinants of HealthThis course is an introduction to the basic biological principles underlying the origins and development of both infectious and non-infectious diseases in human populations. It covers population genetics and principles of inheritance.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB30H3Current Issues in HealthAn interdisciplinary consideration of current and pressing issues in health, including health crises, care, education, policy, research, and knowledge mobilization and translation. The course will focus on emerging questions and research, with attention to local and global experts from a range of disciplines and sectors.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; educatSDG3, SDG4
HLTB40H3Health Policy and Health SystemsThis course focuses on public and private financing mechanisms for health care in Canada, emphasizing provincial differences and discussing the systems in place in other developed nations. Topics will include the forces of market competition and government regulation as well as the impact of health policy on key stakeholders. Students will also learn how to apply simple economic reasoning to examine health policy issues.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB41H3Introduction to the Social Determinants of HealthThis course introduces students to Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) approaches to reducing health inequities, and improving individual and population health. Students will critically explore the social, political, economic, and historic conditions that shape the everyday lives, and influence the health, of people.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB41H3Introduction to the Social Determinants of HealthThis course introduces students to Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) approaches to reducing health inequities, and improving individual and population health. Students will critically explore the social, political, economic, and historic conditions that shape the everyday lives, and influence the health, of people.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB42H3Perspectives of Culture, Illness and HealingThis course introduces students to anthropological perspectives of culture, society, and language, to foster understanding of the ways that health intersects with political, economic, religious and kinship systems. Topics will include ethnographic theory and practice, cultural relivatism, and social and symbolic meanings and practices regarding the body.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTB50H3Introduction to Health HumanitiesAn introduction to human health through literature, narrative, and the visual arts. Students will develop strong critical skills in text-centered methods of analysis (i.e., the written word, visual images) through topics including representations of health, illness narratives, death and dying, patient-professional relationships, technoscience and the human body.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC02H3Women and Health: Past and PresentThis course uses historical, anthropological, philosophical approaches to further understand the relationships intertwining women, health and society. Women's interactions with the health sector will be examined. Particular attention will be devoted to the social and gender construction of disease and the politics of women's health.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; gender; womenSDG3, SDG5
HLTC04H3Critical Qualitative Health Research MethodsStudents will develop a curiosity and awareness about critical approaches to studying health and illness. They will learn what it means to be a critical qualitative health researcher. They will understand how to engage in transformative critical health research practice that questions taken-for-granted assumptions about the social world, and, in the process, students will develop new conceptual and applied skills. Students will draw from interdisciplinary knowledge sources to develop strategies for designing and carrying out critically informed health research projects.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC17H3Introduction to Rehabilitation SciencesThis course will provide students with an introduction to the rehabilitation sciences in the Canadian context. Students will gain knowledge regarding the pressing demographic needs for rehabilitation services and research, as well as the issues affecting the delivery of those services.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC19H3Chronic DiseasesJessica WongThis course will introduce students to the regional, national, and global patterns of chronic disease and demonstrate how demography, behaviour, socio-economic status, and genetics impact patterns of chronic disease in human populations. Using epidemiological studies we will examine these patterns, assess their complex causes, and discuss strategies for broad-based preventative action.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC22H3Health, Aging and the Life CycleThis course focuses on the transition from birth to old age and changes in health status. Topics to be covered include: socio-cultural perspectives on aging, the aging process, chronic and degenerative diseases, caring for the elderly.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC23H3Issues in Child Health and DevelopmentThis course will explore bio-social aspects of health and development in children. Topics for discussion include genetics and development, growth and development, childhood diseases, the immune system, and nutrition during the early years.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5nutrition; healthSDG2, SDG3
HLTC24H3Environment and Health Environmental issues are often complex and require a holistic approach where the lines between different disciplines are often obscured. The environment, as defined in this course, includes the natural (biological) and built (social, cultural, political) settings. Health is broadly defined to include the concept of well-being. Case studies will be used to illustrate environment and health issues using an ecosystem approach that includes humans as part of the ecosystem.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; environmentSDG3, SDG13
HLTC25H3Infectious DiseasesAdopting ecological, epidemiological, and social approaches, this course examines the impact of infectious disease on human populations. Topics covered include disease ecology, zoonoses, and the role of humans in disease occurrence. The aim is to understand why infectious diseases emerge and how their occurrence is intimately linked to human behaviours.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; ecologySDG3, SDG15
HLTC26H3Global Health and Human BiologyThis course will apply students' knowledge of health studies and human biology to solving real-life cases in global health, such as the Ebola outbreaks in Africa or the acute toxic encephalopathy mystery illness among children in India. This case-study-oriented course will focus on the application of human biology principles in addressing current cases in global health.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC27H3Community Health and EpidemiologyEpidemiology is the study or the pattern and causes of health-related outcomes and the application of findings to improvement of public health. This course will examine the history of epidemiology and its principles and terminology, measures of disease occurrence, study design, and application of concepts to specific research areas.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC42H3Emerging Health Issues and Policy NeedsThis course takes an interdisciplinary approach to helping students prepare to tackle complex emerging health issues and to explore ways of addressing these issues through public policy. A range of contemporary and newly-emerging health issues are discussed and analyzed in the context of existing policy constraints within Canada and worldwide.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC43H3Politics of Canadian Health PolicyThis course examines the role of all levels of Canadian government in health and health care. The impact of public policies, health care policy, and access to health care services on the health of populations is considered. The course also examines the role of political parties and social movements in the policy change process.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC46H3Globalization, Gender and HealthSuzanne SicchiaThis interdisciplinary course draws on diverse theoretical and analytical approaches that span the humanities, social sciences and life sciences to critically explore the diverse relationships between gender and health, in local and global contexts. Particular attention is given to intersections between sex, gender and other social locations and processes that impact health and health inequities across the lifespan, including the impacts of ableism, colonialism, hetero-normativity, poverty, racialization, and sexism on women's and men's health, and related health research and practice. Through course readings, case studies, group discussions, class activities, and course assignments, students will apply these theoretical lenses and develop analytical skills that : (1) advance a more contextualized understanding of gender and health across the lifespan, (2) provide important insights into gendered health inequities, and (3) speak to strategies and social movements that begin to address these challenges.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC47H3Special Topics in Health StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to health studies. The specific topic will vary from year to year, and may include: Social Justice and Health Activism; Climate Change and Health; Labour, Precarity, and Health.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; labour; climate; justiceSDG3, SDG9, SDG13, SDG16
HLTC48H3Special Topics in Health StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to health studies. The specific topic will vary from year to year. Topics may include: Social Justice and Health Activism; Climate Change and Health; Labour, Precarity, and Health.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; labour; climate; justiceSDG3, SDG9, SDG13, SDG16
HLTC49H3Indigenous HealthNicholas SpenceThis course will examine the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples, given historic and contemporary issues. A critical examination of the social determinants of health, including the cultural, socioeconomic and political landscape, as well as the legacy of colonialism, will be emphasized. An overview of methodologies and ethical issues working with Indigenous communities in health research and developing programs and policies will be provided. The focus will be on the Canadian context, but students will be exposed to the issues of Indigenous peoples worldwide.Same as SOCC49H3ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5socioeconomic; healthSDG1, SDG3
HLTC52H3Special Topics in Health HumanitiesAn examination of a current topic in Health Humanities. The specific topic will vary from year to year.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC52H3Special Topics in Health HumanitiesAn examination of a current topic in Health Humanities. The specific topic will vary from year to year.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTC55H3Methods in Arts-Based Health ResearchThis course introduces students to the practice of arts-based health research (ABHR), which involves the formal integration of creative art forms into health research methods and outcomes. Students will learn about the conceptual foundations of ABHR and explore various methods for generating, interpreting and representing health-related research (e.g., narrative, performance, visual arts, digital storytelling, or body mapping). With reference to concrete exemplars and experiential learning in creative forms, students will examine critical issues of methodological quality, evidence, research ethics, implementation challenges, and opportunities for arts-based health research in Canada and the global context.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD01H3Directed Readings in Health StudiesThis is an advanced reading course in special topics for upper level students who have completed the available basic courses in Health Studies and who wish to pursue further intensive study on a relevant topic. Topic selection and approval will depend on the supervising instructor.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD01H3Directed Readings in Health StudiesThis is an advanced reading course in special topics for upper level students who have completed the available basic courses in Health Studies and who wish to pursue further intensive study on a relevant topic. Topic selection and approval will depend on the supervising instructor.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD04H3Special Topics in HealthThe topics presented in this course will represent a range of contemporary issues in health research. Topics will vary by instructor and term.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD06H3Special Topics in Migration and Public HealthThe focus of this seminar is on public health as an institution and on the contemporary and historical practices related to migrants in Canada and globally. Practices include surveillance, screening, detention, and quarantine, among other forms of governance and regulation. Societal issues, social theory, and historic case studies drawn from literature, film and empirical research explore enduring questions and tensions related to the treatment of migrants by public health systems.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5health; institution; governanceSDG3, SDG16
HLTD07H3Advanced Rehabilitation Sciences: Disability Studies and Lived Experiences of 'Normalcy'This course builds on HLTC17H3 by examining rehabilitation from the perspectives of researchers, clinicians, and clients. The course focuses on the historical role of rehabilitation, not only in improving health, but also in perpetuating the goal of 'normalcy'. Students will examine how rehabilitation impacts people, both at an individual and societal level, and explore the field of disability studies and its critical engagement with the message that disabled people “need to be repaired.”ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD08H3Special Topics in Health SciencesAn examination of a current health sciences topic. The specific topic will vary from year to year, and may include: clinical epidemiology, an advanced nutrition topic, or the biology and population health impacts of a specific disease or illness condition.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5nutrition; healthSDG2, SDG3
HLTD12H3Special Topics in HealthThe topics presented in this course will represent a range of contemporary issues in health research. Topics will vary by instructor and term.ScarboroughWinterUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)0.5healthSDG3
HLTD21H3Special Topics in HealthThe topics presented in this course will represent a range of contemporary issues in health research. Topics will vary by instructor and term.ScarboroughFallUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughHealth and Society (UTSC)