Sustainability Course Inventory

University of Toronto’s 2022-2023 Undergraduate Sustainability Course Inventory

The Sustainability Course Inventory gathers information about all sustainability-related undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto. It includes 2,702 sustainability-oriented courses, representing 25% of all 11,019 undergraduate courses at U of T. The purpose of the sustainability course inventory is to increase the visibility of such courses, making it more accessible for students to add sustainability content to their educational experience. We hope to encourage deeper understanding of the societal shift towards sustainability, to contribute to the creation of a culture of sustainability at the university. Our understanding of sustainability englobes both human and environmental concerns, and the inventory was created based on keywords from the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), see below. The SDGs were chosen as a basis for the inventory due to their comprehensiveness and widespread usage in the sustainability field. SDG 17, “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the goal partnership for sustainable development,” was excluded from the methodology, as it encompasses the act of achieving the other goals rather than bringing a new perspective to sustainability. The first inventory was created in 2017 by the Expanded Student Engagement (ESE) Project, which supported the the President’s Advisory Committee on the Environment, Climate Change, and Sustainability (CECCS). This 2022-2023 edition was updated by CECCS RA in November 2022. If you have any questions or suggestions for a course to be included in or removed from this inventory, please contact ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

SDG Goals

The UN Sustainable Development Goals and Inventory Keywords

See the SDG Keywords page for the list of keywords searched in the titles and descriptions of undergraduate courses in the master list of undergraduate courses. The search results were quality assured by the CECCS RA team to remove any courses which were deemed not to have sustainability content. Methodologies and contexts for making this inventory were highlighted in an academic paper written by the ESE team and published in the journal “Sustainability”: “Expanding Student Engagement in Sustainability: Using SDG- and CEL-focused Inventories to Transform Curriculum at the University of Toronto“, January 2019, Sustainability 11(2):530.

Summary Tables
University DivisionsUnique Sustainability Courses% of Total Courses% of Undergraduate StudentsNumber of Sustainability Courses per Student (Divisional)
ARTSCI- UTSG12614738.70.0431
USTC5582118.70.0394
UTM6122321.20.0382
APSE10947.50.0193
FALD12<11.40.0112
KPE5321.40.0512
MUSIC24110.044
INFO7<1<10.1296
PHARM6521.50.058
GRAD1<1
Total270210091.40
SDG GroupNumber of Courses% of Total Courses
1. No Poverty1294.8
2. Zero Hunger1013.7
3. Good Health and Well-Being46917.4
4. Quality Education32612.1
5. Gender Equality68425.3
6. Clean Water and Sanitation772.8
7. Affordable and Clean Energy863.2
8. Decent Work and Economic Growth38714.3
9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure34212.7
10. Reduced Inequalities78929.2
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities31112.3
12. Responsible Consumption and Production1525.6
13. Climate Action47117.4
14. Life Below Water1866.9
15. Life on Land32812.1
16. Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions100137

*The following divisions were not included in the table as they had no courses in the inventory: Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, OISE, Woodsworth Certificate, Transitional Year Program

Undergraduate Sustainability Course Inventory

Note: If you are a professor at the University of Toronto and think that a course should be included or removed from the inventory, please email Ayako Ariga: ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse DescriptionDivisionUnitKeyword(s)SDG(s)
ABP102Y1Contemporary CanadaThis interdisciplinary, foundational course provides an introduction to contemporary Canadian society. The course includes the study of geography, politics, literature and culture through a historical framework of the twentieth century. It also emphasizes particular themes including indigenous issues, Quebec nationalism, gender/women's issues and immigration/multiculturalism. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, women, indigenous, nationalismSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
ABP104Y1Introduction to Environmental StudiesThis interdisciplinary course introduces the major issues regarding the sustainability of the global environment in the face of human development by integrating humanities and social science with the fundamental concept of environmental science. It examines major environmental problems, such as rapid climate change and land degradation as well as the role and impact of government, economics, and ethics on environmental issues. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLclimate, environmental, landSDG13, SDG15
ABP105Y1Indigenous Cultures and SocietiesThis course provides an interdisciplinary focus on key topics relevant to Indigenous communities, historically and in the present. Students will be introduced to diverse cultures, communities, and worldviews of Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island (particularly Canada) and how they have been affected by colonialism. Emphasis will be placed on the ways Indigenous peoples are resisting social, economic, political, and environmental injustices, while revitalizing their identities, knowledges, and communities and creating space for the expression of Indigenous voices. Storytelling that prioritizes the perspectives and worldviews of Indigenous peoples will guide students’ learning about course topics, issues, and concepts. Students will be encouraged to connect their own storied identities and perspectives to course themes and issues. Classes will involve a mix of interactive lectures, class discussion, student-led learning opportunities, and field trips. Class time and assignments will also be devoted to helping students build their critical thinking, reading, and writing skills towards the completion of a research-based essay due at the end of the year. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, worldview, learning, knowledges, indigenous, environmental, land, injusticeSDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG15
ABP106Y1Media, Culture, and SocietyThis interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the cultural and social impacts of present-day popular mass media. Themes explored include the economic and political forces that shape the media world, the role of technology, and issues of representation, gender, and social justice. The course examines a wide range of texts, emphasizing popular culture produced in Canada, and students will have the opportunity to draw extensively on their own interactions with popular media. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, social justiceSDG5, SDG16, SDG9, SDG10
ABP109Y1Decentring "Canada"This course centres diverse, under-acknowledged narratives of people, such as Indigenous and racialized peoples, within the territories of "Canada" to challenge monolithic, linear, and uncritical representations of this country's history and future. Archival materials, maps, place names, art, literature, film, and other texts will be approached from interdisciplinary perspectives to reveal different orientations to historical events, social injustices, and futures of this territory. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, indigenous, injusticeSDG10, SDG16, SDG1
ABP109Y1Diverse Histories of CanadaThis course explores diverse, under-acknowledged narratives of people, such as Indigenous and racialized peoples, within the territories currently known as Canada to challenge monolithic, linear, and uncritical representations of this country's past and future. Archival materials, maps, place names, art, literature, film, and other texts will be approached from interdisciplinary perspectives to reveal different orientations to historical events, social injustices, and futures of this territory. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, indigenous, injusticeSDG10, SDG16, SDG1
ACMB10H3Equity and Diversity in the ArtsEquity and diversity in the arts promotes diversity of all kinds, including those of race, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation or identity, age, ability or disability, religion, and aesthetics, tradition or practice. This course examines issues of equity and diversity and how they apply across all disciplines of arts, culture and media through critical readings and analysis of cultural policy.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofsocio-economic, disabilit, equity, gender, equitSDG1, SDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG10
AFR150Y1Introduction to African StudiesA multi-disciplinary study of Africa, emphasizing inquiry and critical analysis. Pre-colonial, colonial and contemporary African history, anthropology, politics, African humanism and society, religion, art, music, race, resistance, gender and Pan-Africanism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
AFR250Y1Africa in the 21st Century: Challenges and OpportunitiesA critical examination of Africa as a living space rather than merely a site of intellectual speculation and study. Uses scholarly and popular literature to explore the issues that engage the attention of ordinary Africans, ranging from the dramatic to the seemingly trivial, as they struggle to fashion meaningful lives in fast-changing societies. Topics include urban transition and city life; economic, political and cultural impacts of globalization; new religious movements and changing conceptions of selfhood; new African diasporas in the West; dynamics of gender relations, kinships and identities; and the politics of liberalization. Materials studied will include print and electronic news media and other mass media resources from Africa and across the world.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, globaliz, urban, transitSDG5, SDG9, SDG11
AFR351Y1African Systems of ThoughtThe exploration of a range of African cosmologies, epistemologies, and theologies, as well as specific case studies on justice, the moral order, and gender relations. The influence of these richly diverse traditions is traced as well in the writings of African thinkers in the Diaspora.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5, SDG16
AFR353H1International Relations of AfricaExplores inter-state relations in Africa, African states’ relations with the West, China, India, Brazil, and international political, economic and financial institutions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinstitutSDG16, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10
AFR359H1The Horn of Africa - Critical PerspectivesExamines the Horn of Africa, its diversity, geopolitics, cultural politics, present conditions and current debates through a critical and comparative lens. Considers social forces in contemporary politics within the region including competing claims, explanations of the underpinnings of the Horn's conflict, and the promise of peace. Draws upon interdisciplinary scholarship, public discourse, texts and media to reflect on the future of the Horn of Africa at this historical moment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpeaceSDG16
AFR365H1Art, Media and Politics in Africa and the African DiasporaExplores the critical intersections between art, media and politics by analyzing the making and circulation of various indigenous and modern art forms and their use as creative and radical strategies for creative expression, dissent, citizenship, and alternative forms of representation, reimaginings, transcendence and agency in African post-colonial contexts, and interconnected with the African Diaspora.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcitizenship, indigenous, giniSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
AFR370H1Anticolonialism, Radicalism and Revolutions in AfricaAn interdisciplinary exploration of the histories of nationalist and revolutionary movements, ideologies, and regimes in twentieth and twenty-first century Africa, examining the various ways that Africans imagined, actively shaped, and continue to demand freedom and political modernity. Emphasis will be placed on African history methodology (including oral history) and historiography to encourage students to apply a historical lens to approaching key themes and concepts in African Studies such as nationalism, decolonization, the state, politics, citizenship, labour movements, and pro-democracy movements.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLanticolonial, citizenship, labour, decolonization, nationalism, democraSDG4, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
AFR389H1The Geopolitics and Debates on Africa-China Economic RelationsExplores the geopolitics of Africa-Asia relations, in particular, the unabated and polarized debates and narratives on China’s engagement across sectors in Africa, ‘Africa-China’ multifaceted trade relations, strategies and interests, and economic diplomacy. Critically examines the changing landscape of economic cooperation and development financing in contemporary Africa, their underlying impulses and their broader implications.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLtrade, landSDG10, SDG15, SDG8, SDG9
AFR454H1Migration, Mobility, and Displacement in Contemporary AfricaWhy do people move voluntarily or involuntarily? What are the causes and consequences of migration and displacement in Africa? This course critically examines the multifaceted dimensions of migration, mobility, and displacement, with a specific focus on communities and populations displaced by war, environmental destruction and disaster, economic failings, and the quest for economic opportunities, love, education, or individual freedom.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLenvironmentalSDG13, SDG16
AFR455H1Conflicts, Negotiations and Peacebuilding in AfricaExamines conflicts and peace negotiations in African contexts such as Somalia, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and North Africa through public discourse, citizen actions, policy debates and mobilizations. Explores formal, informal, indigenous and institutional mediation and peace negotiation platforms, strategies, and impulses. Analyzes various conflict zones, case studies and intervention strategies for negotiating and sustaining peace in Africa in the broader context of the war on terror, increasing militarism, and securitization in peacebuilding.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpeace, indigenous, institut, democraSDG16, SDG10
AFSA03H3Experiencing Development in AfricaThis experiential learning course allows students to experience first hand the realities, challenges, and opportunities of working with development organizations in Africa. The goal is to allow students to actively engage in research, decision-making, problem solving, partnership building, and fundraising, processes that are the key elements of development work. Same as IDSA02H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department oflearningSDG16
AFSB05H3Culture and Society in AfricaAn overview of the range and diversity of African social institutions, religious beliefs and ritual, kinship, political and economic organization, pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial experience. Same as ANTB05H3University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofinstitutSDG16
AFSB50H3Africa in the Era of the Slave TradeAn introduction to the history of Sub-Saharan Africa, from the era of the slave trade to the colonial conquests. Throughout, the capacity of Africans to overcome major problems will be stressed. Themes include slavery and the slave trade; pre-colonial states and societies; economic and labour systems; and religious change. Same as HISB50H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department oflabour, tradeSDG8, SDG10, SDG16
AFSB51H3Africa from the Colonial Conquests to IndependenceModern Sub-Saharan Africa, from the colonial conquests to the end of the colonial era. The emphasis is on both structure and agency in a hostile world. Themes include conquest and resistance; colonial economies; peasants and labour; gender and ethnicity; religious and political movements; development and underdevelopment; Pan-Africanism, nationalism and independence. Same as HISB51H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofgender, labour, nationalismSDG5, SDG8, SDG16, SDG10
AFSB54H3Africa in the Postcolonial EraAfrica from the 1960s to the present. After independence, Africans experienced great optimism and then the disappointments of unmet expectations, development crises, conflict and AIDS. Yet the continent’s strength is its youth. Topics include African socialism and capitalism; structural adjustment and resource economies; dictatorship and democratization; migration and urbanization; social movements. Same as HISB54H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofcapital, urban, democraSDG9, SDG16, SDG8, SDG10
AFSC53H3Gender and Critical DevelopmentHow development affects, and is affected by, women around the world. Topics may include labour and economic issues, food production, the effects of technological change, women organizing for change, and feminist critiques of traditional development models.University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofgender, women, feminis, labour, productionSDG5, SDG8, SDG12, SDG1, SDG2, SDG9
AFSC55H3War and Society in Modern AfricaConflict and social change in Africa from the slave trade to contemporary times. Topics include the politics of resistance, women and war, repressive and weak states, the Cold War, guerrilla movements, resource predation. Case studies of anti-colonial rebellions, liberation wars, and civil conflicts will be chosen from various regions. Same as HISC55H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofwomen, trade, social changeSDG5, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12
AFSC70H3The Caribbean DiasporaThe migration of Caribbean peoples to the United States, Canada, and Europe from the late 19th century to the present. The course considers how shifting economic circumstances and labour demands, the World Wards, evolving imperial relationships, pan-Africanism and international unionism, decolonization, natural disasters, and globalization shaped this migration. Same as HISC70H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department oflabour, globaliz, decolonizationSDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG15, SDG16
AFSC97H3Women and Power in AfricaThis course examines women in Sub-Saharan Africa in the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial periods. It covers a range of topics including slavery, colonialism, prostitution, nationalism and anti-colonial resistance, citizenship, processes of production and reproduction, market and household relations, and development. Same as HISC97H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, women, production, nationalismSDG4, SDG5, SDG12, SDG16, SDG8
AFSD07H3Extractive Industries in AfricaThis course examines resource extraction in African history. We examine global trade networks in precolonial Africa, and the transformations brought by colonial extractive economies. Case studies, from diamonds to uranium, demonstrate how the resource curse has affected states and economies, especially in the postcolonial period. Same as IDSD07H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department oftradeSDG10, SDG8, SDG9, SDG12, SDG15
AFSD51H3Southern Africa: Colonial Rule, Apartheid and LiberationA seminar study of southern African history from 1900 to the present. Students will consider industrialization in South Africa, segregation, apartheid, colonial rule, liberation movements, and the impact of the Cold War. Historiography and questions of race, class and gender will be important. Extensive reading and student presentations are required. Same as HISD51H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofgender, industrializationSDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
AFSD52H3East African Societies in TransitionA seminar study of East African peoples from late pre-colonial times to the 1990's, emphasizing their rapid although uneven adaptation to integration of the region into the wider world. Transitions associated with migrations, commercialization, religious change, colonial conquest, nationalism, economic development and conflict, will be investigated. Student presentations are required. Same as HISD52H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofinvest, transit, nationalismSDG9, SDG11, SDG16, SDG8
ANT198H1Nature: A Cultural IntroductionThis course is a First-Year Foundation Seminar and provides an opportunity for exploration of different topics and themes. The distinction (or dualism) between nature and culture is often described as a central feature of the western cultural imagination and of “modernity.” The nature/culture dualism is also relevant to many current debates about ecology and environment. This course explores various approaches to “nature” through a variety of written and visual texts, and focuses on representations of the nature/culture dualism. First-Year Foundation Seminars are restricted to first-year students and do not normally contribute towards program completion. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofecologSDG15
ANT199H1Living on the Water in TorontoWhat do the Great Lakes mean to people living here? Especially Indigenous people? When and how do people care about the Great Lakes? Poems, stories, social science offer perspectives on the water from anthropology and arts. Field trips including paddling on a river, hiking; talks with local activists and artists. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofwater, indigenousSDG6, SDG10, SDG16, SDG14
ANT199H5First Year Seminar in AnthropologyThis course is designed to offer ambitious students a rigorous introduction to the field of sociocultural anthropology - the study of people as social and cultural beings, and how people order their lives and give meaning to their experiences. It is a reading, writing, and discussion-intensive seminar in which students explore core topics in the study of humanity-power, identity, self, culture, and society-by focusing on issues which may include but are not limited to war, human rights, development, immigration, and religion. Interested students must apply directly to the department.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofhuman rightsSDG16
ANT200Y1Introduction to ArchaeologyHow did art and technology develop in the course of human evolution? What led to the development of agriculture and settled village life? How did social inequality and urbanism emerge? This course takes a global perspective to explore the archaeological evidence that sheds light on these questions and other aspects of prehistory and early history. Students will engage with the challenges posed by new discoveries and also with recent developments in archaeological method and theory. The goal of the course is to involve students with the current state of archaeological research and some of the major issues archaeologists work to address.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofagricultur, inequality, equalit, urbanSDG2, SDG10, , SDG9
ANT204H1Social Cultural Anthropology and Global IssuesA course focused on recent anthropological scholarship that seeks to understand and explain the transformation of contemporary societies and cultures. Topics may include some of the following: new patterns of global inequality, war and neo-colonialism, health and globalization, social justice and indigeneity, religious fundamentalism, gender inequalities, biotechnologies and society etc.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgender, globaliz, inequality, equalit, social justiceSDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
ANT205H1Medical Anthropology: Sociocultural Perspectives on Illness, Medicine and CareIntroduction to medical anthropology with a focus on questions, methods, and insights from sociocultural anthropology. Explores the relationships among culture, society, and medicine with special attention to power, inequality, and globalization. Examples from many parts of the world, addressing biomedicine as well as other healing systems.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofillness, globaliz, inequality, equalitSDG3, SDG10
ANT207H5Being Human: Classic Thought on Self and SocietyThe question of what it means to be human has been at the core of anthropology for over two centuries, and it remains as pressing now as it ever was. This course introduces students to some classic attempts at addressing this question with specific reference to the nature of personhood and social life. By engaging with the writings of Marx, Weber, Freud, and DeBeauvoir among other great thinkers of the modern age, students will develop deeper knowledge of the major theories guiding anthropological research. We will pay close attention to how arguments are constructed in these texts and focus on the methodologies that these pioneers of social thought developed in their inquiries. The course covers enduring topics ranging from the production of social inequality, what it means to be an individual, how collective life is shaped by economic markets, and the role of religion in shaping human experience, to develop an understanding of central issues facing the world today. [24L 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, inequality, equalit, productionSDG4, SDG10, , SDG8
ANT208H1Medical Anthropology: an Evolutionary Perspective on Human HealthIntroduction to applied evolutionary medical anthropology. It explores evidence for the evolution of human vulnerability to disease across the life cycle (conception to death) and implications for health of contemporary populations in behavioral ecological, cross-cultural, health and healing systems, historical trauma, intersectionality, and climate change, lenses.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofvulnerability, climate, ecologSDG1, SDG13, SDG15, SDG3, SDG16
ANT209H5War, Trade and Aid: The Anthropology of Global InterventionThis course explores how anthropology approaches the study of various interventions into human life and society. These forms of intervention--nation building, human rights, and development--differ in the scale and scope of their projects and in what they hope to accomplish. They also have much in common. Each is explicitly concerned with improving the conditions under which people live, and yet each has also been criticized for making things worse rather than better. This course will explore why this might be the case by focusing on examples taken from around the world. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department oftrade, human rightsSDG10, SDG16, SDG3
ANT210H1Anthropologists and Indigenous Peoples in North AmericaThis course provides a rigorous introduction to historical and contemporary relations between Indigenous peoples and anthropologists, spanning archaeology, biological/ evolutionary anthropology, and socio-cultural & linguistic fields. The course centers Indigenous experience, critique, and scholarship, and fosters students’ critical thinking skills as applied to the ethics and politics of anthropological research, past and present. The course is organised into three modules: 1. Introduction to Indigenous peoples’ critiques and concerns regarding anthropology 2. Understanding historical context of these issues 3. In-depth discussion of current issues, oriented to emergent and possible future transformations in anthropology’s relations with Indigenous peoples.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofindigenousSDG10, SDG16, SDG4
ANT214H5Anthropology of Food and NutritionThis course explores human food use and nutrition from a broad anthropological perspective. It examines archaeological evidence of dietary patterns of human ancestors and examines contemporary phenomena such as the preference for sweetness and lactase persistence that are the legacy of ancestral adaptations. It explores significant food revolutions, from the origins of agriculture to the relatively recent phenomenon of biotechnological food production and looks at both the positive and negative effects of these changes on patterns of human growth and health. The goal of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of nutrition science that is contextualized in contemporary anthropological debates about the costs of changing food systems.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofagricultur, nutrition, food system, productionSDG2, SDG12, SDG1, SDG3, SDG10
ANT215H5How Should One Live? An Introduction to the Anthropology of EthicsFew questions are more obviously important than that which Socrates poses in Plato's Republic: "how should one live?" This course considers the various ways this question has been asked and the answers it has received across a range of very different contexts. It begins with Socrates' address to the Athenian assembly in The Apology and his conclusion that the examined life is the only one worth living. We then turn to the Greek past and the Homeric background against which the reflective life, that Socrates exemplified, stood in stark contrast. With this background in place we will proceed to consider the various ways in which the question of how one should live has been answered across of a range of social settings. Drawing on ethnography as well journalism and documentary film we will consider, for instance, Rastafarianism, Jainism, living "off-grid" in North America, deaf communities in the US, transgenderism, and non-binary gender identity. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofgender, non-binary, transgenderSDG5, SDG10
ANT216H5Racketeers, Smugglers and Pirates: Anthropology of IllegalityThis course will explore anthropological approaches to the study of various forms of illegal activities. Denaturalizing the state-imposed categories of legality and illegality, the course will examine how the legal-illegal divide is constructed contingently, and unpack moralities, inequalities, precarities, and forms of politics that illegal activities both rely on and make possible. The course will bring together recent ethnographies of racketeering, gang violence, piracy, human trafficking and contraband smuggling from different world regions. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department oftrafficking, equalit, violenceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANT219H5How Do We Know? The Social Anthropology of Knowledge“How do we know what we know?” is a question that has long concerned anthropologists. And in a world like ours – where “fake news,” religious credos and conspiracy theories coexist with common sense, mainstream media and scientific truth(s) – the question seems more important than ever. This course explore anthropological insights into knowledge and the question of how we know. To do so we will examine a range of contemporary knowledge-making activities which may include surveillance, witchcraft, conspiracy, governance, Artificial Intelligence and Big Data. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, governanceSDG4, SDG16, SDG9
ANT220H5Introduction to the Anthropology of HealthThis course introduces the diverse approaches used by anthropologists to examine human health and illness. Archaeological, biological, sociocultural and medical anthropology examine health and disease in past and present populations using a wide variety of theoretical and methodological tools. The concept of health will be explored using these various and often complementary approaches. The goal is to provide students with a broad theoretical foundation for further study in the anthropology of health. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofillnessSDG3
ANT241H5Anthropology and the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (in Canada)This course will examine the relationship between the field of anthropology and Indigenous people of Turtle Island. We will examine the past, present, and future manifestations of this relationship. This course will emphasize Indigenous, decolonial, and community scholars. Students will be encouraged to think critically and reflect on their own world views. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofdecolonial, indigenous, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
ANT308H5Case Studies in Archaeological Botany and ZoologyThis course examines human interaction with the environment from the perspective of case studies in zooarchaeology and palaeoethnobotany. Topics include prominent theoretical perspectives, domestication, subsistence organization including hunting and gathering as well as agriculture and its intensification.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofagriculturSDG2, SDG15
ANT327H1"Diversity": Critical/Comparative Studies of Indigeneity, Multiculturalism and (Settler) ColonialismHow do societies understand and manage their own diversity? This course unites critical studies of multiculturalism and settler colonialism to study Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S., also examining strategies in other sites for managing diversity which are framed differently (e.g. superdiversity (Europe), co-existence (Japan), multiracialism (Hawai’i), mestizoness (Mexico)).Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofsettler, landSDG4, SDG15, SDG 16
ANT341H5Anthropology of Infectious DiseaseInfection is situated at the intersection of social and biological experience. This course examines why infectious disease occupies such a central position in our contemporary understanding of health. It examines the many theoretical and methodological approaches currently used to understand how humans experience infectious illness. Perspectives from bioarchaeology, demography, environmental anthropology, medical history, biocultural anthropology, and medical anthropology are used to examine the way epidemics and infections have been understood throughout human history and how those understandings continue to shape human perceptions of risk, the body and identity. Social inequality is a major focus of inquiry; the course explores how colonialism, globalization and injustice lead to significant and persistent health inequalities for many populations.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofillness, epidemics, globaliz, inequality, equalit, environmental, injusticeSDG3, SDG9, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
ANT342H1Anthropology of Race and RacismThis course will examine the role of anthropology in the development, maintenance, as well as critique, of race as a concept and racism as a social, cultural, and structural reality. Topics include: the relationships among anthropology, race, and colonialism; the constructions of race as a social, cultural, and biological concept; ethnographic engagements with whiteness and white supremacy; and the future of anthropology as an anti-racist and anti-colonialist enterprise.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofracism, anti-racistSDG4, SDG10, SDG 16
ANT343H1Social Anthropology of GenderSocial anthropological perspectives on variations in gender roles and systems. Examines, through comparison of ethnography, the relationship of gender to social organization, economic and political processes, belief systems and social change.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgender, social changeSDG5, SDG16, SDG 10
ANT344H1Political AnthropologyThis course explores the conceptual and methodological tools anthropologists employ to study the ways social groups enact, resist, and transform social relations that involve the production and distribution of power. It studies how anthropologists theorize politics in relation to power, authority, coercion, and consent. Topics explored in this class include political cultures in state and statelessness societies, political affect and the politics of everyday life, hegemony and resistance, governmentality and bio-politics, violence and militarization, social movements and citizenship, and the difficulties of anthropological research in conflict zones.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofcitizenship, production, violenceSDG4, SDG12, SDG16, SDG 10
ANT345H1Global Health: Anthropological PerspectivesThis course examines medical anthropology's contributions to, and critiques of, global health policies and programs. Topics covered include: colonialism and health, the political ecology of disease, indigenous constructions of illness and healing, medical pluralism, the politics of primary health care, population policies, reproductive health, and AIDS.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofglobal health, health care, illness, reproductive health, indigenous, political ecology, ecologSDG3, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG15
ANT346H1Anthropology of FoodSocial anthropological perspective on the nature and meaning of food production, culinary cultures, industrial food, food as metaphor, and famine and hunger.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofculinary, productionSDG2, SDG12
ANT348H1Medical Anthropology: Health, Power and PoliticsThis course deepens students’ understandings of health and illness as social, cultural, political and historical phenomena. Drawing on theories and approaches from social-cultural anthropology, students will develop skills in critical analysis of experiences and meanings of healing and illness in particular contexts, with a focus on anthropological critique of dominant health policies, discourses, technologies and practices.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofillnessSDG3
ANT352H5Protest, Power and Authority: Topics in Political AnthropologyThis course explores ethnographically the social and cultural practices through which the exercise of power is legitimized, authorized, and contested, examining such topics as nation-building, non-governmental activism, human rights, and the global "war on terror." [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofhuman rightsSDG16, SDG10
ANT353H5Queer Bodies: Gender, Disability, and IllnessThis course explores key concepts in medical anthropology, disability studies, and gender and queer studies by examining how gender and sexuality matter in the contexts of illness and disability across a range of institutional, social, and national contexts. Students will learn to think critically about the body as a site of power configured in the social and material fields of heath/illness, dis/ability, race, and gender and sexuality.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, illness, gender, queer, institutSDG3, SDG5, SDG16
ANT354H5Capitalism and its RebelsThis class explores different forms of rebellion, insurgency, protest and political mobilization from an anthropological perspective, focusing specifically on anti-capitalist mobilizations. Grounded in ethnographies that range from studies of piracy, hacking, and the occupy movements, to struggles against the privatization of water and social movements organizing for "the commons," this course offers key insight into contemporary social movements, their deep groundings in the past, and the implications they might have for the future. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofwater, capitalSDG6, SDG9, SDG 6
ANT355H5Disabled Cyborgs and Racist Robots: Bodies, Technologies, and Social JusticeHow does technology mediate our ideas about the social differences of disability, race, and gender? By rethinking the role of technology in reproducing social disparities and challenging bioethical debates about enhancement, students will emerge with the tools to reimagine the relationship between technology, the human body, and social justice.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, gender, social justiceSDG3, SDG5, SDG16, SDG 9
ANT357H1Social Worlds of Medicine and CarePresents anthropological perspectives on provision of healthcare as a complex social and cultural phenomenon. Examines hierarchies and division of labour among health care providers, and how social groups come to occupy particular positions. Considers how knowledge and skills are gained through formal training and/or lived experience, how they are recognized and valued, and may become sources of identity. Examines local variations within biomedicine as practiced in different settings around the world.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofhealth care, healthcare, knowledge, labourSDG3, SDG4, SDG8
ANT357H5Nature, People and Power: Topics in Environmental AnthropologyThis course examines anthropological approaches to the environment and environmentalism. Through key readings on indigenous peoples and conservation, traditional ecological knowledge, community-based natural resource management, ecotourism and the human dimensions of climate change, the course explores the complex social, cultural and political encounters that produce 'the environment' as a resource in need of management. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, indigenous, natural resource, climate, environmental, conserv, ecologSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ANT358H1Medical Anthropology and Social JusticeIt is widely acknowledged that sharp disparities in disease burden and access to medical care characterize global patterns in health. These disparities affect the life chances of much of the worlds population, based on class position, gender, and geographical region.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, gender, social justiceSDG4, SDG5, SDG16, SDG3
ANT364H1Environment & GlobalizationThis course will examine the relationships between humans and the environment in the context of contemporary efforts to develop within or in opposition to the political economy of neoliberal globalization. We will critically examine the discourses of progress and environment within a broader theoretical inquiry of structure/agency and power.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofglobalizSDG9, SDG16
ANT366H1Anthropology of Activism and Social JusticeExplores how anthropologists have traditionally studied social movements and how new social movements have challenged anthropologists to rethink some of their ethnographic methods and approaches. Some specific movements covered include those related to indigenous rights, environmentalism, refugees, gay and lesbian issues, biotechnology, new religions, and globalization.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofglobaliz, refugee, indigenous, environmental, social justice, indigenous rightsSDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG10
ANT368H5World Religions and EcologyA study of the responses of selected world religious traditions to the emergence of global ecological concerns. Key concepts and tenets of the traditions and their relevance for examination of the environment crisis. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department oflearning, ecologSDG4, SDG15, SDG14
ANT369H5Religious Violence and NonviolenceReligious violence and nonviolence as they emerge in the tension between strict adherence to tradition and individual actions of charismatic figures. The place of violence and nonviolence in selected faith traditions. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofviolenceSDG16
ANT370H1Introduction to Social Anthropological TheoryAn in-depth critical review of foundational ideas in the development of the practice of Anthropology. Topics may include questioning fieldwork, origins and legacies of functionalism, cultural materialism, politics of culture, power and political economy, globalization and post modernism, gender and post-structuralism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgender, globalizSDG5, SDG9, SDG16
ANT370H5Environment, Culture and FilmOur present environmental challenge constitutes of the most pressing areas of contemporary social, cultural, ethical and ecological concern. Acid rain, poisoned air, forest clear-cutting, ozone depletion, global climate change, toxic waste sites--the list goes on--all weigh heavily on our personal and intellectual lives. This course attempts to introduce students to both the scope and seriousness of present ecological concerns, as well as some core principles and concepts in the field of the intersection of environment and culture, through the lens of feature films. Themes such as the precautionary principle, urban/rural dualisms, ecofeminism, deep ecology, and the overwhelming burden placed on poor populations by environmental destruction are but a few of the areas which will be examined through the use of feature films, both classic and contemporary. We will do this in part by touching on some of the major writers and classic essays in the field, Class lectures will be supplemented by audiovisuals, guest lectures and class discussions. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department offeminis, urban, rural, waste, climate, environmental, toxic waste, forest, ecologSDG5, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15, SDG10, SDG16
ANT405H5Behind Bars: Anthropology of Institutions and ConfinementThis course explores confinement, institutions, and incarceration from a broad anthropological perspective. Bioarchaeological, archaeological, and ethnographic research on institutions (e.g., asylums, poorhouses, prisons) will be critically examined. The goal of the course is to provide students with a complex understanding of institutionalization through time and how health vulnerabilities are created and recreated.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofinstitutSDG16, SDG10
ANT414H5People and Plants in PrehistoryThe relationship between plants and people through time offers important insights into our past, particularly human-environmental interaction, plant domestication, and agricultural origins and development. Students will learn archaeological plant remains identification and interpretation skills through a combination of laboratory and seminar sessions. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process. Skills learned in this course are also useful in forensic investigations. Students will develop a project based on archaeological material from Japan and/or Ontario in consultation with the instructor.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofagricultur, learning, labor, invest, environmentalSDG2, SDG4, SDG8, SDG9, SDG13
ANT430H1Primate Conservation BiologyThe focus of this course is on the science of primate conservation biology in an anthropological context. Topics will include primate biodiversity and biogeography, human impacts, and conservation strategies/policies. The effects of cultural and political considerations on primate conservation will also be discussed.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofconserv, biodiversSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
ANT435H1Anthropology of Childhood and ChildcareA detailed review of the classic and recently emerging literature on the anthropology of children, childhood, and childcare. Focus is on theories for evolution of human parenting adaptations, challenges in research methodology and implications for contemporary research, practice and policy in the area of care and nutrition of infants and children.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofnutritionSDG2, SDG3
ANT437H5Advanced Seminar in the Anthropology of HealthThis course undertakes a critical examination of theory and methods used in the study of human health. It traces the historical development of the powerful biomedical paradigm that dominates health research today and uses a critical lens to examine the systems used to measure and classify health and disease. It explores evolutionary and biological approaches to understanding human health by examining the concepts of adaptation and plasticity, genetic and epigenetic approaches, developmental origins and life history theories, social determinants of health, and critical medical anthropology. The course explores the profoundly influential role of social inequality on the production and reproduction of health in historical and contemporary populations. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, productionSDG10, SDG12, SDG3
ANT450H1Multispecies CitiesAs of 2007, for the first time in human history, more than half the world’s peoples lived in cities. It is estimated that by 2030 over 60% will be urban-dwellers. This demographic shift suggests that for many (if not most) people, their primary encounter with “nature” will be urban based. This course explores the idea of “urban-nature” by 1) focusing on the ways in which various theorists have challenged traditional ways of viewing both “the city” and “nature” and 2) encouraging students to develop their own critical perspectives through ethnographic engagements with the city of Toronto.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofcities, urban, speciesSDG11, SDG14, SDG15, SDG14
ANT455H1Ethnographic Approaches to the Middle East and North AfricaThis course explores the literature and concerns of anthropologists conducting ethnographic research in the greater Middle East and North Africa (MENA). It is designed for students with a background in social and cultural anthropology who wish to become familiar with the social and religious complexity of the MENA region, and the anthropological questions it has compelled. Islam has long been the area's principal social and historical force and thus provides the backdrop for much, but not all, of the ethnography considered in the course. Moreover, Muslim majority MENA countries exhibit considerable social and sectarian diversity. Readings and lectures attend to differences as well as resemblances, while considering issues such as gender roles, kinship, marriage, local level practices, medicine, secularism, 'public Islam,' nationalism, and the persistent problem of orientalism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgender, nationalismSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANT455H5TOXIC! The anthropology of toxicityThe presence of toxic chemicals is a defining feature of contemporary life. But while toxicity is everywhere, it is not everywhere the same. Considering toxicity through medical and environmental anthropology, science and technology studies, and environmental justice, we will gain new perspectives on the politics of evidence, the nature of health, and the nature of nature. Creative, hands-on assignments will help us understand the toxic worlds around us at UTM.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofenvironmental, environmental justiceSDG13, SDG10, SDG3
ANT458H1Settler-Colonialism and Indigenous Health in CanadaThis course draws on anthropological and historical literatures to explore the relationship between the health of Indigenous people and Canadian settler-colonialism. In conceptualising this relationship, we focus on critical analysis of the role of biomedical health-care systems in settler-colonial governmentality, and how history is understood in discourses on Indigenous health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofsettler, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
ANT459H1Multispecies EthnographyThis course introduces perspectives which extend anthropological inquiry beyond the solely human realm. Building on an acknowledgement of the fundamental interconnectedness of humans and other life forms, it explores the agencies of other-than-humans, including nonhuman animals, land and seascapes, plants, bacteria, “contaminants,” and others. The course involves field-site visits and fieldwork projects in Toronto (GTA region) and engages with ethnographic methodologies best suited to investigations of inter-species, inter-life form relationships.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, invest, species, animal, landSDG4, SDG9, SDG14, SDG15
ANT460H1Global Perspectives on Women's HealthThis fourth-year seminar examines how female gender shapes health and illness. Using case studies of sexual health, fertility and its management, substance use/abuse, mental health, and occupational/labor health risks, the course investigates the material, political, and socio-cultural factors that can put women at risk for a range of illness conditions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofmental health, illness, gender, women, female, labor, investSDG3, SDG5, SDG8, SDG9
ANT462H5Living and Dying: Topics in Medical Anthropology & Global HealthThis course is concerned with contemporary medical knowledge practices, with particular emphasis on Western medicine and Public Health. Through a set of key readings in sociocultural medical anthropology, students will explore topics such as the art and science of medicine, end of life rites and rituals, expertise, and the politics and perils of intervention. This is an advanced, writing -intensive seminar that will particularly appeal to sociocultural anthropology students, and those interested in pursuing a career in the health professions. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department ofpublic health, global health, knowledgeSDG3
ANT463H5Anthropologies of Water: On Meaning, Value, and FuturesThis class delves into the topic of water from an anthropological perspective by thinking of water not only as resource but also as meaningful substance, symbol, and mediator of human and non-human relations. Class will consist mainly of discussions of ethnographic readings but also of hands-on class exercises, field-trips, and auto-ethnographic work. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department oflearning, waterSDG4, SDG6, SDG14
ANT464H1Black EthnographiesBlack populations in the African Diaspora defy simple characterizations. In this course, we will examine the experiences of Black people through an ethnographic exploration of their lives. The close analysis of ethnographic monographs and articles will illuminate the ways in which race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, ability, nationality, and other factors, shape the everyday for Black people in different cultural contexts. An additional focus will be a consideration of the experiences of Black anthropologists as ethnographers and scholars who are broadening anthropological discourses.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANT464H5The End of Coal: An Ethnographic Approach“Coal is Dead” is a phrase often heard these days, and yet it is quite emphatically not. While coal prices are plunging, countries like China are currently building new coal plants all over Africa. Coal, in other words, is increasingly declared dead even as it is decidedly undead, raising the question of what social, political, cultural, and economic processes make this so-called transition so protracted and piece-meal. This class thus offers a social and cultural approach to the protracted energy transition, asking how the study of coal offers insight into questions of history, politics, race, class, and gender. In some years, students may additionally have the option of participating in an international learning experience during Reading Week that will have an additional cost and application process.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropology (UTM), Department oflearning, gender, energy, transitSDG5, SDG7, SDG12
ANT472H1Japan in Global Context: Anthropological PerspectivesThis course examines how what we know as Japan and its culture has been constructed through global interactions. Topics include gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social and family life, work and leisure, and Japanese identity amid changing global power relations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG 16
ANT474H1Ethnographies of HIV/AIDS: Risk, Vulnerability, and CareThis course examines HIV/AIDS globally and ethnographically focusing on how gendered political economies create HIV vulnerability; the experiences of sexual minorities; how religious institutions shape practices of social care and exclusion; and anthropological critiques of HIV awareness campaigns and counseling as sites of governmentality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofvulnerability, gender, minorit, institutSDG5, SDG10, SDG6, SDG3
ANT476H1Body, Self and SocialityThis seminar class examines 'the body' as a historically and culturally contingent category, the material site and means of practice, and a foundation point for identity and self-fashioning. We consider the relevance of cultural meanings to biomedical practices, the centrality of the body to consumer techno-society, and the body’s role as a locus of experience, political inscription, and struggle.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofconsumSDG3
ANT477H1Transnational Korea in and outside the PeninsulaThis course addresses reading ethnography as a tool to understand compressed and complex modernity such as Korean societies, both in and outside of the Korean peninsula. In particular, this course aims to develop students’ critical thinking on class, ethnicity, gender, family, and migration in Korea and diasporic societies of Koreans in Canada, China, Japan, and US.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG1, SDG16
ANTB01H3Political EcologyThis course examines human-environmental relations from an anthropological perspective. Throughout the semester, we explore how peoples from different parts of the globe situate themselves within culturally constructed landscapes. Topics covered include ethnoecology, conservation, green consumerism, the concept of 'wilderness', and what happens when competing and differentially empowered views of the non-human world collide.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofconsum, environmental, political ecology, conserv, ecolog, landSDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ANTB18H3Development, Inequality and Social Change in Latin AmericaThis course addresses Latin American systems of inequality in relation to national and transnational political economy, from colonialism to neoliberalism; how ideas of race, culture, and nation intersect with development thinking and modernization agendas; and how the poor and marginalized have accommodated, resisted, and transformed cultural and political domination. Area courseUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, marginalized, social changeSDG10, SDG16, SDG1
ANTB20H3Ethnography and the Global ContemporaryHow has the global flow of goods, persons, technologies, and capital reproduced forms of inequality? Using ethnography and other media, students examine globalization through topics like migration, race and citizenship, environmental degradation, and increasing violence while also discussing older anthropological concerns (e.g., kinship, religious practices, and authority). This course enhances students’ understanding of ethnography, as a method for studying how actors engage and rework the global forces shaping their lives.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, capital, globaliz, inequality, equalit, environmental, violenceSDG9, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
ANTB36H3Anthropology of the End of the WorldA cultural and comparative study of apocalyptic thought, practice, and representation around the world. It explores the conditions that inspire end times thinking and the uses it serves. Cases may include: millenarian movements, Revelation, colonialism, epidemics, infertility, deindustrialization, dystopian science fiction, nuclear war, climate change, and zombies.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofepidemics, industrialization, climateSDG3, SDG13, SDG10
ANTC10H3Anthropological Perspectives on DevelopmentA critical probe of the origins, concepts, and practices of regional and international development in cultural perspective. Attention is paid to how forces of global capitalism intersect with local systems of knowledge and practice.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofknowledge, capitalSDG9, SDG10
ANTC12H3Culture and Society in Contemporary South AsiaThis course surveys central issues in the ethnographic study of contemporary South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka). Students will engage with classical and recent ethnographies to critically examine key thematic fault lines within national imaginations, especially along the lines of religion, caste, gender, ethnicity, and language. Not only does the course demonstrate how these fault lines continually shape the nature of nationalism, state institutions, development, social movements, violence, and militarism across the colonial and post-colonial periods but also, demonstrates how anthropological knowledge and ethnography provide us with a critical lens for exploring the most pressing issues facing South Asia in the world today. Same as GASC12H3University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofknowledge, gender, institut, nationalism, violenceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANTC14H3Feminism and AnthropologyExamines why, when, and how gender inequality became an anthropological concern by tracing the development of feminist thought in a comparative ethnographic framework.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofgender, feminis, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
ANTC15H3Genders and SexualitiesComplements and extends ANTC14H3 by exploring cultural constructions of male and female in a range of societies and institutions.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofgender, female, institutSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANTC18H3Urban AnthropologyUrban spaces, neighbourhoods, and institutions have at different times been the focus of ethnographic studies of cities. In this course we will examine the role of culture, cultural diversity, space and performance in urban institutions.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofcities, urban, institutSDG11
ANTC18H3Urban WorldsThe planet today is more urbanized than at any other moment in its history. What are the tools we need to examine urbanization in this contemporary moment? This course explores how urbanization has altered everyday life for individuals and communities across the globe. Students will trace urbanization as transformative of environmental conditions, economic activities, social relations, and political life. Students will thus engage with work on urbanization to examine how urban spaces and environments come to be differentiated along the lines of race, class, and gender. Not only does this course demonstrate how such fault lines play themselves out across contexts, but also provides the critical lenses necessary to tackle the most pressing issues related to urbanization today.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofgender, urban, environmental, planetSDG5, SDG11, , SDG10, SDG1
ANTC24H3Culture, Mental Illness, and PsychiatryDoes schizophrenia exist all over the world? Does depression look different in China than it does in Canada? By examining how local understandings of mental illness come into contact with Western psychiatric models, this course considers the role of culture in the experience, expression, definition, and treatment of mental illness and questions the universality of Western psychiatric categories.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofillnessSDG3
ANTC32H3Political AnthropologyCan ethnographic research help us make sense of various political situations and conflicts around the world? In this course we will review different approaches to power and politics in classical and current anthropology. We will consider notions of the state, political agency and power, civil society, authoritarianism and democracy.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofdemocra, authoritarianSDG16, SDG10
ANTC34H3The Anthropology of TransnationalismThis course considers dimensions of transnationalism as a mode of human sociality and site for cultural production. Topics covered include transnational labour migration and labour circuits, return migration, the transnational dissemination of electronic imagery, the emergence of transnational consumer publics, and the transnational movements of refugees, kinship networks, informal traders and religions.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department oflabour, trade, refugee, consum, production, nationalismSDG8, SDG10, SDG16
ANTC41H3Environmental Stress, Culture and Human AdaptabilityHuman adaptability refers to the human capacity to cope with a wide range of environmental conditions, including aspects of the physical environment like climate (extreme cold and heat), high altitude, geology, as well as aspects of the socio-cultural milieu, such as pathogens (disease), nutrition and malnutrition, migration, technology, and social change. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofnutrition, malnutrition, climate, environmental, social changeSDG2, SDG16, SDG3
ANTC42H3Human Growth, Development and AdaptabilityHuman adaptability refers to the human capacity to cope with a wide range of environmental conditions. Emphasis is placed on human growth and development in stressed and non-stressed environments. Case studies are used extensively. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG3
ANTC52H3Global Politics of LanguageLanguage and ways of speaking are foundational to political cultures. This course covers the politics of language in the age of globalization, including multiculturalism and immigration, citizenship, race and ethnicity, post-colonialism, and indigeneity. Ethnographic examples are drawn from a variety of contexts, including Canadian official bilingualism and First Nations.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, globalizSDG9, SDG16
ANTC59H3Anthropology of Language and MediaAnthropology studies language and media in ways that show the impact of cultural context. This course introduces this approach and also considers the role of language and media with respect to intersecting themes: ritual, religion, gender, race/ethnicity, power, nationalism, and globalization. Class assignments deal with lecturers, readings, and students' examples. Same as MDSC21H3University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofgender, globaliz, nationalismSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
ANTC61H3Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing in Cultural PerspectiveSocial and symbolic aspects of the body, the life-cycle, the representation and popular explanation of illness, the logic of traditional healing systems, the culture of North American illness and biomedicine, mental illness, social roots of disease, innovations in health care delivery systems.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofhealth care, illnessSDG3
ANTC62H3Medical Anthropology: Biological and Demographic PerspectivesThe examination of health and disease in ecological and socio-cultural perspective. Emphasis is placed on variability of populations in disease susceptibility and resistance in an evolutionary context. With its sister course, ANTC61H3, this course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and principles of medical anthropology. Principles of epidemiology, patterns of inheritance and biological evolution are considered. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofecologSDG15
ANTC68H3Deconstructing EpidemicsColonization, globalization and socio-ecological factors play an important role in origin, maintenance and emergence of old and new infectious diseases in human populations such as yellow fever, cholera, influenza, SARS. Issues of co-morbidity, the epidemiological transition, syndemics and the impact of global warming on the emergence of new diseases are discussed. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofepidemics, globaliz, transit, global warming, ecologSDG3, SDG16
ANTC71H3Climate, Palaeoecology, and Policy: Archaeology of Humans in the EnvironmentThis course examines the evolution of human-environment systems over deep time as well as the present implications of these relationships. We will examine the archaeological methods used in reconstructing human palaeoecology and engage with evolutionary and ecological theory as it has been applied to the archaeological record in order to understand how humans have altered ecosystems and adapted to changing climates through time and space. Building upon the perspective of humans as a long-term part of ecological systems, each student will choose a current environmental policy issue and progressively build a proposal for a remediation strategy or research program to address gaps in knowledge.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofknowledge, remediation, climate, environmental, ecosystem, ecologSDG6, SDG14, SDG15
ANTC80H3Race and Racism: Anthropological InsightsThis course explores ideas of race and racist practice, both past and present. Socio-cultural perspectives on race and racism must address a central contradiction: although biological evidence suggests that racial categories are not scientifically valid, race and racism are real social phenomena with real consequences. In order to address this contradiction, the course will examine the myriad ways that race is produced and reproduced, as well as how racism is perpetuated and sustained.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofracismSDG10, SDG16
ANTD04H3The Anthropology of Violence and SufferingThis course examines the social life of violence, its cultural production and political effects in a global perspective. It asks how social worlds are made and unmade through, against, and after violent events, how violence is remembered and narrated, and how ethnography might respond to experiences of suffering, trauma, and victimhood.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofproduction, violenceSDG16, SDG10
ANTD16H3Biomedical AnthropologyThis course is designed for advanced students seeking an intensive examination of specific problems in medical Anthropology. Problems to be discussed include: genetic disorders in families and populations, the interaction of malnutrition and infectious diseases in human populations, chronic non-infectious diseases in populations today, and epidemiology and medical anthropology as complementary disciplines. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofnutrition, malnutritionSDG2, SDG3
ANTD17H3Medical Osteology: Public Health Perspectives on Human Skeletal HealthThis seminar course will examine the clinical, epidemiological and public health literature on osteoporosis and other conditions impacting skeletal health. The course will also explore the potential economic impacts of osteoporosis on Canada's health care system given emerging demographic changes. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofpublic health, health careSDG3
ANTD19H3Primate ConservationA large percentage of nonhuman primate species are at risk of extinction due mostly to human-induced processes. Relying on theory from Conservation Biology, this course will consider the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that lead to some primate species being threatened, while others are able to deal with anthropogenic influences. Students will critically examine conservation tactics and the uniqueness of each situation will be highlighted.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofanthropogenic, conserv, speciesSDG13, SDG15
ANTD25H3Medical Primatology: Public Health Perspectives on Zoonotic DiseasesThis course will examine the social and cultural contexts of animal-to-human disease transmission globally, and the public risks associated zoonoses present here in Canada. The course will incorporate both anthropological and epidemiological perspectives. Science creditUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofpublic health, animalSDG3, SDG14, SDG15
ANTD26H3Caveman, Farmer, Herder, Trader: Evolution of Diet in SocietyBeginning with archaic Homo sapiens and ending with a discussion of how diet exists in a modern globalized cash economy, this course engages an archaeological perspective on changes in human diet and corresponding societal shifts. We will explore paradigmatic discourse around topics such as big game hunting, diet breadth, niche construction, and the Agricultural Revolution, while examining the archaeological record to clarify what "cavemen" really ate, inquire whether agriculture was as "revolutionary" as it has been presented, and delve into evidence of how colonialism, capitalism, and globalization have shaped our modern diet. Discussions will aim to interrogate current theories and contextualize why scientists (and the public) think the way they do about diet in the past and present.University of Toronto ScarboroughAnthropology (UTSC), Department ofagricultur, capital, globaliz, tradeSDG2
APS470H1Engineering and Public HealthAn introduction to the disciplines of public health and the connections with engineering; quantitative and qualitative public health methods including study designs and statistical analysis; legal, regulatory and ethical frameworks applicable to public health; the structure and regulation of the public health and health care system; examples of common public health hazards to illustrate public health toxicology, exposure measurement and modelling, data analysis and prevention strategies.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, health careSDG3, SDG9
APS510H1Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy SystemsComplementary Studies electiveA broad range of global energy systems are presented including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure. Discussions are based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques. The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world. The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies. The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental sustainability analysis perspectives.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLenergy, entrepreneur, infrastructure, environmentalSDG7, SDG8, SDG9, SDG13
ARA210H5Arab Culture IThis course introduces the Arab culture in general terms and familiarizes students with some fundamental realities of the Arab world (e.g. family, gender roles, social etiquette, etc.) with a general introduction to values and religious practices. The course is taught in English. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
ARC281H1Structures, Building Systems, and Environments IAn introduction to structural and environmental design, the technologies of building and landscape systems, and the methods and frameworks through which the built environment is constructed. The calculation of quantitative criteria is taught through first-principles explorations.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLenvironmental, landSDG15, SDG9, SDG11
ARC355H1History of UrbanismA consideration of urbanism through an examination of physical, social, economic, and political factors that have shaped cities and regions from the early modern period up to the present.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLcities, urbanSDG11
ARC357H1Environmental History of Landscape ArchitectureAn examination of the global history of the interrelations between societies and their environment. This course examines the organisation of landscape and urban systems in a variety of geographic and cultural regions across the globe and over large spans of time. Please note that ARC356H1 Design History of Landscape Architecture is recommended as background for this course.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLurban, environmental, landSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ARC382H1Structures, Building Systems, and Environments IIContinued exploration of the principles of structural and environmental design, the technologies of building and landscape systems, and the methods and frameworks in which the built environment is constructed. The calculation of quantitative criteria is taught through first-principles explorations.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLenvironmental, landSDG13, , SDG9, SDG11
ARC386H1Landscape EcologyAn introduction to the principles of landscape ecology, addressing the application of evolving scientific understanding to contemporary landscape architecture and urban design practice.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLurban, ecolog, landSDG11, SDG9
ARC426H1Working with WoodWood has been an important building material throughout the ages and in today's world has taken on the added importance of being a renewable and sustainable material that assists with greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. This course will provide students with an understanding of wood’s unique physical properties, the variability of these properties within different species and how these properties can inform its proper use in various applications. The Canadian forestry industry sets the context for this course acknowledging that forests transcend political borders and reach around the world.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLrenewabl, greenhouse, greenhouse gas, species, forestSDG7, SDG13, SDG15
ARH309H1Archaeology, Ethics, and the PublicAn analysis of ethics in contemporary archaeology that covers reburial and repatriation, interpretation of the archaeological record in the context of historically oppressed groups, ethnic minorities, and non-western societies, the ethics of collecting and managing cultural property, relationships with the media, the debates surrounding looting, and other issues.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAnthropology (FAS), Department ofminoritSDG10, SDG16
BIO205H5EcologyAn introduction to the scientific study of ecology, emphasizing the structure and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population growth and regulation, competition, predation, biodiversity, succession, and nutrient cycling. Classic models and studies will be supplemented with both plant and animal examples. [24L, 18P]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofanimal, biodivers, ecosystem, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BIO220H1From Genomes to Ecosystems in a Changing WorldDynamics of genetic and ecological change in biological systems, from genomes to ecosystems. Evolutionary genetic and ecological perspectives on wide-ranging topics including disease, aging, sexual conflict, genetics of human differences, conservation, and global climate change. Applications of evolutionary, ecological, and molecular-genetic principles and processes. Responsibilities of human societies in a changing world. (Lab Materials Fee: $26).Arts and Science, Faculty ofEcology and Evolutionary Biology (FAS), Department ofclimate, conserv, ecosystem, ecologSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3
BIO251H1Form, Function and Development in PlantsIntroduction to structure, function, and ecology of vegetative and reproductive processes in plants with a focus on flowering plants and gymnosperms. Lectures emphasize photosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, transport processes, patterns of plant growth and development, the role of hormones in development, photomorphogenesis, and plant reproduction.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEcology and Evolutionary Biology (FAS), Department ofnutrition, production, ecologSDG12, SDG15
BIO311H5Landscape EcologyLandscape ecology asks how spatial patterns originate and how they affect ecological processes like forest dynamics, nutrient cycling, species interactions, and the distribution and population dynamics of plants and animals. Lectures and computer labs introduce students to concepts and methods of landscape ecology and their application to current issues of land-use management and global change. The students will learn to apply GIS, spatial statistics, landscape metrics, and modelling to address problems in conservation, biodiversity, and ecosystem management. Note: Students interested in this course will need to meet with the course instructor before being approved and permitted to enroll.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofABS, conserv, species, animal, biodivers, ecosystem, forest, ecolog, landSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
BIO318Y5Animal BehaviourThis course will cover the adaptive (evolved) behaviours of organisms that result from interactions with the biological environment. We ask why animals behave in a particular way, i.e. how does their behaviour enhance success in survival or reproduction? Examples involve adaptive strategies in competing with rivals, choosing mates, and avoiding parasites. We also ask how adaptive behaviour is controlled; what are the genetic, developmental, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviour? Assignments involve observing and analyzing (suggesting alternative explanations/ hypotheses) for behaviour, followed by a use of these skills to critique a published scientific paper. [48L, 72P]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofproduction, animalSDG14, SDG15
BIO324H5Plant BiochemistryThis course examines plants as the biochemical motors and sustainers of life on earth. The major pathways of plant metabolism are surveyed to provide students with an integrated model of plant cells as autonomous biochemical networks. This course further emphasizes the specialized metabolism of economically significant plant species, the biosynthesis of pharmacologically and agriculturally important metabolites, and the role of biotechnology in engineering exotic plant metabolism in industrial settings.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofagricultur, speciesSDG14, SDG9
BIO326H5OrnithologyEcology, evolution, form, function, diversity, and conservation of birds. Practical sessions focus on observation and assessment of local avian populations using field ornithology techniques and approaches. [24L, 30P]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofconserv, ecologSDG15, SDG13
BIO330H5Plant EcologyA survey of the population and community ecology of plants. Topics include resource acquisition, growth and reproduction, mutualisms, competition, defence, invasions, disturbance, population dynamics, and community structure. Interactions with other plants, diseases, and animals particularly are emphasized. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofurban, production, animal, ecologSDG12, SDG15
BIO376H5Marine EcologyThis course addresses the diversity of marine life, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in marine ecosystems. Students will explore current methods and theories in marine ecology and consider the societal importance of marine resources with a special emphasis on Canada's coasts. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofmarine, ecosystem, ecologSDG14
BIO406H5Current Topics in Ecology and EvolutionA combination of lectures and tutorials. The course will emphasize group discussion and critiques of current publications in the field. The theme of the course is expected to be topical and current and to vary from year to year, with the interests of the faculty member(s) teaching the course. Course themes are expected to range from structure and function of whole ecosystems (e.g. the collapse of fisheries) to evolutionary ecology (e.g. the evolution of emergent diseases).University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department offish, ecosystem, ecologSDG14, SDG15, SDG3
BIO412H5Climate Change BiologyClimate change is affecting life on earth at all levels from cells to ecosystems. As a result, shifts in the distribution of species, the timing of biological events, and large impacts on natural resources, agriculture, and forestry may be seen. This course explores past climate, predictions of future climate, impacts of climate change on biological systems, and potentials for adaptation. Mitigation of climate change impacts on biological systems will also be discussed.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofagricultur, natural resource, climate, species, ecosystem, forestSDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIO416H5Field Course in EcologyStudents may choose from a variety of field courses offered through a cooperative arrangement among ecologists at ten Ontario universities. Courses involve a two-week period at a field site in early May or late August, and require a major paper or project report be submitted within six weeks of course completion. A fee for room and board is usually charged over and above tuition. Lists of courses available are posted at www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/courses/field.htm Please check this list early for balloting dates.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofecologSDG15
BIO434H5Social and Developmental Determinants of Human HealthThis course encourages students to explore the relationship between social conditions and health outcomes. Topics may vary across years. Topics include the importance of the early years, interactions between the environment and the genes, epigenetic influences on health, sensitive periods of development, the influence of nutrition on health, the interaction between social policy, medical care, social class and human health. The students direct the learning experience in groups as they engage in case-based and problem-based learning. Note: Students interested in this course must contact the Biology Undergraduate Advisor to enroll.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofnutrition, learningSDG2, SDG3
BIO445H5Evolutionary EcologyThis course focuses on the interface between ecology and evolution. Research has shown that biotic and abiotic ecological factors drive evolution, and in turn, evolution feeds back to influence the ecological processes and patterns of populations and communities. Throughout this course we will focus on this dynamic interplay over short and long time spans in animals, plants, fungi, and other microbes. While covering the concepts and questions of this field we will also consider the theory, methods, and statistics used to bring new insights to evolutionary ecology. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, present methods and concepts to the class, and complete written assignments. [48L]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofanimal, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BIO464H5Conservation and BiodiversityBiodiversity is the sum of species diversity, and also the interaction of species at population, at ecosystem and at migration-route levels; it is one barometer of environmental health. Conservation biology applies ecological and genetic principles to the problem of declining biodiversity. We discuss the species concept, quantification and cost-benefit analysis of biodiversity and extinction, causes, consequence, diagnosis and treatment of population declines, as well as the effects of different land uses on biodiversity and reserve design. A key part of this course is a case study by each student. Note: Students from a wide range of programs are encouraged to enrol.University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofmental health, environmental, conserv, species, biodivers, ecosystem, ecolog, land use, landSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIO475H5VirologyVirology examines the biology of viruses infecting all forms of life including humans and other animals, plants, eukaryotic microorganisms, and bacteria. The scope ranges from the molecular biology of virus replication to virus evolution and ecology. Current issues surrounding virology and society are incorporated into the course including vaccines, emerging viruses, and even consideration of practical applications of viruses. [24L, 24S]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofvaccine, animal, ecologSDG3
BIO476H5Molecular Basis of DiseaseThis advanced course explores the primary concepts of pathogenesis and investigates current research in the field of molecular pathology. Specific disease topics include inflammation, injury and repair, neoplasia, immune disorders, infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, and toxicology. Analysis of the primary literature is a key component of this course. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaBiology (UTM), Department ofinvestSDG3
BIOB38H3Plants and SocietyHow do plants feed the world and which plants have the highest impact on human lives? What is the origin of agriculture and how did it change over time? The human population will climb to 10 billion in 2050 and this will tax our planet’s ability to sustain life. Environmentally sustainable food production will become even more integral.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofagricultur, production, environmental, planetSDG12, SDG13, SDG14
BIOB50H3EcologyAn introduction to the main principles of ecology; the science of the interactions of organisms with each other and with their environment. Topics include physiological, behavioural, population, community, and applied aspects of ecology (e.g. disease ecology, climate change impacts, and approaches to conservation). Emphasis is given to understanding the connections between ecology and other biological subdisciplines.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofclimate, conserv, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BIOB51H3Evolutionary BiologyThis course is an introduction to the main principles of evolution; the study of the diversity, relationships, and change over time in organisms at all scales of organization (from individuals to populations to higher taxonomic groups). The theory and principles of evolutionary biology give critical insight into a wide range of fields, including conservation, genetics, medicine, pathogenesis, community ecology, and development.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofconserv, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BIOC35H3Principles in ParasitologyThis course introduces principles in parasitic lifestyles. Topics that will be covered include common parasite life strategies, host-parasite interactions and co-evolution, parasite immune evasion strategies, impacts on public health, and treatment and prevention strategies.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofpublic healthSDG3
BIOC37H3Plants: Life on the EdgePlants have evolved adaptations to maximize growth, survival and reproduction under various taxing environmental conditions. This course covers the great diversity of plant structures and function in relation to ecology, focusing mainly on flowering plants.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofproduction, environmental, ecologSDG13, SDG14
BIOC51H3Tropical Biodiversity Field CourseA course with preparatory lectures on the UTSC campus and 1 week at a field station in Costa Rica where ecological, evolutionary, and practical aspects of tropical biodiversity will be explored. Field work will involve outdoor activities in challenging conditions.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofbiodivers, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BIOC52H3Ecology Field CourseThis course provides students with the opportunity to experience hands-on learning through informal natural history walks, and group and individual research projects, in a small-class setting. The course covers basic principles and selected techniques of field ecology and ecological questions related to organisms in their natural settings. Most of the field work takes place in the Highland Creek ravine.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department oflearning, ecolog, landSDG15
BIOC58H3Biological Consequences of Global ChangeA lecture and tutorial course that addresses the key environmental factor that will dominate the 21st Century and life on the planet: Global Climate Change. The course will examine the factors that influence climate, from the formation of the earth to the present time, how human activities are driving current and future change, and how organisms, populations, and ecosystems are and will respond to this change. Finally, it will cover human responses and policies that can permit an adaptive response to this change.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofclimate, environmental, planet, ecosystemSDG14, SDG15
BIOC61H3Community Ecology and Environmental BiologyAn examination of the theory and methodology of community analysis, with an emphasis on the factors regulating the development of communities and ecosystems. The application of ecological theory to environmental problems is emphasized. We will examine the impacts of various factors, such as primary productivity, species interactions, disturbance, variable environments, on community and metacommunity structure, and on ecosystem function. We will also examine the impacts of climate change on the world's ecosystems.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofurban, climate, environmental, species, ecosystem, ecologSDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG13
BIOC62H3Role of Zoos and Aquariums in ConservationThis lecture and tutorial course explores the strategic and operational aspects of zoos and aquariums in conservation. Emphasis is on contemporary issues, including the balance between animal welfare and species conservation; nutrition, health and behavioural enrichment for captive animals; in situ conservation by zoos and aquariums; captive breeding and species reintroductions; and public outreach/education.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofwelfare, nutrition, conserv, species, animalSDG4, SDG5, SDG13
BIOC63H3Conservation BiologyA lecture and tutorial course offering an introduction to the scientific foundation and practice of conservation biology. It reviews ecological and genetic concepts constituting the basis for conservation including patterns and causes of global biodiversity, the intrinsic and extrinsic value of biodiversity, the main causes of the worldwide decline of biodiversity and the approaches to save it, as well as the impacts of global climate change.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofclimate, conserv, biodivers, ecologSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIOC65H3Environmental ToxicologyAn introduction to the scientific study of the effects of toxic chemicals on biological organisms. Standard methods of assessing toxicant effects on individuals, populations, and communities are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on the chemistry of major toxicant classes, and on how toxicants are processed by the human body.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIOD13H3Herbology: The Science Behind Medicinal PlantsThe use of plants in medicine has been documented for over 2,000 years. Their use is immersed in major ancient civilizations from around the World. This lecture/seminar/lab course will take the knowledge from indigenous medicine as a starting point and expand it with more recent advances in plant biochemistry, genetics and biotechnology.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofknowledge, indigenousSDG10, SDG3, SDG9
BIOD19H3Epigenetics in Health and DiseaseA lecture/seminar/discussion class on the emerging field of environmental epigenetics. Course will cover basic epigenetic mechanisms, methods in epigenetic research, epigenetic control of gene function, and the role of epigenetics in normal development and human disease.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
BIOD25H3GenomicsA course considering the principles of genome organization and the utilization of genomic approaches to studying a wide range of problems in biology. Topics to be presented will include innovations in instrumentation and automation, a survey of genome projects, genomic variation, functional genomics, transcription profiling (microarrays), database mining and extensions to human and animal health and biotechnology.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofanimalSDG14, SDG15, SDG3
BIOD26H3Fungal Biology and PathogenesisA lecture and tutorial based course designed to provide an overview of the fungal kingdom and the properties of major fungal pathogens that contribute to disease in animals (including humans) and plants. This course will address the mechanisms and clinical implications of fungal infections and host defence mechanisms. Topics include virulence factors and the treatment and diagnosis of infection.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofanimalSDG14, SDG15, SDG3
BIOD29H3Pathobiology of Human DiseaseThis lecture/seminar format course will critically examine selected topics in human disease pathogenesis. Infectious and inherited diseases including those caused by human retroviruses, genetic defects and bioterrorism agents will be explored. Discussions of primary literature will encompass pathogen characteristics, genetic mutations, disease progression and therapeutic strategies.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofterrorisSDG3
BIOD34H3Conservation PhysiologyThis is a combined lecture and seminar course that will discuss topics such as climate change and plastics/microplastics effects on the physiology of animals, and physiological tools and techniques used in conservation efforts. The course will focus on how physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofclimate, conserv, animalSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
BIOD37H3Biology of Plant StressThis course examines resistance mechanisms (anatomical, cellular, biochemical, molecular) allowing plants to avoid or tolerate diverse abiotic and biotic stresses. Topics include: pathogen defence; responses to temperature, light, water and nutrient availability, salinity, and oxygen deficit; stress perception and signal transduction; methods to study stress responses; and strategies to improve stress resistance.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofwaterSDG14
BIOD48H3OrnithologyAn overview of the evolution, ecology, behaviour, and conservation of birds. Field projects and laboratories will emphasize identification of species in Ontario.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department oflabor, conserv, species, ecologSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
BIOD52H3Biodiversity and ConservationA seminar exploration of current topics in biodiversity and conservation, including genetic, organismal, and community levels. Examples include DNA barcoding, adaptive radiations, phylogenetic trees, and biodiversity hotspots. Skills development in critical thinking and interpretation of the primary literature is emphasized, with coursework involving group presentations, discussions, and written analyses.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofconserv, biodiversSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
BIOD54H3Applied Conservation BiologyCanada has a complex conservation landscape. Through lectures and interactive discussions with leading Canadian conservation practitioners, this course will examine how conservation theory is put into practice in Canada from our international obligations to federal, provincial, and municipal legislation and policies.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofconserv, landSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
BIOD59H3Models in Ecology, Epidemiology and ConservationModelling is a critical tool for describing the complex dynamics of ecosystems and for addressing urgent management questions in ecology, epidemiology and conservation. In this practical introduction, students learn how to formulate ecological and epidemiological models, link them to data, and implement/analyze them using computer simulations. The course includes approaches for modelling individuals, populations, and communities, with applications in population viability assessments, natural resource management and food security, invasive species and pest control, disease eradication, and climate change mitigation. While not a requirement, some experience with computer programming will be beneficial for this course.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department offood security, climate change mitigation, natural resource, climate, conserv, species, ecosystem, ecologSDG2, SDG13,, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3
BIOD60H3Spatial EcologyThe study of how space and scale influence ecological patterns and species coexistence. The course will cover three main topics: 1) spatial dynamics, such as spatial spread and dispersal models; 2) species coexistence with metapopulation/metacommunity, neutral and lottery models; and 3) spatial analysis of ecological communities. Basic concepts will be applied to ecological problems such as: species invasions, reserve design and understanding threats to island biodiversity. Priority will be given to students enrolled in the specialist program in Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofspecies, biodivers, ecolog, landSDG14, SDG15
BIOD62H3Symbiosis: Interactions Between SpeciesA species is the basic unit of evolution and symbiotic interactions are integral to the rise of global biodiversity. Using a multidisciplinary approach, this course will study symbiotic systems such as plant-animal, microbe-plant, and microbe-animal interactions. This course thus provides the student with a deeper understanding of how Earth's biodiversity is maintained through natural selection.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofspecies, animal, biodiversSDG14, SDG15
BIOD63H3From Individuals to Ecosystems: Advanced Topics in EcologyThis lecture/seminar course will discuss advanced topics in behavioural ecology, ecosystem and landscape ecology, and evolutionary ecology, with an emphasis on the impacts of past and present species interactions. Topics will vary based on current scientific literature and student interests. This course will strengthen the research, writing, and presentation skills of students while deepening their understanding of ecology.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofspecies, ecosystem, ecolog, landSDG14, SDG15
BIOD66H3Causes and Consequences of BiodiversityThis course will combine lecture and student paper projects and presentations to explore the evolutionary and ecological processes that generate patterns of biological diversity as well as how species interactions and ecosystem function are affected by diversity. Of key interest will be how invasions, climate change, and habitat destruction affects diversity and function.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department ofclimate, species, biodivers, ecosystem, ecologSDG14, SDG15
BMS392H1Media IdentitiesAn exploration of media’s influence on the constructions and representation of identity and power relations across race, gender and class in individual and collective spheres. Applies a social justice and intersectional framework to media technologies and industries in order to expose socio-political influence on identity and to position media consumption and production as potential vehicles for restorative mediations of marginalized identities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, marginalized, consum, production, social justiceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
BPM100H1The Art & Science of Human FlourishingA multi-cultural survey of recipes for a life of “flourishing,” through satisfaction, well-being, resilience, and accomplishment, as well as critical scholarship on concepts and practices of human flourishing. Students explore perspectives from the sciences and the humanities about what it means to flourish across diverse cultures and contexts, each week covering a specific theme and set of practices that expand self-awareness, enhance social connectivity, and facilitate purpose and passion.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwell-being, resilien, resilienceSDG3, SDG13
BPM214H1Socially Engaged BuddhismSocially Engaged Buddhism is developing in response to social and political struggles, in the context of global conversations on human rights, equity and social progress. Explores roots of Engaged Buddhism in countries such as Vietnam, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India, and its transformation into a global movement. We study engaged initiatives including Buddhist environmental activism, Buddhist prison ministries, and Buddhist protest movements, along with research on the application of Buddhist teachings in the sectors of healthcare, education, business and the criminal justice system.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealthcare, equity, equit, environmental, land, criminal justice, human rightsSDG3, SDG4, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
BPM232H1Buddhist PsychologyDescribes the psychology inherent within the original teachings of Buddhism. Primary focus is on the understanding of the causes of suffering and happiness, the nature of cognition and emotion, characteristics of the self/ego, personality transformation, the role of the unconscious, and mindfulness meditation. Includes an option for Community Engaged Learning experience.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmindfulness, learningSDG3, SDG4
BPM330H1Mindfulness-Informed Interventions for Mental HealthAn exploration of the current interest in incorporating mindfulness into western mental health interventions. Examines the concept of mindfulness closely to show how mindfulness is implicitly a component of western psychological theories and interventions. Also discussed is how mindfulness is used directly and indirectly as a psychological intervention.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmental health, mindfulnessSDG3
BPM332H1Buddhism and PsychotherapyEvaluates the relationship between Buddhist psychology and the practice of Western psychotherapy. Areas that will be studied include positive psychology, psychoanalysis, cognitive-behaviour therapy, mindfulness meditation and Jungian psychology. Comparisons with original Buddhist teachings and commentaries will be made.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmindfulnessSDG3
BPM333H1Buddhism and Cognitive ScienceExplores some important connections between Cognitive Science and Buddhism. In particular it will examine the insights of cognitive science into central Buddhist concepts such as wisdom, mindfulness, meditation, insight and self-control, as well as related concepts such as flow and mystical experience.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmindfulnessSDG3
BPM335H1Meditation and the BodyIn recent years, the effects of meditation on the body have been widely researched. There is an increasing body of evidence that mindfulness meditation can affect brain activity, brain structure, neurochemistry and other psychobiological processes (e.g. blood pressure, cardiac function). This course will examine the research in this emerging field.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmindfulnessSDG3
BPM381H1Buddhist Perspectives on Current Social IssuesExplores teachings and principles in Buddhist canonical sources and considers their application to a wide range of social, political, and environmental crises we are facing today, including climate justice, systemic racism, burnout and mental health. We explore how Buddhist teachings are applied and adapted across different sectors of society including healthcare, education and business.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmental health, healthcare, racism, climate, environmental, climate justiceSDG3, SDG4, SDG13
BPM430H1Jungian Psychology and Tantric BuddhismJung wrote extensively on the benefits of Buddhism to personal development and transformation. This course explores the contribution of Jungian psychology to understanding Tantric (or Vajrayana) Buddhism. Through experiential exercises, students will investigate the role of archetypal psychology as a mediator of the spiritual transformation described in Tantric Buddhism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinvestSDG13
CAR225H1Caribbean SocietiesOffers an interdisciplinary introduction to Caribbean sociology, focusing on the writings of thinkers and scholars from the era of decolonization to the more contemporary period. Themes may include: colonial encounters in the making of Caribbean societies; the role of religion; popular consciousness; histories of capitalism and exploitation; the relationship between political institutions and the wider society; "development", dependency and "underdevelopment".Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcapital, decolonization, institut, exploitationSDG10, SDG16, SDG1
CAR226H1Caribbean Political ThoughtExamines currents of Caribbean political thought from the Haitian Revolution to the present. Themes may include: struggles for independence and liberation, particularly the Haitian and Cuban Revolutions; theories of dependency; Caribbean political systems; regional integration; contemporary political issues facing Caribbean societies today; analyses of capitalism by Caribbean thinkers.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcapitalSDG10, SDG16
CAR317H1Caribbean Women WritersA critical feminist reading of selected works of fiction, poetry and essays by Caribbean women writers. The aim is to appraise the development of this literature, situate texts within the key social and political debates which have influenced the region's literary output, as well as to consider the implications of the environments within which these writers function.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomen, feminisSDG5
CAR324H1Capitalism and Crisis in the CaribbeanThis upper level course examines the interplay between wider global processes and intra-regional responses that together help shape contemporary Caribbean realities. Topics include: economic crisis and structural adjustment; tourism; the agricultural sector; the Caribbean Single Market and Economy; migration and diaspora.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLagricultur, capitalSDG9, SDG16, SDG10, SDG8,
CAR325H1Caribbean Women ThinkersAn examination of the historical and political significance of writings (literary, political, scholarly) by Caribbean women who engage problems within Caribbean culture and provide insights into the endeavours of the peoples of the region.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomenSDG5
CAR328H1Caribbean Indentureship and its LegaciesExplores indentured migration and its legacies from the 17th century through to the present. Encourages students to think comparatively and transnationally about indentureship and diaspora, as well as indentured migration's relationship to contract and labour law.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlabourSDG8, SDG10, SDG16
CAR332Y0Puerto Rican Culture and EnvironmentBased on readings, lectures, experiential activities and discussions, CAR332Y0 examines the cultural and environmental history of Puerto Rico. The course explores debates on colonialism, capitalist modernity, development, ecosystems, religion, race and politics. Such analysis will help with the consideration of Puerto Rico as the last colony of the Americas within the larger context of the Caribbean. The course will include on-site excursions related to the lectures and reading material covered. This course will be taught in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcapital, environmental, ecosystemSDG13, SDG10, SDG16, SDG8
CAR422H1Caribbean RegionalismIn a public lecture in 1958, Trinidadian CLR James described Federation as the means to "accomplish the transition from colonialism to national independence." This course explores the shift from James' vision to Jamaican economist Norman Girvan's observation that contemporary "...governments tend to perceive supranationality as less an exercise in collective sovereignty and more a diminution of national sovereignty." Among the topics to be considered are: histories of regionalism; formal and informal dimensions of regional identity-making practices; freedom of movement; governance mechanisms; and widening and deepening debates, with particular reference to the non-Anglophone Caribbean and Latin America.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLtransit, governance, sovereigntySDG16, SDG10
CAR428H1Caribbean Migrations and DiasporasExamines Caribbean migration in the post-slavery era. Topics include: Caribbean diasporas in the West; labour migrations such as the Panama Canal migration; Caribbean migrant communities in Central America; intra-regional migrations between the Caribbean islands; 'guest worker' programs; remittances and their impact; heritage tourism and 'return' migrations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlabour, worker, landSDG8, SDG16, SDG10
CAS200H1Introduction to Contemporary Asian StudiesThis course is an introduction to Contemporary Asian Studies. It covers detailed case study material from South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. It introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of political, sociocultural and economic interactions among these regions, as well as the transnational forces shaping internal dynamics throughout Asia. In addition, it examines the ways that forces stemming from Asia are affecting global processes, pushing scholarship to engage questions about colonialism, nationalism, "race," religion, markets, urbanization, migration, and mass mediated culture. This course provides preparation for more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides an introductory gateway for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. May be taken in the first year of studies.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)globaliz, urban, nationalismSDG11, SDG16
CAS202H1Global Asian Studies: Sites and PracticesThis interdisciplinary course explores a variety of sites and topics in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It explores themes including contemporary and historical articulations of socio-economic development, (post)colonial political formations, urbanization processes, climate change, labour struggles, gender studies, migration, citizenship, and social justice. The course examines the diversity of Asian modernities, cross-regional linkages, and changing approaches to area studies over time. It provides a foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor, preparing students for taking more advanced courses on Asia in the global context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)socio-economic, citizenship, gender, labour, urban, climate, social justiceSDG1, SDG8, SDG13, SDG16, SDG10
CAS310H1Comparative Colonialisms in AsiaThis course analyzes the impact of colonialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia and the various ways in which pre-colonial traditions intersect with and reshape colonial and postcolonial process across the various regions of Asia. The course will examine the conjunctures of economy, politics, religion, education, ethnicity, gender, and caste, as these have played out over time in the making and re-making of Asia as both idea and place. Attention will be paid to postcolonial and indigenous theories, questions of ‘the colonial’ from the perspective of Asian Studies, and debates about the meaning of postcolonialism for the study of Asia now and in the future.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)gender, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CAS320H1Comparative Modernities in AsiaSince at least the late 1700s, the effects of capitalism across the globe have profoundly transformed the landscapes of human livelihood, consumption, production and governance in Asia. While colonial empires have declined, new empires have emerged, and a growing number of countries have witnessed the rise of nationalism and independent states, social, political and technological revolutions, and most recently neoliberal globalization. This course theorizes and explores these dramatic changes in a comparative framework. It is aimed at students wishing to better understand the great transformations of modern Asia in a global context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)capital, globaliz, consum, production, land, governance, nationalismSDG9, SDG16, SDG8, SDG10
CAS360H1Asian GendersThis course will explore ways that gender is mobilized and produced in parts of Asia. It seeks to understand gender and sexuality in their diversity and in attempts to “fix” or locate it in various bodies and places. Attempts will be made to see how gender is made knowable in terms of sexuality, medicine, nation, class, ethnicity, religion, and other discourses. The course assumes a willingness to read challenging theory – such as the writings of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Eve Sedgwick – and asks that students commit to regular attendance.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)genderSDG5
CAS420H1Asia and the New Global EconomyThis course explores the rise of Asia and its integration into the new global economy (labour, capitalism, knowledge economy, economic nationalism, inequality, gender, the meaning of capitalism, democracy, among others), exposing students to diverse disciplinary perspectives. Geographical coverage is pan-Asian, including East, Southeast and South Asia.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)knowledge, gender, labour, capital, inequality, equalit, nationalism, democraSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
CAS430H1Nationalism and Revolution in AsiaThis course explores the far-reaching social, political, and cultural transformations in modern East, Southeast, and South Asia, focusing on the twentieth-century revolutionary histories and struggles to establish modern nation-states. The course adopts a topical approach within a chronological and comparative framework to highlight major historical movements and theoretical issues significant to the Asian experience.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)nationalismSDG16
CCT200H5Race, Media and CultureThis course provides an introduction to the intersecting fields of critical race, media, and cultural studies. We will pay particular attention to dynamics of social difference and power and the communication strategies and technologies through which these are navigated, reproduced and interrupted. Students will be introduced to critical and analytical tools for understanding the cultural and media circulation, regulation and reimagination of things like race, sexuality, time, gender, class, indigeneity, space, ethnicity, ability and nationality. These critical tools equip students with the skills to write, design and build ethical innovations in new media and culture.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofgenderSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CCT205H5Digital Innovation and Cultural TransformationThis course examines a range of theoretical perspectives and worldviews that assess the cultural and social changes brought about by modern technology. These perspectives will be used to analyze the potential problems initiated by the introduction of digital and computing technologies to various contexts. Possible topics include: cybernetics; media convergence; artificial intelligence/life; smart technology; digital environmentalism and digital warfare.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofworldview, environmental, social changeSDG13, SDG16
CCT207H5Introduction to InfrastructureThis course explores how society, culture, and understanding of the human condition influence, and are influenced by, technological development. It focuses on the study of interdependent and institutionalized systems of law, economics, culture and technology, exploring the conditions of stability and instability in these systems. We will survey the available theories and methods for understanding large scale socio-technological systems, including the social construction of technology, technological determinism, and feminist technology studies. [24L, 12P]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute offeminis, infrastructure, institutSDG5, SDG9, SDG16, SDG10
CCT222H5Political Economy of Communication, Culture, and TechnologyThe course analyzes the relationship between media systems, communication technologies, and power. As an introduction to a political economy approach, this course surveys how media, culture, information and technologies are produced, circulated, and consumed, with attention to both historical developments and contemporary practices in the digital era. The course provides a basic understanding of media systems, technologies, and culture production in relation to the market, the state, and civil society. Students will develop a basic understanding of the political, economic, cultural, and regulatory environment in which media, culture, and technologies are produced, and pay particular attention to the implications of processes such as globalization, digitization, marketization, and commodification for social life. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofglobaliz, consum, productionSDG12, SDG10, SDG16
CCT320H5Communication, Technology, and Social ChangeThis course explores how media and media technology have shifted the nature of the existing political and social orders, We will focus on how social movements and political challengers have used media to disrupt and, in many cases, overthrow leaders, corporations, and governments. This will bring us in contact with theories of social movement mobilization, political communication, and digital media. We will also explore the ways that legacy and digital media have changed to be in service of misinformation and state repression.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofsocial changeSDG16
CCT340H5Gender, Media and TechnologyThis course brings a gendered lens to the study of media and technology. The course explores the (re)production and (re)presentation of gender through communicative practices in a variety of mediums, including print media, TV, activist media, video games and online platforms. The course develops an understanding of gender ideologies and how media, technologies, and communication help produce gender. The course examines the way gender identities are constructed by mainstream and alternative media; gendered divisions of media and digital labour; the relationship between ICTs and the performance of gender and sexuality; masculinities, gender politics; feminist theory; and the construction and negotiation of gender in relation to mediated environments. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofgender, feminis, labour, productionSDG5
CCT374H5Critical Histories of Information TechnologiesThe course approaches current information and communication technologies from critical and historical perspectives. It investigates the interests, motives and tactics of news media, pop culture producers, amateurs, universities, corporations, and governments in promoting, sustaining, and interpreting information and communication systems. It also asks how the focus will be on media and information technologies, more theoretical or methodological readings will necessarily cover other systems. Case studies may include investigations of orality, writing, the printing press, industrialized printing, and electronic media from the telegraph and the telephone to broadcasting and the internet.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofinvest, internetSDG9
CCT380H5Human-Computer Interaction and CommunicationThe emphasis in this course will be on theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues in the study of Human-Computer Interaction. Intelligent interface designs, usability assessment, user modeling and the accessibility of the technology for the disabled are among the topics to be examined. Related behavioural investigations concerning the ease and efficiency of users' interactions with computerized environments will also be discussed. [36P]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofinvest, accessibSDG11, SDG10
CCT381H5Media AudiencesAudiences are social constructions which must be imagined to be actualized. Beginning with an exploration of the nature and role of audiences from early 20th century media, students explore how audiences make meaning of popular media platforms today. How are audiences situated within media texts, what role does this play in how media is generated and circulated, and how do audiences both enact and resist media influence? Broadcast models, interactive models, audience reading, gender, culture, race, and audience feedback are investigated. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofgender, investSDG5,
CCT383H5The Interactive SocietyThis course introduces students to the theoretical and practical study of how interactive digital media and systems affect, influence and reshape our society and what does it mean to be a "user" in the information-centric society. It will expose students to specific theoretical issues such as privacy by design, usable privacy, marginalized and at-risk user groups, the digital divide, behavioural modification (persuasion) through new media, ICT4D (info tech for development) and empowerment/alienation through intelligent interactive systems. Focus will be on developing skills that will enable students to propose changes (design, policy, framework) to existing and future envisioned interactive technologies that address the issues analyzed. [36P]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofmarginalizedSDG10, SDG11
CCT384H5Inclusive Design and Social Responsibility(Offered at Sheridan College) The course provides an overview of inclusive design, a paradigm that empowers people of all ages and abilities. By analyzing products, buildings and communities from an inclusive perspective and making the needs of people the central focus of the design process this new paradigm seeks to develop form from function to increase the usefulness and responsiveness of our physical world for a wider and more diverse range of people.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofbuildingsSDG9, SDG10
CCT385H5Conceptualizing Media EnvironmentsMarshall McLuhan was one of the first theorists to conceptualize media as environments. Media were no longer conceptualized as instruments or tools but as systems that would capture their audience within. This course investigates the role of media in structuring and conditioning how we inhabit environments. From geology to ecology, from the umwelt to ecosystems, from urban to outer space, from bodies to biospheres, this class looks at media as modes of inhabitation. The intersections of media and environments will thus be problematized in their social, cultural, and political dimensions. Students will be introduced to these systems from a conceptual and a practical perspective through the study of scientific, artistic and design projects.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofinvest, urban, ecosystem, ecologSDG11
CCT386H5Information Practice in Virtual Worlds: Exploration of Information EnvironmentsFrom Webkinz to World of Warcraft, in the past decade immersive, 3D gaming environments have driven the technological and social development of virtual worlds. With or without the gaming aspects, virtual worlds have the potential to support a wide variety of activities related to information creation, distribution, reception, and use in supporting social, economic, and cultural causes. Compared to everyday information practices, however, those enacted in virtual worlds are uniquely characterized by multimodality, synchronicity, digital embodiment and geographic distribution of users. In this course, students engage in participatory learning in virtual environments such as Second Life and World of Warcraft, using avatars to assess how the world's technological and social features support and constrain information practices. Using theories of gaming, virtuality, and information lifecycles, students critically analyse how information is produced and used in these environments. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute oflearningSDG9
CCT390H5Digital Media and Communications AbroadStudents on International exchange programs are encouraged to seek out courses in digital media and technologies that enrich their learning within an international context. This course is intended as an opportunity for students to study global issues and contexts abroad that provide a comparator to the Canadian media and communications landscape.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute oflearning, landSDG4
CCT402H5Creating, Protecting and Managing Digital ArtifactsDigital artifacts play an increasingly important role in our society. It is essential that in the digitization of these artifacts appropriate attention is paid to their representation, protection and management. Students will review the theories and practices of representation. They will investigate the technologies associated with the storage of digital artifacts as well as investigating appropriate legal perspectives. This varied knowledge will be integrated into a study of best practices in the management of digital artifacts. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofknowledge, investSDG9
CCT404H5Remote Work, Technology and CollaborationThis project-based course aims to demonstrate how collaboration is a critical capability often overlooked. During the course students will integrate their learning and experience and first hand see how, in combination with collaboration it can lead to creatively solving problems in areas as varied as business, health care delivery, urban planning and development. In addition to lectures, students will have the benefit of a series of guest lecturers. A large, group based project will serve to integrate learning and allow students the benefit of experiential learning.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofhealth care, learning, labor, urbanSDG3, SDG8, SDG11
CCT418H5Work, Media and TechnologyThe course analyses the political, historical, and technical relationships between media, technology, and work in contemporary capitalism. The course will examine the power and social relationships that structure work in contexts such as media, creative industries, and the platform or "gig" economy. The course will focus on critical theories of work and will engage with case studies of the intersection of work, media and technology. The aim of the course is to build a tool kit for encountering an increasingly casualized and digitally-mediated labour market. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute oflabour, capitalSDG8
CCT420H5Information Technology and GlobalizationThe variety of ways in which various information technologies influence and are influenced by globalization will be critically examined. The class will explore metaphors or ways of thinking about society and technology to critically examine the complex process and the diverse consequences of globalization. Topics may shift focus yearly but will include the economy, culture, politics, social movements, migration, social identity, war and global conflict, etc. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofglobalizSDG9
CCT431H5Drones, Robots, Artificial IntelligenceDrones, robots, and artificial intelligence are three interrelated technologies that are changing the most fundamental considerations of how society and sociality should operate. Work, war, consumption, and even love are being reconfigured. This course will address debates concerning the cultural, political, economic, military, and economic considerations surrounding the growing use of these technologies. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofconsumSDG9
CCT433H5Sustainable Design(Offered at Sheridan College) This course immerses students in sustainable design methodologies based upon whole systems analysis, applying the quadruple bottom line of people, profit, planet, and culture to understand and design for environmental issues and social change. During this course, students will apply the process and rhetoric of sustainable systems thinking to the re-design of an object or service applying such methodologies as cradle-to-cradle, 'design-for-environment', pricing based on full cost accounting, greening of the supply chain, and corporate responsibility. Throughout the course, students will examine the need for sustainable design through case studies, best practice analyses, and relevant readingsUniversity of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofsustainable design, supply chain, environmental, planet, social changeSDG12, SDG13
CCT440H5Power, Privilege and TechnologyHow is social inequality reproduced and encoded in technology systems and in digital media? In what ways do technology and media creations inform and influence perceptions, beliefs, and practices that impact girls and women, communities of colour, Indigenous groups, LGBTQ+ and other minoritized people? This course will address overlapping and intersectional issues of power, privilege, oppression, and sociotechnical imaginaries - all related to networks, big data and predictive analytics, algorithms, digital gig economies, and interactive multimedia like social media and virtual reality.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofwomen, girl, lgbtq, inequality, equalit, minorit, of colour, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CCT441H5Online Collaborative Project ManagementInformation Communication Technologies have facilitated a perceptible change in collaborative practices across geographically dispersed teams and projects. Therefore, Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW) is, increasingly, a major area of design and research across many disciplines and contexts. This class takes a theoretical and practical approach to computer supported collaboration by placing students in interdisciplinary teams spread across traditional geographic boundaries. The class covers topics which include: organizing and managing project teams, quantitative methods for project planning and scheduling, introduction to computer-based project management and collaboration tools. The class will be focused on project based learning and will look at key literatures in CSCW and project management.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute oflearning, laborSDG8
CCT487H5Advanced Communication Policy in a Global ContextThis course provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of media, technology, and cultural policy in a global context. The course focuses on issues such as national identity and globalization, media convergence, intellectual property, global media regulation, security and privacy by examining how media, communication, and cultural policy is created, influenced, and contested by a range of actors.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofglobalizSDG9
CDN197H1Inventing CanadaThis course explores the ways that Canadian history and identity have been commemorated, interpreted and experienced, now and in the past. The course focuses in particular on who has been included or excluded in commemorative efforts over time. Key topics include representations of women, Indigenous peoples, and political figures on screen and through public installations like museum exhibits, plaques and statues. Case studies highlighting a range of interpretive media will encourage students to work with and discuss a range of primary and secondary sources, build critical thinking and academic writing skills. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomen, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CDN198H1Canada, Colonialism and Settler RelationsA First Year Foundations seminar focused on exploring Canada's colonial history and recent efforts to enact appropriate settler relations through an interdisciplinary lens. Topics will include contemporary land claims and treaty-making processes, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, governmental apologies for the mistreatment of Indigenous peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, land acknowledgements, practices of allyship through social movement such as Idle No More, and efforts to influence Canada's overseas mining practices. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, settler, indigenous, reconciliation, truth and reconciliation, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
CDN199H1Canada- Hong Kong MigrationThis course surveys the effects of migrations and cultural connections between Hong Kong and Canada from the 1960s. Students will discuss and analyze the impact of migrations, and study the connection between the two locations from the perspectives of history, culture and literature, politics and democracy, economic and financial development and the network of people and community. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdemocraSDG16
CDN240H1Italian Canadian StudiesAn interdisciplinary course that examines the social, economic, and political forces and events that have shaped the Italian Canadian experience. Topics include initial and subsequent settlement patterns including suburbanization, identity formation, education, mobility, work, media, multiculturalism, transnationalism, and political participation and representation. The course interrogates the complexities of the social and cultural interactions of Italian Canadians in the context of the changing demography of Canada.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLurban, nationalismSDG16
CDN267H1Canadian NationalismsA critical examination of contemporary forms of Canadian nationalism. This interdisciplinary course will interrogate national formations across theoretical works, policy documents, and cultural representations. Students will address the ways that nationalist discourses constitute difference, especially with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, nationalismSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
CDN268H1Canada and GlobalizationStudents examine the impact of contemporary globalization on Canada, and for Canada’s place in the world. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and addresses globalization from a wide range of perspectives, including mobility, trade, urbanization, health, religion, environmental change, technology, communications, and the arts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLglobaliz, trade, urban, environmentalSDG9, SDG10, SDG11, SDG13
CDN325H1Asian Canadian Space & PlaceA comprehensive examination of how Asian Canadian communities shape urban and suburban environments. Explore how urban planning and peoples’ local decisions interact to create space, place, and culture. The course applies a multidisciplinary lens, with an emphasis on culture and heritage, place and identity formation, diasporas, multiculturalism, and nationalism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLurban, nationalismSDG11, SDG16
CDN335H1Black Canadian StudiesAn interdisciplinary course that interrogates the constitution of blackness in Canada. Students will study race and ethnic relations, alongside other identity formations such as class, gender and sexuality. Topics to be addressed include media, education, law, immigration and mobility, urbanism, work, political representation and the arts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, urbanSDG5, SDG11
CDN340H1The History of Canadian-U.S. RelationsOver time, Canadians and Americans have developed distinct identities and cultures, but their histories have always been closely linked. This course examines the complex interrelationship between Canada and the United States. from the colonial period through the present day, especially its political, cultural, and indigenous dimensions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLindigenousSDG10, SDG16
CDN365H1The Canadian ArcticThis course surveys topics related to the Canadian Arctic. Through a critical interdisciplinary lens, the course looks at a broad set of issues including discovery and history, the environment and climate change, economic and resource development, sovereignty and security, social conditions, governance, and First Nations, Inuit, and Metis perspectives.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLclimate, governance, sovereigntySDG13, SDG16
CDN367H1Canadian PluralismStudents will examine the complexities of social and cultural interaction in the context of changing Canadian demographics. This course compares and contrasts policies regarding indigenous rights, migration, multiculturalism, and citizenship with contemporary cultural narratives in literature, painting and film.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcitizenship, indigenous, indigenous rightsSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CDN368H1Canada's BordersThe Canadian border is being reshaped by the increasing transnational movement of people, goods and ideas. Students will examine border issues relating to mobility, trade, and security from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives, from public policy to contemporary media, such as TV, films, and novels.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLtradeSDG8
CDN380H1Socio-Cultural Perspective of the Canadian Jewish CommunityThis course examines: the relationship between prominent Canadians who happen to be Jews and those whose works are founded in Jewish identity; the diversity of the community on the basis of religion, language, class, ideology, etc.; contributions to the arts and scholarship; and the role and contribution of Jewish women.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomenSDG5
CDN385H1Re-Imagining Canada: Creative Visions of Our Past, Present, and FuturesArtists and writers are re-imagining Canada, exploring alternate pasts, presents, and futures, often critiquing systemic inequities by positing “what ifs” of resistance and renewal, while reclaiming agency, voice, and power for those who are disadvantaged in society. This course will examine these re-imaginings across various media such as fiction, poetry, graphic novels, films, multimedia installations, performance art, paintings, virtual reality works, and video games. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of genres such as speculative fiction, Afrofuturism, Indigenous arctic horror, trans, queer, Indigenous and Indigiqueer perspectives.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLqueer, equit, indigenous, giniSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CHC309H1Christianity and PoliticsThis course explores developments in the relations between the Catholic Church and the states of Western Europe and America from the Enlightenment to the present. Of particular concern is Catholicism's response to the political theories of the Enlightenment, the secularization of the state and social justice issues.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsocial justiceSDG16
CHC322H1Women and ChristianityAn exploration of what Pope John Paul II, among others, called the "feminine tradition" in Christian life and thought. Possible topics include women's roles in the early church, Marian dogmas and devotions, women mystics and Doctors of the Church, and Christian feminisms and New Feminisms in the contemporary period.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomen, feminisSDG5
CHC330H1Christ in Christian TraditionFaith in Christ is central to Christianity. This course offers an advanced introduction to classical debates about the person and work of Christ, the modern Quest of the Historical Jesus, and selected feminist, liberationist and indigenized perspectives on Christ from Asia, Africa and Latin America.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfeminisSDG5
CHC362H1International Development, Justice, and Human DignityThis seminar raises critical questions of social justice and international development from diverse religious and disciplinary perspectives.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsocial justiceSDG16
CHC372H1The Catholic Church in CanadaAn exploration of the historical development of Catholic communities and institutions in all regions of Canada since the 16th century. Emphasis placed on themes of mission, church-state relations, ethnicity, belief and practice, social justice, gender, and secularization.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, institut, social justiceSDG5, SDG16
CHC471H1InternshipArranged by each student in consultation with faculty, the internship enables teacher candidates to integrate, extend and deepen their learning experiences in a way not otherwise available in the program. Those wishing to take this course must have their program approved by the Program Coordinator and Director. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG4
CHE249H1Engineering Economic AnalysisEngineering analysis and design are not ends in themselves, but they are a means for satisfying human wants. Thus, engineering concerns itself with the materials used and forces and laws of nature, and the needs of people. Because of scarcity of resources and constraints at all levels, engineering must be closely associated with economics. It is essential that engineering proposals be evaluated in terms of worth and cost before they are undertaken. In this course we emphasize that an essential prerequisite of a successful engineering application is economic feasibility. Hence, investment proposals are evaluated in terms of economic cost concepts, including break even analysis, cost estimation and time value of money. Effective interest rates, inflation and deflation, depreciation and income tax all affect the viability of an investment. Successful engineering projects are chosen from valid alternatives considering such issues as buy or lease, make or buy, cost and benefits and financing alternatives. Both public sector and for-profit examples are used to illustrate the applicability of these rules and approaches.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofinvest, incomeSDG9
CHE308H1Energy Systems and Fuels: Global Needs, Challenges, and Technological OpportunitiesThe chemistry and chemical engineering involved in various forms of power generation and storage: alternative liquid fuels, nuclear power, fuel cells, solar cells/photovoltaics. A team-taught course with instruction from leading experts within the Faculty. Lectures will be focused around the presentation and analysis of recent published accounts or a review of the state of the art, while providing the necessary background within each field to enable the students to make objective critiques of the topics discussed. Where applicable, the design of facilities and devices for the forms of generation or storage will be discussed.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofenergy, solarSDG7
CHE334H1Team Strategies for Engineering DesignIn this course, team strategies including how teams work, how to lead and manage teams, and decision making methodologies for successful teams will be taught in the context of engineering design. The development of problem solving and design steps will be undertaken. This course will be taught with an emphasis on team development and problem solving as it relates to the practice of process safety management in engineering and engineering design. The teams will develop a PFD and P&ID's, as well as an operating procedure for a portion of the process. Thus, environmental and occupational health and safety becomes the vehicle through which the teamwork is performed.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofenvironmentalSDG8
CHE403H1Professional PracticeIn this course, lectures and seminars will be given by practicing engineers who will cover the legal and ethical responsibility an engineer owes to an employer, a client and the public with particular emphasis on environmental issues.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
CHE416H1Chemical Engineering in Human HealthLife expectancy has consistently increased over the past 70 years due to advances in healthcare and sanitation. Engineers have played key roles in developing technologies and processes that enabled these critical advances in healthcare to occur. This course will provide an overview of areas in which chemical engineers directly impacted human health. We will study established processes that had transformative effects in the past as well as new emerging areas that chemical engineers are developing today to impact human health. Emphasis will be placed on quantitative approaches. Engineering tools, especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics will be used. Required readings, including scientific papers, will be assigned. Industrial visit and/or a hands-on project will be included.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofhealthcare, sanitaSDG3, SDG6
CHE460H1Environmental Pathways and Impact AssessmentReview of the nature, properties and elementary toxicology of metallic and organic contaminants. Partitioning between environmental media (air, aerosols, water, particulate matter, soils, sediments and biota) including bioaccumulation. Degradation processes, multimedia transport and mass balance models. Regulatory approaches for assessing possible effects on human health and ecosystems.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofwater, environmental, ecosystem, soilSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3
CHE467H1Environmental EngineeringCore Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor A course which treats environmental engineering from a broad based but quantitative perspective and covers the driving forces for engineering activities as well as engineering principles. Models which are used for environmental impact, risk analysis, health impact, pollutant dispersion, and energy system analysis are covered.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofenergy, environmental, pollutSDG13, SDG15, SDG3
CHE488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MIE488H1, MSE488H1 and CIV488H1.) *Complementary Studies ElectiveApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofemployment, entrepreneur, taxationSDG8
CHE565H1Aqueous Process EngineeringApplication of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofwater, production, waste, recycl, environmentalSDG12, SDG13, SDG14
CHI311H5Classical Chinese LiteratureThis course will examine representative genres of traditional Chinese literature—poetry, prose, fiction and drama—with emphasis on language structure and style. We will also analyze typical masterworks and discuss the intertextuality between these genres, as well as some of the major features of traditional Chinese society in terms of religion, philosophy, the imperial system, gender relations, ethnicity, family, and romance.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CHI314H5Chinese Culture through MediaThis course examines Chinese cultural traditions and values through contemporary media produced in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background readings and literary works will provide students with the necessary historical and cultural context for each work. Class discussions will focus on the political, social and cultural transformations presented in the media. Special attention will be paid to topics such as family, class issues, gender and identity.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CHM101H5The Science of Human HealthThis course is intended for humanities and social science students who wish to gain knowledge of the science behind our well-being that may help them to make personal, social and political decisions in their future. Chemistry will be taught on a need-to-know basis in order to consider some contemporary applications. The course will focus on three themes in the realm of human health: nutrition for the prevention of disease, diagnostic tests for the detection of disease and drug discovery for the treatment of disease. Among the questions that may be addressed are "What is the nutritional difference between vitamins from foods and those from supplements?", "Should ketchup be considered a vegetable?", "How do diagnostic strips work?", "What advances in microfluidics have provided inexpensive diagnostics for use in remote areas?", "How are drug targets identified?", and "What is the path from drug discovery to bringing a drug to market?". The roles of nutritional, analytical and medicinal chemistry in these processes will be studied. (Please note the course exclusion: Students are ineligible to register for this course if they have taken any previous or current CHM/JCP course).University of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences (UTM), Department ofnutrition, well-being, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4, SDG4
CHM195H1Innovative Teaching Methods in ChemistryGood teaching is effective communication that engages the audience. In this breadth course, we'll explore innovative teaching in science, through an examination of the nature of science, how scientific knowledge is built, and what makes certain concepts in science problematic to the learner. Students will read and discuss relevant articles in newsmagazines, popular science sources, and educational literature. They will design and deliver mini-lessons to communicate specified scientific concepts. As a major course project, students will develop a communication tool that integrates pedagogical know-how with leading-edge chemical discoveries to produce a teaching unit for use by Ontario teachers. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofknowledgeSDG4
CHM197H1Environmental Chemistry in a Sustainable WorldRapid and widespread industrialization is changing the chemical nature of the planet. In order to have a sustainable future, we need to manage chemicals released by humankind, and to understand their effects on the environment and on us. Each year, this seminar course will address the fundamental science behind a specific topic in this field, such as the interactions of our energy choices and the environment, changes in water and air quality, or exposure to biologically-active synthetic chemicals such as pharmaceuticals or personal care products. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofwater, energy, industrialization, environmental, planetSDG6, SDG7, SDG13, SDG3, SDG13, SDG14
CHM210H1Chemistry of Environmental ChangeExamines the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth’s natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics related to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, climate change; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofpollution, water, urban, waste, climate, environmental, pollutSDG3, SDG6, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHM211H5Fundamentals of Analytical ChemistryA rigorous introduction to the theory and practice of analytical chemistry. Development and applications of basic statistical concepts in treatment and interpretation of analytical data; direct and indirect precipitations; volumetric methods; acid-base, complexometric, redox and precipitation titrations; introduction to instrumental methods; potentiometry and absorption spectroscopy. Applications in biomedical, forensic and environmental areas will be considered.University of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences (UTM), Department ofABS, environmentalSDG13
CHM310H1Environmental Fate and Toxicity of Organic ContaminantsOrganic chemical contaminants surround us in our everyday lives (e.g. in medications, personal care products, flame retardants, refrigerants) and because of this, they are present in the environment and in ourselves. In this course we will explore the fate of chemicals in the environment as a whole, as well as in the body, to understand how chemicals can be designed to mitigate the risks associated with their use and unintended release. Specific topics will include environmental partitioning; environmentally-relevant transformation processes; the chemistry and effects of redox-active species; and the toxicity/detoxification of electrophilic species in the body.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofenvironmental, speciesSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3
CHM343H1Organic Synthesis TechniquesThis laboratory course showcases modern organic synthesis techniques and introduces chemical research principles. It provides excellent preparation for a CHM499Y1 project in organic chemistry. Associated lectures teach theory and problem-solving approaches from a practical perspective and through industrial case studies. Green chemistry decision-making is a central theme of both the lecture and laboratory components. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department oflaborSDG13
CHM410H1Analytical Environmental ChemistryAn analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues and the determination of physical/chemical properties including vapour pressure, degradation rates, partitioning. Lab experiments involve application of theory. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofwater, environmental, pollut, soilSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHM499Y1Introduction to Chemistry ResearchAn experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a teaching faculty or research faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. Five mandatory 90-minute professional development workshops cover aspects of academic writing, poster presentations, reading scientific literature, and job applications/interviews. Each student is required to attend a total of six one-hour research colloquia during the Fall and Winter Sessions. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding Winter Session with the deadline being the Friday before Reading Week: the application form is available at the Department of Chemistry website. Students are notified with the results of their application by the last week of March. Only students being admitted are required to contact chemistry faculty to discuss available research projects. Projects are in the areas of environmental, analytical, physical, inorganic, materials, polymer, organic and biological chemistry. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
CHMB55H3Environmental ChemistryAn investigation of aspects of chemical substances and processes as they occur in the environment, including both naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals. This course will include an introduction to atmospheric chemistry, aqueous chemistry, some agricultural and industrial chemistry, and chemical analysis of contaminants and pollutants.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofagricultur, invest, environmental, pollutSDG9, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3, SDG12
CHMD59H3Modelling the Fate of Organic Chemicals in the EnvironmentThis course introduces quantitative approaches to describe the behaviour of organic chemicals in the environment. Building upon a quantitative treatment of equilibrium partitioning and kinetically controlled transfer processes of organic compounds between gaseous, liquid and solid phases of environmental significance, students will learn how to build, use and evaluate simulation models of organic chemical fate in the environment. The course will provide hands-on experience with a variety of such models.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
CHMD89H3Introduction to Green ChemistryThe 'twelve principles' of green chemistry will be discussed in the context of developing new processes and reactions (or modifying old ones) to benefit society while minimizing their environmental impact. Examples will be taken from the recent literature as well as from industrial case studies.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
CIN204H5The Films of Martin ScorseseThis course will examine the films of Martin Scorsese, one of the most influential figures in the history of cinema. Scorsese's films will be understood in relation to questions about imitation and originality, genre, violence, male hysteria, and also as meditations on the history of film itself. [24L, 12T, 36P]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofviolenceSDG16
CIN215H5Bollywood in ContextIndia has arguably the most popular and prolific film industry in the world. This course contextualizes the relatively recent 'Bollywood' phenomenon within the history of Indian commercial cinema and key aspects of modern Indian culture, emphasizing the popular cinema's role in constructing historically changing ideas of national and gendered identity. It also challenges the assumptions of film theories developed in relation to Hollywood or European cinema by introducing film theory concepts that address South Asian image-cultures (such as darshan, frontality, melodrama, and interruption). [24L, 12T, 36P]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CIN216H1Crime Film TraditionsOriginating in the mid-19th century from journalistic accounts and detective stories, crime fiction has emerged as one of the dominant popular genres in the 20th century across a variety of media and platforms, from true crime dime novels to radio dramas, from hard-boiled literature to prestige television series. Rejuvenated in the 21st century by the consolidation of gaming culture and the rise of podcasting, crime narratives have expanded to transmediality, stretching the boundaries between fiction and documentary practices. In this context, the culturally porous and generically elastic crime film had remained one of the most enduring cinematic expressions of sociopolitical anxieties related to class, gender, race, and ethnicity. This course examines a selection of crime film traditions across various geographical areas and historical periods, investigating the resilience of this form from the silent period to the present day.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)gender, invest, resilien, resilienceSDG5
CIN304H5The Violent ImageIt is commonly believed that violent images produce violent, or desensitized people. In this class, we will examine the multiple forms of violence in film, television, and videogames as well as the variety of discourses about violence and images. Rather than confirming the moral logic of condemnation of the violent image, we will ask instead what good a violent image might do. [24L, 36P]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofviolenceSDG16
CIN322H1Cult CinemaThis course examines "cult" and "exploitation" cinema. It examines the growing popularity of cult/exploitation films as an emerging cinematic subculture that valorizes disreputable or "trash" cinema. A number of sub-genres within exploitation film, including teen films, educational/instructional films, sexploitation, and Blaxploitation, will be explored. The social politics of appropriating texts through ironic reading strategies will also be considered.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)exploitationSDG16
CIN330Y1Feminist Approaches to CinemaGender politics of feminist film culture since the 1970s. Topics include: apparatus theory and its legacy, models of spectatorship, feminist historiography, the cinematic (re)production of identity, the relationship between social movements and cinema, "postfeminism."Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)gender, feminis, productionSDG5
CIN332Y1Screening RaceHow race functions in cinema. Topics include: the foundational role of racial inscription and its expansion beyond the black/white paradigm, visual ethnography, 'the primitive,' and Orientalism, indigenous media, the 'Black Atlantic' and Diaspora, Banlieu and exilic film practice and theory, border aesthetics, race and urban space, 'post-race', and the evolving racial imaginary.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)indigenous, urbanSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
CIN336H1Queer Film and MediaThis course focuses on queer film, television, and/or digital media. Approaches may include cultural, historical, analytical, critical, and theoretical methods. This course may focus on the representation of queer people in film in media, or film and/or media made by queer people, or both.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)queerSDG5
CIN337H1Black CinemaThis course explores the cultural, aesthetic, technological, and political category of “Black cinema.” Across the diaspora, Black cinema is an artistic praxis that utilizes techniques like improvisation and collaboration in order to make and remake the cinematic archive. The films and filmmakers in this category intervene in cinematic histories by responding to exclusionary narratives, technologies, and critical discourse by imagining alternative stories, spaces, and temporalities. Thus, these films help articulate both the pervasiveness of anti-blackness in our visual culture and help us understand the difference (film) aesthetics can make (Chun, 2019). Our goal is to 1) develop a critical language to discuss Black cinema (its techniques, its aims, and its political contexts) and 2) articulate research questions, methods, and arguments that consider what is happening inside and outside the frame in these films.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)labor, giniSDG10
CIN363H1Ecocinema: The Nature of FilmThis course takes a broad approach to the growing field – sometimes termed “ecocinema” or “film ecology” – devoted to cinema’s relationship to the natural environment. We will consider that relationship through a combination of historical, textual, and theoretical analysis.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)ecologSDG15
CIN371H1(New) Media AestheticsInvestigates the theory and history of media technologies as sites of aesthetic investment in a wide variety of artistic practices, focusing on contemporary digital media work, including experimental cinema, gallery installation, net.art, and avant-garde videogames. One important emphasis lies in the aesthetic possibilities new (and newly inexpensive) media technologies have made available to marginalized artists, including especially women and queer artists. We will study the work of Maya Deren, John Cage, Tony Conrad, Yoko Ono, Jack Smith, Andy Warhol, Michael Snow, Marina Abramovic, Marlon Riggs, Felix Gonzales-Torres, Anna Anthropy, and others.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)women, queer, invest, marginalizedSDG5, SDG10
CIN403H5Queerscapes, Screenscapes, Escapes: Gender and Sexuality Across East and Southeast Asian Cinemas"Queerness is not yet here." José Esteban Muñoz begins Cruising Utopia with the provocation that queerness is a mode of desire that allows for an escape from the conditions of the present. How does queer studies contribute to the building of and the continued hope for a more just world? Through cinema, theory, and philosophy, this course makes the claim that investigating queerness in the world marks a critical move away from restrictive modes of identification and holds open life's horizons of possibility. Course texts emphasize queer cinemas of Asia and their transnational connections. 24S, 24PUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, queer, investSDG5
CIN404H5Film Noir and the Problem of StyleBy way of an introduction to some of the key instances of film noir, this course is concerned with what we will call the paradox of style; namely, that style can indicate both what is specific and also what is general, what is unique and what is repeatable. We will look at the way in which this paradox is amplified by issues of gender, genre, fashion, and power that seem to concern so many films in this tradition. 24S, 30PUniversity of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CIN470H1Advanced Study in History and NationSeminars in historiography and questions of national cinema. Past seminars include: “Film Historiography,” “Early Cinema,” “Reviewing Hollywood Classicism,” “Women Pioneers,” “Local Film Cultures: Toronto Sites and Scenes,” and “Debating Transnational Cinema." Pre-enrolment balloting for 400-Level seminars will start in late May to early June, opening roughly five weeks before the July enrolment period begins. More information on balloting procedures, the balloting form and the submission deadline can be found in Cinema Studies Undergraduate Forms.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)womenSDG5
CIN471H1Advanced Study in History and NationSeminars in historiography and questions of national cinema. Past seminars include: “Film Historiography,” “Early Cinema,” “Reviewing Hollywood Classicism,” “Women Pioneers,” “Local Film Cultures: Toronto Sites and Scenes,” and “Debating Transnational Cinema." Pre-enrolment balloting for 400-Level seminars will start in late May to early June, opening roughly five weeks before the July enrolment period begins. More information on balloting procedures, the balloting form and the submission deadline can be found in Cinema Studies Undergraduate Forms.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)womenSDG5
CIN472H1Advanced Study in History and NationSeminars in historiography and questions of national cinema. Past seminars include: “Film Historiography,” “Early Cinema,” “Reviewing Hollywood Classicism,” “Women Pioneers,” “Local Film Cultures: Toronto Sites and Scenes,” and “Debating Transnational Cinema." Pre-enrolment balloting for 400-Level seminars will start in late May to early June, opening roughly five weeks before the July enrolment period begins. More information on balloting procedures, the balloting form and the submission deadline can be found in Cinema Studies Undergraduate Forms.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCinema Studies Institute (FAS)womenSDG5
CITA01H3Foundations of City StudiesA review of the major characteristics and interpretations of cities, urban processes and urban change as a foundation for the Program in City Studies. Ideas from disciplines including Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Planning, Political Science and Sociology, are examined as ways of understanding cities.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcities, urbanSDG11
CITB01H3Canadian Cities and PlanningAfter reviewing the history of urban and regional planning in Canada, this course considers alternative ideologies, models of public choice, the role of the planner, the instruments of planning, tools for the analysis of planning, and planning in the context of the space economy.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcities, urbanSDG11
CITB03H3Social Planning and Community DevelopmentThis course provides an overview of the history, theory, and politics of community development and social planning as an important dimension of contemporary urban development and change.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurbanSDG11
CITB04H3City PoliticsThis course is the foundations course for the city governance concentration in the City Studies program, and provides an introduction to the study of urban politics with particular emphasis on different theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding urban decision-making, power, and conflict.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurban, governanceSDG11, SDG16
CITB08H3Economy of CitiesAn introduction to economic analysis of cities, topics include: theories of urban economic growth; the economics of land use, urban structure, and zoning; the economics of environments, transportation, and sustainability; public finance, cost-benefit analysis, the provision of municipal goods and services, and the new institutional economics.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofeconomic growth, cities, urban, land use, land, institutSDG8, SDG11, SDG15, SDG16
CITC01H3Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East ScarboroughThis course engages students in a case study of some of the issues facing urban communities and neighbourhoods today. Students will develop both community-based and academic research skills by conducting research projects in co-operation with local residents and businesses, non-profit organizations, and government actors and agencies.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurbanSDG11
CITC02H3Placements in Community DevelopmentWith a focus on building knowledge and skills in community development, civic engagement, and community action, students will ‘learn by doing’ through weekly community-based placements with community organizations in East Scarborough and participatory discussion and written reflections during class time. The course will explore topics such as community-engaged learning, social justice, equity and inclusion in communities, praxis epistemology, community development theory and practice, and community-based planning and organizing. Students will be expected to dedicate 3-4 hours per week to their placement time in addition to the weekly class time. Community-based placements will be organized and allocated by the course instructor.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofknowledge, learning, equity, equit, social justiceSDG10, SDG16
CITC03H3Real Estate and the CityOperation of property markets; cities as markets in land and structures; stocks of property and flows of accommodation service; location of industry, offices and retailing within the city; rental and owner-occupied housing; depreciation and maintenance; cyclical behaviour in metropolitan property markets; impacts of local government; property taxation.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department oftaxation, cities, metro, housing, landSDG11, SDG15
CITC07H3Urban Social PolicyIn recent years social policy has been rediscovered as a key component of urban governance. This course examines the last half-century of evolving approaches to social policy and urban inequality, with particular emphasis on the Canadian urban experience. Major issues examined are poverty, social exclusion, labour market changes, housing, immigration and settlement.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofpoverty, labour, inequality, equalit, urban, housing, governanceSDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG11, SDG16
CITC08H3Cities and Community DevelopmentAn examination of community development as the practice of citizens and community organizations to empower individuals and groups to improve the social and economic wellbeing of their communities and neighbourhoods. The course will consider different approaches to community development and critically discuss their potential for positive urban social change.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofwellbeing, cities, urban, social changeSDG3, SDG11, SDG16
CITC09H3Introduction to Planning History: Toronto and Its RegionAn introduction to the study of the history of urban planning with particular emphasis on the investigation of the planning ideas, and the plans, that have shaped Toronto and its surrounding region through the twentieth century. The course will consider international developments in planning thought together with their application to Toronto and region.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofinvest, urbanSDG9, SDG11
CITC10H3Selected Issues in City StudiesExamination of one or more current issues in cities. The specific issues will vary depending on the instructor.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcitiesSDG11
CITC12H3City Structures and City Choices: Local Government, Management, and PolicymakingThis course examines the structure of local government, how local Government is managed, how policy decisions are made. Viewing Canadian cities in comparative perspective, topics include the organization and authority of the mayor, council, civic bureaucracy, and special-purpose bodies, and their roles in the making and implementation of public policies; ethical and conflict-of-interest dilemmas; collective bargaining; and provincial oversight of municipal affairs.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcitiesSDG11
CITC14H3Environmental PlanningThis course introduces students to questions of urban ecology and environmental planning, and examines how sustainability and environmental concerns can be integrated into urban planning processes and practices.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurban, environmental, ecologSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CITC15H3Taxing and Spending: Public Finance in Canadian CitiesThe course examines Canadian local public finance in comparative perspective and discusses the implications of municipal finance for urban public policy, planning, and the provision of municipal services. Topics include local government revenue sources and expenditures, the politics of municipal budgeting and intergovernmental fiscal relations, and how public finance influences urban form.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcities, urbanSDG11
CITC16H3Planning and Governing the MetropolisMost of the world's population now lives in large urban regions. How such metropolitan areas should be planned and governed has been debated for over a century. Using examples, this course surveys and critically evaluates leading historical and contemporary perspectives on metropolitan planning and governance, and highlights the institutional and political challenges to regional coordination and policy development.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurban, metro, institut, governanceSDG11, SDG16
CITC17H3Civic Engagement in Urban PoliticsThis course examines the engagement of citizen groups, neighbourhood associations, urban social movements, and other non-state actors in urban politics, planning, and governance. The course will discuss the contested and selective insertion of certain groups into city-regional decision-making processes and structures.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurban, governanceSDG11, SDG16
CITC18H3Urban Transportation Policy AnalysisDemand forecasting; methodology of policy analysis; impacts on land values, urban form and commuting; congestion; transit management; regulation and deregulation; environmental impacts and safety.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofurban, transit, environmental, landSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CITD12H3Planning and Building Public Spaces in TorontoThis course is designed to develop career-related skills such as policy-oriented research analysis, report writing, and presentation and networking skills through experiential learning approaches. The policy focus each year will be on a major current Toronto planning policy issue, from ‘Complete Streets’ to improvements to parks and public space infrastructure, to public transit-related investments. Students work closely in the course with planners and policymakers from the City of Toronto, policy advocates, and community organizers.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department oflearning, infrastructure, invest, transitSDG9, SDG11
CIV185H1Earth Systems ScienceThis course introduces students to the basic earth sciences with an emphasis on understanding the impact of humans on the natural earth systems. Beginning with a study of the lithosphere, principles of physical geology will be examined including the evolution and internal structure of the earth, dynamic processes that affect the earth, formation of minerals and rocks and soil, ore bodies and fossil- energy sources. Next, the biosphere will be studied, including the basic concepts of ecology including systems ecology and biogeochemical cycles. The influence of humans and the built environment on these natural systems will also be examined with a view to identifying more sustainable engineering practices. Finally, students will study the oceans and the atmosphere and the physical, chemical and thermodynamic processes involved in climate change.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLenergy, climate, ocean, ecolog, soilSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CIV201H1Introduction to Civil EngineeringA field-based course introducing students to current and historical civil engineering works in the urban and natural environments, highlighting the role of the Civil Engineer in developing sustainable solutions. It will run the Tuesday through Thursday immediately following Labour Day, with follow-up assignments coordinated with the course CIV282 Engineering Communications I. Students must have their own personal protective equipment (PPE). One night will be spent at the University of Toronto Survey Camp near Minden, Ontario.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflabour, urbanSDG11, SDG15
CIV220H1Urban Engineering EcologyCore Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofpollution, water, energy, cities, urban, waste, industrial ecology, environmental, pollut, biodivers, ecosystem, ecologSDG3, SDG6, SDG7, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CIV250H1Hydraulics and HydrologyThe hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofABS, water, energy, transit, climate, land use, landSDG2, SDG6, SDG7, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CIV300H1Terrestrial Energy SystemsCore Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, solar, planet, fossil fuel, oceanSDG7, SDG13, SDG14
CIV301H1Design of Hydro and Wind Electric PlantsIntroduction to the applications of turbo-machinery. Description of typical wind and hydroelectric plants; different types of turbo-machines. Fundamental fluid mechanics equations, efficiency coefficients, velocity triangles, characteristic curves, similarity laws, specific speed, vibration, cavitation of hydraulic turbines, pump/turbines; variable speed machines. Estimation of main dimensions of machine units, machine house, waterways, electrical and civil structure; transients and stability. Layout of electric and storage plants. Major and auxiliary equipments and systems. Small and mini plants. Case studies.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofwater, wind, hydroelectricSDG7
CIV324H1Geotechnical Engineering IIBuilding on CME321, more complex aspects of geotechnical analysis and design are considered. Topics include: mineralogy; soil identification and classification; laboratory- and field-based soil index tests; correlations of index test results to engineering properties; vertical stress distribution; soil-foundation interaction; volume change and consolidation of clay and settlement. Shear strength of soil and slope stability analysis are also discussed. Laboratories are held for soil identification and classification, and confined triaxial compression tests of clay and sand.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflabor, soilSDG15
CIV331H1Transport I - Introduction to Urban Transportation SystemsThis course introduces the fundamentals of transportation systems and the application of engineering, mathematical and economic concepts and principles to address a variety of transportation issues in Canada. Several major aspects of transportation engineering will be addressed, including transportation planning, public transit, traffic engineering, geometric design, pavement design and the economic, social and environmental impacts of transportation. The course focuses on urban transportation engineering problems.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofurban, transit, environmentalSDG11, SDG13
CIV340H1Municipal EngineeringMunicipal service systems for water supply and wastewater disposal, land development, population forecasting, and demand analysis. Water supply: source development, transmission, storage, pumping, and distribution networks. Sewerage and drainage, sewer and culvert hydraulics, collection networks, and storm water management. Maintenance and rehabilitation of water and wastewater systems, and optimization of network design. Design projects.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, waste, landSDG6, SDG12, SDG15
CIV342H1Water and Wastewater Treatment ProcessesPrinciples involved in the design and operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities are covered, including physical, chemical and biological unit operations, advanced treatment and sludge processing.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, wasteSDG6, SDG12
CIV375H1Building ScienceThe fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflabor, invest, sustainable designSDG9, SDG12, SDG11
CIV380H1Sustainable Energy SystemsThis course will provide students with knowledge of energy demand and supply from local to national scales. Topics include energy demands throughout the economy, major energy technologies, how these technologies work, how they are evaluated quantitatively, their economics and their impacts on the environment. In addition, the ever changing context in which these technologies (and emerging technologies) are being implemented will be outlined. Systems approaches including life cycle assessment, will be refined and applied to evaluate energy systems. A particular focus will be placed on analysis of energy alternatives within a carbon constrained economy.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofknowledge, energySDG7, SDG13
CIV401H1Design and Optimization of Hydro and Wind Electric PlantsThe application of turbo-machinery including the design and operation of typical wind and hydroelectric plants from first principles to the various types of turbo-machines choices. Fundamental fluid mechanics equations, efficiency coefficients, momentum exchanges, characteristic curves, similarity laws, specific speed, vibration, cavitation of hydraulic turbines, pump/turbines; variable speed machines including transients and hydraulic stability. An introduction to overall system configuration and both component and system optimization. Case studies.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwind, hydroelectricSDG7
CIV440H1Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCore Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, production, environmental, ecosystem, landSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG3
CIV460H1Engineering Project Finance and ManagementThis course deals with the structuring, valuing, managing and financing of infrastructure projects. The financing portion builds on material covered in Engineering Economics. Key topics include; structuring projects, valuing projects, the rationale for project financing (types of funds and financing), project viability and financial modeling, risk analysis, externalities and social cost benefit analyses. Financing of large scale projects by the public and private sectors as well as through public/private partnerships is treated in detail. Project management concepts, issues, and procedures are introduced. A series of case studies analyzing both successful and unsuccessful projects are examined.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofinfrastructureSDG9
CIV488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered in other Departments: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, ECE488H1 and CHE488H1.)*Complementary Studies ElectiveApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofemployment, entrepreneur, taxationSDG8, SDG4
CIV514H1Concrete TechnologyMaterial aspects of concrete production will be dealt with in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability. The process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing concrete will be the framework within which topics such as: the use of admixtures, choice of cements, environmental influences, methods of consolidation and testing techniques will be studied.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofproduction, environmentalSDG13
CIV516H1Public Transit Operations and PlanningThis course covers a broad range of topics in urban transit operations and planning, with special emphasis on best-practice strategies of modern transit systems. The course will help students: Learn the history of transit and its relationship to urban development, emerging challenges, transit role in society, and new trends and issues; Understand and analyze the factors that affect transit performance and demand; Identify and analyze transit operational and planning problems; Identify possible solutions at the operational level (mostly short-term and line-based) and the strategic level (mostly long-term and network-based), and assess alternative solutions; Understand the relative performance of various transit modes (both conventional and new modes) and their domains of application; and gain knowledge of best-practice transit systems planning and emerging innovations.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofknowledge, urban, transitSDG11
CIV523H1Geotechnical DesignThis course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a project. The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction. In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control. The highway will require a soil cut. One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils. A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service. A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, invest, soilSDG9, SDG15
CIV531H1Transport PlanningThis course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A "systems" approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofknowledge, urban, environmental, land use, landSDG11, SDG13, SDG15, SDG8
CIV536H1Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and HealthThis is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofpollution, emission, cities, urban, emissions, pollutSDG3, SDG7, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CIV541H1Environmental BiotechnologyPrinciples involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability. The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, remediation, energy, waste, environmentalSDG6, SDG7, SDG12,
CIV550H1Water Resources EngineeringGlobal and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, urbanSDG6, SDG11
CIV575H1Studies in Building ScienceThis course examines the basic principles governing the control of heat, moisture and air movement in buildings and presents the fundamentals of building enclosure design. With this background, students are required to research advanced topics related to emerging areas of Building Science, and to write and present to the class an individual comprehensive paper related to their research. Lectures for this course will be jointly offered with those of CIV375H1.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofbuildingsSDG9
CIV576H1Sustainable BuildingsBuilding systems including the thermal envelope, heating and cooling systems, as well as water and lighting systems are examined with a view to reducing the net energy consumed within the building. Life-cycle economic and assessment methods are applied to the evaluation of various design options including considerations of embodied energy and carbon sequestration. Green building strategies including natural ventilation, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar water heaters, green roofs and geothermal energy piles are introduced. Following the application of these methods, students are introduced to efficient designs including LEED designs that lessen the impact of buildings on the environment. Exemplary building designs will be presented and analyzed.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLwater, energy, solar, geothermal, buildings, consum, carbon sequestrationSDG7, SDG9, SDG12,, SDG15
CIV577H1Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesDeveloping infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, energy, infrastructure, buildings, cities, urban, green buildings, anthropogenicSDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13
CIV578H1Design of Building EnclosuresA brief summary of the science involved in controlling heat, moisture and air movement in buildings is presented at the outset of the course. With this background, methods of designing enclosures for cold, mixed, and hot climates are examined. Design principles related to the design of walls, windows and roofs are presented and applied. In particular, topics related to the control of rain penetration, air movement, and interstitial condensation are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on developing designs based on fundamentals which can be verified with computer modelling solutions.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwind, buildings, climateSDG7, SDG9, SDG13
CIV580H1Engineering and Management of Large ProjectsThis technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofinvest, environmentalSDG9, SDG13
CJS330H1Who's a Jew? Theory, Myth, and PracticeThis course introduces students to the host of core concepts in terms of which Jewish identity has been and continues to be defined and debated. Topics include: the difference between insiders and outsiders; collective vs individual identity; the nature of the bond between group members; identification across time, space, and disagreements; social and gendered hierarchies; joining and leaving the group; the identities of outsiders.Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre forgenderSDG5
CJS383H1Jews and PowerThis course will explore the relationship of Jews to political power. Among the themes to be covered are: How has the relationship of the Jewish community to political authority changed over time? What is the Jewish conception of political authority? How did Jews protect their communal and individual rights in the absence of sovereignty? How did the dynamics of antisemitism, philosemitism, and anti-Jewish violence change over time? How did Zionism and the revival of Jewish sovereignty change the position of Jews in the political order? What are the political and moral dilemmas posed by statehood? And what are the implications of Jewish sovereignty for Jews in the Diaspora?Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre forABS, sovereignty, violenceSDG16
CJS401H1Community & IdentityExploration of Jewish notions of community, identity, and humanity in classic and contemporary sources as well as through experiential learning in which students are placed in internships at organizations and institutions that identify themselves as Jewish and as serving the Jewish community in the GTA. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre forlearning, institutSDG16
CJS401Y1Community & IdentityExploration of Jewish notions of community, identity, and humanity in classic and contemporary sources as well as through experiential learning in which students are placed in internships at organizations and institutions that identify themselves as Jewish and as serving the Jewish community in the GTA. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre forlearning, institutSDG4
CJS440H1The Arab Jew: A History of a ConceptThis course invites students to explore the debates around the term “Arab Jews.” A cultural, historical, and historiographical designation, the term encompasses a range of experiences for Arabic-speaking Jews. These Jews lived in diverse cultural worlds across the Middle East and North Africa, where they developed deep and enduring relationships with non-Jews, and were instrumental in shaping local, regional and national cultures and politics. By engaging with the term “Arab Jews” in its various incarnations, the course offers new perspectives on questions of Zionism and nationalism, colonialism and geography, religion and secularization, as well as historiography and memory.Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre fornationalismSDG16
CLA196H1AnimalsThis course offers a survey of some of ways in which animals enter into the texts produced by Greco-Roman antiquity. The deployment of animals is varied. But most discussions of animals - whether scientific, literary, allegorical or practical - tend to shed a great deal of light on the question of what the people who produced these accounts thought it meant to be human. Animals are simultaneously our doubles, neighbors, slaves, and tools. And even as strangers, they speak to our sense of self. We will also consider this ancient material in light of the way we talk about animals today. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofanimalSDG14, SDG15
CLA199H1Loss, Losing, LosersWe will explore the theme of loss in Greco-Roman antiquity. We will also consider this material in light of modern conceptions about the same theme. This course offers the other side of a more familiar coin, namely stories of success, triumph, power, strength, and celebration. We will investigate various major strands of loss. These tend to involve either personal loss or public loss, or perhaps both. Defeat in battle and loss of political office are examples of key areas where the public discourse of loss lingers. But the sack of a city meant the enslavement of the defeated and political failure can result in exile. The public stakes are also very personal. People can lose family members to war, disease or misfortune. What does one tell oneself or say to others at such a juncture? The lover can lose his or her beloved: again, what sorts of things get said at such moments? In short we will be examining moments where there is a potential crisis of identity whether civic or personal. What stories do they tell themselves about their own vulnerability, about their setbacks? What new aspects of the self emerge in the light of loss? Which old qualities are consolidated or reaffirmed? And how do these stories of loss relate to our own? Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofvulnerability, investSDG1
CLA199H1The “Decline and Fall” of the Roman EmpireAfter a high water mark of territorial reach and economic success in the middle of the 2nd century CE, the Roman Empire eventually disintegrated. How? Why? When? In this course, we will consider some of the historical features that may have contributed to its political collapse, and we will consider some modern scholarly analyses from Edward Gibbon (late 18th century) to the present. But we will also investigate “decline and fall” as a narrative trope. Why is this story arc always with us? Who decides what qualifies as “decline”? Is the “fall” of some systems necessarily a bad thing? Among the topics to be considered in the context of the Later Roman Empire are several of relevance in the modern world, not least: climate change, disease, human migration, religious difference, and economic inequality. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofwater, invest, inequality, equalit, climateSDG9, SDG10, SDG13
CLA215H1Classical WarfareAn introduction to the military history of ancient Greece and Rome from the 8th century BCE to the 7th century CE, with an emphasis on the political, social and economic implications of warfare and military institutions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofinstitutSDG16
CLA217H1Marginal Identities in the Ancient MediterraneanAn exploration of the groups and individuals who could be considered "marginal" in Greek and Roman antiquity. Includes discussion of ancient ideas about race, ethnicity, social status, economic class, gender, sexuality, and disability.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofdisabilit, genderSDG3, SDG5
CLA219H1Women in AntiquityA survey of the position of women in ancient Greece and Rome, with focus on women's sexuality and socialization; their economic, religious, and political roles; and their creative production in the arts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofwomen, productionSDG5
CLA233H5Introduction to Roman Culture & SocietyAn introduction to the cultural and social history of ancient Rome and those living in the Roman world. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, the Roman family, gender and sexuality, the Roman political system and the army, religion, Roman entertainments (the circus, gladiatorial games, the theatre), and Latin literature. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CLA237H5Introduction to Greek Culture & SocietyAn introduction to the society and culture of the ancient Greek world and those who were in contact with it. Topics may vary from year to year but include daily life and demography, social customs, gender and sexuality, literature, art, as well as religion and religious festivals (such as processions, theatrical performances and athletic competitions such as the Olympic Games). [24L,12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
CLA319H1Sexuality and Gender in Classical LiteratureDetailed study of the representation of sexuality and gender in Greek and/or Roman literary texts from one or more genres.Arts and Science, Faculty ofClassics (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
CLA319H5Women and Gender in AntiquityA study of gender in the ancient Mediterranean, with a focus on female and male sexuality and socialization; their economic, religious, and political roles; and aspects of daily life. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, women, femaleSDG5
CRI445H1International Criminal LawAn advanced seminar focusing on the legal and conceptual framework for responding to state violence and war crimes, and the challenges faced by various international legal institutions. Legal doctrines of sovereign immunity and universal jurisdiction, the history of international criminal prosecutions, and substantive international criminal law are examined.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCriminology and Sociolegal Studies (FAS), Centre forinstitut, violenceSDG16
CRI487H1Law, Space, and the CityAn introduction to interdisciplinary studies of law and space, this course covers a broad range of topics, from work on empire and colonialism by legal historians and indigenous scholars to studies of national spaces, urban spaces, and bodily spaces. Some background in either legal studies or cultural geography is desirable. Open to students in law, geography, anthropology, women/gender studies, and sociology, though permission of the instructor is required.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCriminology and Sociolegal Studies (FAS), Centre forgender, women, indigenous, urbanSDG5, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
CSB197H1Human VirusesThis course allows students to broaden their knowledge about the most important human viruses and prions. In essence, what viruses are, what they do, what are the diseases caused by viruses and how they are transmitted, etc., and what can be done about them (vaccines, antiviral treatments, etc.). Viruses cause many diseases ranging from a benign rash to severe hemorrhages and death. Each student will select a specific topic in Virology and write an essay and present a seminar for the rest of the class. Major "hot" problems in Virology from pandemics to controversial vaccines will also be discussed. Two tests covering all materials presented by all the students' seminars will be conducted. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCell and Systems Biology (FAS), Department ofvaccine, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4, SDG14, SDG15
CSB199H1Biotechnology and SocietyFrom the manipulation of genes of plants for improved food production through to human tissue engineering and stem cell research, biotechnology is increasingly playing a major role in our world. Society, however, is often challenged by the rapid advances in our knowledge in these areas, and how to best apply these technologies in a manner that is socially responsible and economically viable. In this seminar course, students will research and describe various applications of biotechnology using information obtained from reputable sources, and lead discussions on the benefits and concerns that arise from this research. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCell and Systems Biology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, productionSDG12, SDG2, SDG15
CSB202H1Further Exploration in BiotechnologyProvides non-science students with an additional opportunity to explore biotechnology and its applications in agriculture, the environment, and human health including: genetically modified organisms, drug discovery and aging. Most lectures are viewed online before class and students work in groups during class on problem sets and case studies designed to stimulate further learning, enhance evidence-based reasoning, and promote reflection on the role of biotechnology in society. This course does not count towards CSB programs. CSB201H1 is not a prerequisite for this course.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCell and Systems Biology (FAS), Department ofagricultur, learningSDG2, SDG4, SDG3, SDG13
CSB451H1Seminar in Plant Cell BiologyPlants represent roughly 80% of the biomass on our planet and are essential primary producers in our ecosystems. At the cellular level, plants display some fascinating differences from other eukaryotic cells, including fragmentation of the secretory pathway, dramatic changes to cytoskeleton organization, and other adaptations to life as a pressurized cell. This course will examine and discuss examples from the primary scientific literature that highlight these distinct features of plant cells by contrasting them to animal cells. We will also discuss how these discoveries can contribute to addressing global challenges, such as developing innovative biomaterials, enhancing food security and cultivating renewable biofuels.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCell and Systems Biology (FAS), Department offood security, renewabl, biofuel, planet, animal, ecosystemSDG2, SDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CSB459H1Plant Molecular Biology and BiotechnologyThis course introduces students to major features of gene expression and signal transduction in plants. Topics include strategies for generating transgenic plants and regulating gene expression, as well as the importance of signal transduction in plant growth and survival. How plants sense and respond at the molecular level to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and disease will be discussed. The application of this basic scientific information in biotechnological strategies for improving agronomic traits will also be addressed.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCell and Systems Biology (FAS), Department ofagro, drought, environmentalSDG2, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CSC199H1Intelligence, Artificial and HumanWhat is human intelligence? How close are we to replicating it? How productive/reductive is the brain-computer analogy? What ethical challenges are posed by AI on workers, society, and the environment? Can we put a hold on "progress"? Is Silicon Valley the seat of a new techno-religion? What can they teach us about today's research priorities? What insight (or inspiration) can we get from works of science fiction about the future of human-AI interaction? Through reading discussion, written assignment, and workshops, this seminar will present students with the opportunity to integrate their computer science interests with philosophy, history, and literature. There is an equivalent course offered by St. Michael’s College. Students may take one or the other but not both. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofComputer Science (FAS), Department ofworkerSDG8
CSC300H1Computers and SocietyThis course offers a concise introduction to ethics in computing, distilled from the ethical and social discussions carried on by today's academic and popular commentators. This course covers a wide range of topics within this area including the philosophical framework for analyzing computer ethics; the impact of computer technology on security, privacy and intellectual property, digital divide, and gender and racial discrimination; the ethical tensions with Artificial Intelligence around future of work and humanity, the emerging role of online social media over voice, inclusion, and democracy; and the environmental consequences of computing.Arts and Science, Faculty ofComputer Science (FAS), Department ofgender, environmental, democraSDG5, SDG13, SDG16, SDG12
CSC415H5Introduction to Reinforcement LearningReinforcement learning is a powerful paradigm for modeling autonomous and intelligent agents interacting with the environment, and it is relevant to an enormous range of tasks, including robotics, game playing, consumer modeling and healthcare. This course provides an introduction to reinforcement learning intelligence, which focuses on the study and design of agents that interact with a complex, uncertain world to achieve a goal. We will study agents that can make near-optimal decisions in a timely manner with incomplete information and limited computational resources. The course will cover Markov decision processes, reinforcement learning, planning, and function approximation (online supervised learning). The course will take an information-processing approach to the concept of mind and briefly touch on perspectives from psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy.University of Toronto MississaugaMathematical and Computational Sciences (UTM), Department ofhealthcare, learning, consumSDG3, SDG4, SDG12
CSCD03H3Social Impact of Information TechnologyThe trade-offs between benefits and risks to society of information systems, and related issues in ethics and public policy. Topics will include safety-critical software; invasion of privacy; computer-based crime; the social effects of an always-online life; and professional ethics in the software industry. There will be an emphasis on current events relating to these topics.University of Toronto ScarboroughComputer & Mathematical Sciences (UTSC), Department oftradeSDG10, SDG3, SDG12, SDG13
CSCD54H3Technology Innovation and EntrepreneurshipThis course examines high-Tech innovation and entrepreneurship, principles of operation of successful high-tech enterprises, customer identification and validation, product development, business models, lean startup techniques, and financing of high-technology ventures. Students will work in teams to develop their own innovative product idea, and will produce a sound business plan to support their product.University of Toronto ScarboroughComputer & Mathematical Sciences (UTSC), Department ofentrepreneurSDG8, SDG9
CSCD90H3The Startup SandboxIn this capstone course, students will work in teams to develop a viable product prototype following the methodologies and techniques covered in CSCD54H3. Students will produce written reports, short videos pitching their idea, and a final presentation showcasing their proposed innovation, as it would be pitched to potential investors. The course instructor and TAs will provide close supervision and mentorship throughout the project.University of Toronto ScarboroughComputer & Mathematical Sciences (UTSC), Department ofinvestSDG9
CSE240H1Introduction to Critical Equity and Solidarity StudiesAn interdisciplinary intersectional interrogation and examination of systemic inequity and social justice in local and global contexts. Provides a foundation for the field of critical equity and solidarity studies through a concentrated focus on theory and practice as it relates to major concepts, historical perspectives, key debates and radical grassroots community resistance to inequity. Introduces and foregrounds the concept of critical equity as both a theoretical framework and as a lived contestation of the structural nature and effects of systemic inequity. The concept of self-defense articulated historically by the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense among others is a key component.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLequity, equit, social justiceSDG10, SDG16, SDG5
CSE241Y1Introduction to Critical Disability StudiesDraws on an intersectional history and politics of normativity and bodily difference to understand disability as a diverse and materially salient social category that can be used as a lens to better understand systems and experiences of colonization, race, class, gender, age, etc. Explores scenes of disability or 'crip' solidarity, resistance and cultural production, disability D/deaf and mad arts, coalitional movements for disability justice, collective approaches to access and other non-normative ways of knowing and being.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, gender, productionSDG3, SDG5, SDG, SDG11, SDG16, SDG8, SDG10
CSE270H1Community (dis)Engagement and SolidarityAn introduction to issues and questions arising from the field of 'community engagement'. Explores the meaning, practices and implications of/for 'community' and 'community (dis)engagement' from multiple perspectives (e.g. the State and its agencies, institutional power, colonial discourse, communities of embodied difference, etc.) Takes a multi-media and arts-based approach to examining self-care from an anti-colonial perspective of central importance in the practice and pedagogy of critical equity and solidarity in the collective struggle for freedom and transformation.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpedagogy, equity, equit, institutSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CSE340H1Abolition in the Global Context: Theorizing Uprisings and Youth Activism against Policing and PrisonsConsiders the question: what does abolition mean in a global context? An analysis of how nation-states use prisons, (im)migrant detention centers, black sites, detention camps, military prisons, border checkpoints, refugee camps, walls, and concentration camps, to surveil, contain, and lock up disposable populations, and/or to suppress those that resist state violence. Explores these carceral spaces through a historical and political economic investigation of the processes that have produced these sites. Draws on anti-carceral perspectives on abolition and reform to examine uprisings and political activism, particularly youth activism, against prisons, policing, and forms of militarized, capitalist violence transnationally.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcapital, invest, refugee, violenceSDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG3, SDG5
CSE341H1Theorizing Settler Colonialism, Capitalism and RaceProvides students with a theoretical background for understanding settler colonialism, capitalist social relations and difference (including race, class, gender, disability and sexuality) and solidarity. Provides an analysis of state violence and the formation of hegemonic power relations. Introduces students to the method of thinking dialectically to examine the social world as a set of relations between multiple phenomena occurring at the same time. Articulates an emancipatory politics of knowledge production and strategies of building solidarities to enable the imagination of a different future.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, knowledge, settler, gender, capital, production, violenceSDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG9, SDG12, SDG16, SDG10, SDG14, SDG15
CSE342H1Theory and Praxis in Food SecurityExplores the concept of food security in the context of equity issues related to global food systems. Students participate in food-related field work activities outside of regular classroom time.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfood security, food system, equity, equitSDG2, SDG4, SDG, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CSE344H1Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and JusticeThrough lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, decolonial, gender, queerSDG3, SDG5, SDG10
CSE344Y1Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and JusticeThrough lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, decolonial, gender, queerSDG3, SDG5, SDG10
CSE345H1Equity and Activism in EducationExamines contemporary issues in education and schooling from a social justice and equity perspective. Engages with a variety of theoretical frameworks including anti-homophobia education, critical pedagogy, critical race theory, decolonizing knowledges, and intersectionality. Includes an overview of educational activist projects.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpedagogy, knowledge, knowledges, equity, equit, social justiceSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG5
CSE346H1Community Organizing and Global SolidarityConsiders, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the evolution of community organizations and non-profits in the context of neoliberalism, settler colonialism, and imperialism. Examines the inter-woven relations of political economy, local community development, marginalized communities in Canada, and emergent forms of global/local solidarity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, marginalizedSDG10, SDG5, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
CSE442H1Food Systems and the Politics of ResistanceExamines the food we eat in the local and global context of food systems, food sovereignty and food movements. Explores the possibilities for food as a catalyst for learning, resistance and social change. Enrolment is by application. Application forms are available on the CSES webpage prior to the start of course enrolment, and are accepted up to the end of the enrolment period, space permitting. Note: This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfood system, food sovereignty, learning, social change, sovereigntySDG2, SDG4, SDG16
CSE444H1Anti-Colonization and the Politics of ViolenceThis advanced seminar interrogates how the theorizations, embodied lived experiences and lived resistance to structural violence can create social, epistemological, ontological and political decolonizing/anti-colonial transformation. The work of Frantz Fanon, John Akomfrah, The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, Elaine Brown and Assata Shakur amongst others are utilized to search for alternative and oppositional ways to rethink and re-respond to violence. The seminar pursues a nuanced understanding of violence as it relates to de/anticolonization as a lived praxis of resistance and as a practice of self-defense that is grounded in the assertion that there can be no decolonization without anticolonization.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdecolonization, violenceSDG10, SDG16
CSE445H1Geographies of Military Occupation, (Un)Freedom and Transnational SolidarityExamines how some of the longest military occupations in history have produced forms of inequality, injustice, and violence that have given rise to mass resistance and global solidarity on an unprecedented scale. Through a comparison of cases such as Palestine/Israel and Kashmir analyzes concepts such as imperialism, settler colonialism, militarism, occupation, nationalism, indigeneity, demography, sovereignty, collective memory, resistance, liberation and transnational solidarity. Draws on memoirs, oral histories, films, poetry, music, and literature to understand the historical and political economic foundations that have produced these occupations and the forms of resistance and liberation struggles that have shaped international solidarity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, inequality, equalit, injustice, nationalism, sovereignty, violenceSDG10, SDG16
CSE445H1Rethinking Palestine: Colonialism, Revolution and Transnational SolidarityAims at decolonizing the study of Palestine by providing an overview of Palestine’s modern history that is grounded in critical perspectives that challenge dominant scholarly paradigms about Palestine. Provides specific theoretical approaches in the study of Palestinian history, culture and politics through such concepts as settler colonialism, occupation, revolution, nationalism, indigeneity, racial capitalism, imperialism, sovereignty, collective memory, resistance, liberation and transnational solidarity. Engages with memoirs, oral histories, archival documents, films, poetry, music and literature to understand the historical, political-economic and juridical foundations that have produced a century of oppression, violence, resistance and solidarity within, across and beyond Palestine.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, capital, nationalism, sovereignty, violenceSDG4, SDG9, SDG16
CSE449H1Contemporary Theories in Critical Disability StudiesExplores competing conceptions, definitions and practices of disability through a range of critical disability theories, including crip-of-colour critique, decolonial theories of disability studies and black feminist disability frameworks. Enacts disability studies as a justice-oriented methodology or practice that has value for understanding and responding to colonial systems of race, class, gender and disability. Interrogates the shape and limits of disability and disability studies to ask the provocative question: what can disability studies do?Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, decolonial, gender, feminisSDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG10
CSE469Y1Decolonizing Research Methodologies for New ResearchersA feminist/anti-racist/anti-colonial/anti-imperialist exploration of research methods. Examines the work of researchers and scholar-activists who seek to humanize research with communities detrimentally impacted by colonial, imperialist, heteropatriarchal research agendas and processes. Supports students' independent research projects through guidance from the course instructor. Prepares students for graduate studies or research-oriented careers. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfeminis, anti-racistSDG5, SDG10, SDG4, SDG16
CTLB03H3Introduction to Community Engaged LearningIn this experiential learning course, students apply their discipline-specific academic knowledge as they learn from and engage with communities. Students provide, and gain, unique perspectives and insights as they interact with community partners. Through class discussions, workshops and assignments, students also develop transferable life skills such as interpersonal communication, professionalism and self-reflection that support their learning experiences and help them connect theory and practice.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLknowledge, learningSDG4, SDG10, SDG11, SDG16
DHU435H1The Internet ArchiveDigital environments change how knowledge is created, communicated, and used. Using the Internet Archive as case study, this course examines the significance of such changes from a variety of perspectives: knowledge representation; technical infrastructure; gender, class, and race issues; disability rights; intellectual property questions; and algorithmic and interpretive scholarly approaches.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, knowledge, gender, infrastructure, internetSDG4, SDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
DRE405H5Topics in Indigenous PerformanceThis senior research and creation seminar will explore topics in contemporary Indigenous performance. These topics will vary with faculty research interests; course may cover such matters as intergenerational cross-cultural collaboration, Anishinaabe star and land knowledge, working with culturally-codified objects, contextualizing projects in non-institutional spaces, international inter-indigenous productions, community outreach, and Indigenous feminisms and futurisms. The course may include a practical workshop component or a capstone research or performance project. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama (UTM), Department ofknowledge, feminis, labor, indigenous, production, land, institutSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12, SDG15
DRM360H1Race, Gender and PerformanceThis course will enable students to look at performance in generative new ways by introducing them to theoretical frameworks and critical perspectives from postcolonial theory and queer theory, critical race studies and gender studies. As well as learning to apply these critical tools to works that they are already familiar with, students will be introduced to work in feminist, queer, and anti-racist performance from outside the mainstream.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDrama, Theatre and Performance Studies (FAS), Centre forlearning, gender, queer, feminis, anti-racistSDG5, SDG10
DRM363H1Story-ing the Possible: Talking Treaties, Rehearsing (Re) conciliationThis half course offers a comprehensive examination of Indigenous history in the territories (now called Canada), Treaty Relationships, and Indigenous-Settler Relationships, as they have shifted and evolved since first contact. Students will enter into conversation with this history and the contemporary issues confronting all Canadians today through the writings of Indigenous playwrights, oral history keepers, academic historians, and Indigenous theorists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDrama, Theatre and Performance Studies (FAS), Centre forsettler, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
DTS199H1The Bible and MigrationFrom the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden to the border-crossings in the book of Ruth and the journey of Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem, the Bible speaks powerfully and in many voices about the experience of displacement and migration. These stories continue to play a complex and important role in modern literature and contemporary debates about migration and migrants. Our course will explore biblical narratives and laws about sojourners, strangers, foreigners, refugees and migrants, follow the paths of these travelers into later religious and political discourse, and attend to the reverberations of these journeys in contemporary art, literature and political discourse. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDiaspora & Transnational Studies (FAS), Centre forrefugeeSDG10, SDG11
DTS200Y1Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies IWhat is the relationship between place and belonging, between territory and memory? How have the experiences of migration and dislocation challenged the modern assumption that the nation-state should be the limit of identification? What effect has the emergence of new media of communication had upon the coherence of cultural and political boundaries? All of these questions and many more form part of the subject matter of Diaspora and Transnational Studies. This introductory course ex-amines the historical and contemporary movements of peoples and the complex issues of identity and experience to which these processes give rise as well as the creative possibilities that flow from movement and being moved. The area of study is comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing from the social sciences, history, the arts and humanities. Accordingly, this course provides the background to the subject area from diverse perspectives and introduces students to a range of key debates in the field, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDiaspora & Transnational Studies (FAS), Centre forglobaliz, productionSDG12, SDG3, SDG5, SDG15, SDG16, SDG10
DTS314H1Citizenship and MulticulturalismThis course examines approaches to belonging and distinction that accompany different models of citizenship. What are some historical and recent trends in the intersections of place, custom, and rights? How have governments related social diversity to social justice in theory and in practice? Areas of emphasis will vary, but may include topics such as authenticity and assimilation; ethno-nationalism; immigration and naturalization policy; indigeneity; insurgency; legacies of colonialism; mass media and popular culture; policing and surveillance; racial stratification; transnational markets; and xenophobia.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDiaspora & Transnational Studies (FAS), Centre forcitizenship, social justice, nationalismSDG4, SDG16, SDG5, SDG10
DTS410H1Diasporic FoodwaysFood links people across space and time. As it spirals outward from parochial sites of origin to articulate with new sites, actors and scales, it assumes new substance and meaning in new locales. This movement of food gives rise to new ‘foodways’ to help us to understand the past in terms of temporally connected sites of intense interaction. Food also plays a strong role in shaping translocal identities. As peoples have moved in the world, food has played a central role in (re)defining who they are, reproducing myth and ritual, and bounding diasporic communities. This course seeks to address questions surrounding the dynamics of the food ‘we’ eat, the ways in which ‘we’ eat, the meaning ‘we’ give to eating, and the effect of eating in a transnational world. Recognizing that culinary culture is central to diasporic identifications, the focus is on the place of food in the enduring habits, rituals, and everyday practices that are collectively used to produce and sustain a shared sense of diasporic cultural identity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDiaspora & Transnational Studies (FAS), Centre forculinarySDG2, SDG12, SDG15
DTS413H1Global SexualitiesSexuality is a complex interplay of desires, attractions, interests, and modes of behavior and has diverse meanings in different societies and cultures. In this course, we will examine the notion of sexuality as well as gender identity and expression from an interdisciplinary perspective that is rooted in ethnography. A cross-cultural study of sexuality and gender identity within global and transnational contexts will provide students with an understanding of how the intersections of culture, community, as well as social and political factors affect individuals’ sexual choices and understandings of gender. A particular focus in this course will be experiences of sexuality and gender within diasporic communities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofDiaspora & Transnational Studies (FAS), Centre forgenderSDG5, SDG10
EAS195H1Shan Shui Landscape: A Cultural Historical StudyThis course looks into the history of cultural production of Chinese Shan Shui (lit., mountain and water) landscape representations from an environmental humanities perspective. As an artistic motif, Shan Shui travels between past and present and across various mediums as well as literary and artistic genres. What exactly are we invited to see and contemplate on in the Shan Shui? Are Shan Shui works about “nature,” spirit, Qi, or the human world? The course seeks to inquire into these and other questions through examining the concepts, arts, and transformations of selected Shan Shui works in imperial and contemporary China. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofwater, production, environmental, landSDG6, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
EAS247H1History of Capitalism in Modern JapanThis course provides a historical narrative of the development of the capitalist mode of production in Japan, from the mid-19th century to the present day. Readings include texts from various disciplines: economics, philosophy, social and labour history, and literature.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department oflabour, capital, productionSDG8, SDG9, SDG12, SDG16
EAS273H1Modern Chinese CitiesThis course offers a critical review of the history and historiography of modern Chinese cities. Focusing on the development of specific Chinese cities, the course emphasizes understanding the socio-cultural production of space as well as analytical reading of landscape, urban imagery, and urban writings.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofcities, urban, production, landSDG11, SDG12, SDG15, SDG9
EAS279H1East Asian EcocinemaThe course examines the ethical, political, historic and aesthetic dimensions of Asian Ecocinema (environmental films that engage with the Asia-based global environmental crisis) and discusses the films’ ways of connecting place and planet.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofenvironmental, planetSDG13, SDG10
EAS289H1Environment and East AsiaThis course introduces environmental issues that are important to East Asia. Or better put, it examines the role East Asia plays in the global environmental crisis. We engage both the factual and humanities' dimensions of Climate Change, biodiversity loss, and other urgent environmental crises.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofclimate, environmental, biodiversSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG9, SDG11, SDG12
EAS324H1The Asia-Pacific in the Nuclear AgeFrom the events such as the world’s first use of the atoms for war, the Cold War nuclear arms race, the “Atoms for Peace” campaign, the worst nuclear accident in history, to the unfolding threat of nuclear proliferation, the twentieth century Asia-Pacific region has been profoundly shaped by the nuclear age. The course introduces the diverse cultural knowledge and social thoughts that have developed distinctly in the Asia- Pacific in response to the nuclear-related affairs. They include, for instance, the ideas and practices concerning the environment, the human, peace, visibility, security, coloniality, sustainability, etc.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofknowledge, peaceSDG16, SDG14, SDG15
EAS402H1Modern Standard Chinese IVbAn advanced Chinese language course which explores major concerns in contemporary China, including mass consumption, Western influences and technological innovation. Students will improve their reading comprehension, strengthen their writing skills and, importantly, advance their speaking and listening abilities through debate exercises. Students who do not meet the prerequisite must go through placement process conducted by the Department. See https://www.eas.utoronto.ca/languages/enrolment-instructions/chinese for details.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEast Asian Studies (FAS), Department ofconsumSDG12
ECE488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.) *Complementary Studies ElectiveApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofElectrical & Computer Engineering (FASE), Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department ofemployment, entrepreneur, taxationSDG8, SDG10
HLTB11H3Basic Human NutritionAn introductory course to provide the fundamentals of human nutrition to enable students to understand and think critically about the complex interrelationships between food, nutrition, health and environment.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLnutritionSDG2, SDG13
HLTB16H3Introduction to Public HealthThis course will present a brief history about the origins and development of the public health system and its role in health prevention. Using a case study approach, the course will focus on core functions, public health practices, and the relationship of public health with the overall health system.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLpublic healthSDG3
HLTB30H3Current Issues in HealthAn interdisciplinary consideration of current and pressing issues in health, including health crises, care, education, policy, research, and knowledge mobilization and translation. The course will focus on emerging questions and research, with attention to local and global experts from a range of disciplines and sectors.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLknowledgeSDG3
HMU303H1Music of the World's Indigenous PeoplesAn investigation of the topic of indigeneity through listening to and discussing traditional and popular musics of Indigenous people from around the world. Students consider music in traditional contexts, paying attention to local theories of sound, and study music by Indigenous artists vis-a-vis contemporary local and global politics and media.Music, Faculty ofNULLinvest, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
HMU307H1Music, Sound, and the EroticThis seminar surveys musical and sonic genres intended or perceived to be erotic. Students read foundational literature in the study of performance, gender and sexuality, the senses, and sound. Students analyze erotic genres across historical periods and generic categories, including Goa trance, early modern Italian song, Sumatran saluang, African American soul, ASMR, sound baths, and audio pornography.Music, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5
HMU329H1Women in OperaThis course examines various roles of women in opera from Monteverdi to Berg. Topics including the power of the female voice, constructions of gender and identity, the diva or 'star singer' and images of women in society will be explored through DVD excerpts, source documents and selected readings.Music, Faculty ofNULLgender, women, femaleSDG5
KPE472H1Lifestyle Toxicity and Chronic DiseaseThe top two causes of death and chronic disease burden in Canada are cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although commonly thought of as two separate disease entities, an emerging paradigm recognizes that cancer and cardiovascular disease possess various similarities and possible interactions. The two diseases share common biological mechanisms and risk factors including inflammation, oxidative stress, obesity and smoking. Further, poor lifestyle behaviors (or lifestyle toxicity) increase the risk of development of both conditions, in addition to most other chronic diseases, and negatively affect prognosis after diagnosis. This course will discuss the intersectionality among chronic diseases in the role of lifestyle toxicity in development and prognosis as well as the role of healthy lifestyle behaviours in prevention and treatment. The primary focus will be on cardiovascular disease and cancer, but students will have opportunities to complete individual assignments on other chronic diseases. An important secondary learning outcome is the development of scientific skills including scientific presentation and discussion, giving and receiving peer-based feedback.Kinesiology and Physical Education, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG3
LAS302H1Topics in Latin American StudiesThe goal of this course is to critically explore debates and perspectives on development and on the politics of inequality in Latin American contexts. Topics of the course may vary, depending on the needs of the program and the interests of students and instructors.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
LAS320H1Latin American ThoughtThis seminar-style course explores critical thinking about culture, history, politics, and society by some of the most influential Latin American intellectuals of the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis on theoretical contributions, in English translation, of Latin American thinkers such as Rodó, Vasconcelos, Mariategui, Zea, Dussel, García Canclini, Cornejo Polar, Quijano and Lugones. Topics covered include questing identities, cultural diversity, indigenism, liberation theology, colonialism, neocolonialism, postcolonialism, coloniality, and decoloniality. Readings and seminar discussions in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofdecolonialSDG10, SDG16
LAS350H1Indigenous Realities in Latin AmericaThis course studies the past and present realities of the diverse indigenous societies of the regions we now call Latin America. Eurocentric texts such as the chronicles of the conquest of Mexico, are critically contrasted with diverse indigenous peoples’ self-representing narratives that respond to more than five hundred years of Spanish and Portuguese occupation of their lands. These texts include Nahuatl poetry and accounts of the conquest of Mexico, literary creations from multiple Maya linguistic groups, multi-lingual chronicles from the colonial Inca period, diverse indigenous political manifestos and movements, indigenous testimonios, and decolonizing indigenous literature and criticism. Taught in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofindigenous, landSDG10, SDG16
LAS370H1Critical Perspectives of Development in Latin American ContextsA seminar-style course that engages in critical analysis of local and global development initiatives in a Latin American context. The seminar is organized around the interrelated themes of health, economics, education, globalization, and infrastructure. Topics of discussion may include: challenges and ethics of sustainable development initiatives in theory and practice, medical missions and global health, community-based transnational public health projects, developing localities and sustainable economics, local infrastructure development and environmental impacts, ethics and implications of volunteerism, local and global cultural perspectives, the colonial legacies of inequality, dependency and sustainability of development projects. Readings and lectures in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofpublic health, global health, sustainable development, infrastructure, globaliz, inequality, equalit, environmentalSDG3, SDG8, SDG11, SDG9, SDG10, SDG13, SDG4
LAS401H1Latinos in CanadaA historical survey of migration from Latin American countries to Canada, this course examines mediation strategies of Latinos as they adjust to a new home: negotiation of national identities, political participation, entrepreneurship, cultural representations, and charitable work. Students engage in service with organization working with/in LatAm communities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofentrepreneurSDG8, SDG16
LCT205H1Empires IIThis course examines the literary and non-literary representations that accompany imperial conquests and hegemony from the emergence of the modern nation-state through more recent developments in globalization. We compare the establishment, interpretation and reinvention of cultural forms of empire (e.g. British, Japanese, Spanish) at local, national, transnational and global levels.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLglobalizSDG9
LCT305H1Institutions and PowerThis course will consider some of the ideologies and practices of various institutions at work in the production and transmission of cultural objects and social power. These may include the family, museum, hospital, prison, university, library, and theatre, as well as fields such as publishing and religion.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLproduction, institutSDG16
LCT308H1IdentitiesThough “identity” might suggest sameness, it is historically unstable and has many components, including ability/disability, age, class, ethnicity, gender, health/illness, ‘race,’ sexuality, and religion. This course considers the complexities of identity-formation and identity-transformation as captured in literary texts and cultural artefacts over a wide range of historical and cultural contexts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdisabilit, illness, genderSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
LIN192H1Sustaining Indigenous LanguagesThere has been much publicity in recent years about language shift and language loss and, along with it, language revitalization. In this course we examine shift involving Indigenous languages – and particularly those of Canada – from a variety of perspectives, and looking at reasons why one might want to 'save' a language. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofindigenousSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
LIN197H1Language and Social JusticeThis course explores how language is used to construct and reinforce unjust social structures. Topics may include: the underlying sexism, classism, racism, and ableism of prestige dialects and prescriptive language education; the history and consequences of national language movements; language endangerment, documentation, and revival; sign languages and language rights for the deaf and hard-of-hearing; popular media representations of linguistic variation, especially vocal fry, uptalk, and regional accents; and the relationships between language and sex, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will develop research, analytic, and writing skills through critique and discussion of assigned texts, independent research projects, and regular written and oral presentation of their work. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofracism, gender, social justiceSDG4, SDG5, SDG16, SDG11
LIN202H1Introduction to Indigenous Languages of the AmericasThis is an introduction to Indigenous languages and cultures of Central, North, and South America. Students will be exposed to discussions about what is an indigenous language, social status of indigenous languages as well as indigenous movements towards language documentation and revitalization and language education in the Americas.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofindigenousSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
LIN251H1Introduction to SociolinguisticsHow does linguistic variation construct identity? Introduction to recent sociolinguistic literature on language contact, multilingualism, code-switching, expressions of ethnic solidarity and regional identity, sex and gender differentiation, dialect geography, sociophonetics, perceptual dialectology, diffusion of norms in mobile populations, documentation of variation in lesser studied languages, and changes across the life-span.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
LIN279Y5A Language UnlockedIntroduction to the fundamentals of grammar and usage in context of an understudied language. The language offered will vary from year-to-year, and may include American Sign Language, an Indigenous language of Canada, or an extinct or endangered language. This course can be used to count toward the Major Program’s Language Requirement. [24L, 12P]University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofindigenousSDG16, SDG11
LIN302H1South American Indigenous LanguagesThis course is an overview of linguistic diversity in South America, centred on Brazilian indigenous languages and peoples. Students will be introduced to current practices in the maintenance and revitalization of Brazilian indigenous languages and current strategies for empowering indigenous peoples (such as training indigenous filmmakers and music production). We will study aspects of the grammar of Brazilian languages through the analysis of small data sets, and we will discuss the influence of Brazilian indigenous languages on Brazilian Portuguese. Not offered every year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofindigenous, productionSDG10, SDG16, SDG, SDG11
LIN303H1Central American Indigenous LanguagesThis course is about indigenous languages of Central America, focusing on Mayan languages and culture. Students will be introduced to current movements in the maintenance and revitalization of indigenous languages and current strategies for empowering indigenous people (such as training indigenous linguists, music production in indigenous languages, and intercultural bilingual education). Students will also study grammatical features of indigenous languages through the analysis of small data sets, and discuss the contact between indigenous languages and Spanish. Not offered every year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofindigenous, productionSDG10, SDG16, SDG, SDG11
LIN458H1Revitalizing LanguagesA study of language endangerment and language revitalization efforts, focusing on Indigenous languages of Canada. Topics include language classification and a survey of major features of the languages, what it means for a language to be endangered, the factors that contribute to language shift, and efforts to reverse language shift, including discussion of literacy, documentary linguistics and dictionaries.Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofindigenousSDG16, SDG11
LINB20H3SociolinguisticsThe study of the relationship between language and society. Topics include: how language reflects and constructs aspects of social identity such as age, gender, socioeconomic class and ethnicity; ways in which social context affects speakers' use of language; and social factors which cause the spread or death of languages.University of Toronto ScarboroughLanguage Studies (UTSC), Department ofsocioeconomic, genderSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
LINC28H3Language and GenderAn introduction to the research on differences between women and men in how they use language and how they behave in conversational interaction, together with an examination of the role of language in reflecting and perpetuating cultural attitudes towards gender. Same as WSTC28H3University of Toronto ScarboroughLanguage Studies (UTSC), Department ofgender, womenSDG5
MAT192H1Liberating MathematicsCurrently, mathematics is at a crossroads between tradition and progress. Progress has been led in large part by women mathematicians, in particular Black women, Indigenous women, and women from visible minorities. Intertwined in their studies of mathematics is a daring critique of traditional mathematics, re-imagining of mathematics culture, and more. This course will compare and contrast new forms of accessible mathematics with standard sources that draw dominantly on the experiences and narratives of men. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofMathematics (FAS), Department ofwomen, minorit, indigenous, gini, accessibSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
MAT193H1Women’s MathematicsMathematics has been shaped in significant ways by the work of outstanding female mathematicians such as Hypatia, Emmy Noether, Sofia Kovalevskaya, and Maryam Mirzakhani. Despite these successes, women still experience barriers to entering the field and participating at the highest levels. This course will blend an exploration of mathematics created by women with a study of the issue of women in mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to examine the complex factors that impact women’s participation in STEM, learn about the lives of female mathematicians, create their own mathematics, and sharpen their spatial cognition and logical thinking skills. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofMathematics (FAS), Department ofwomen, femaleSDG5
MCS327H1Digital Material CultureThis course explores the materiality of digital objects, from image and music files to digital documents to video games and other software, and considers their status as material culture. It involves the primary study of digital objects and also considers the technological infrastructures, cultural contexts, and signifying systems in which they are produced, circulated, and interpreted.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinfrastructureSDG9
MGEC65H3Economics of the Environment and Climate ChangeThis course provides an Economic framework to understand issues around the environment and climate change. The economic toolkit to understand these issues includes externalities, tradeoffs, cost-benefit analysis, marginal analysis, and dynamic accounting. The course will cover optimal policy approaches to pollution, carbon emissions, and resource extraction. These include carbon taxes, subsidies, cap-and-trade systems, bans, and quotas. Both theoretical and empirical approaches in Economics will be discussed.University of Toronto ScarboroughManagement (UTSC), Department ofpollution, emission, trade, carbon tax, climate, emissions, pollutSDG3, SDG7, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13, SDG, SDG15, SDG8
MGM465H5Occupational Health & SafetyAs individuals spend more and more time at work, it becomes increasingly important for organizations to protect their employees from harm and to support their physical, psychological, emotional, and social welfare. Students in this course will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to design and foster healthy and safe working environments. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaManagement (UTM), Department ofwelfare, knowledgeSDG1, SDG8
MGSB22H3EntrepreneurshipThis course focuses on the skills required and issues such as personal, financial, sales, operational, and personnel, which entrepreneurs face as they launch and then manage their early-stage ventures. Particular focus is placed on developing the analytical skills necessary to assess opportunities, and applying the appropriate strategies and resources in support of an effective business launch. This course includes work-integrated-learning components, and satisfies the WIL requirement of the BBA degree.University of Toronto ScarboroughManagement (UTSC), Department oflearning, entrepreneurSDG8
MIE221H1Manufacturing EngineeringProduction Fundamentals: Metal casting; metal forming - rolling, forging, extrusion and drawing, and sheet-metal forming; plastic/ceramic/glass forming; metal removal - turning, drilling/ boring/reaming, milling, and grinding; non-traditional machining - ECM, EDM and laser cutting; welding; surface treatment; metrology. Environmental issues in manufacturing processes, recycling of materials. Automation Fundamentals: Automation in material processing and handling - NC, robotics and automatically-guided vehicles; flexible manufacturing - group technology, cellular manufacturing and FMS; and computer-aided design - geometric modelling, computer graphics, concurrent engineering and rapid prototyping. Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofmetro, production, recycl, environmentalSDG, SDG12, SDG13
MIE258H1Engineering Economics and AccountingEngineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems. Financial analysis topics include: financial statements, depreciation, income tax, and basic accounting techniques. Project analysis topics includes: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, defining alternatives, analysis of independent projects, acceptance criteria, buy or lease, make or buy, replacement analysis, economic analysis in the public sector, project risk and uncertainty. Inflation concepts.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofincomeSDG, SDG8
MIE263H1Operations Research II: Stochastic ORModeling and analysis of systems subject to uncertainty using probabilistic methods. Introduction to decision analysis. Derivation and application of Bernoulli and Poisson processes, Markov chains, and queuing models. Stochastic optimization and extensions. Applications to engineering, games of chance, health care, and management.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofhealth careSDG3
MIE303H1Mechanical and Thermal Energy Conversion ProcessesEngineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework; Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Fossil fuel combustion, Alternative fuel combustions, fusion processes and introduction to advanced systems of fuel cells.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofenergy, environmental, fossil fuelSDG7, SDG13
MIE311H1Thermal Energy ConversionEngineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework. Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Refrigeration, psychrometry and air conditioning. Fossil fuel combustion and advanced systems includes fuel cells.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, environmental, fossil fuelSDG7, SDG13
MIE315H1Design for the EnvironmentLife Cycle Assessment for the measurement of environmental impacts of existing products and processes. Design for Environment principles for the reduction of environmental impacts in new product and process designs. Functional, economic, and societal analysis taught for use in a major team-written project to compare and contrast two product or process alternatives for a client. Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13, SDG8
MIE354H1Business Process EngineeringThis course focuses on understanding multiple perspectives for grouping, assessing, designing and implementing appropriately integrated and distributed information systems to support enterprise objectives. The emphasis is on understanding how Business Process Management techniques and tools can contribute to align an organization's business and information technology perspectives, as well as the characteristics of application and system types and the implications for their design, operation and support of information needs, including those associated with different platforms and technology infrastructure e.g., legacy systems, client/server, the Internet and World Wide Web including the emergence of a web-service-based service oriented architecture. Students will work in the laboratory to develop business processes that can be specified and executed by information systems supporting BPEL, a widely supported standard for describing web-service-based business process.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department oflabor, infrastructure, internetSDG9
MIE363H1Operations and Supply Chain ManagementThis course focuses on features of production/service systems and methods of modelling their operation; the material flow, information flow and control systems. Topics include demand forecasting, inventory management, supply chain management, capacity planning, and lot size planning. Emphasis will be placed on the modelling aspects of operations management, as well as the application of analytical methods in the design of production/service systems. Students will be asked to address open-ended design problems in various activities of the course.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofproduction, supply chainSDG12
MIE368H1Analytics in ActionThis course showcases the impact of analytics focusing on real world examples and case studies. Particular focus on decision analytics, where data and models are combined to ultimately improve decision-making. Methods include: linear and logistic regression, classification and regression trees, clustering, linear and integer optimization. Application areas include: healthcare, business, sports, manufacturing, finance, transportation, public sector.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofhealthcareSDG3, SDG8, SDG11
MIE375H1Financial EngineeringThis course provides a background in the fundamental areas in financial engineering including relevant concepts from financial economics. Major topics include interest rate theory, fixed income securities, bond portfolio construction term structure of interest rates, mean-variance optimization theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), arbitrage pricing theory (APT), forwards and futures, and introduction to option pricing and structured finance.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofcapital, incomeSDG8
MIE377H1Financial Optimization ModelsThis course deals with the formulation of optimization models for the design and selection of an optimal investment portfolio. Topics include Risk Management, Mean Variance Analysis, Models for Fixed Income, Scenario Optimization, Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Stochastic Programming, Index Funds, Designing Financial Products, and Scenario Generation. These concepts are also applied to International Asset Allocation, Corporate Bond Portfolios and Insurance Policies with Guarantees.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofinvest, incomeSDG10, SDG8
MIE440H1* Design of Innovative ProductsRecently developed methods applied at different stages of the design process include: Identification of unmet/underserved user needs through a modified definition of lead users (those who experience needs in advance of the mainstream population) including identifying/studying lead users, identifying which lead-user needs are relevant to the general population; Roles of function and affordance in successful products; Obstacles of fixation and cognitive bias to creativity; Concept generation methods including TRIZ/TIPS (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, use of unrelated stimuli and analogy (e.g., from biology); Configuration design methods including design for transformation, design for assembly and end-of-life, e.g., reuse, repair and recycling. Hands-on experience of these topics in lectures, tutorials, and labs support successful application of the methods for the course project, as well as future design activities.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofABS, underserved, recycl, reuseSDG10, SDG12
MIE459H1Organization DesignStudy of work systems design in new and existing organizations. Consideration will be given to sociotechnical systems design methodology, division of labour, change management, teams, incentives, project management, safety culture, automation, equity and union-management relations.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofequity, labour, equitSDG8, SDG10
MIE465H1Analytics in ActionThis course showcases the impact of analytics focusing on real world examples and case studies. Particular focus on decision analytics, where data and models are combined to ultimately improve decision-making. Methods include: linear and logistic regression, classification and regression trees, clustering, linear and integer optimization. Application areas include: healthcare, business, sports, manufacturing, finance, transportation, public sector.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofhealthcareSDG3, SDG11
MIE469H1Reliability and Maintainability EngineeringAn introduction to the life-cycle costing concept for equipment acquisition, operation, and replacement decision-making. Designing for reliability and determination of optimal maintenance and replacement policies for both capital equipment and components. Topics include: identification of an items failure distribution and reliability function, reliability of series, parallel, and redundant systems design configurations, time-to-repair and maintainability function, age and block replacement policies for components, the economic life model for capital equipment, provisioning of spare parts.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofcapitalSDG9
MIE488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MSE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.) *Complementary Studies ElectiveApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofemployment, entrepreneur, taxationSDG8
MIE491Y1Capstone DesignAn experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby students teams meet specific client needs or the requirements of a recognized design competition through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process. The project must include:The application of disciplinary knowledge and skills to conduct engineering analysis and design,The demonstration of engineering judgement in integrating economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent interdisciplinary factors,Elements of teamwork, project management and client interaction, andA demonstration of proof of the design concept.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofknowledge, environmentalSDG13, SDG8
MIE561H1Healthcare SystemsMIE 561 is a "cap-stone" course. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to integrate the Industrial Engineering tools learned in previous courses by applying them to real world problems. While the specific focus of the case studies used to illustrate the application of Industrial Engineering will be the Canadian health care system, the approach to problem solving adopted in this course will be applicable to any setting. This course will provide a framework for identifying and resolving problems in a complex, unstructured decision-making environment. It will give students the opportunity to apply a problem identification framework through real world case studies. The case studies will involve people from the health care industry bringing current practical problems to the class. Students work in small groups preparing a feasibility study discussing potential approaches. Although the course is directed at Industrial Engineering fourth year and graduate students, it does not assume specific previous knowledge, and the course is open to students in other disciplines.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofhealth care, healthcare, knowledgeSDG3
MIN120H1Insight into Mineral EngineeringA comprehensive introduction into the global minerals industry using international regulatory requirements as a thematic structure. Engineering applications together with current and emerging issues are emphasized throughout. Principal topics include: mineral resources in the economy; land and mineral ownership; legal and environmental issues; mineral exploration; surface and sub‑surface mine development and management; fundamentals of mineral processing; mineral industry finance. Graphics communication skills are developed in the associated laboratory sessions, and a visit to an operating mine is used to place the course material in context.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflabor, environmental, landSDG8, SDG13
MIN225H1Introduction to the Resource IndustriesThis course introduces the global resource industries in three parts. In Module 1, students learn about mineral resources in the economy, the origin of ore deposits, mineral exploration and processing techniques, land ownership and environmental issues. Engineering applications are emphasized. Exploration and development topics are investigated. Module 2 presents an introduction to modern mining engineering. The basics of both surface (open pit) and sub-surface mining is covered. Module 3 presents an introduction on the processing of mineral resources into metals. The course helps to develop communication skills through student presentations on current issues in the industry and through training in technical communications by faculty from the Engineering Communications Program. Training for AutoCad and an extensive communications module are provided in the laboratory section. Students will participate in a field trip to an operating mine. *Only students enrolled in the Lassonde Mineral Engineering program are eligible to participate in the 2nd year field trip.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflabor, invest, environmental, landSDG8, SDG13
MIN250H1Surface MiningOperational aspects of open pit mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: open pit design and pit optimization; long term and short term planning considerations; materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; industrial minerals production; mine safety and mine regulations; mining and the environment; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwater, production, wasteSDG12
MIN330H1Mining Environmental ManagementThis course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofsustainable development, environmentalSDG8, SDG11, SDG13
MIN351H1Underground MiningOperational aspects of underground mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: underground mining methods for hard and soft rock; shaft sinking, hoisting and materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; mine safety and mine regulations; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofproductionSDG, SDG8
MIN430H1Mining Environmental ManagementThis course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofsustainable development, environmentalSDG8, SDG11, SDG13
MIN450H1Mineral EconomicsCourse covers the evaluation of mineral projects, mining operations, and mining companies. Topics will include: discounted cash flow techniques including net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), net asset value (NAV); feasibility studies and due diligence reports; reserves and resources, data sources; metal prices and markets; cash flow modeling including revenue calculations, capital and operating costs, taxes, depreciation, inflation; risk and risk assessment, discount rates, red flags, checklists; financing. Guest lectures will provide industry insights into financing, fund raising, consulting, project control, and evaluation. There are two assignments: review of an annual report; due diligence report and net asset value calculation.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofcapitalSDG8
MIN466H1Mineral Project Design IMineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. The course will culminate in the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. In the first half of the course (F) students perform individual detailed case history analyses. Additional instruction in technical aspects of communication is provided during both semesters (preparing and writing technical reports, industry research and analysis, presentation skills, as well as other technical elements as required). These skills will form a foundation for students to use in industry. Critical non-technical aspects of rock engineering projects will also be examined, and guest speakers will present on specialized topics such as: cultural and social effects of rock engineering projects on communities and the environment; economic planning and impact; ethical considerations; aboriginal land claims, etc.. The social license to operate will be emphasized. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence. (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department oflandSDG8, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
MIN467H1Mineral Project Design IIMineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. Part II (S) focuses on the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. Students will be grouped into teams and provided with one or more data sets and a design problem to solve. The end product is a major engineering design report and oral presentation (including several interim reports and presentations). Technical aspects will serve to examine a "cradle to grave" view of a project, from initial planning through to final closure and site remediation. The course will include an intensive two-day Professional Supervisors Short Course. Topics include: Discovering a commonality among supervisors and their key role in maintaining standards. The importance of sharing information and expectations about costs, production goals and business objectives are explored in the context of motivation. The necessity of successful communication skills and techniques are discussed and demonstrated to achieve behaviours on the job, producing consistent results. A reliable methodology for handling difficult situations is provided. The fundamental rationale for safety and loss control is presented as well as a relevant perspective on management structure. A workable code of conduct that is a guide to professional behaviour is developed. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofremediation, productionSDG12
MIN511H1Integrated Mine Waste EngineeringThe engineering design of conventional mine waste management systems, including tailings ponds, rock dumps, and underground mine backfill systems, is considered first. Emerging trends in integrated mine waste management systems, including paste stacking and "paste rock" on surface, and cemented paste backfill forunderground mining will then be covered. Engineering case studies will be used throughout, and each case study will be evaluated in terms of how the mine waste systems used contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of the mining operation.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofwaste, environmentalSDG12, SDG13
MIN520H1Mine OptimizationIntroduces principles and fundamental concepts involved in the optimization of different aspects of mineral resource extraction. Explores the key sources of uncertainty that affect a final mine plan and design such as orebody, technological and economic uncertainties. Stochastic simulation techniques will be introduced for the quantification of uncertainties and risk management. Other topics related to optimizing mine production and performance such as delaying or eliminating waste stripping, and more efficient resource use through better blending and cut-off grade decisions, as well as holistic mine-to-mill process optimization will be introduced.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofCivil and Mineral Engineering (FASE), Department ofproduction, wasteSDG12
MSE244H1Inorganic Materials Chemistry and ProcessingBasic materials processing flowsheet including priIntroduction to atomic and molecular structures, acid-base and redox reactions, transition metal complexes, and detailed chemical properties of the main group elements in the periodic table. Examples of industrial practice in metal processing industry and energy generation/storage technologies. Hands-on qualitative and quantitative analyses of inorganic compounds, by both classical "wet" volumetric and instrumental methods.mary processing and recycling of materials. Materials and energy balance of individual units and of overall process flowsheets. Use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation. Translating process flowsheets to resource and utility requirements, capital/operating cost, and environmental impact of processing operations. Basics of equipment sizing, operation scheduling, and plant layout.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, capital, transit, recycl, environmentalSDG9, SDG12, SDG13, SDG8
MSE245H1Organic Materials Chemistry and PropertiesIntroduction to organic chemistry and organic materials. Naming, bonding and shapes of organic molecules. Properties and reactions of organic compounds. Key mechanisms including electrophilic addition, nucleophilic aliphatic substitution, β-elimination reactions and electrophilic aromatic substitution. Syntheses of polymers (step-growth and radical chain growth polymerization) and processing methods. Structure and properties of polymeric materials (amorphous, crystalline, elastomeric). Thermo-transition properties of polymers. Life-cycle of polymers, mechanisms of degradation and strategies of polymer recycle. Hands-on organic syntheses and separation experiments.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department oftransit, recyclSDG12
MSE355H1Materials ProductionMaterials life cycle, primary and secondary resources, resource life and sustainability. Technologies and unit operations used in the production of light metals, non-ferrous and ferrous metals. Energy use and conservation in production of materials. Benefits and technologies of recycling. Treatment of waste streams for value recovery and safe disposalApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, production, waste, recycl, conservSDG12, SDG14, SDG15
MSE431H1Forensic EngineeringThe course provides participants with an understanding of scientific and engineering investigation methods and tools to assess potential sources, causes and solutions for prevention of failure due to natural accidents, fire, high and low speed impacts, design defects, improper selection of materials, manufacturing defects, improper service conditions, inadequate maintenance and human error. The fundamentals of accident reconstruction principles and procedures for origin and cause investigations are demonstrated through a wide range of real world case studies including: medical devices, sports equipment, electronic devices, vehicular collisions, structural collapse, corrosion failures, weld failures, fire investigations and patent infringements. Compliance with industry norms and standards, product liability, sources of liability, proving liability, defense against liability and other legal issues will be demonstrated with mock courtroom trial proceedings involving invited professionals to elucidate the role of an engineer as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofinvestSDG16
MSE450H1Plant and Process DesignBasic materials processing flowsheet including primary processing and recycling of materials. Materials and energy balance of individual units and of overall process flowsheets. Use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation. Translating process flowsheets to resource and utility requirements, capital/operating cost, and environmental impact of processing operations. Basics of equipment sizing, operation scheduling, and plant layout.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, capital, recycl, environmentalSDG7, SDG12, SDG13
MSE455H1Process Simulation and Computer DesignVarious production processes use simulation software to shorten the route from the initial design to finished product. Simulation software provides the designer and practicing engineer with a powerful tool in the tasks of improving and optimizing the industrial processes. Expensive trials can be avoided and the quality of the finished product secured from the beginning of production. First, this course will cover the basics of the process simulation used in industrial setting. Subsequently, the course will focus on industrial process simulation software used extensively in foundry industry worldwide. Essential elements of CAD/CAM techniques will be covered. Numerical simulation of the filling and solidification in castings will be presented. Calculation of foundry processes with multiple production cycles will be analyzed. Another course feature will be the graphical presentation of the results on the screen. Limited enrolment.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofproductionSDG9
MSE458H1Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsThe unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures renders these materials to be ideal candidates for use in corrosion, catalysis and energy conversion devices. This course deals with the fabrication of materials suitable for use as protective coatings, and their specific exploitation in fields of hydrogen technologies (electrolysis, storage, and fuel cells) linked to renewables. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A major team design project along with demonstrative laboratory exercises constitutes a major portion of this course. Limited Enrolment.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, renewabl, labor, exploitationSDG7
MSE488H1Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersA complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prizes for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1, MIE488H1, CHE488H1 and CIV488H1.) *Complementary Studies ElectiveApplied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofemployment, entrepreneur, taxationSDG8
MSE498Y1Capstone Project: Design of Materials ProcessesThe students, working in small groups complete a project involving design of a materials processing plant, leading to a design report delivered at the conclusion of the course. The topics covered in the lectures and design process include basic materials processing flowsheet for primary processing and recycling of materials, materials and energy balance of individual units and of overall process flowsheets, use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation, translating process flowsheets to resource and utility requirements, energy analysis, capital/operating cost, basics of equipment sizing, operation scheduling, safety and HAZOP, plant layout, and design for sustainability.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, capital, recyclSDG7, SDG12, SDG8
MSE558H1Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsThe unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures renders these materials to be ideal candidates for use in corrosion, catalysis and energy conversion devices. This course deals with the fabrication of materials suitable for use as protective coatings, and their specific exploitation in fields of hydrogen technologies (electrolysis, storage, and fuel cells) linked to renewables. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A major team design project along with demonstrative laboratory exercises constitutes a major portion of this course. Limited Enrolment.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMaterials Science and Engineering (FASE), Department ofenergy, renewabl, labor, exploitationSDG7
MST234H1Women's Lives in Mediaeval EuropeUsing an interdisciplinary lens, this course explores the experiences of Mediaeval women. Some attention will be given to subjects such as the idea of the Mediaeval feminine, holiness and femininity, and appropriate feminine behaviour. At the same time, we will look at the social and cultural roles of women in society for instance the gendered ideals of marriage, guild structures, and childrearing.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, womenSDG5
MST340H1Mediaeval Genders and SexualitiesThis course explores ideas of gender and sexuality in the mediaeval world. In particular it examines the links between the two throughout history, the social religious, and literary ideas of marriage and reproduction. Through close readings of primary sources including literature, canon law, penitentials, sermons, and medical treatises, students will explore the boundaries between the worlds of biology and culture.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, productionSDG5
MUN101H1Global Innovation I: Issues and PerspectivesInnovation has always been a key driver of economic growth, population health, and societal success. Transformative change has historically been linked to major innovations such as urban sanitation, pasteurization, the printing press and the industrial revolution. Currently, the opportunity to enhance life chances worldwide relies on innovating for the poor, social innovation, and the ability to harness scientific and technological knowledge. What precisely is innovation? When does innovation happen? Who benefits from innovation? How can innovation be fostered, and how do innovations spread? Relying on major global transformations and country-specific case studies (for example, South Korea, Taiwan, Israel and India), this course examines the drivers of innovation, the political, social, economic, and scientific and technological factors that are critical to promoting innovation and addressing current global challenges, and the consequences of innovation. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofknowledge, sanita, economic growth, urbanSDG6, SDG8, SDG11, SDG3, SDG9
MUN102H1Global Innovation II: Challenges and SolutionsGoverning public goods has been an age-old concern for social scientists and policymakers alike. This is not surprising since the provision of global public goods is riddled by problems of collective action. In this course, we focus on how to implement solutions through states, markets and communities. The first objective is to familiarize students with the concept of global public goods, the different mechanisms that can provide these goods and the challenges that emerge from lacking incentives to secure their provision. To this end, the course will introduce theories from sociology, political science, philosophy, and history to help us understand different types of governance mechanisms and how they may be used to scale global solutions. Theories can help us explain the tensions between cooperating for the public good at the expense of sacrificing individual goals, or why certain areas of our lives, like the Internet, seem to produce public goods without any formal mechanism of cooperation. The second objective is to use the class and subject of study as an arena to model and practice the kind of learning that is expected of university students. The main skills that the course will help students target and develop are: research (finding, evaluating and assimilating reliable information); writing (developing ideas into logically written arguments); and critical analysis of arguments presented in the readings and debated in class (this includes identifying the key assumptions that are implicit in different theories as well as inherent in our own positions on various questions related to governance). Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School oflearning, internet, governanceSDG9, SDG16
MUN105Y1Global Problem-Solving: Laboratory OpportunitiesThis course teaches students how to conduct analytically rigorous social science research to improve their insights into complex global problems and devise innovative solutions to address them. A unique feature of this class is that students have the opportunity to learn by doing. Students work hands-on in one of several labs dealing with some of the most intractable global problems of our time in the areas of the environment, health, digital governance, security and the gap between rich and poor. By the end of this course students will be able to:Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofABS, labor, governanceSDG8, SDG16, SDG1, SDG3, SDG10
MUN200H1Understanding Global ControversiesThis course provides students from different programs with a forum to discuss and engage with major global issues within the framework of thematic and regional studies and with comparative and multidisciplinary perspectives. Because this course will be team-taught by Munk faculty from the Humanities and Social Sciences, it will provide students with an introduction to interdisciplinary studies. The course envisions examining several topics which will be based on current global controversies including climate change, sustainability, inequality, democracy, migration and conflict. This course is restricted to second-year students who have either completed MUN105Y1 or enrolled in one of the following programs: American Studies Major; American Studies Minor; Contemporary Asian Studies Major; Contemporary Asian Studies Minor; European Affairs Major (formerly European Studies Major); European Affairs Minor (formerly European Union Studies Minor); Peace, Conflict and Justice Major; Peace, Conflict and Justice Specialist; Major in Public Policy; South Asian Studies Minor.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeace, inequality, equalit, climate, democraSDG16, SDG10, SDG13
MUS235H1Survivors' MusicInvestigating music’s myriad roles in the lives of survivors of violence and traumatic experience, for example, in health and recovery, witnessing, and advocacy—and the hidden histories these musics reveal. We encounter survivors of the Holocaust, Hiroshima, the Japanese “comfort women” system, and quotidian domestic and sexual violence.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomen, invest, violenceSDG5, SDG16
MUS301H1African Popular MusicA survey of popular music in Sub-Saharan Africa from the 1920s to today. Students will listen to and think critically about a range of musical genres in their historical and social contexts. Case studies include Ghanaian highlife, Congolese rumba, Ethiopian jazz, South African kwaito, and Nigerian afrobeat(s). In our exploration of popular genres, we will engage topics of colonialism, nationalism, ethnicity, aesthetics, commodification, and appropriation, among others. No prior background in music is required.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLnationalismSDG16
MUS330H1Music, Violence, and WarAn inquiry into the social life of music in situations of violence, war, social domination, and traumatic experience. Case studies include music and African-American slavery, the First World War, Nazi Germany and the Holocaust, the Asia-Pacific War, Khmer Rouge Cambodia, the Iraq Wars and others.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLviolenceSDG16
MUS335H1A Social History of the PianoA survey of the changing roles and gendered associations of the piano c.1700 to the present day. Examples from the western art music tradition are compared to the acculturating force of the piano in other cultures, representations in the visual arts and film, and contemporary contexts of piano performance.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5
MUZC01H3Exploring Community MusicOur local communities are rich with music-making engagement. Students will critically examine community music in the GTA through the lenses of intergenerational music-making, music and social change, music and wellbeing, and interdisciplinary musical engagement. Off-campus site visits are required.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofwellbeing, social changeSDG3, SDG16
NEW101H1The Everyday Politics of FoodHow often do we reflect on the environmental, social and economic impact of our everyday food choices? This course offers an introduction to the key concepts, terms and theories that underlie our current food system. The course links the food we eat to global forces and considers how these forces affect food distribution, access and consumption. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfood system, consum, environmentalSDG2, SDG13
NEW102H1Exploring Multilingual TorontoHow does language connect and divide people, places and communities? This course considers how interactions between people in Toronto are shaped by language as well as history, economy, architecture and urban landscapes. Students engage with the city both in and out of class to think about a range of questions linked to gender and sexuality, indigeneity, migration, race, ethnicity, and public/private space. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, urban, landSDG5, SDG11, SDG10
NEW103H1Digital Technology and SocietyWhile the internet and other forms of digital technology have created new forms of social relationships and widened access to information, they have also raised concerns. This course explores issues such as surveillance, addiction and bullying as well as the potential of digital technologies (e.g. smart cities, Big Data, and the internet of things). The course engages students' own experience of digital technology. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinternet, citiesSDG9, SDG11
NEW106H1Science, Health and Social JusticeHow can scientific knowledge and research be mobilized to impact individual and global health? How is health impacted by social, racial and economic inequalities? This course explores scientific research and practice with special attention to the translation of scientific knowledge in the public sphere, and its ability to inform policies, practices and laws. Students have the opportunity to meet with clinician-scientists, policy-makers, and other professionals connected to the health care system. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLglobal health, health care, knowledge, equalit, social justiceSDG3, SDG10, SDG16
NEW111H1Food, Ethics and SustainabilityHow do we produce and ensure access to nutritious and environmentally sustainable food for all? This course explores what is involved in achieving ethical food production and food security, examining topics such as: the paradox of food waste amidst scarcity, the relationship between food production and climate change, community-led alternatives to dominant food systems, and the role of biotechnology. Research projects allow students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfood security, food system, production, waste, food waste, climate, environmentalSDG2, SDG12, SDG13
NEW112H1Language Freedom and PowerHow do we imagine a balance between the need for communication, freedom of expression, and protection for marginalized groups? This course considers how language shapes and is shaped by the relations of power not only in such sites as colonies, nations and institutions, but also in popular culture and how we communicate online. It explores the key role of language in activism and youth cultures and allows students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmarginalized, institutSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
NEW116H1Science and Global ThreatsWhat is the role of science in addressing current global threats? What are the possibilities and the limitations of scientific research and knowledge in tackling complex problems such as climate change, pandemics and pollution? In this course, students explore these questions by examining case studies, meeting with specialists in various scientific fields, and engaging in research on a topic of their own choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpollution, knowledge, climate, pollutSDG3, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
NEW197H1Public Intellectual Activism: Theory and PracticeExplores the role of the public intellectual in modern and contemporary societies from a theoretical and practical lens. Specifically, investigates the interventions of this capital actor of the social fabric in specific historical junctures of the 20th century and the new millennium with the idea of informing a hands-on approach to participation in civil society debates. Students will be encouraged to examine how “marginalized communities” intervene in the public sphere to effect social change. Term work will include the writing and publishing of an op-ed article, blog, social media posts and a podcast interview. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcapital, invest, marginalized, social changeSDG10, SDG16
NEW199H1We Are What We Eat: The Example of French CuisineThe historical study of French cuisine reveals a culture rich in controversy and conflicting narratives. These include contested origins, court intrigues, sensual delight, revolutions, colonialism and slavery, controversial farm practices, haute cuisine, cuisine bourgeoise, regionalism, European regulation. Through various research, writing and presentation techniques, including mini-essays, wikis and pecha kucha, students will explore what is left of French food culture in an era of globalization. No knowledge of French is necessary. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLfood culture, knowledge, globalizSDG2, SDG9
NEW302Y1C.G. Jung: Stories, Patterns, SymbolsImpact of Jung's analytical psychology, critical methodology and interpretative practice on issues in religion, anthropology, art and literature, popular culture, gender studies and postmodernist critique. Theoretical studies include traditional Jungian and contemporary post-Jungian texts together with feminist and non-Jungian sources.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, feminisSDG5
NEW495Y1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learning, social justiceSDG16, SDG11
NEW496H1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learning, social justiceSDG16, SDG11
NEW497Y1Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced SeminarExplores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, indigenous, marginalized, production, social changeSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
NEW498H1Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced SeminarExplores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, indigenous, marginalized, production, social changeSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
NFS284H1Basic Human NutritionAn introductory course to provide the fundamentals of human nutrition to enable students to understand and think critically about the complex interrelationships between food, nutrition, health and the environment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLnutritionSDG2, SDG3, SDG13
NFS386H1Food ChemistryStructure, composition and chemical and biochemical reactions in foods during postharvest/postmortem, processing, storage and utilization. Implications for organoleptic properties, nutritional value, toxicity and human health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLnutritionSDG2, SDG3
NFS487H1Nutrigenomics and Personalized NutritionThe impact of the human genome on nutrition research. Experimental approaches to investigating gene-diet interactions. Understanding how genetic variability affects nutrient response, and how dietary factors regulate gene expression. Application of the various ‘omics’ technologies to nutrition research as well as exploring the social, legal and ethical issues associated with direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests for personalized nutrition.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLnutrition, invest, consumSDG2
NFS490H1International and Community NutritionThis course focuses on current issues in international and community nutrition including global and domestic food security, micronutrient deficiencies and other forms of undernutrition, maternal and infant/child nutrition, dietary guidance, and food and nutrition policy. The course will consider the environmental, sociopolitical, cultural and biosocial contexts of nutrition.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLnutrition, food security, environmentalSDG2, SDG13
NMC195H1Rebels, Misfits, and Outcasts in Modern Arabic LiteratureThis course examines modern Arabic literary texts that portray marginalized social figures and groups who have been excluded from a protective system of resources and privileges. Students will read novels and short stories by prominent Arab authors who have represented marginal social groups in their fiction, including representations of the urban poor, the peasantry, the delinquent, the prostitute, sexual minorities, women who reject normative roles, and the political rebel. These fictional texts address issues such as political resistance and rebellion, economic precarity, and social exclusion. Students will engage with these texts by critically examining the role of literature in narrating unspoken and suppressed histories. The class will also introduce students to theoretical modes of literary analysis and interpretation. All texts will be read in English translation. Authors include Mohamed Choukri, Hanan al-Shaykh, Alifa Rifaat, Sonallah Ibrahim, and Arwa Salih. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofprecarity, women, minorit, marginalized, urbanSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11
NMC198H1Iranian Women Reveal Their Lives: The First GenerationThe course focuses on Iranian women born in the late 19th and early decades of the 20th centuries. Making of the Modern Iranian Woman, 1865-1946 introduces the context of social, cultural, and governmental change that encouraged educated females to think beyond the dominant conservative ideal of a woman's place. Primarily we will use writings by women themselves, such as Memoirs of a Persian Princess: From the Harem to Modernity, 1884-1914, to examine their lives. Interviews with women in Exiled Memories give voice to repressed memories that inhibited female self-development. The memoir Reveille for a Persian Village reveals the challenge of introducing change for females into an isolated rural community. Poems by this early generation vividly reveal their anger, regret, difficulties, and hopes for the future. Memories of a Persian Childhood helps us to appreciate the important role of childhood experience in later choices. Each woman is discussed as an individual and as a product of a period of turbulent social and cultural change in the history of Iran. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofwomen, female, rural, conservSDG5, SDG11, SDG, SDG15
NMC241H1Anthropology of the Middle EastThis course aims to familiarize students with the anthropological study of the contemporary Middle East. It introduces key questions and concepts for anthropological study: who speaks for the Middle East? What is culture? What is ethnography? It analyzes systems of power and exclusion, and everyday life and relations in countries like Egypt, Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, and Kuwait. The course will provide critical perspectives on gender, religion, family relations, national belonging, migrant workers, and refugees. Students will apply anthropological methods learned in class to do an independent project.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, worker, refugeeSDG5, SDG8, SDG10
NMC243H1The Arabic NovelThis course focuses on the origins and development of the novel genre in the modern Arabic literary tradition. The course examines the aesthetic qualities of the novel as an artistic form as well as the ways it has represented and intervened in the modern social, political, and cultural upheavals that have shaped the Arabic-speaking world from the mid 19th century to the 21st century. Students will read literary criticism that addresses the Arabic novel’s emergence and consolidation as a major literary form and will engage with contemporary methods of literary analysis and interpretation. Topics addressed in the course include textual representations of colonialism and post-colonialism, gender and sexuality, representations of the peasantry, the nation-state and Arab nationalism, and discourses of progress and modernity. Authors include Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, Yahya Haqqi, Naguib Mahfouz, Tayeb Salih, Latifa al-Zayyat, Mohamad Choukri, and Hanan al-Shaykh. Readings of novels and criticism in English translation.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, nationalismSDG5, SDG16
NMC244H1The Arab Spring and Cultural ProductionThis course examines the Arab revolutions that began in 2011 and their ongoing repercussions through the lens of cultural production. How have Arab writers and artists contributed to and reflected upon the Arab revolutions known as the Arab Spring? How has cultural production mediated the demands, aspirations, and struggles of the Arab peoples during and after these transformative revolutionary struggles? The cultural texts examined in this course range from those that mediate the euphoric optimism heralded by the revolutions to those that narrate and reflect upon the dystopian aftermath after revolutionary failure, including fiction and art that considers the reassertion of authoritarian rule, the violence of civil war, and the homelessness of exile. Through novels, poetry, music, art, and film, the course will broadly consider the role of culture as an alternative mode of narrating and historicizing the Arab revolutions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofhomeless, production, authoritarian, violenceSDG1, SDG, SDG16
NMC284H1Topics in Judaism and Feminism: Conflict, Competition, ComplementAgitation for change exists in religious practice worldwide in areas of access, status, inclusion, and egalitarianism. Traditional religion is often in conflict with egalitarian modernity. This sometimes results in difficulties with religious identification. This course will explore the interaction between feminism and Judaism. We will examine how Jewish law (halakhah) sometimes conflicts with ideas of egalitarianism particularly in legal disabilities for women such as divorce, lack of access to high-level Torah study, and discrimination in public religious roles. The traditional exemption of women from the obligation of Torah study had great impact on women’s religious responsibility and status. Various movements within Judaism competed in efforts to resolve these difficulties. In this course we will consider to what extent inclusion and egalitarianism have become complementary to traditional Judaism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofdisabilit, women, feminisSDG5, SDG10
NMC284H1Judaism and Feminism: Legal Issues from Menstruation to OrdinationAgitation for change exists in religious practice worldwide in areas of access, status, inclusion, and egalitarianism. Traditional religion is often in conflict with egalitarian modernity. This sometimes results in difficulties with religious identification. This course will explore the interaction between feminism and Judaism. We will examine how Jewish law (halakhah) sometimes conflicts with ideas of egalitarianism particularly in legal disabilities for women such as divorce, lack of access to high-level Torah study, and discrimination in public religious roles. The traditional exemption of women from the obligation of Torah study had great impact on women’s religious responsibility and status. Various movements within Judaism competed in efforts to resolve these difficulties. In this course we will consider to what extent inclusion and egalitarianism have become complementary to traditional Judaism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofdisabilit, women, feminisSDG5, SDG10
NMC356H1Anthropology of IslamThis course introduces students to studies of contemporary Islam that are based on extensive periods of research with Muslim communities in their own languages using anthropological methods. What do such studies teach us about the varied ways Muslims engage with their religious tradition in the modern world? And how can such studies make us think differently about gender, economy, science, and secularism? We will discuss examples from Nigeria to Somalia, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran, to India, Pakistan, and Indonesia, to Canada, the US, and Europe. Students will apply anthropological methods learned in class to do research among a Muslim community in Toronto or online.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG8, SDG9
NMC357H1Gender and Sexuality in Premodern Arabic LiteratureStudents read translations of Arabic literary texts composed by women or dealing with gender and sexuality. Class discussion considers debates in the field about how to analyze these texts in their historical context and in a theoretically grounded manner. Topics addressed include: popular and elite narrative representations of gender and sexuality; pre-Islamic and Abbasid poetry and remarks composed by women, and their transmission in male-authored anthologies; hetero- and homoerotic obscenity and eroticism in Arabic poetry, epistles, and scientific texts; and literary representations of sexual minorities like eunuchs, intersex people, and mukhannathūn (people with apparently male biology who dressed and behaved as women, and had a specific social position at certain times).Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, women, minoritSDG5, SDG10
NMC358H1Gender and Sexuality in Modern Middle Eastern CulturesThis course examines questions of gender and sexuality in the broader Middle East (Iran, Turkey, and the Arab world) from the colonial period (19th to early 20th centuries) to the present through readings of religious, cultural, historical, visual, and literary texts. We will begin the course by thinking critically about colonial and Orientalist legacies that continue to structure contemporary debates on representations of women, gender, and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Students will read and analyze a range of primary historical texts written by Middle Eastern women reflecting the ways in which women of different backgrounds (religious, class, urban/rural) and generations have conceptualized and inhabited their gendered and sexual identities. Topics students will explore include the development of modern secular and religious feminist thought; cultural representations of gender, sexuality, and queerness; fictional texts that represent non-normative expressions of gender and sexuality; and critical approaches to theorizing gender and sexuality in the Middle East. All readings are in English translation.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, women, queer, feminis, urban, ruralSDG5, SDG10
NMC365H1Women and Gender in Egyptian ArchaeologyThe course explores issues related to gender within the ancient Egyptian context and investigates the activities of women through the study of many different kinds of archaeological and material evidence. We'll build a foundation for this work with an overview of current developments in gender theory and consider their applications for research on ancient Egyptian society and culture. No prior knowledge of theoretical approaches is expected. From this basis, we'll go on to consider how archaeological material can contribute to the understanding of gender roles and examine how excavators may unconsciously impose their own gender perspectives on ancient contexts, creating biased views of ancient societies that become entrenched in scholarly tradition. The same methods of critical analysis will inform our study of women in ancient Egypt, incorporating archaeological data and artifactual material that can inform our understanding of the complex roles that women played in Egyptian culture, society, and religious practice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofknowledge, gender, women, investSDG5
NMC372H1Islam and Muslims in the BalkansThe Balkans has been in contact with Islam and inhabited by Muslims for six centuries. Nowadays it is the home of over eight million Muslims of various ethnic backgrounds who constitute the second largest religious group in the region. This course examines the history of Islam, Muslims, and Muslim culture in the Balkans from the Ottoman conquest in the fourteenth century until the present day while placing it in a wider transregional context. Topics covered include formation of Muslim communities, Sufi groups, the Muslims and the Balkan national imagination, responses to modernity, Muslims as minorities, Muslim experiences in communist states, and the breakup of Yugoslavia.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofminoritSDG10
NMC379H1Capital, Technology, and Utopia in the Modern Middle EastHow does the workings of capital intersect with technological innovation and political visions in the modern Middle East? This course approaches this question through critical reading in the histories of capitalism, crisis, science, politics, and intersections between cultural history and technology studies using the Middle East as a starting point for the study of global phenomena. We will examine the ways in which constructions like race and ethnicity, gender, and the human/non-human divide have mediated the social and spatial expansion of capital in the region, especially through technological infrastructure and utopias between the late 18th and the 21st centuries.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, infrastructure, capitalSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
NMC381H1Modern Islamic ThoughtSurvey of major intellectual trends in the Islamic tradition, particularly those identified with Middle Eastern Muslim thinkers, from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include reformism, modernism, hermeneutics, feminism, Islamism, and liberal and progressive trends in contemporary Muslim thought. Readings in English translation.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department offeminisSDG5
NMC384H1Life Cycle and Personal Status in JudaismThis course will examine certain aspects of status and family law in Judaism, as well as Zoroastrianism, Eastern Christianity, and Islam. We will review some literature in legal theory to test its applicability to religious-based law. Our main topics include virginity (marital age, proof of virginity or its absence, rape or seduction of virgins, economics and theology of virginity); menstrual laws (impurity, punishment, sexuality, purification); mysticism (practitioners, purity requirements, theology); and sexuality (marriageability, prohibited partners, sex acts). Sectarian approaches to these legal issues will be examined, for example, how biblical law is interpreted in Qumran, by the rabbis, and how these topics are addressed by Zoroastrian law, the Eastern Church Fathers and the Four Schools in Islamic law.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofABS, giniSDG10, SDG5, SDG16
NMC384H1Marking Time: Legal Issues and Personal Status in JudaismThis course will examine certain aspects of status and family law in Judaism, as well as Zoroastrianism, Eastern Christianity, and Islam. We will review some literature in legal theory to test its applicability to religious-based law. Our main topics include virginity (marital age, proof of virginity or its absence, rape or seduction of virgins, economics and theology of virginity); menstrual laws (impurity, punishment, sexuality, purification); mysticism (practitioners, purity requirements, theology); and sexuality (marriageability, prohibited partners, sex acts). Sectarian approaches to these legal issues will be examined, for example, how biblical law is interpreted in Qumran, by the rabbis, and how these topics are addressed by Zoroastrian law, the Eastern Church Fathers and the Four Schools in Islamic law.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofABS, giniSDG10, SDG5, SDG16
NMC463H1Warfare: The Archaeology of Conflict in the Ancient Near EastWhen did humans start fighting each other, and how far back can we trace the history of warfare? This course investigates the origin, nature, and manifestation of military conflicts in the ancient Near East and studies their impact on political, economic, and social developments in the region. Following a review of the relevant terminology (e.g., “warfare” vs “skirmish”) in archaeological literature, we will investigate the archaeological and historical data for a time span that extends from 9,000 to 300 BC. Evidence from archaeological sites (notably violent destructions of ancient settlements) will be compared with available artistic representations of warfare in sculpture, reliefs, inlays, and glyptics, complemented by textual accounts. While the course focuses on Mesopotamia, evidence from Syria, Turkey, Iran, the Levant, and Egypt will also be included.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofinvestSDG16
NMC472H1Theory & Method in Middle East StudiesExamines current theoretical and methodological trends in the study of the Near/Middle East. A seminar course, it consists of presentations, discussions, lectures, guest speakers, and documentaries. No previous knowledge of methodology required. Special attention will be paid to the politics, culture, political economy, gender, and ethics of various research practices. Intended for 4th year students only.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofknowledge, genderSDG5, SDG16
NMC476H1Politics of Archaeology in the Modern Middle EastThis course examines the role nineteenth and twentieth-century archaeology played in Middle Eastern politics, the culture of colonialism and in nationalist struggles. The course will first familiarize the students with the diplomatic and intellectual context of the formation of archaeology as a field of study in Europe and analyse the role archaeology played in the production of knowledge about the Middle East. Next, the course will examine the archaeological practices on the ground (and underground) and inquire what happens in the contact zone between foreign and local archaeologists. Finally, we will trace the ways in which emergent nationalist discourse challenge, appropriate and imitate the historical narratives of Western archaeology.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofknowledge, productionSDG12, SDG16
NMC477H1Modern TurkeyThe course examines the history of modern Turkey from the beginning of the 20th century until the present day. Topics include transition from empire to nation-state; the establishment of the Turkish republic; the Kemalist reforms and legacy; nationalism and nation-building; Islam and politics; gender and sexuality; as well as recent political, social, and cultural developments. The course seeks to situate the history of Turkey in a broader regional context and introduces students to some historiographical debates. In seminar discussions, students are encouraged to explore topics from a critical post-nationalist perspective and to think about current events in a historical context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofgender, transit, nationalismSDG5, SDG, SDG16
NMC478H1Modern Arab SocietiesA weekly seminar built around thematic readings of social and economic history of the modern Arab world. Sometimes, the course is geographically extensive, encompassing the predominantly Arabic-speaking lands of North Africa and the Middle East from Morocco in the west to Iraq in the east. At other times, the course focuses on a more narrowly defined geographic region—one country or a group of countries in the Arabic-speaking lands. Readings and discussions emphasize the experiences of broad sectors of the population, not just of elites. This framework of “history from below” also invites scrutiny of historically-marginalized populations (“subalterns”), or at least of silences in the literature about these populations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofmarginalized, landSDG10
NMC479H1Nationalism in the Arab WorldA seminar that critically examines the types and varieties of national expression in Arab societies of the Middle East and North Africa, through a reading of common texts and students' individual research projects.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofnationalismSDG16
NMC484H1Gender-related Topics in Jewish Law and ReligionAmong the topics addressed in this course in various years are the requirement for women divorced or widowed (either from betrothal or marriage) to wait three months before remarriage to determine paternity or for pregnant or nursing women to protect the fetus or infant; legal disabilities for women in marriage and divorce (consent, unilateral acquisition, power differentials, exit options); legal status according to age (fetus, infant, before and after age six, approaching legal majority, legal majority, anomalies); sexuality (age, sexual acts and their legal repercussions, prohibitions, consent, intergenerational sexual connections, homosexuality); rabbinic ordination of women in the various streams of Judaism; and abortion (contraception, status of embryo or fetus, viability, reasons). These issues will be discussed in terms of gender and modern law.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNear & Middle Eastern Civilizations (FAS), Department ofdisabilit, gender, womenSDG5, SDG16
PCJ260Y1Introduction to Peace and Conflict StudiesThe course reviews theories exploring the causes of conflict, the possibilities for the pursuit of peace, and the role of justice in both. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, including political science, psychology, sociobiology, economics, and religion, it offers an introduction to diverse approaches to conflict resolution and peace-building. After examining the role of individual characteristics, social group dynamics, and structural processes in generating conflict, the course interrogates different conceptions of peace and justice as well as the dilemmas involved in pursuing them in practice. Case studies and examples are used to help students apply the conceptual tools they acquire to prominent world conflicts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ261H1Introduction to Peace, Conflict and Justice IIThe course reviews theories exploring the causes of conflict, the possibilities for the pursuit of peace, and the role of justice in both. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, it offers an introduction to diverse approaches to conflict resolution and peace-building. Case studies and examples are used to help students apply the conceptual tools they acquire to prominent world conflicts. Students must be enrolled in either the PCJ Major or PCJ Specialist program to take this course.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ360H1Topics in Peace, Conflict and JusticeThis course explores selected issues in the field of peace, conflict and justice. Topics may vary from year to year. Through a suite of recent readings, students will strive to critically examine implications and challenges of, and solutions to the issues being studied. Please visit the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice website for current offering information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ361H1Special Topics in Peace, Conflict and Justice StudiesAn exploration of selected issues in the field of Peace, Conflict and Justice involving an overseas and/or practicum component.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ361Y1Special Topics in Peace and Conflict StudiesAn exploration of selected issues in the field of Peace, Conflict and Justice involving an overseas and/or practicum component.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ362H1Service LearningStudents are given a service learning placement in the GTA in partnership with local, national, or international not-for-profits or governmental organizations. Students work in teams of 2-7 students, and help partner organizations solve important problems. Student teams mostly work independently of the organization, while receiving some mentoring, critique, and advice from the organizations. Students are expected to invest 5-7 hours per week in course projects, in addition to class time. In this non-competitive course, students are asked to engage in deep personal reflection, help teammates, advise other teams, and contribute their skills and talents to their community partners. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School oflearning, capital, investSDG9, SDG11
PCJ363H1Study Abroad Module[This course will not be offered in 2021-22] Using Quercus, Skype, and email, students meet weekly in a virtual class that will assign readings, provide written assignments, and require a final assignment. Students are asked to situate their training from the PCJ program within the context of their academic study abroad experiences, though they may also have the opportunity to reflect on volunteer, activist, and social experiences. In written assignments, students are required to reflect on how their thinking has been influenced by their study abroad experiences, what they will do with their new perspectives upon returning to the University of Toronto, and how these affect how they think about peace, conflict, and justice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ444H1Special Topics in Peace and Conflict StudiesTopics vary annually. The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Peace and Conflict Studies. The focus of the course will be on a specific topic, rather than a broad survey of the field.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ460H1Advanced Topics in Peace, Conflict and JusticeThis course explores selected issues in the field of peace, conflict and justice. Topics may vary from year to year. Through a suite of recent readings, students will strive to critically examine implications and challenges of, and solutions to the issues being studied. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Peace, Conflict and Justice Major or Specialist programs. Please visit the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice website for current offering information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG16
PCJ499H1Peace and Conflict Studies Independent Study CourseThis course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore topics not covered in the curriculum, or to develop a more detailed focus on topics covered. Approval of the program director is required. The student must obtain written agreement of the instructor who will supervise the independent study, submit the proposal to and obtain approval from the director and program administrator, who will then add the student to the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Applications are due two weeks before course enrolment deadlines.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG4, SDG16
PCJ499Y1Peace and Conflict Studies Independent Study CourseThis course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore topics not covered in the curriculum, or to develop a more detailed focus on topics covered. Approval of the program director is required. The student must obtain written agreement of the instructor who will supervise the independent study, submit the proposal to and obtain approval from the director and program administrator, who will then add the student to the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Applications are due two weeks before course enrolment deadlines.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofpeaceSDG4, SDG16
PCL200H1Drugs & the BrainLectures introduce students to prescribed and illicit drugs that affect the brain. Lectures cover drug pharmacology and explain how drugs alter mood, perception, cognition, and arousal by affecting different aspects of brain function. The societal impact of these prescribed and illicit drugs is also discussed. Note: This course is not intended for upper-year students who have already completed BCH210H1 or other exclusion courses. Upper-year Life Science students who are excluded and are interested in this content should look into PCL475H1 and/or PCL476H1 as the more appropriate choice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLillicitSDG16, SDG3
PCL218H1Cannabis the DrugThere is a critical need for a breadth of understanding regarding its mechanism of action, pharmacological effects and its potential benefits and harms (short- and long-term). Students will gain a breadth of understanding in cannabis-related topics including pharmacology and toxicology, its role in mental health and addictions, medical use, drug policy and new drug development that stems from increased access to cannabis constituents. They will learn to differentiate myths and anecdotes from evidence-based knowledge. Going forward it is imperative that students spanning basic sciences through business, arts and engineering have a comprehensive understanding of these topics. PCL218H1 will give students for a variety of academic backgrounds a basic understanding of the health implications of cannabis which have broad implications for both our professional and personal lives.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmental health, knowledgeSDG3
PCL389H1Understanding the Role of Pharmacology and Toxicology in SocietyThis service learning course explores issues surrounding the effects that pharmaceuticals and chemicals have in society. Specifically, it integrates pharmacology and toxicology with social, health and political issues as they relate to drug abuse and addiction. Students are required to interact and work with community partners during the semester (approx. 20hrs). Classroom discussions will integrate community experiences with lecture material.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG3
PCL483H1Interdisciplinary ToxicologyThis course explores several contemporary topics in biomedical and environmental toxicology with emphasis on how chemicals affect human health. Lectures cover principles of toxicology, the mechanisms of toxicity of a wide variety of toxic agents and the associated toxicities, methodologies used to examine chemical toxicities, risk assessment, and the applications of toxicology.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcities, environmentalSDG, SDG13, SDG3
PHC470H1Global Pharmaceutical PolicyThis course is designed for students who are interested in the critical analysis of global health policy and the interrelationship between global and domestic policy issues. The course will introduce students generally to the basic concepts and issues in global health with a particular focus on pharmaceutical policy. We will address key issues in health and discuss core institutional and transnational actors, how governments in different jurisdictions manage public health responsibilities, the tension between economic imperatives and health objectives, global obligations, and pressure from special interest groups. More narrowly, we will analyze a breadth of complex policies questions. Examples include: the research and development global divide, policial issues influences on pharmaceutical policy, how global commitments, such as membership in the World Trade Organization, conflict with or correspond to domestic policy directions and national sovereignty. Guest speakers will lead some sessions. This course will consist of lectures, guest discussions, case studies and student-led presentations. This is restricted to students in the Pharmaceutical Chemistry specialist program.Arts and Science, Faculty ofChemistry (FAS), Department ofpublic health, global health, trade, institut, sovereigntySDG3, SDG, SDG16
PHL196H1Multiculturalism, Philosophy and FilmThis course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social "other". Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism, and (5) the ways in which cinema can help illuminate a cluster of relevant notions in political philosophy including citizenship, communitarianism, cosmopolitanism, and the relation between individual rights and group rights. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofcitizenshipSDG10, SDG16
PHL243H1Philosophy of Human SexualityPhilosophical issues about sex and sexual identity in the light of biological, psychological and ethical theories of sex and gender; the concept of gender; male and female sex roles; perverse sex; sexual liberation; love and sexuality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofgender, femaleSDG5
PHL243H5Philosophy of Human SexualityPhilosophical issues about sex and sexual identity in the light of biological, psychological, and ethical theories of sex and gender. The concept of gender; male and female sex roles; theories of psycho-sexual development; sexual morality; "natural," "normal," and "perverse" sex; sexual liberation; love and sexuality.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofgender, femaleSDG5
PHL244H5Human NatureTheories of human nature, e.g., psychoanalysis, behaviourism, sociobiology. Current issues, e.g., egoism and altruism, instincts, I.Q., rationality, sanity and mental illness.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofillnessSDG3
PHL265H1Introduction to Political PhilosophyAn introduction to central issues in political philosophy, e.g., political and social justice, liberty and the criteria of good government. The writings of contemporary political philosophers, as well as major figures in the history of philosophy, may be considered.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofsocial justiceSDG16
PHL267H5FeminismMain types of feminist theory: liberal, Marxist, Existential and "Radical." A number of ethical, political and psychological issues are considered.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department offeminisSDG5
PHL268H1Philosophy and Social CriticismIs the objective of philosophy to understand and interpret the world, or to change it? A study of theorists who have taken philosophy to be a tool for social criticism. Topics studied may include feminism, critical race theory, anti-consumerism, the critique of mass society, new social movements and conservative cultural criticism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department offeminis, consum, conservSDG5, SDG12, SDG, SDG15
PHL269H1Philosophy of RaceWhat is the meaning of race? How does it affect political philosophy? Is there an ethics of race? These are some of the questions that will be covered in this course on the critical philosophy of race. Students will be introduced to problems concerning the metaphysics of race, race and political injustice, ethics and recognition, race and aesthetic critique, and others.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofinjusticeSDG16, SDG10
PHL271H1Law and MoralityJustifications for the legal enforcement of morality; particular ethical issues arising out of the intersection of law and morality, such as punishment, freedom of expression and censorship, autonomy and paternalism, constitutional protection of human rights.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofhuman rightsSDG16
PHL271H5Ethics and the LawMoral issues in the law, such as civil liberties and police powers, censorship, civil disobedience, the death penalty, inequality, paternalism and the constitutional protection of human rights. Case studies from Canadian law.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, human rightsSDG10, SDG16
PHL272H5Philosophy of EducationThe nature, aims, and content of education; learning theory; education and indoctrination; the teaching of morals and the morality of teaching; the role and justification of educational institutions, their relation to society and to individual goals; authority and freedom in the school.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department oflearning, institutSDG4, SDG16
PHL273H1Environmental EthicsA study of environmental issues raising questions of concern to moral and political philosophers, such as property rights, responsibility for future generations, and the interaction of human beings with the rest of nature. Typical issues: sustainable development, alternative energy, the preservation of wilderness areas, animal rights.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofenergy, sustainable development, environmental, animalSDG7, SDG8, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
PHL273H5Environmental EthicsEnvironmental ethics is a relatively new development in philosophical thinking which focuses on the ethical and value questions arising from our relation to nature. Focal question of the area asks: Is the non-human world of ethical significance only insofar as it is connected with human well-being, or is ethically significant in itself? This course investigates and evaluates anthropocentrim, ecofeminism and radical biocentric theories of the deep ecologists.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofwell-being, feminis, invest, environmental, ecologSDG3, SDG5, SDG13
PHL274H5Ethics and SocietyThe course explores ethical problems posed by social issues such as inequality, poverty, war, corporate responsibility, the treatment of animals, and social media, against the background of major ethical and political theories.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofpoverty, inequality, equalit, animalSDG1, SDG10, SDG, SDG15, SDG16
PHL276H1Philosophy of SportsSports play a complex role in contemporary society. They offer recreational participants a source of meaning in life and professional participants a livelihood. They inspire intense devotion from fans. They are a crucible for debates about fair play, medical enhancement, sex, gender, race, and sexuality. This course will explore the nature and ethics of sports.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
PHL281H1BioethicsAn introduction to the study of moral and legal problems in medical practice and in biomedical research; the development of health policy. Topics include: concepts of health and disease, patient rights, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources, euthanasia, abortion, genetic and reproductive technologies, human research, and mental health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofmental healthSDG3
PHL282H5Ethics: Death and Dying(Formerly PHL382H5) An intermediate-level study of moral and legal problems, including the philosophical significance of death, the high-tech prolongation of life, definition and determination of death, suicide, active and passive euthanasia, the withholding of treatment, palliative care and the control of pain, living wills; recent judicial decisions.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofjudicSDG16
PHL283H5BioethicsMoral implications of recent developments in medicine and the life sciences; related legal and social issues. Euthanasia, health care priorities, abortion, fertility control, against the background of some major ethical theories.University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofhealth careSDG3
PHL295H1Business EthicsPhilosophical issues in ethics, social theory, and theories of human nature insofar as they bear on contemporary conduct of business. Issues include: Does business have moral responsibilities? Can social costs and benefits be calculated? Does modern business life determine human nature or the other way around? Do political ideas and institutions such as democracy have a role within business?Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofinstitut, democraSDG16
PHL295H5Philosophy of BusinessPhilosophical issues in ethics, social theory, and theories of human nature insofar as they bear on contemporary conduct of business. Issues include: Does business have moral responsibilities? Can social costs and benefits be calculated? Does modern business life determine human nature of the other way around? Do political ideas and institutions such as democracy have a role within business?University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofinstitut, democraSDG16
PHL323H1Social and Cultural TheoryA study of philosophical approaches to understanding various aspects of contemporary culture and/or society. Topics may include theories of modernity, capitalism and consumerism, architecture and design, cultural pluralism, globalization, media and internet.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofcapital, internet, globaliz, consumSDG9
PHL365H5Issues in Political PhilosophyA study of some of the best recent work by political philosophers on topics such as justice, rights, welfare and political authority. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofwelfareSDG1, SDG16
PHL367H1Philosophy of FeminismSelected issues and topics in the philosophy of feminism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department offeminisSDG5
PHL367H5Issues in Philosophy and FeminismThis course will examine selected philosophical topics in feminism, such as multiculturalism and women's rights, feminist epistemologies, ethics of care, the intersection between sexism and other forms of oppression, pornography. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPhilosophy (UTM), Department ofwomen, feminisSDG5
PHL369H1Philosophy of Race, Gender, and CapitalismHow should our understanding of capitalism be shaped by the realities of racial domination and gender oppression? What are the different accounts of justice and injustice that would emerge from trying to think through these three phenomena together? Or are they really one phenomenon? This course will survey the complex philosophical debates, both historical and contemporary, concerning the specificities and interrelationships between race, gender, and capitalism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofgender, capital, cities, injusticeSDG5, SDG16, SDG8
PHL370H1Issues in Philosophy of LawMajor issues in philosophy of law, such as legal positivism and its critics, law and liberalism, feminist critiques of law, punishment and responsibility.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department offeminisSDG5, SDG16
PHL373H1Issues in Environmental EthicsAn intermediate-level examination of key issues in environmental philosophy, such as the ethics of animal welfare, duties to future generations, deep ecology, ecofeminism, sustainable development and international justice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofwelfare, feminis, sustainable development, environmental, animal, ecologSDG5, SDG8, SDG1, SDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG16
PHL380H1Global BioethicsAn intermediate-level study of moral problems that arise in international contexts, including issues of special interest in bioethics: moral universalism and relativism; global distributive justice; poverty relief and international aid; international health disparities; globalization and health; HIV/AIDS; intellectual property and access to essential medicines; clinical trials in developing countries; exploitation and the 10/90 gap.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofpoverty, globaliz, exploitationSDG1, SDG9, SDG16, SDG3
PHL382H1Ethics: Death and DyingAn intermediate-level study of moral and legal problems, including the philosophical significance of death, the high-tech prolongation of life, definition and determination of death, suicide, active and passive euthanasia, the withholding of treatment, palliative care and the control of pain, living wills; recent judicial decisions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofjudicSDG16
PHL383H1Ethics and Mental HealthAn intermediate-level study of moral and legal problems, including the concepts of mental health and illness, mental competence, dangerousness and psychiatric confidentiality, mental institutionalization, involuntary treatment and behaviour control, controversial therapies; legal issues: the Mental Health Act, involuntary commitment, the insanity defence.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofmental health, illness, institutSDG3
PHL384H1Ethics, Genetics and ReproductionAn intermediate-level study of moral and legal problems, including the ontological and moral status of the human embryo and fetus; human newborn, carrier and prenatal genetic screening for genetic defect, genetic therapy; the reproductive technologies (e.g., artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization); recent legislative proposals and judicial decisions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofproduction, judicSDG, SDG16
PHL394H1Markets and MoralsA study of the standards that can be used to judge the performance of economic systems, e.g., efficiency, fairness, maximization, along with the different institutional mechanisms that can be used to organize economic activity, e.g., markets or hierarchies, public or private ownership.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofinstitutSDG16, SDG8
PHL395H1Issues in Business EthicsA focused examination of moral issues that arise in the conduct of business, in areas such as accounting and finance, corporate governance, human resources, environmental conduct, business lobbying and regulatory compliance.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofenvironmental, governanceSDG13, SDG, SDG8
PHL413H1Seminar in Applied EthicsAdvanced study of some topic in an area of applied ethics, including bioethics, environmental ethics, and so on.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13, SDG3
PHL440H1Clinical BioethicsAdvanced study of topics in bioethics, taught in conjunction with clinical bioethicists associated with the health care organization partners of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhilosophy (FAS), Department ofhealth careSDG3
PHLB02H3Environmental EthicsThis course examines ethical issues raised by our actions and our policies for the environment. Do human beings stand in a moral relationship to the environment? Does the environment have moral value and do non-human animals have moral status? These fundamental questions underlie more specific contemporary issues such as sustainable development, alternative energy, and animal rights.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofenergy, sustainable development, environmental, animalSDG7, SDG8, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
PHLB05H3Social IssuesAn examination of contemporary or historical issues that force us to consider and articulate our values and commitments. The course will select issues from a range of possible topics, which may include globalization, medical ethics, war and terrorism, the role of government in a free society, equality and discrimination.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, equalit, terrorisSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
PHLB06H3Business EthicsAn examination of philosophical issues in ethics, social theory, and theories of human nature as they bear on business. What moral obligations do businesses have? Can social or environmental costs and benefits be calculated in a way relevant to business decisions? Do political ideas have a role within business?University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13, SDG8
PHLB11H3Philosophy of LawA discussion of right and rights, justice, legality, and related concepts. Particular topics may include: justifications for the legal enforcement of morality, particular ethical issues arising out of the intersection of law and morality, such as punishment, freedom of expression and censorship, autonomy and paternalism, constitutional protection of human rights.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofhuman rightsSDG16
PHLB12H3Philosophy of SexualityPhilosophical issues about sex and sexual identity in the light of biological, psychological and ethical theories of sex and gender; the concept of gender; male and female sex roles; perverse sex; sexual liberation; love and sexuality.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofgender, femaleSDG5
PHLB13H3Philosophy and FeminismWhat is feminism? What is a woman? Or a man? Are gender relations natural or inevitable? Why do gender relations exist in virtually every society? How do gender relations intersect with other social relations, such as economic class, culture, race, sexual orientation, etc.?University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofgender, feminisSDG5
PHLB17H3Introduction to Political PhilosophyThis course will introduce some important concepts of and thinkers in political philosophy from the history of political philosophy to the present. These may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, G.W.F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, or Karl Marx. Topics discussed may include political and social justice, liberty and the criteria of good government.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofsocial justiceSDG16
PHLC10H3Topics in BioethicsAn intermediate-level study of bioethical issues. This course will address particular issues in bioethics in detail. Topics will vary from year to year, but may include such topics as reproductive ethics, healthcare and global justice, ethics and mental health, the patient-physician relationship, or research on human subjects.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofmental health, healthcareSDG3
PHLC13H3Topics in Philosophy and FeminismFeminist philosophy includes both criticism of predominant approaches to philosophy that may be exclusionary for women and others, and the development of new approaches to various areas of philosophy. One or more topics in feminist philosophy will be discussed in some depth. Particular topics will vary with the instructor.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofwomen, feminisSDG5
PHLD09H3Advanced Seminar in BioethicsThis advanced seminar will delve deeply into an important topic in bioethics. The topics will vary from year to year. Possible topics include: a detailed study of sperm and ovum donation; human medical research in developing nations; informed consent; classification of mental illness.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofillnessSDG3
PHLD78H3Advanced Seminar in Political PhilosophyThis advanced seminar will delve more deeply into an issue in political philosophy. Topics will vary from year to year, but some examples include: distributive justice, human rights, and the political morality of freedom. Students will be required to present material to the class at least once during the semester.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhilosophy (UTSC), Department ofhuman rightsSDG16
PHM101H1Pharmacotherapy 1: Foundations & General MedicineThis is the first of a series of courses taught over three years of the program which will provide the required knowledge and skills to effectively manage patients’ drug therapy. In addition to covering selected therapeutic topics, the course will integrate relevant pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, selected pharmaceutics and principles of evidence-based pharmacotherapy. Principles of drug therapy in geriatrics, pediatrics and other special populations will be addressed. Various learning and teaching methodologies will be used including didactic teaching, small group case discussions, and in-depth discussions of cases in small case study seminar groups. This course will help students prepare for the Medication Therapy Management course and the other Pharmacotherapy courses.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM105H1Medication Therapy Management 1Medication Therapy Management (MTM) involves a partnership between the patient, pharmacist, and other healthcare providers to promote safe and effective medication use so that desirable patient outcomes are attained. It is founded on the philosophy of Pharmaceutical Care, and may encompass an array of services, whereby the pharmacist employs a systematic patient-centered approach to define and achieve goals related to optimal pharmacotherapy. The MTM series of courses will be delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program, with MTM 1 being the first of the four-part course series. MTM 1 will allow students to begin to apply knowledge and develop skills needed to undertake MTM, with content drawn from co-requisite and pre-requisite courses. Lecture and laboratory sessions will be designed to facilitate guided, independent, and collaborative learning. A key element of MTM 1 is that students will have the opportunity to undertake the role of a pharmacist in a simulated community practice and will be responsible for various tasks such as conducting patient interviews, assessing the appropriateness of pharmacotherapy, providing medication-related patient education, actively participating in the medication-dispensing process, responding to drug information queries from patients and health care providers, documenting pharmacotherapeutic recommendations, and interpreting the pharmacist’s ethical and legal obligations within provincial and federal regulatory frameworks. This course will introduce and develop fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes intrinsic to the pharmacy student’s professional identity development; these attributes will be transferable to diverse practice settings, and prepare students for their first year early experiential rotation.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, healthcare, knowledge, learning, laborSDG3
PHM110H1Health SystemsThis course introduces pharmacy students to Canada’s health care system, including the structures, functions and the policies that underpin health care services. Students will learn about the roles and responsibilities of the key health care providers in a variety of health care settings. Students will gain insight into how and where pharmacy and medications fit within the larger system of care. Historical context will be used to explain why the health care system exists and critical reflection will be encouraged to explore how and why the system may be evolving, especially with respect to the roles that pharmacists and other professionals play within the system. The course provides an introduction to essential management, communication, leadership, and interprofessional skills that are required by health care professionals. Interprofessional collaboration is a key component to optimal patient care and an efficient health care system. Students will participate in small groups with other health professional students to explore team work, roles and team dynamics.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, laborSDG3
PHM113H1Pharmacy InformaticsPharmacy informatics introduces students to two core types of information: 1) patient-specific information created in the care of patients and 2) knowledge-based information, which includes the scientific literature of health care. Informatics also implies the use of technology in managing information and knowledge. Students will develop the introductory knowledge and skills to assume responsibility for identifying, accessing, retrieving, creating and exchanging relevant information to ensure safe and effective patient care throughout the medication use process. This course will utilize an innovative e-Resource and ample opportunity to develop skills in this emerging area.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledgeSDG3
PHM114H1Social & Behavioural HealthThis course is composed of three components: 1) introduction to sociological theories and concepts that impact health and health care; 2) introduction to professionalism and ethics and 3) introduction to the ways in which individual psychology shapes and affects health and health care. Topics such as the social determinants of health and related ethical issues; the social construction of disease; and the exploration of when and why people seek health care services will be used to stimulate discussion about how social forces impact pharmacy practice. Codes of ethics and other ethical principles for guiding professional practice in pharmacy will be discussed through the analysis of ethics cases. Behaviouralist, cognitivist, developmentalist, and psychoanalytic theories will be used to help students understand the range of responses and behaviours individuals may demonstrate when dealing with health-related issues. Students will apply these theories to discussion of different patient education (counselling) approaches designed to optimize personal and health-related outcomes.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth careSDG3
PHM130H1Pharmaceutical CalculationsAs pharmacists, you are expected to integrate your knowledge and skills gained throughout the pharmacy curriculum to provide direct patient care. Pharmacy practice is calculations intensive and accuracy is critically important to safe and effective patient care. As medication therapy experts, patients and other health care providers value and depend on pharmacists’ expertise and accuracy in pharmaceutical calculations. Throughout the course, students will be required to complete pharmaceutical calculations with a focus on accuracy. A case based approach will be taken to familiarize students with real life examples of common calculations required to practice in community and hospital settings. The objective of this course is to prepare the student to apply knowledge and skills gained to other courses in the program, such as the early practice experience (EPE 1).Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledgeSDG3
PHM151H1Early Practice Experience 1This course is the first of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake this first EPE-1 during the summer following Year 1 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within a community pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, laborSDG8, SDG3
PHM201H1Pharmacotherapy 2: Self-Care Perspectives and PharmacotherapySelf-care perspectives and pharmacotherapy is the second in a series of Pharmacotherapy courses taught over three years. In addition to covering selected therapeutic topics relating to self-care, (primarily dermatology and EENT) the course will address principles of drug therapy in the practice context of self-care in which pharmacists work unsupervised as the primary health professional contact. It will build and enhance students’ knowledge and skills in the management of minor, self-limiting and self-diagnosed ailments, which is within the scope of practice for pharmacists. Special contextual issues relating to the pharmacist’s role in self-care, particularly communicating with patients; and the pharmacist’s responsibility in accurately assessing and triaging patients, developing care plans and monitoring for this patient population, including special populations of concern. Issues of preventing drug therapy problems related to patient self-selection will be part of patient safety concerns. This course will build on content and skills from PHM101H1 and PHM105H1. The course will be aligned to the other Pharmacotherapy modules and will provide the required knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours to effectively manage patients’ drug therapy in incorporating relevant schema recognition, pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmaceutics and evidence-based authoritative sources of best practice pharmacotherapy.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledgeSDG3
PHM203H1Pharmacotherapy 4: Infectious DiseasesThis course is designed to provide students with the knowledge in pathobiology, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, clinical pharmacokinetics and relevant pharmaceutics required to be a practitioner in infectious diseases therapeutics. The course will be taught using a variety of techniques including on-line lectures, case-based learning and small interactive group learning.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM204H1Pharmacotherapy 5: Cardiovascular DiseasesThis course is designed to provide students with the knowledge in pathobiology, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, and clinical pharmacokinetics required to be a practitioner in cardiovascular therapeutics. The course will be taught using a variety of techniques including lectures and team-based learning.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM205H1Medication Therapy Management 2This Medication Therapy Management (MTM) course is the second of the four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses. MTM 2 will enable a student to continue to apply knowledge and develop skills needed by a pharmacist to provide patient care, using a systematic patient-care process to define and achieve the goals of optimizing safe, effective pharmacotherapy. MTM 2 course content is drawn from relevant co- and pre-requisite courses. Lectures and simulated practice sessions are designed to facilitate independent and collaborative learning that will be transferrable to diverse practice settings and prepare a student for early experiential learning. Students will be responsible to perform and document a comprehensive patient assessment to identify, resolve and prevent drug therapy problems, and educate patients on the appropriate use of medications. Students will be required to assess a patient’s health status; integrate relevant information to recommend appropriate therapy, determine efficacy and safety endpoints for monitoring therapy, document a care plan, and appropriate follow-up parameters with patients to evaluate their response to therapy, in a simulated practice environment. Students will also actively participate in the medication dispensing process, prepare extemporaneously compounded pharmaceutical products and interpret the pharmacist’s professional, ethical and legal obligation within provincial and federal frameworks.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learning, laborSDG8
PHM206H1Medication Therapy Management 3Medication Therapy Management 3 (MTM 3) is the third of a four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses that is delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program. MTM 3 builds on the skills developed in MTM 1 and MTM 2, focusing on more comprehensive, integrated patient centred care. MTM is founded on the philosophy of Pharmaceutical Care and involves a partnership between the patient, pharmacist, and other health care providers to promote safe and effective medication use to achieve desirable patient outcomes. MTM 3 provides students learning opportunities to apply and integrate materials learned through all courses in the curriculum to date, using simulated practice-based interactions to enhance their patient-care skills. Lectures will provide foundational material and skills which will be applied in the simulated interactions. Simulated interactions will focus on developing effective patient-centered management of multidimensional drug-therapy anchored in a professional context, in preparation for the student’s second year practice experiential course.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, learningSDG3
PHM213H1Health Economics & PharmacoeconomicsThis course surveys the economic aspects of the pharmaceutical sector. The course will use the methods of economic analysis to investigate how markets allocate resources, when they work well and the role for government when they do not work well. Specific topics include the economics of the development of new drugs; economic aspects of drug insurance, economic appraisal of new drugs (“pharmacoeconomics”); and economic models of the pharmacist labour market.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlabour, investSDG8, SDG3
PHM215H1Management: Skills, Communication & CollaborationManagement skills and related communication and collaboration skills are essential for success in any field of pharmacy practice. This course will provide students with an introduction to basic concepts in management, communication and collaboration with other health and business professionals, and will culminate with the development of a business plan that enables students to apply knowledge and skills. This course is also designed to give students a broad overview in collaborative leadership theory so that they are better prepared to work effectively in their chosen field. Students will learn how pharmacy practice in different settings has evolved from 1985 to 2000 to 2015 as well as how practice may evolve in the future. In doing so students will develop a greater appreciation of the skills required to deliver effective patient care-focused services. Overall, the aim of this course is to equip students with the ability to apply their clinical, pharmaceutical and management skills to provide high quality services that are patient focused and demonstrate value for money.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, laborSDG8, SDG3
PHM230H1Physical Assessment & Injection TechniquesThis course will provide an introduction to physical assessment of patients. Students will engage in lectures, on-line activities, and skills practice in a laboratory setting. This course includes a module pertaining to the administration of substances by injection that allows students to meet the competencies required by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Ontario College of Pharmacists.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLpublic health, laborSDG3
PHM241H1Topics in Pharmaceutical Quality & Clinical Laboratory MedicineThis course will provide an introduction to pharmaceutical analysis and discuss the importance of assuring the pharmaceutical quality of medicinal products with an emphasis on establishment of quality control assays and specifications, bioequivalence testing of generic drugs, special considerations for biopharmaceutical products, and the regulatory process in Canada. In addition, the course will discuss the application of analytic techniques in clinical laboratory medicine with a focus on commonly used tests to monitor patient health and the therapeutic use of drugs, including tests for personalized drug therapy. The course includes a laboratory component which will present drug formulation and related quality control issues.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlaborSDG3
PHM251H1Early Practice Experience 2This course is the second of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake EPE-2 during the summer following Year 2 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within an institutional pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, labor, institutSDG8, SDG3
PHM302H1Pharmacotherapy 7: NeuropsychiatryThis course is designed to provide pharmacy students with the knowledge in pathobiology, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy and clinical pharmacokinetics required to be a practitioner in neuropsychiatric therapeutics. The course may be taught using a variety of techniques including on-line lectures, case-based learning and small interactive group learning.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM305H1Medication Therapy Management 4Medication Therapy Management 4 (MTM 4) is the final course in a four-part course series that is delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program. MTM 4 builds on the skills developed in previous MTM courses, offering students opportunities to apply and integrate materials learned through all courses in the curriculum to date. This course focuses on the development of skills required for Expanded Scope of Practice (renewing, modifying and initiating pharmacotherapy) and specifically medication reconciliation. Lectures and applied Simulated Practice Sessions emphasize the pharmacists’ role and responsibilities as a communicator, care provider, collaborator and advocate, to prepare students for their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience rotations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlabor, reconciliationSDG10, SDG3
PHM310H1Pharmacy in the Modern Health Care SystemThis course will take an issues-oriented, critical-thinking approach to the healthcare system, with a particular emphasis on pharmacy practice. The course will build on the material from PHM110H1, PHM114H1 and PHM215H1, and will allow a deeper look into areas such as quality and patient safety, e-health technology and the health care needs of diverse populations, including Indigenous peoples. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the role of interprofessional collaboration in health care delivery. Week by week students will examine issues with drug supply and access, pharmacy practice reform, expanded services, collaborative care and reimbursement models, and the interconnectivity of the disparate parts of the health care system. By participating in class discussions, reading course reference materials and completing assignments, students will learn to identify and analyze current and emerging health system issues. In the course of doing so, they will also become aware of, understand and appreciate: factors internal and external to pharmacy and medication use that drive change in practice current strategies for evaluating and improving health care and pharmacy practice the role of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of healthcare emerging roles and opportunities in pharmacy. This course will help students complement their thinking about medications, individual patients, and the clinical encounter with an orientation to the healthcare system as a whole: how it functions, what are some of its key issues, and how do we tackle them.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, healthcare, labor, indigenousSDG3, SDG10, SDG16
PHM320H1Global Pharmaceutical PolicyThis course is designed for students who are curious to learn about pharmaceutical public policy at the global level and also to explore the interrelationship between global and domestic health public policy issues, particularly those related to political economy and the governance of the pharmaceutical system. There are no prerequisites required but students are strongly recommended to have taken at least one social science or public health course given the ample reading and research requirements. Particular emphasis will be placed on how governments in different jurisdictions manage their public health responsibilities, particularly in terms of providing access to essential medicines and human development objectives, the tension between economic and health objectives, global trade obligations and their impact on access to medicines, and how pressure from special interest groups are relevant to pharmaceutical policy. Corruption issues will also be addressed. This course encourages a large amount of student participation through group work, discussion, presentations, and debate. Accordingly, students will need to keep up with the weekly readings in order to ensure that they are prepared for the class.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLpublic health, trade, governance, corruptSDG3, SDG10, SDG16
PHM325H1Indigenous Issues in Health & HealingThis course examines the many issues surrounding the health of Indigenous people living in Canada. During the 13 weeks of class, students will come to understand the present day health issues of Indigenous peoples from the perspective of their historical and political context and the effects of health care policy. The many highly qualified speakers from the Indigenous community and its focus on health and the healing process make this course unique in the university. Optional, but strongly recommended, field trips include a “medicine walk” on the Six Nations reserve in which students will be able to see firsthand the source of some of the herbal preparations that are used in healing, and a purification (sweat) lodge ceremony outside the city. The course is enriched by its association between students of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy and the Indigenous Studies program in the Faculty of Arts, and Science, many of whom are of Indigenous origin.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, health issues, indigenousSDG3, SDG10, SDG16
PHM326H1Advanced Pharmacotherapy of Infectious DiseasesThis course is designed to expose students to hospital-based clinical pharmacy practice, with a focus on advanced topics in the area of Infectious Diseases and an emphasis on the role of pharmacotherapy. As an extension of PHM 203 (PCT 4: The Pharmacotherapy of Infectious Diseases), students will be introduced to more complicated and nuanced clinical syndromes, such as nosocomial-acquired infections and infections in immunocompromised hosts. The course will be taught using a combination of classroom lectures, case-based discussions, small-group and self-directed learning. Student participation both within the classroom and group work assignments is expected.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG3
PHM330H1Preparation for Advanced Pharmacy Practice ExperienceThe Preparation for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) course is designed to strengthen and integrate students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in preparation for, and make the transition to, APPE rotations. This course, via lectures, workshops, case-based role play activities and related assignments and assessments, will enable students to review, build on, consolidate and apply previous knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired throughout the curriculum in academic courses and in earlier experiential rotations in the areas of patient care provision, communication, collaboration, management, advocacy, scholarship, and professionalism. (CanMEDS, 2005, AFPC, 2010). The goal of this course is to engender students’ practical skills and strategies to help prepare them for the role of advanced pharmacy practice students.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, gender, labor, transitSDG5, SDG8, SDG11, SDG3
PHM348H1Intermediate Pharmacy Practice ExperienceThis direct patient care rotation is designed to build and enhance students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the provision of direct patient care in institutional, community or ambulatory pharmacy practice. The rotation will build on knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in academic courses and earlier experiential rotations throughout the curriculum. This rotation will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in any patient care setting such as a hospital, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on establishing a context for the provision of pharmaceutical care in a clinical setting. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, provision of follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, with regular communication with team members to share and document their assessment of the patient’s medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledge, labor, institutSDG3
PHM350H1Pharmacotherapy in Ambulatory CareAmbulatory care pharmacists are accountable for addressing drug therapy needs and developing sustained partnerships with patients in an outpatient environment. They practice in primary care, family health teams, community pharmacies and specialty clinics. This practice can be independent or in a collaboration with other health care providers. Ambulatory care pharmacists require the knowledge and skills to triage, prescribe, administer and monitor medication therapies. They provide pharmaceutical care to patients with a variety of medical conditions and levels of acuity. This course will provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values to be a contemporary ambulatory care practitioner with an emphasis on ambulatory care sensitive conditions, preventative care, minor ailments and natural health products.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledge, laborSDG3, SDG4, SDG8
PHM351H1Pharmacotherapy in Institutional CareInstitutional pharmacists are accountable for addressing drug therapy needs with patients in an inpatient environment. Students will learn to apply therapeutics that are commonly seen when caring for a hospitalized patient. Some of the topics included are: IV therapeutics (fluid and electrolytes), acute pain management, VTE prophylaxis, diabetic ketoacidosis and in-hospital management of diabetes, perioperative medication management. Topics may include a brief introduction to critical care and some aspects of emergency medicine. Aspects of patient and medication safety will be integrated into the course.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLinstitutSDG, SDG3
PHM352H1Pharmacotherapy in Older AdultsGrowth in the proportion of the population over age 65 is expected to place significant demands on the health care system. Pharmacists must be prepared to manage the pharmacotherapy of older patients in order to achieve optimal individual and health system outcomes. This 26-hour selective course will prepare students for their future roles in geriatric practice through the development of specific competencies in the knowledge and application of pharmaceutical care for older adults. This course will cover demographics, biology and pathophysiology of aging, socioeconomics, ethical issues, and beliefs and barriers regarding health care and medication use in older individuals. Communication issues, unique needs of caring for seniors, and barriers to medication taking will also be addressed. Specific pharmacotherapy of conditions prevalent in the elderly, including movement disorders, dementia, urinary incontinence, and specific drug-induced illnesses and adverse events will be covered. This course will rely on both didactic and case-based discussions to demonstrate and enable students to develop skills integral to patient assessment and optimizing drug therapy in the older adult with complicated diseases and medication history.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLsocioeconomic, health care, illness, knowledgeSDG3
PHM353H1Pharmacotherapy in Critical CareThis course is designed to expose students to hospital-based clinical pharmacy practice, with a focus on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Various topics that encompass commonly encountered clinical conditions of patients in the ICU will be discussed, with an emphasis on the role of pharmacotherapy. Students will also be introduced to the role of multidisciplinary team members integral to the ICU including the respiratory therapist, nurse, ethicist and intensivist (pending availability). The course will be taught using traditional classroom lectures, case-based discussions, small-group learning projects, and self-directed learning. Student participation both within the classroom and online, and in group work assignments is expected.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG3
PHM354H1Pharmacotherapy in PediatricsThis course builds on general knowledge and skills gained in the first three years of pharmacotherapy courses. It allows students to gain the fundamental pharmacotherapeutic knowledge and practice skills to care for patients from the neonatal period to the adolescent years. In addition to covering evidence-based pharmacotherapy of several pediatric conditions, the course integrates relevant normal development and physiology (fetal, neonatal, infant, child and adolescent), pathophysiology, clinical pharmacokinetics, medication safety, poison prevention, and patient (through the ages) and caregiver education. Each week the course will consist of two hours of lectures and group case discussions primarily presented by pediatric clinicians from Sick Kids Hospital. The course allows students to effectively manage pediatric patients’ medication therapy in selected pediatric conditions, prepares the student for pediatric direct patient care (DPC) and non-direct patient care (NDPC) rotations, and encourages a career in pediatric pharmacy practice.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledgeSDG3
PHM355H1Pharmacotherapy in Women's HealthMedications used in the care of Canadian women are amongst the most commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals. This course is designed to allow the student to obtain fundamental pharmacotherapeutic knowledge of medications used from menarche to menopause. This course will encourage students to develop a practice that provides quality care to women.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, womenSDG4, SDG5
PHM360H1Personalized MedicineThis course builds upon fundamental pharmacokinetic concepts taught in the first and second years in order to understand, describe and predict the sources of intra- and inter-individual variability in drug disposition and response in different patient population groups. The course is designed for students to understand the underlying basic principles used to individualize drug and dosage regimens for patients based on genetic, physiological and environmental factors. Critical evaluation of evidence and review of current guidelines for dose or drug adjustments based on genetic factors and the potential for drugdiet, drug-drug or drug-disease interactions will be covered. Recent advances in pharmacogenomics and targeted drug therapy will also be covered. The format of the course to address these issues will be student presentations and in-class discussion of specific questions that are designed to illustrate these points.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLenvironmentalSDG3
PHM370H1Community Pharmacy ManagementA comprehensive program outlining the issues and topics which are critical in the successful operation of a community pharmacy practice including: selection of organizational structures, demographic review, financial analysis, business plan development, purchasing and financing a community pharmacy, operational workflow, financial management, risk management and insurance, inventory purchasing procedures and inventory management, pricing decisions, marketing strategy, advertising, sales promotion and salesmanship, ethics, security and general business policies. Building on the basic principles taught in PHM215H1, this course expands into a case based learning application of business administration which offer students exposure to Finance, Operations, Organizational Behaviour, Innovation and General Management as applied to the field of Pharmacy and Healthcare. The cases will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills for effective analysis, evaluation and problem-solving. To do this, students will learn about basic analytical tools (e.g., projections, break-evens, communication, organization theory) and will then be required to apply these tools using case methodology. Students will be given the opportunity to practice decision-making with imperfect information under time constraints and develop business writing skills. Preparation of a detailed business plan will also be a mandatory component for this course.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealthcare, learningSDG3
PHM371H1Institutional Pharmacy Practice ManagementThis course builds on the principles taught in PHM215H1 Management: Skills, Communication and Collaboration with specific application to an institutional setting. By means of lectures and case discussions, students will gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required to successfully practice in a hospital environment. A focus of the course will be on critical thinking, problem solving and project management.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, labor, institutSDG8, SDG3
PHM383H1Antimicrobial StewardshipAntimicrobial Stewardship is an inter-disciplinary, multi-faceted approach to optimize antimicrobial use. While the ultimate goal of Antimicrobial Stewardship is to improve patient outcome, appropriate and effective use of antimicrobials is an important component to control antimicrobial resistance, minimize unintended consequences such as C. difficile infections, and to contain health care costs. As of 2013, presence of an active Antimicrobial Stewardship Program has been made a Required Operating Practice for acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities by Accreditation Canada. This course expands and deepens knowledge gained from the Year 2 Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy and Microbiology courses, with an emphasis on clinical application within the antimicrobial stewardship context. It will introduce students to the principles of antimicrobial stewardship to facilitate rational selection of antimicrobial regimens; stewardship interventions; quality improvement methods; as well as program development, implementation and evaluation. The course culminates to a team proposal presentation for an antimicrobial stewardship program based on a fictitious institution’s profile. Each team is tasked with convincing a panel of judges, who in practice are antimicrobial stewardship clinicians or program executives, to support their proposed program.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledge, institutSDG3
PHM384H1Teaching & LearningThe educator role for pharmacists is broad and involves diverse roles, including teaching patients, designing and delivering continuing education, mentoring/precepting students, and educating other care professionals in small and large group settings. In order to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to fulfill this mandate, a course in educational theories and methods is important. Material from this course will be applied in a practical sense to pharmacy practice courses and experiential learning activities. Specific topics to be covered in the course will include: development of behavioural learning objectives, learning theories, teaching techniques for various audiences, assessment tools, methods, and techniques and educational practice as a professional.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM386H1Mental Health & AddictionsThis course is designed to provide students interested in mental health and addictions with a broader knowledge base in the field. It will introduce students to the mental health and addiction system in Canada, the role of stigma in accessing and providing care, the role of psychotherapy and the evidence base for specific modalities, including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), mindfulness therapy, and motivational interviewing. The course will also address issues such as medication adherence and mental health first aid. Students will also be taught how to use validated scales to assess for psychotropic-induced movement disorders. The course will introduce additional mental health disorders/issues, not covered in PHM302H1 including psychotropic medication use in pregnancy and lactation and child and adolescent psychiatry. It will also cover key substance use disorders/issues in more depth than was possible in PHM302H1, including harm reduction principles, cannabis use (recreational and medicinal), recreational drugs and anabolic steroids. The course will be taught using a variety of techniques including didactic lectures, observed patient interviews (video-simulation), case-based learning and interactive group learning.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLmental health, mindfulness, knowledge, learningSDG3
PHM387H1Global HealthGlobal Health is defined as an area for study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide by reducing avoidable diseases, disabilities, and deaths. This elective will introduce students to selected foundational competencies in global health education such as the global burden of disease, social and economic determinants of health, the globalization of health and healthcare, global health governance, human rights and equity. Students will discuss practical and ethical challenges in delivering care in low-resource settings, describe tools and strategies to address the needs of specific vulnerable populations and examine cultural awareness and its importance in caring for diverse vulnerable populations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLglobal health, healthcare, disabilit, health education, equity, globaliz, equit, vulnerable population, governance, human rightsSDG3, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
PHM388H1Self-Care Perspectives and Pharmacotherapy for Minor AilmentsThe management of minor, self-limiting and self-diagnosed ailments such as rashes, cold sores and hay fever is within the scope of practice for pharmacists. This course is designed to build and enhance students’ knowledge and skills necessary for contemporary and future pharmacy practice in the area of self-care and minor ailments. This course will cover the management of conditions not covered in other courses and will provide the students’ with a comprehensive understanding of non-prescription and prescription therapeutics as they relate to patient self-medication and minor ailments. Emphasis will be placed on the role and responsibility of the pharmacist in accurately assessing and triaging patients, determining the appropriate use of non-prescription and prescription drugs, by determining when to follow-up, refer, and how to document the patient’s care. The student will be equipped with the clinical skills, confidence, and tools needed to gather and convey reliable minor ailment information to patients and healthcare providers in an effort to effectively and confidently assess and treat patients. With this knowledge and a structured framework for conducting a minor ailments assessment, students will be able to help patients make appropriate decisions and achieve optimal outcomes from their selected, evidence-based therapy. The main course material will be presented as case-based didactic lectures; student participation in class discussions and interactive classroom activities will be expected. There will be an opportunity for application of the concepts discussed in lectures via simulated patient counselling activities, case-based group learning, and self-directed activities.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealthcare, knowledge, learningSDG3
PHM400H1Transition to Advanced Pharmacy Practice ExperienceThe Transition to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) course is designed to strengthen and integrate students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in preparation for, and make the transition to, APPE rotations. This course, via lectures, workshops, case-based role play activities and related assignments and assessments, will enable students to review, build on, consolidate and apply previous knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired throughout the curriculum in academic courses and in earlier experiential rotations in the areas of patient care provision, communication, collaboration, management, advocacy, scholarship, and professionalism. (CanMEDS, 2005, AFPC, 2010). The goal of this course is to engender students’ practical skills and strategies to help prepare them for the role of advanced pharmacy practice students.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, gender, labor, transitSDG5, SDG8, SDG11, SDG3
PHM401H1Institutional Practice Direct Patient Care 1All students will be required to complete two 5-week institutional rotations. At least five weeks will be in an adult in-patient service; the other five weeks may be in any area of the institution (including ambulatory clinics and pediatric populations). These rotations will ideally occur within academic health care institutions. The emphasis for all direct patient care rotations is for the student to be immersed in the responsibility of providing pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate effectively with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, labor, institutSDG3
PHM402H1Institutional Practice Direct Patient Care 2All students will be required to complete two 5-week institutional rotations. At least five weeks will be in an adult in-patient service; the other five weeks may be in any area of the institution (including ambulatory clinics and pediatric populations). These rotations will ideally occur within academic health care institutions. The emphasis for all direct patient care rotations is for the student to be immersed in the responsibility of providing pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate effectively with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, labor, institutSDG3
PHM411H1Community Practice Direct Patient Care 1These Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotations occur within academic community pharmacies, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage accurate and effective drug distribution under the supervision of the pharmacist and will participate in expanded scopes of pharmacy practice.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, laborSDG3
PHM414Y1Community Practice Direct Patient CareAll students will be required to complete a 10-week rotation in a community pharmacy setting. This type of rotation will ideally be held at an academic community pharmacy, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage safe and effective drug distribution under the guidance and supervision of the pharmacist as appropriate, and will participate in the full scope of pharmacy practice.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, laborSDG3
PHM424H1Selective Direct Patient CareThese rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, labor, institutSDG3
PHM451H1Elective Direct Patient Care 1These rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, labor, institutSDG3
PHM452H1Elective Direct Patient Care 2These rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, labor, institutSDG3
PHM461H1Elective Non Direct Patient Care 1These 5-week elective rotations are designed for the student to gain insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice and/or the health care system, which may require a diversity of knowledge or skills (e.g., pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). Such rotations enable students to gain awareness of a variety of roles for pharmacists and enhance the student’s understanding of the broader scope within which pharmacists work. The rotation will build on the knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and other experiential rotations. The specific focus of the student’s activities and rotation-specific learning objectives will be determined through a collaborative discussion between the preceptor and student, taking into account the needs of the site and student interest. Each student may complete a maximum of two 5-week NDPC rotations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledge, learning, laborSDG3
PHM462H1Elective Non Direct Patient Care 2These 5-week elective rotations are designed for the student to gain insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice and/or the health care system, which may require a diversity of knowledge or skills (e.g., pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). Such rotations enable students to gain awareness of a variety of roles for pharmacists and enhance the student’s understanding of the broader scope within which pharmacists work. The rotation will build on the knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and other experiential rotations. The specific focus of the student’s activities and rotation-specific learning objectives will be determined through a collaborative discussion between the preceptor and student, taking into account the needs of the site and student interest. Each student may complete a maximum of two 5-week NDPC rotations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLhealth care, knowledge, learning, laborSDG3
PHM618H1Educational Theory and PracticePharmacists work as educators in a variety of different contexts: for patients, for peers, for students, and for other health professionals. This course will introduce students to major theoretical principles and methods of teaching, learning in the health professions and provide them with opportunities for application in their workplace.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG4, SDG3
PHM622H1Patient/Medication SafetyThis course will examine patient safety and the potential for medication incidents from two aspects: (1) the medication-use system (e.g. prescribing, order entry, dispensing, administration, and monitoring); and (2) patient care (e.g. preventable adverse drug events experienced by patients). It will build on materials from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada (ISMP Canada), the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), and the concept of continuous quality improvement in pharmacy practice. The CPSI Patient Safety Competency Domains will be applied to topics covered in this course.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLinstitutSDG, SDG3
PHM651H1Contemporary Topics in Infectious DiseasesThis course is designed to advance the student’s knowledge and skills in the management of infectious diseases through a focus on selected infection syndromes and their management. The course will be case- based with topics representing commonly encountered infections allowing the student to further develop their pharmacotherapy knowledge to be able to manage complex patients. Students will demonstrate their pharmaceutical care skills as they progress through the course. All material will be delivered on- line with opportunities for the student to pose questions for additional learning to an expert in the field. Each lesson will incorporate active learning activities for the students to complete in order to facilitate knowledge and skill development.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM652H1Contemporary Topics in Primary CareThis course is designed to advance the student’s knowledge and skills in the management of common topics encountered in an integrated team primary care practice through a focus on selected topics and their management. The course will be case-based with topics representing commonly encountered diseases allowing the student to further develop their pharmacotherapy knowledge to be able to manage complex patients. Students will demonstrate their pharmaceutical care skills as they progress through the course. All material will be delivered on-line with opportunities for the student to pose questions for additional learning to an expert in the field. Each lesson will incorporate active learning activities for the students to complete in order to facilitate knowledge and skill development.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLknowledge, learningSDG3
PHM655H1Contemporary Topics in Addictions and Mental HealthThis course is designed to advance the student’s knowledge and skills in psychiatry through a focus on selected disorders and their management. There will be an emphasis on substance use disorders, and their comorbidity with other mental health disorders. The course will be case-based with topics representing commonly encountered disorders allowing the student to further develop their pharmacotherapy knowledge to be able to manage complex patients. Students will demonstrate their pharmaceutical care skills as they progress through the course. All material will be delivered on-line with opportunities for the student to pose questions for additional learning to an expert in the field. Each lesson will incorporate active learning activities for the students to complete in order to facilitate knowledge and skill development.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLmental health, knowledge, learningSDG3
PHM656H1Managing Drug OverdosesPharmacists in a variety of practice settings can have a positive influence on the identification and management of intentional and accidental drug overdoses. This course will provide in-depth reviews of the top drug categories involved in human exposures. This includes analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, antipsychotics, antidepressants, secretagogues, insulin and cardiovascular drugs. Learners will also be able to effectively triage patients who require medical assessment and facilitate self-care when required. Pharmacists who work in emergency departments, intensive care units and general medicine wards will have enhanced understanding of the decontamination, elimination and treatment strategies employed in managing patients experiencing drug overdose.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcontaminationSDG3
PHS100H1Discovering Global HealthThis course introduces students to basic public health-related concepts, significant aspects of the historical development of global health, and a selection of topics illustrating the broad and evolving nature of this field. In addition, it helps students explore the contributions that various disciplines/fields offer to global health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, global healthSDG3
PHY100H1The Magic of PhysicsThis course provides a survey of Physics, including both Classical and Modern Physics. It is designed for non-scientists, and assumes no background in either science or mathematics. The approach to the course is broad rather than deep. We will concentrate on the concepts underlying such fascinating topics as planetary motion, chaos, the nature of light, time travel, black holes, matter waves, Schrodinger's cat, quarks, and climate change. We will uncover the wonders of the classical and the quantum worlds courtesy of Galileo, Newton, Maxwell, Einstein, Heisenberg and many others. (PHY100H1 is primarily intended as a Breadth Requirement course for students in the Humanities and Social Science)Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhysics (FAS), Department ofclimate, planetSDG13
PHY198H1Physics at the Cutting EdgeA limited enrollment seminar course for First Year Science students interested in current research in Physics. Students will meet active researchers studying the universe from the centre of the earth to the edge of the cosmos. Topics may range from string theory to experimental biological physics, from climate change to quantum computing, from superconductivity to earthquakes. The course may involve both individual and group work, essays and oral presentations. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhysics (FAS), Department ofclimateSDG13
PHY351H5Climate PhysicsThis course presents the physics of Earth’s climate. Emphasis will be placed on the basic principles and processes involved in physical and dynamic climatology and the physical interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, and land surface. Topics may include components of the climate system and global energy balance, atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, the hydrological cycle, general circulation of the atmosphere, ocean circulation and climate, climate modeling, and climate change. In the lab practicals, students will gain hands-on experience in analyzing climate data and simple climate modeling. [24L, 24P]University of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences (UTM), Department ofhydrological cycle, energy, climate, ocean, landSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
PHY392H1Physics of ClimateThis course provides an introduction to climate physics and the earth-atmosphere-ocean system. Topics include solar and terrestrial radiation; global energy balance; radiation laws; radiative transfer; atmospheric structure; convection; the meridional structure of the atmosphere; the general circulation of the atmosphere; the ocean and its circulation; and climate variability.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPhysics (FAS), Department ofenergy, solar, climate, oceanSDG7, SDG13
PHYC14H3Introduction to Atmospheric PhysicsThis course provides an introduction to atmospheric physics. Topics include atmospheric structure, atmospheric thermodynamics, convection, general circulation of the atmosphere, radiation transfer within atmospheres and global energy balance. Connections will be made to topics such as climate change and air pollution.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofpollution, energy, climate, pollutSDG3, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
PMA445Y1Oratorio EnsembleThis course focuses on the study and performance of solo arias, duets, trios, and quartets of the oratorio genre. It has a thematic trajectory from its European Christian origins to its present-day empowerment in cultural and secular determinations, and across world religions. The course takes an activist’s eye to acknowledging, re-examining, and renewing the storytelling prominence of oratorio through lenses of decolonization, survivorship bias, intentionality, universality, and dedicated authenticity. The repertoire will include traditional masterworks, new works, and genre-bending concepts, with an orientation to professional engagement.Music, Faculty ofNULLdecolonizationSDG10
PMDB41H3Professional and Legal Issues, Research, Responsibilities and LeadershipDiscusses the changing role of the paramedic and introduces the student to the non-technical professional expectations of the profession. Introduces fundamental principles of medical research and professional principles. Topics covered include the role of professional organizations, the role of relevant legislation, the labour/management environment, the field of injury prevention, and basic concepts of medical research. This course is taught at the Centennial HP Science and Technology Centre.University of Toronto ScarboroughBiological Sciences (UTSC), Department oflabourSDG8
PMU445Y1Oratorio EnsembleThis course focuses on the study and performance of solo arias, duets, trios, and quartets of the oratorio genre. It has a thematic trajectory from its European Christian origins to its present-day empowerment in cultural and secular determinations, and across world religions. The course takes an activist’s eye to acknowledging, re-examining, and renewing the storytelling prominence of oratorio through lenses of decolonization, survivorship bias, intentionality, universality, and dedicated authenticity. The repertoire will include traditional masterworks, new works, and genre-bending concepts, with an orientation to professional engagement.Music, Faculty ofNULLdecolonizationSDG10, SDG16
POL101H1The Real World of Politics: An IntroductionThis course introduces students to compelling issues of contemporary politics through the lens of classic and important texts in political science. The course covers the politics of climate change, Indigenous rights, elections and electoral systems, terrorism, social movements and political activism, voting, democracy, and power.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPolitical Science (FAS), Department ofindigenous, climate, democra, indigenous rights, terrorisSDG10, SDG16, SDG13
POLC58H3The Politics of National Identity and DiversityThis course explores the foundational concepts of nation and nationalism in Canadian and comparative politics, and the related issues associated with diversity. The first section looks at the theories related to nationalism and national identity, while the second applies these to better understand such pressing issues as minorities, multiculturalism, conflict and globalization. Areas of Focus: Canadian Government and Politics; Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, minorit, nationalismSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
POLC68H3The Constitution of Canada and the Charter of Rights and FreedomsThis course will investigate the development of Canadian constitutional law under the Constitution Act of 1982 and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Specific topics include criminal rights, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, equality rights, and aboriginal rights. Areas of Focus: Canadian Government and Politics; Public PolicyUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofinvest, equalitSDG10, SDG16
POLC69H3Political Economy: International and Comparative PerspectivesThis course provides an introduction to the field of political economy from an international and comparative perspective. The course explores the globalization of the economy, discusses traditional and contemporary theories of political economy, and examines issues such as trade, production, development, and environmental change. Areas of Focus: Comparative Politics; International RelationsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, trade, production, environmentalSDG9, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13
POLC70H3Political Thought: Foundations of Justice, Citizenship and PowerThis course introduces students to central concepts in political theory, such as justice, rights, and the state. Readings will include classical and medieval texts, such as Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Politics. Area of Focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofcitizenshipSDG16
POLC71H3Political Thought: Rights, Revolution and ResistanceThis course introduces students to central concepts in political theory, such as sovereignty, liberty, and equality. Readings will include modern and contemporary texts, such as Hobbes' Leviathan and Locke's Second Treatise of Government. Area of Focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofequalit, sovereigntySDG10, SDG16
POLC79H3Feminist Political ThoughtThis course examines the challenges and contributions of feminist political thought to the core concepts of political theory, such as rights, citizenship, democracy, and social movements. It analyzes the history of feminist political thought, and the varieties of contemporary feminist thought, including: liberal, socialist, radical, intersectional, and postcolonial. Area of Focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, feminis, democraSDG4, SDG5, SDG16
POLC80H3International Relations of AfricaThis course introduces students to the International Relations of Africa. This course applies the big questions in IR theory to a highly understudied region. The first half of the course focuses on security and politics, while the latter half pays heed to poverty, economic development, and multilateral institutions. Area of Focus: International RelationsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofpoverty, institutSDG1, SDG16, SDG8
POLC88H3The New International AgendaTraditional International Relations Theory has concentrated on relations between states, either failing to discuss, or missing the complexities of important issues such as terrorism, the role of women, proliferation, globalization of the world economy, and many others. This course serves as an introduction to these issues - and how international relations theory is adapting in order to cover them. Area of Focus: International RelationsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofwomen, globaliz, terrorisSDG5, SDG9, SDG16
POLC91H3Latin America: Dictatorship and DemocracyThis course explores the origins of Latin America's cycles of brutal dictatorship and democratic rule. It examines critically the assumption that Latin American countries have made the transition to democratic government. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department oftransit, democraSDG, SDG16
POLC94H3Globalization, Gender and DevelopmentThis course explores the gendered impact of economic Globalization and the various forms of resistance and mobilization that women of the global south have engaged in their efforts to cope with that impact. The course pays particular attention to regional contextual differences (Latin America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East) and to the perspectives of global south women, both academic and activist, on major development issues. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofgender, women, globalizSDG5, SDG9
POLC96H3State Formation and Authoritarianism in the Middle EastThis course examines the origins of, and political dynamics within, states in the contemporary Middle East. The first part of the course analyses states and state formation in historical perspective - examining the legacies of the late Ottoman and, in particular, the colonial period, the rise of monarchical states, the emergence of various forms of "ethnic" and/or "quasi" democracies, the onset of "revolutions from above", and the consolidation of populist authoritarian states. The second part of the course examines the resilience of the predominantly authoritarian state system in the wake of socio-economic and political reform processes. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofsocio-economic, resilien, resilience, democra, authoritarianSDG1, SDG11, SDG, SDG15, SDG16
POLC97H3Protest Politics in the Middle EastThis course examines various forms of protest politics in the contemporary Middle East. The course begins by introducing important theoretical debates concerning collective action in the region - focusing on such concepts as citizenship, the public sphere, civil society, and social movements. The second part of the course examines case studies of social action - examining the roles played by crucial actors such as labour, the rising Islamist middle classes/bourgeoisie, the region's various ethnic and religious minority groups, and women who are entering into the public sphere in unprecedented numbers. The course concludes by examining various forms of collective and non-collective action in the region from Islamist social movements to everyday forms of resistance. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, women, labour, minoritSDG5, SDG8, SDG10
POLC98H3International Political Economy of FinanceThe course explains why financial markets exist, and their evolution, by looking at the agents, actors and institutions which generate demand for them. We also consider the consequences of increasingly integrated markets, the causes of systemic financial crises, as well as the implications and feasibility of regulation. Area of Focus: International RelationsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department offinancial market, institutSDG10, SDG16, SDG8
POLC99H3Latin America: The Politics of the DispossessedThis course explores the way the poor and oppressed have organized and fought for their rights. Special attention is given to the way in which globalization has affected popular organizing, including its impact on insurgent movements such as the Zapatistas. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobalizSDG9, SDG1, SDG16
POLD30H3Legal ReasoningThis course will introduce students to the ideas and methods that guide judges and lawyers in their work. How does the abstract world of the law get translated into predictable, concrete decisions? How do judges decide what is the “correct” decision in a given case? The class will begin with an overview of the legal system before delving into the ideas guiding statute drafting and interpretation, judicial review and administrative discretion, the meaning of “evidence” and “proof,” constitutionalism, and appellate review. Time will also be spent exploring the ways that foreign law can impact and be reconciled with Canadian law in a globalizing world. Area of focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofABS, globaliz, legal system, judicSDG9, SDG16
POLD38H3Law and Global BusinessThis course examines how law both constitutes and regulates global business. Focusing on Canada and the role of Canadian companies within a global economy, the course introduces foundational concepts of business law, considering how the state makes markets by bestowing legal personality on corporations and facilitating private exchange. The course then turns to examine multinational businesses and the laws that regulate these cross-border actors, including international law, extra-territorial national law, and private and hybrid governance tools. Using real-world examples from court decisions and business case studies, students will explore some of the “governance gaps” produced by the globalization of business and engage directly with the tensions that can emerge between legal, ethical, and strategic demands on multinational business.University of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, governanceSDG9, SDG16
POLD42H3Advanced Topics in Public LawTopics and area of focus will vary depending on the instructor, and may include global perspectives on social and economic rights, judicial and constitutional politics in diverse states and human rights law in Canada.University of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofhuman rights, judicSDG16
POLD44H3Comparative Law and Social ChangeThis seminar examines how legal institutions and legal ideologies influence efforts to produce or prevent social change. The course will analyze court-initiated action as well as social actions “from below” (social movements) with comparative case studies. Area of Focus: Comparative PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofinstitut, social changeSDG16
POLD45H3ConstitutionalismThis course studies the theory of constitutionalism through a detailed study of its major idioms such as the rule of law, the separation of powers, sovereignty, rights, and limited government. Area of Focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofsovereignty, rule of lawSDG16
POLD53H3Political Disagreement in CanadaWhy do Canadians disagree in their opinions about abortion, same-sex marriage, crime and punishment, welfare, taxes, immigration, the environment, religion, and many other subjects? This course examines the major social scientific theories of political disagreement and applies these theories to an analysis of political disagreement in Canada. Area of Focus: Canadian Government and PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofwelfareSDG1, SDG4, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
POLD54H3Michi-Saagiig Nishnaabeg Nation Governance and PoliticsThe campuses of the University of Toronto are situated on the territory of the Michi-Saagiig Nation (one of the nations that are a part of the Nishnaabeg). This course will introduce students to the legal, political, and socio-economic structures of the Michi-Saagiig Nishnaabeg Nation and discuss its relations with other Indigenous nations and confederacies, and with the Settler societies with whom the Michi-Saagiig Nishnaabeg have had contact since 1492. In an era of reconciliation, it is imperative for students to learn and understand the Indigenous nation upon whose territory we are meeting and learning. Therefore, course readings will address both Michi-Saagiig Nishnaabeg and Settler contexts. In addition to literature, there will be guest speakers from the current six (6) Michi-Saagiig Nishnaabeg communities that exist: Alderville, Mississaugas of the Credit, Mississaugi 8, Oshkigamig (Curve Lake), Pamitaashkodeyong (Burns/Hiawatha), and Scugog.University of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofsocio-economic, learning, settler, indigenous, reconciliation, governanceSDG1, SDG10, SDG16
POLD55H3The Politics of Equality and Inequality in CanadaThis seminar provides an in-depth examination of the politics of inequality in Canada, and the role of the Canadian political-institutional framework in contributing to political, social and economic (in)equality. The focus will be on diagnosing how Canada’s political institutions variously impede and promote equitable treatment of different groups of Canadians (such as First Nations, women, racial and minority groups) and the feasibility of possible institutional and policy reforms to promote goals of social and economic equity. Area of Focus: Canadian Government and PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofequitable, equity, women, inequality, equit, equalit, minorit, institutSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
POLD58H3The New Nationalism in Liberal DemocraciesThis course examines the recent rise of ethnic nationalism in western liberal democracies, with a particular focus on the US, Canada, UK and France. It discusses the different perspectives on what is behind the rise of nationalism and populism, including economic inequality, antipathy with government, immigration, the role of political culture and social media.University of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, nationalism, democraSDG10, SDG16
POLD59H3Politics of DisabilityAn in-depth analysis of the place and rights of disabled persons in contemporary society. Course topics include historic, contemporary, and religious perspectives on persons with disabilities; the political organization of persons with disabilities; media presentation of persons with disabilities; and the role of legislatures and courts in the provision of rights of labour force equality and social service accessibility for persons with disabilities. Area of Focus: Canadian Government and PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofdisabilit, labour, equalit, accessibSDG8, SDG10, SDG11
POLD70H3Topics in Political TheoryThis seminar explores the ways in which political theory can deepen our understanding of contemporary political issues. Topics may include the following: cities and citizenship; multiculturalism and religious pluralism; the legacies of colonialism; global justice; democratic theory; the nature of power. Area of Focus: Political TheoryUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, cities, democraSDG11, SDG16
POLD75H3Property and PowerThis course examines the concept of property as an enduring theme and object of debate in the history of political thought and contemporary political theory. Defining property and justifying its distribution has a significant impact on how citizens experience authority, equality, freedom, and justice. The course will analyze different theoretical approaches to property in light of how they shape and/or challenge relations of class, race, gender, and other lines of difference and inequality.University of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
POLD89H3Global Environmental PoliticsExamines the challenges faced by humanity in dealing with global environmental problems and the politics of addressing them. Focuses on both the underlying factors that shape the politics of global environmental problems - such as scientific uncertainty, North-South conflict, and globalization - and explores attempts at the governance of specific environmental issues. Area of Focus: International RelationsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, environmental, governanceSDG9, SDG13, SDG16
PPG200H1Microeconomics for Policy AnalysisThe objectives are: (1) To provide students with a foundation in microeconomic analysis and; (2) To demonstrate how this foundation can be applied to design, predict the effects of and evaluate public policies. Students will be equipped to understand the main issues on a range of policy topics such as taxation, social insurance, welfare and income support programs.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPublic Policy & Governance (FAS), School ofwelfare, taxation, incomeSDG1, SDG10
PPG401H1The Role of GovernmentThis course explores the government’s role in promoting efficiency and equity in both the financing and delivery of public policy goals. It explores the conditions when government involvement is important, the policy levers available to government in promoting social policy, market failures, and conditions for efficiency. It examines the role of government in many of the major areas of social policy such as health care, education, redistribution, the environment, financial regulations and other important issues.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPublic Policy & Governance (FAS), School ofhealth care, equity, equitSDG3, SDG4
PPGB66H3Public Policy MakingThis course provides an introduction to the study of public policy. The course will address theories of how policy is made and the influence of key actors and institutions. Topics include the policy cycle (agenda setting, policy information, decision making, implementation, and evaluation), policy durability and change, and globalization and policy making. Areas of Focus: Public Policy, Comparative Politics, Canadian Government and PoliticsUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofglobaliz, institutSDG16
PPGC67H3Public Policy in CanadaThis course is a survey of contemporary patterns of public policy in Canada. Selected policy studies including managing the economy from post-war stabilization policies to the rise of global capitalism, developments in the Canadian welfare state and approaches to external relations and national security in the new international order. Areas of Focus: Canadian Government and Politics; Public PolicyUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofwelfare, capitalSDG1, SDG8
PPGD64H3Comparative Public PolicyThis seminar course explores some of the major theoretical approaches to the comparative analysis of public policies across countries. The course explores factors that influence a country’s policy-making process and why countries’ policies diverge or converge. Empirically, the course examines several contemporary issue areas, such as economic, social or environmental policies. Areas of Focus: Comparative Politics; Public PolicyUniversity of Toronto ScarboroughPolitical Science (UTSC), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
PRT275H1Contemporary Brazilian CinemaThis course covers aesthetic, cultural, and social aspects of contemporary Brazilian cinema. The course examines both works of fiction and documentaries from emerging voices as well as world renowned filmmakers, spanning from Cinema Novo to the present. Topics include: music and urban culture, violence, inequality, environmental justice, and gender and sexuality. Lecture time is divided between film screening and class discussion held in English. Students choose tutorials in Portuguese (necessary for this course to be considered towards credit in Portuguese programs) or English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, urban, environmental, environmental justice, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG, SDG13, SDG16
PSL310H1Clinical ReasoningImproved clinical reasoning will reduce the current likelihood that most people will suffer at least one medical diagnostic error, errors that contribute to ~10% of patient deaths. Learn to apply strategies of critical thinking and principles of physiology to solve clinical cases. Shadow a healthcare professional. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealthcareSDG3
PSY197H1The Individual and SocietyHow does one develop a sense of individuality? Can individual will and freedom be reconciled with the interests of society? Are we determined by society or culture or do we, in some important sense, determine our own behaviour and futures? In this course, we will use classic and contemporary readings from psychology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and law to explore general characterizations of the individual and society. Basic questions will be examined in light of these characterizations such as: Is there a universal human nature? Who is a “person”?, and What is the ideal society? We will examine these questions in light of various social issues, such as debates about multiculturalism and democracy, whether children have rights to freedom of speech, and women’s equality in society. Throughout the course, the emphasis will be on the different views of the person underlying and informing contrasting perspectives on important social questions. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPsychology (FAS), Department ofwomen, equalit, democraSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
PSY313H5Adult Development and AgingAn introduction to current research in human development from young adulthood through old age. Adult development will be examined in terms of the interplay of biological, socio-cultural, and psychological determinants, with special emphasis on psychological factors. Topics include the demographics of aging, research methods and problems, developmental changes in sensory-perceptual systems, memory, intelligence, personality, as well as issues related to mental health, dying and bereavement. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofmental healthSDG3
PSY317H5Gender and Sexual DevelopmentGender and sexuality influence how we think about ourselves and relate to others. This course explores the development of these aspects with emphasis on cognitive, social and cultural processes. Topics include gender stereotypes and the emergence of gender differences, gender and education, gender bias, gender identity, sexual development in children and youth, and sexual partner preferences.University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
PSY323H1Sex Roles and BehaviourThe effect of sex-role expectations on how men and women behave and perceive the world: theories of sex-role development, physiological and cultural determinants of sex differences, power relationships between men and women.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPsychology (FAS), Department ofwomenSDG5
PSY324H5The Science of WellbeingWhat makes people happy? Does money buy happiness or do unhappy people not know where to shop? Are people in California happier than people in Ontario? Does marriage make men happier and women unhappier? This course reviews the scientific evidence regarding these and other questions about the determinants of happiness from an interdisciplinary perspective (psychology, economics, sociology, philosophy, & biology) that ranges from molecular genetics to cross-national comparisons. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofwellbeing, womenSDG3
PSY327H5Psychology of Intimate RelationshipsThe objective of this course is to review what relationship science can tell us about close relationships, with a particular focus on romantic relationships. We will explore questions such as: Why do we want to be in relationships, what informs our choice of relationship partners, what predicts satisfaction and stability in relationships, and what is the role of sexuality in relationships? These and other questions will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives and will be applied to better understand real-world relationship functioning. General topics include theory and methods of relationships, attraction, social cognition, interdependence, attachment, sexuality, culture and gender, jealousy, and thriving relationships. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
PSY328H5Psychology and the LawAn examination of relevant research and contemporary methodologies examining phenomena encountered in the justice system. Topics include jury decision-making, violence and risk assessment, eye-witness evidence, insanity, psychopathy and anti-social personality disorder, sentencing, treatment of special offender groups, and criminal profiling. Students will learn how to apply the scientific method to examine behaviours that occur in a legal context. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofviolenceSDG16
PSY341H5Abnormal Psychology: Disorders of Children and AdolescentsConsiders concepts of normal, abnormal and delayed development. Schemes of classification and diagnosis, approaches to identification of causes, antecedents, and consequences, as well as contemporary treatment methods are critically evaluated. In addition, resilience in the face of adversity will be addressed, since risk and traumatic events often do not lead to disorders. The emphasis is on rigorous research as a primary source of knowledge about psychological disorders and empirically supported treatment. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, resilien, resilienceSDG11, SDG13, SDG15, SDG3
PSY344H5Forensic PsychologyAn exploration of the role of psychology in forensic science (the application of scientific inquiry into criminal investigation). Topics, which will vary from year to year, could include the assessment of criminal responsibility, competency issues, psychiatric disorders associated with crime, criminal profiling, behavioural analysis of a crime scene, prediction of dangerousness, workplace and family violence, sexual assault/abuse/rape, recovered memories, detection of malingering and deception, deindividuation and bystander intervention, social psychology of the jury, use of psychological tests in legal cases, witness preparation/interrogation, and the psychologist as expert witness. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofinvest, violenceSDG16
PSY345H5Exceptionality: Disability and GiftednessA survey of contemporary theory and research related to exceptionality with a special emphasis on disability and educational issues. Topics include controversial psychosocial issues, legal, family, and multicultural issues, disability across the lifespan, communication disorders, hearing and visual impairment, autism, and acquired brain injury. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofdisabilitSDG4, SDG10
PSY435H1Environmental PsychologyThis lecture course explores how psychologists can contribute to finding solutions to today's pressing environmental challenges. Topics include persuasion, community-based social marketing, social influence, social capital, and the many ways in which the physical environment affects psychological processes. The course takes a multi-scalar approach to the human-environment relationship, covering individual, community, cultural and global levels of scale, through the lens of complex dynamic systems theories.Arts and Science, Faculty ofPsychology (FAS), Department ofcapital, environmentalSDG13
PSY442Y5Practicum in Exceptionality in Human LearningSeminar and practicum on issues relating to the life-long development of individuals with disabilities. Seminar at UTM; practicum involves supervised placements in schools or social service agencies (80 hours). Course is required for students enrolled in the Exceptionality in Human Learning Specialist program and is available to Psychology Specialists, Majors and Minors on a competitive basis. Course fulfills the 400-level seminar requirement for the Psychology Specialist Program. Admission by academic merit. Interested students should submit an application to the Psychology office by mid-April. Application procedures: http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology/undergraduate-studies/course-information/courses-requiring-application.University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, learningSDG4, SDG10
PSYC33H3Neuropsychological RehabilitationAn examination of the therapeutic methods used to improve the capacity of a brain damaged individual to process and use incoming information, enhancing functioning in everyday life. Students will be introduced to methods that aim to restore cognitive function by compensatory techniques. Neuropsychological rehabilitation problems caused by deficits in attention, visual processing, language, memory, reasoning/problem solving, and executive functioning will be stressed. Lectures and demonstrations. Students in the Specialist (Co-operative) Program in Mental Health Studies will have priority for entry to the course.University of Toronto ScarboroughPsychology (UTSC), Department ofmental healthSDG3
PSYC58H3Psychology and Climate ChangeThis course will introduce students to a variety of topics in psychology as they relate to climate change. Topics covered will include the threats of a changing environment to mental health and wellbeing; the development of coping mechanisms and resilience for individuals and communities affected negatively by climate change; perceptions of risk, and how beliefs and attitudes are developed, maintained, and updated; effective principles for communicating about climate change; how social identity affects experiences and perceptions of climate change; empirically validated methods for promoting pro-environmental behaviour; and how, when required, we can best motivate people to action. Special focus will be placed on the cognitive mechanisms underlying risk perception, beliefs, and attitudes, and the roles they play in shaping behaviour.University of Toronto ScarboroughPsychology (UTSC), Department ofwellbeing, mental health, resilien, climate, environmental, resilienceSDG3, SDG13
PSYD18H3Psychology of GenderThis course focuses on theory and research pertaining to gender and gender roles. The social psychological and social-developmental research literature concerning gender differences will be critically examined. Other topics also will be considered, such as gender-role socialization.University of Toronto ScarboroughPsychology (UTSC), Department ofgenderSDG5
PSYD31H3Cultural-Clinical PsychologyThis course provides an in-depth introduction to the field of cultural-clinical psychology. We examine theoretical and empirical advances in understanding the complex interplay between culture and mental health, focusing on implications for the study and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include cultural variations in the experience and expression of mental illness.University of Toronto ScarboroughPsychology (UTSC), Department ofmental health, illnessSDG3
PSYD37H3Social Context of Mental Health and IllnessThis course is an opportunity to explore how social practices and ideas contribute to the ways in which society, families and individuals are affected by mental health and mental illness.University of Toronto ScarboroughPsychology (UTSC), Department ofmental health, illnessSDG3
REN341H1The Self and Society: Women, Men and ChildrenA study of the changing conception of the human self in the Renaissance, and of its representation by major authors: Erasmus, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Castiglione, Machiavelli and others.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwomenSDG5
REN342H1Women and Writing in the RenaissanceFocusing on writers from various geographical areas, the course examines a variety of texts by early modern women (for example, treatises, letters, and poetry) so as to explore the female experience in a literate society, with particular attention to how women constructed a gendered identity for themselves against the backdrop of the cultural debates of the time.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, women, femaleSDG5
REN343H1Sex and GenderAn interdisciplinary approach to questions of gender and sexuality in early modern Europe, with special focus on the representations of the sexual drive, the gender roles of men and women, and varieties of sexual experience in the literature and art of the period.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgender, womenSDG5
REN441H1Michel de Montaigne: A Renaissance LifeA study of Montaigne as a multifaceted historical and cultural figure, as a mirror to sixteenth-century history, as product and observer of the religious divisions, political transformations, and cultural evolutions in an age marked by religious war, the growth of the state, the advent of the printed book, and the dissemination of the humanist project across western Europe. The course examines Montaigne’s essays, travel journals, and important scholarly works on Montaigne, in the context of contemporary gender relations, colonial empire, religious belief, and early modern Europe’s complex relationship with Greco-Roman Antiquity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5, SDG16
RLG196H1Goddess Lessons: Gender, Religion and PopIs God a woman? How can we get to heaven without losing a piece of ourselves? What does it mean to follow Lesbian Jesus? Pop music provides us with some important – if often surprising – opportunities to think through deep questions. Increasingly, these questions tie together two of our most powerful human categories: gender and religion. This course will consider the diverse interactions between pop, gender, and religion. Examples might include Beyonce’s self-representation as the Yoruba goddess Oshun and Lil Nas X’s reinterpretation of the Garden of Eden in Montero. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgenderSDG5
RLG198H1Dystopia: Religion & Gender in Science FictionThis course will examine the “what ifs” and imagined worlds of ideal utopias and oppressive dystopias through the lens of religion and gender in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland. Because science fiction and utopian/dystopian literature expresses what an author sees as possible or hopes is possible, but also fears is possible, we will consider science fiction as a political and social critique. Themes to be covered include fundamentalism, totalitarianism, the relationship between technology and religion, religion and reproductive rights, and the potential relationship between religion, gender and oppression. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, landSDG5, SDG16
RLG206H1BuddhismBuddhismArts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofmindfulness, capital, investSDG9, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
RLG211H1Psychology of ReligionA survey of the psychological approaches to aspects of religion such as religious experience, doctrine, myth and symbols, ethics and human transformation. Attention will be given to phenomenological, psychoanalytic, Jungian, existentialist, and feminist approaches.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study offeminisSDG5
RLG222H1Witchcraft, Religion and the Powers of the OccultPicture a witch in your mind’s eye. Do you see them as male, female, or somewhere between the two? Young or old? Good or evil? This course goes beyond common Western assumptions about the character and morality of witchcraft to show how its study, its representation and its practice contribute in vital ways to our understandings of religion, the occult, morality, gender, sexuality and science. We move across Europe, Africa, Melanesia and North America to shed light on a controversial figure in numerous societies and literary traditions, past and present. Depictions of witches, wiccans, sorcerers and magicians are analyzed and compared. At the same time, the course should make you ask yourself: What is rational, what is ethical—and ultimately, what is human?Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, femaleSDG5
RLG230H1Religion, Law and SocietyThe course examines various issues, including: Canadian society and secularization; religious pluralism and legal pluralism; the role of religions in public contexts; land and property; marriage and women’s rights; and the place of minority religious communities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofwomen, minorit, landSDG5, SDG10
RLG235H1Religion, Gender, and SexualityThis course equips students to understand how norms and practices of gender and sexuality are deeply entangled with religious imaginations and traditions. We will examine how ritual, scriptural, and legal traditions enable and constrain embodied and political power. Readings will draw from feminist, womanist, queer, and other perspectives. With a combination of in-class discussions, critical reading exercises, and short essay assignments, students will strengthen their awareness of transnational intersections of religion, gender, and "religio-racial" formations. You will develop skills in analyzing the role of popular culture and legal and religious texts in shaping norms and experiences of gender and embodiment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, queer, feminisSDG5
RLG300H5Religion at the Edge of TomorrowWhat will religion look like in 2100? This course asks how early twenty-first century society is using religion to imagine its future around such questions as climate change, neoliberalism, authoritarian capitalism, pandemics, artificial intelligence, etc. Readings pair history, anthropology, and critical theory with science fiction, news media, and visual culture.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofcapital, climate, authoritarianSDG9, SDG13, SDG16, SDG3, SDG8
RLG308H1Migration, Religion and City SpacesImmigrants have transformed cities through religious practices. Explore how transnational migration has affected religious diversity and vitality in metropolitan areas. Through discussion, site visits and analysis, students will examine the ways that immigrants use religion to make home, challenges around the establishment of new religious structures, and policy designed to accommodate new religious practices and communities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofcities, metroSDG11, SDG16
RLG309H1Religion and Human RightsThe relationship and interaction between religious and ethical norms, social and political ideals, and systems of law. The course concerns the ongoing dialectic between religious and other values, the application of religious ideas to social orders, and questions of religious and human rights.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofhuman rightsSDG16
RLG311H1Gender, Body and Sexuality in Asian TraditionsA study of women in the religious traditions of South and East Asia, including historical developments, topical issues, and contemporary women's movements.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, womenSDG5
RLG311H5Religion and EcologyThis course explores how ecological concerns have influenced and challenged contemporary religious traditions and non-traditional forms of religious expression. We will also consider how religious traditions themselves have shaped or contributed to the environmental crisis.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofenvironmental, ecologSDG13
RLG312H1Gender, Body and Sexuality in IslamThis course focuses on constructions of sexuality, gender, and embodiment in Islamic texts and contexts across time and space. Drawing from historical texts, ethnographic research, and feminist and queer theory, we will examine how norms of gender and sexuality are constructed and contested through practices such as marriage and divorce, dress, and inheritance. Students will strengthen their literacy on global gender issues, historicize religious ideas on gender, and analyze the role of culture, legal and religious texts in shaping norms and experiences of gender, sexuality, and embodiment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, queer, feminisSDG5
RLG313H1Love, Sex, FamilyThis course equips students to understand the religious roots of modern formations of gender, sexuality, and kinship, focusing in particular on Judaism, Christianity, and New Religious Movements. Topics we will cover include: the transformation of traditional religious structures into the modern “religion of romantic love,” the reshaping of religious practices within the modern nuclear family and its gendered division of labour, the persistent religious entanglements within not only normative but also queer and transgressive gender performances and kinship structures, the political asymmetries within which different religious modernities emerge, and the role of literature in preserving religious enchantment in modernity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, queer, labourSDG5, SDG8
RLG314H5Religion and GenderThis course focuses on the interaction of gender and religion from a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective; topics include creation myths, authority and leadership, sainthood, expressions of the divine, and gendered ritual.[24L]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
RLG315H1Rites of PassageWe examine rituals of transition from one social status to another (such as childbirth, coming of age, marriage) from theoretical, historical and ethnographic perspectives. We pay particular attention to the importance of rites of passage in the construction of gendered identities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, transitSDG5
RLG316H5Religion and ViolenceIs violence inherent in religion? Most religious traditions include teachings that profess a love of peace, and yet these same traditions have motivated some of the most atrocious acts of violence in human history. This course will explore this issue through a critical and comparative examination of theories of different forms of religious violence (e.g., terrorism, sacrifice, patriarchy, colonialism). This examination will in turn involve considering violence in various historical and contemporary religious texts, practices, beliefs, and events.[24L]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofpeace, patriarchy, violence, terrorisSDG16, SDG5
RLG317H1Religion, Violence, and Non-ViolencePeople acting in the name of religion(s) have incited violence and worked for peace. How can we understand this tension both today and in the past? Through examination of the power of authoritative tradition, collective solidarity, charisma, and acts of resistance, this course addresses religious justifications of violence and non-violence across varied historical and geographical contexts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofpeace, violenceSDG4, SDG16
RLG321H1Women and the Hebrew BibleThis course provides a critical examination of the Hebrew Bible (sometimes called the Old Testament) with an emphasis on women characters. It examines the historical and literary contexts of Hebrew Bible texts and engages diverse methods of contemporary biblical scholarship with particular attention to issues of gender. All readings will be in English. No knowledge of Hebrew is required.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofknowledge, gender, womenSDG5
RLG325H1The Uses and Abuses of the BibleFrom politics to popular culture, the Bible has shaped people and nations for good and for ill. This course introduces the Jewish and Christian Bibles and considers case studies of how biblical texts have been interpreted. The Bible has been used to bolster slavery and white supremacy and to inspire political liberation movements. It has been used to justify annihilation of Indigenous people by Christian colonists yet given hope to Jews that next year in Jerusalem might be better. How can the same “book” be used for such different purposes? This course focuses on the cultural and political consequences of biblical interpretation. An underlying premise is that the Bible is not static but is rather a nomadic text as it is continuously interpreted in ways that sometimes contribute to human flourishing, but also can result in violence, human diminishment, or death.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofindigenous, violenceSDG10, SDG16
RLG327H1Hospitality and Ethics in Judaism, Christianity, and IslamRefugee crises in modern times have raised questions concerning what degree of hospitality is owed the stranger or foreigner whose motivation is a new, safe, and secure home rather than being treated as a guest passing through on a time-limited visa. Jacques Derrida’s ideas of both conditional hospitality (e.g., tourists) and unconditional hospitality (e.g., strangers) need to be explored from the perspective of philosophical and ethical traditions including Jewish, Christian, and Muslim ethics.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofrefugeeSDG16
RLG345H1Social Ecology and JudaismThe environment and human society studied as systems of organization built for self-preservation. Such topics as vegetarianism and the humane treatment of animals, suicide and euthanasia, sustainability and recycling, explored from the perspective of Judaism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofrecycl, vegetarian, animal, ecologSDG12, SDG13, SDG15
RLG346H1Time and Place in Judaism, Christianity, and IslamJudaism, Christianity, and Islam each have their own sets of prayer times, frequency of prayers and their locations such as home, synagogue, temple, church or mosque. They have completely different calendrical systems. Holiness is also connected to geographical locations, which often serve as destinations of pilgrimage. This course will examine linear and cyclical times and the concepts of holiness in time and place by looking at primary sources in translation. We will investigate the persistence of holy places, how their names continue, and how gender issues are part of the jurisdictional politics of disputes over place and time.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, investSDG5
RLG353H1The Politics of CharityThe course examines religious charitable giving, philanthropic foundations, and humanitarian aid and asks: Is charitable giving altruistic or is it always partly self-interested? Could aid perpetuate poverty? What kinds of "strings" come with receiving aid and is there such thing like a free gift?Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofpoverty, humanitarianSDG1, SDG10
RLG355H1Living IslamThis course introduces students to studies of contemporary Islam that are based on extensive periods of research with Muslim communities in their own languages using anthropological methods. What do such studies teach us about the varied ways Muslims engage their religious tradition in the modern world? And how can such studies make us think differently about gender, economy, medicine, and secularism?Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgenderSDG5, SDG3, SDG8
RLG356H1Islam in ChinaDespite having an estimated Muslim population of 20 million, the place of Islam within the Peoples Republic of China is not widely understood. This course will examine the history of Islam in China from its introduction in the seventh century through the modern period. Emphasis will be placed on the variety of practices within Chinas contemporary Muslim communities. Specific attention will be paid to official state policy toward the Hui and Uygur ethnic minorities, including laws governing pilgrimage, the veil, the formation of Islamic organizations, the reformation of writing systems and so on.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofminoritSDG10, SDG16
RLG368H1Hindu Ways of LivingThe course surveys the textual sources of the practices of Yoga, Ayurveda and Hindu traditions such as domestic rituals, rites of passage and community centered religious activity. It critically evaluates the assumption of an unbroken continuity of tradition of these practices from antiquity onwards and comes to consider what they have come to constitute as a result of modernity and globalization.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofglobalizSDG9
RLG371H1InterdependenceAn exploration of the Buddhist concept of interdependence, or interdependent origination, from doctrinal and contemplative perspectives, as presented in classic Buddhist texts and as used in contemporary environmental and activist movements globally.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofenvironmentalSDG13
RLG376H1Touching the EarthA study of Buddhist relationships with the earth, including “earth touching” contemplative practices, ritual ceremonies for land spirits or sacred sites, geomantic and cosmographic traditions, the use of landscape imagery to depict enlightenment, contrasts between wilderness and urban spaces, and contemporary ecological movements in Buddhist communities and their responses to climate disruption. The course combines experiential learning approaches and outdoor excursions with reading and written work.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study oflearning, urban, climate, ecolog, landSDG11, SDG13
RLG385H1Becoming Modern: Institutions, Individuals, and the Dark Side of ModernityWhat does it mean to be modern? Words like “modern,” “modernity,” and “modernism” are used to mark a fundamental boundary between our era and all that came before it (or lies outside of it); but most of us are hard-pressed to offer a solid account of what exactly this boundary is. This course examines the relationship between: a fundamental shift in the nature of daily experience; an order-of-magnitude expansion of the power of the State; a dramatic reorganization of religious experience and cultures; and a tremendous growth in the enterprise of Western science and technological production. We trace this reorientation over the last two centuries and examine its consequences using philosophical, literary, theological, and scientific sources, as well as recent scholarly work on the topic.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofproduction, institutSDG16, SDG9
RLG394H1Religion in the Game of ThronesReligion weaves complex social logics and social rationales imbedded in all levels of culture. This course explores multiple questions of religion as a cultural element, both visible and invisible. Theories of religion as well as questions of gender, authority, and power will be examined. The course culminates in a student project oriented toward an academically oriented “Handbook” for the study of religion in the Game of Thrones.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgenderSDG5
RLG415H1Performance, Gender, Religion“Performance, Gender, Religion” will explore gendered religious experience through the lens of performance and theories of performativity. Topics include: The inculcation of religious norms through required gender performance, the performative dimension of religious ritual, and performance culture within religious communities. We will not only consider the ways in which “manhood” and “womanhood” are performed, we will also consider performances that critique and confront these categories. Students will have the opportunity to engage in a research project on gender performance from a specific cultural context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgenderSDG5
RLG416H1Topics in Religion and GenderAdvanced study in specialized topics focusing on the intersection of religion and gender. If the course is offered during the year, a detailed course description of the topic will be available under current courses in the undergraduate section of the Department’s website. As these courses are offered simultaneously as graduate level courses, students interested in taking them are encouraged to contact the instructor.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgenderSDG5
RLG419H1Ghosts to Ancestors: Racialized Hauntings and Reparative Promise in PsychoanalysisAll forms of injustice disfigure both societies and psyches. Racist, sexist, and other unconscious fantasies of evil and persecuting ‘others’ generate social injustice. At the same time, social injustice distorts the mind. This “dual track” process can drive human beings and their societies mad. Justice depends upon transformations of social structures and moral codes as well as changes within human minds. In order for psychoanalysis to realize its own potential for facilitating justice, it must confront its own historical contribution to injustice. Through a close reading of selected texts from Sigmund Freud and the activist psychiatrist Franz Fanon, this course explores the inherent tensions between colonizing and emancipatory themes within psychoanalytic discourses. Both Freud and Fanon contribute to a psychoanalytic critical theory that have influenced several contemporary ethnographic writers who explore the intricate ways in which social and cultural realities are internalized as unconscious hauntings and tormenting spirits across generations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofinjusticeSDG16, SDG10
RLG420H5Women and Gender in Early and Medieval ChristianityThis course combines lecture and seminar approaches to understand how ideas about women, gender, and the body were constructed and naturalized in ancient and medieval Christianity. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, womenSDG5
RLG443H1Genealogies of ChristianityHow do disciplinary commitments shape theoretical and historical accounts of Christianity’s relationship to “modernity”? Through comparative analysis (including topics of science, colonialism, capitalism, and gender) students will develop an historically-grounded critique of the key terms: genealogy, Christianity, and modernity. Based on reading and seminar discussion, the course encourages interdisciplinary exchange.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofgender, capitalSDG5, SDG8
RLG449H5Islamic SexualitiesThis course focuses on the diverse attitudes and expressions of sexuality in Islam. Taking a broad approach, this course examines issues of sexuality, including homosexuality, fe/male sexuality, birth control, divorce, marriage, transgender identity and performance, and feminist sexual ethics. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, feminis, transgenderSDG5
RLG452H5Anthropology of IslamThis course focuses on the everyday lived experience of Muslims in different parts of the world. We will read ethnographic studies and analyze films, which highlight important issues in everyday Muslim life: gender, modernity and piety, the role of ritual in everyday practice. This course has an ethnographic field project. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
RLG453H1Christianity and Judaism in Colonial ContextSets the study of early Christianity and Second Temple Judaism into relation with postcolonial historiography. Topics include hybridity, armed resistance, the intersection of gender and colonization, diaspora, acculturation, and the production of subaltern forms of knowledge. Comparative material and theories of comparison are also treated.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofknowledge, gender, productionSDG5, SDG16
RLG462H5Sex and Gender in South Asian ReligionsThis course examines ideas, roles, and regulation of sexuality and gender in South Asian religious traditions, paying attention to sexual abstinence and promiscuity as forms of piety, and we will examine performances of the gendered body that transcend and/or problematize the binary construction of masculine and feminine. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofABS, genderSDG5
RLGC14H3Religion and Globalization: Continuities and TransformationsThe course cultivates an appreciation of the global perspective of religions in the contemporary world and how religious frameworks of interpretation interact with modern social and political realities. It provides a viewpoint of religion through ideas and issues related to globalization, syncretism, and modernity.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofglobalizSDG9
RSM493H1EntrepreneurshipIntroduces essentials of starting a new business: how to evaluate new opportunities, craft strategy, obtain resources, manage growth, and distribute ownership. Applies concepts from strategic management to challenges facing new/small businesses. Examines the role of entrepreneurs in spurring technological innovation and economic growth, and the effect of government policy on entrepreneurial activity. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLeconomic growth, entrepreneurSDG8
RSM498Y1Creative Destruction Lab - Advanced CourseCDL Advanced is a hands-on, theory-guided course about commercializing technological innovation. Students learn the theory of startup strategy, pricing, scaling, and financing, and then apply this theory by working closely with early-stage technology ventures in the CDL program. In addition to their direct work with a CDL venture, students participate in CDL-Toronto meetings which offers them the opportunity to observe and interact with CDL’s network of experienced entrepreneurs and investors. Enrolment in this course is by application. Students who have completed the CDL introductory course (RSM391H1) may apply.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLentrepreneur, investSDG8, SDG9
SAS318H1Colonialism and TraditionThis course analyzes the impact of colonialism in South Asia and the various ways in which tradition intersects with and has reshaped colonialism in postcolonial South Asia. The course will examine the role of religion, education, ethnicity, gender, and caste. Some attention will be paid to postcolonial and indigenous theory.Arts and Science, Faculty ofAsian Institute (FAS)gender, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SDS199H1Sexuality at the IntersectionsThis First-Year Foundations seminar will explore sexuality at the intersections of race, gender, class, disability, citizenship status, and geography, among other social relations and processes as a foundational practice in Sexual Diversity Studies. In an intimate seminar setting, students will develop reading, writing, and presentation skills necessary for engaging in Sexual Diversity Studies across a wide array of disciplinary traditions. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre fordisabilit, citizenship, genderSDG4, SDG5
SDS345H1Sex and the Epidemic: Social Work, HIV, and Human SexualityHIV has forever changed the way human beings understand sexuality. Through a social justice lens, this course examines the nature of community norms, laws, popular media, and the academy to explore how the epidemic has impacted the provision of social services in relation to the diversity of human sexuality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forsocial justiceSDG16, SDG5
SDS346H1Feminist and Queer Approaches to TechnologyWhat do electronic technologies mean for feminist and queer identity, activism, sociability, art, and politics? This course considers a range of critical pressure points central to digital studies, including social networking, participatory media, digital archives, databases, new media activism, performance, embodiment, and representations of race, gender, and sexuality in electronic contexts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forgender, queer, feminisSDG5, SDG10
SDS346H1Queer Digital Media StudiesWhat do electronic technologies mean for feminist and queer identity, activism, sociability, art, and politics? This course considers a range of critical pressure points central to digital studies, including social networking, participatory media, digital archives, databases, new media activism, performance, embodiment, and representations of race, gender, and sexuality in electronic contexts.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forgender, queer, feminisSDG5
SDS355H1Theories of SexualityThis course introduces students to key theories of sexuality and sexual diversity. The main goal is to create a framework for understanding sexuality at its intersections with race, gender, class, disability, citizenship status, and geography among other social relations and processes at an advanced level. Closely tracing sexuality’s intersections, course readings will draw upon critical race theory, postcolonial critique and decolonizing movements, women of colour feminisms, trans studies, and transnational sexuality and gender studies.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre fordisabilit, citizenship, gender, women, feminis, of colourSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
SDS365H1Sexuality and LawThe course explores the legal regulation of sexuality. How does law understand, constitute and regulate sex, sexuality and sexual diversity? It will consider the role of different types of regulation, including criminal law, family law and constitutional law, and explore issues ranging from sex work and pornography to same sex marriage to transgender discrimination.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forgender, transgenderSDG5, SDG16
SDS378H1Queer Youth Studies in EducationExperiences of queer youth are explored in various education settings through academic research, personal essays, and visual and performing arts to investigate how queer youth define themselves, what they are learning, the curriculum and pedagogy used in the learning process and the possibilities of said learning for social change, individual and community well-being.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forwell-being, pedagogy, learning, queer, invest, social changeSDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG16
SDS380H1Sexual Diversity in Transnational PerspectiveAn exploration of LGBTQ rights and changes in social and cultural responses to sexual diversity in varied regional, national, and cultural contexts, potentially including Africa, Latin America, South and East Asia, and Eastern Europe. The role of transnational linkages and networks will also be considered in effecting change.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forlgbtqSDG5
SDS381H1Intro to Trans StudiesThis course examines current and historical transgender issues by exploring legal and health care issues, politics, mainstream and other media representations (including films, interviews, and other genres), as well as current and historical advocacy and community work in relation to power structures such as the nation-state, race, disability, and sexuality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forhealth care, disabilit, gender, transgenderSDG3, SDG5, SDG10
SDS382H1Intro to Queer of Colour CritiqueThis course provides an introduction to the intersections between race, gender and sexuality through an exploration of the political theories, activisms and cultural forms of LGBTQ people of colour. It examines the emergence of queer of colour theory and critiques, and the ways in which the intersections of race, gender and sexuality figure in national, global, economic, & cultural structures.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forgender, queer, lgbtq, of colourSDG5, SDG10
SDS385H1Queer Indigenous Politics and CulturesThis upper level course introduces students to questions of gender, sexuality, two-spirit, and same-sex desire at the intersections of race, indigeneity, and the violences of settler colonialism. Students will engage with work by scholars, activists, and artists in the fields of indigenous and queer studies, decolonizing activism, and cultural production.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forsettler, gender, queer, two-spirit, indigenous, production, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SDS425H1Sexuality & HealthHow is the idea of “ethics” understood and deployed in research on sexuality and health? What are the ways that discourses of “risk,” “precarity,” and “cure” become regulative frameworks? How do racialization, colonialism and nation-­building participate in the biopolitics of sexuality and health? With these questions in mind, this interdisciplinary course will discuss various scholarly and activist literatures, including Youth Studies, Critical Disability Studies, Environmental Justice scholarship, Sex Education and Public Health Research, Critical Development Studies, and Queer and Feminist Studies to explore the cultural, social and political dimensions of ethics, health, and sexuality historically, and at the present moment.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forprecarity, public health, disabilit, queer, feminis, environmental, environmental justiceSDG1, SDG3, SDG5, SDG13
SDS458H1Research Essay in Sexual DiversityA research essay under the supervision of a faculty member with knowledge of sexual diversity, the proposal and supervisor subject to the approval of the SDS Undergraduate Coordinator. This course is available to students enrolled in Sexual Diversity Studies programs (Specialists, Majors, and Minors). Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Students must submit a supplemental application one month prior to the start of term: August 01 for courses starting in the Fall term, December 01 for courses starting in the Winter term, and April 01 for courses in the Summer term. The application must describe the student's planned independent research project, supervisor, prospective readings, timeline, and method(s) of assessment. Students are responsible for finding their own supervisor. Both the supervisor and SDS Undergraduate Coordinator or Director must approve the application. Applications will be reviewed to assess the intended research plan and timeline, and the suitability of the project for SDS credit. Please visit https://sds.utoronto.ca/courses/ and email sexual.diversity@utoronto.ca for application materials and more information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forknowledgeSDG5
SDS459Y1Honours Essay in Sexual DiversityA major research essay under the supervision of a faculty member with knowledge of sexual diversity, the proposal and supervisor subject to the approval of the SDS Undergraduate Coordinator. This course is available to students enrolled in Sexual Diversity Studies programs (Specialists, Majors, and Minors). Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Students must submit a supplemental application at least one month prior to the start of term: August 01 for courses starting in the Fall term, December 01 for courses starting in the Winter term, and April 01 for courses in the Summer term. The application must describe the student's planned independent research project, supervisor, prospective readings, timeline, and method(s) of assessment. Students are responsible for finding their own supervisor. Both the supervisor and SDS Undergraduate Coordinator or Director must approve the application. Applications will be reviewed to assess the intended research plan and timeline, and the suitability of the project for SDS credit. Please visit https://sds.utoronto.ca/courses/ and email sexual.diversity@utoronto.ca for application materials and more information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forknowledgeSDG5
SDS460Y1Advanced Research in Sexual Diversity StudiesA capstone for majors and specialists who will work closely with SDS faculty in developing their own research project while participating in this seminar and learning about key debates, methodologies, and ethical issues in conducting research in SDS. Students will learn to write proposals, ethics reviews, grants and other relevant documents. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forlearningSDG5
SDS465H1Queer Migrations and Refugee PoliticsThis interdisciplinary course will explore the politics of migration and border-crossing from queer, feminist, and trans perspectives. Drawing upon contemporary North American and transnational research, students will engage with critical literatures on citizenship and the state, mobility, belonging, and kinship and how these processes intersect with sexuality in the context of immigration and refugee systems.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forcitizenship, queer, feminis, refugeeSDG5, SDG10
SDS470H1Sexual Representations: Critical Approaches in Porn StudiesThis course is a critical study of the historical, aesthetic, and cultural formation of the concept of pornography. The course explores the relationship between sexual representation and sex work; works through debates about artistic merit and censorship and how they relate to larger issues of power, capitalism, and technology; and theorizes the relationship between sex and commerce. Readings will include work from feminist, queer, people of colour, and trans theorists in the cutting-edge field of porn studies.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forqueer, feminis, capital, of colourSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
SDS470H1Critical Approaches in Porn StudiesThis course is a critical study of the historical, aesthetic, material, technical, legal, and cultural formation of the concept of pornography. The course explores the relationship between sexual representation, sex work, visual cultures, consumption, distribution, and format; works through debates about artistic merit and censorship and how they relate to larger issues of power, capitalism, and technology; and theorizes the relationship between sex and commerce. Readings will emphasize work by sex workers and feminist, queer, people of colour, and trans scholars.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forqueer, feminis, worker, capital, of colour, consumSDG5, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG
SDS475H1The New Queer VisibilityThis course critically examines the socio-political cultural context that has produced a new queer visibility. It assesses many of the post-Stonewall changes in the North American public sphere and the interrelationship between the new queer visibility and the North American and public sphere.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forqueerSDG5
SDS478H1Queer MusicsThis course explores, through queer of colour critique, feminist and queer theories, how sexuality, gender, and race are performed and heard in several popular music styles/genres. Sampling the field with readings, music videos and audio recordings, we examine sexuality, gender and race in music performance and reception currently and historically.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forgender, queer, feminis, of colourSDG5, SDG10
SDS485H1Advanced Seminar in Queer StudiesThis course will provide an advanced exploration of the historical and contemporary formations and debates of queer studies. This seminar is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation at a particularly advanced level. The specific theme of the seminar changes per year. Please see the department website for details.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forqueerSDG5
SDS490Y1Engaging Our CommunitiesA service learning course with student placements in various LGBT community organizations alongside regular classroom seminars to look at the politics of engagement, active citizenship, mobilization, archiving community histories, accessibility, belonging, activism, and philanthropy. For students in the Sexual Diversity Studies Major or Specialist.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forlearning, citizenship, accessibSDG11, SDG5
SLA192H1On the Road in Eastern EuropeThis course examines the function of travel within texts and films depicting journeys through Eastern Europe. We will distinguish various types of journeys, the narrative and cultural expectations they imply, and the ways that travel relates to individual identity, raising questions about nationality, race, gender, sexuality, and the Other. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG10
SLA193H1Objects of WarAn object or a thing always has a collective history. It speaks of the political and the social conditions under which it was made. In this course, objects of war – the material culture of conflict – from the 20th and 21st centuries will be critically and historically examined. How do these objects speak of violence, politics, and culture, but also rewrite and influence the arenas within which they circulate? Some objects include: canned food, drones, the journalists’ hotel, helmets, tents. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofviolenceSDG16
SLA194H1Utopia Interrupted: Late and Post-Soviet Russian LiteratureAlmost 30 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, what can we understand about its culture and people, and its impact on the popular imagination in the West? To answer these questions, the course introduces students to canonical literary and cinematic works from the post-Stalin era to the present, with particular attention to the literary and cultural peripheries. Some of the topics will include: Gulag, or Return of the Repressed, Counter-Culture, Space Race, Immigration, Gender, Perestroika, and Putin’s Russia. All readings in English. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG10, SDG11
SLA202H1Jewish Communities in Slavic CountriesLiterature about the Jewish community in Slavic countries. How do these Jewish minorities perceive and identify themselves? How are they perceived by others? Taught in English, all readings in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofminoritSDG10, SDG16
SLA234H1Russian and Soviet CinemaA survey of the Russian cinematic tradition from its beginnings through the first decade following the disintegration of the USSR. The course examines the avant-garde cinema and film theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian esthetics of the 1920s-1940s and the ideological uses of film art; the revolution in film theory and practice in the 1950s-1960s; cinema as medium of cultural dissent and as witness to social change. Students also acquire basic skills of film analysis. Taught in English, all films subtitled in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SLA235H1After Communism: Literature and Art Post-1989This course examines the era inaugurated by the collapse of the state-socialist regimes in the former Eastern Bloc, marked by political turmoil, major economic restructuring, and social ambivalences. The course investigates topics such as: socialist legacy and nostalgia, mass emigrations and refugee crises, conflicts over national identity and borders, sociocultural anxieties about inclusion in the EU, perspectives on the future of socialist thought and practice in Eastern Europe.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofinvest, refugeeSDG10
SLA247H1Cinema of the BalkansAn overview of the cinematic tradition in Yugoslavia, Greece, Albania, and Bulgaria from the 1960s to the present. Topics include revolution and socialism; cinema as activism; ideology and politics; sex and gender; war and trauma. Taught in English. All films with subtitles.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
SLA248H1Women and Women's Themes in Ukrainian LiteratureThis course examines the presentation of women and women's themes in works of Ukrainian literature. The subjects covered include: role models, freedom, socialism, nationalism, feminism, and sexuality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofwomen, feminis, nationalismSDG5, SDG16
SLA325H1Magic PragueInspired by Angelo Ripellino’s “Magic Prague,” this class explores Prague as a palimpsest of different genres in works by Jan Neruda, Franz Kafka, R.M. Rilke, G. Meyrink, G. Apollinaire, B. Hrabal and others. Selected secondary texts illuminate questions of literary cityscapes, center and margins, multiculturalism and nationalism and magic. Readings in English and for the specialists in the original.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofnationalismSDG16
SLA358H1Breaking Away from Empire: Ukrainian Fiction Since IndependenceThis course traces the extraordinary development of Ukrainian prose since the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will explore postmodernist euphoria, colonial angst, cultural entropy, hooliganism, national identity, gender issues, and other aspects of modern Ukraine. All readings in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
SLA435H1Contemporary East European CinemasThis course will examine stylistic innovations and production practices in contemporary national cinemas of Eastern Europe through the framework of film theory and critical writing concerned with cinema's audiovisual appeal to viewers, as well as questions of nationalism, historical memory, and the transitions to democracy and capitalism in the region.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofcapital, transit, production, nationalism, democraSDG9, SDG16, SDG8
SLA492H1Race, Empire, Gender in Eastern Europe and RussiaThis course examines recent scholarship dedicated to race, empire, and gender in Eastern Europe and Russia. The course will explore theoretical texts (e.g. decolonial criticism, “second world” feminisms), scholarship on particular case studies (e.g. Catherine Baker’s 2018 Race and the Yugoslav Region), and literature and art that speaks to these issues from the perspective of the East European, Russian, and Soviet experience. We will explore oft-sidelined topics, such as ideologies of race and historicizing whiteness as a colonial formation. The aim of the course is to address some of the silences within Slavic studies by foregrounding the complicated political legacies of the region.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSlavic Languages and Literatures (FAS), Department ofdecolonial, gender, feminisSDG5, SDG10
SMC185H1SMC One: Seminar in Christianity, Truth and ReconciliationThis seminar critically explores the complex relations of Christianity and Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, with a special focus on education. Sample topics include: settler colonialism and treaty relationships; prominent Indigenous Christians, critics and reformers; the residential school system; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; recent initiatives in ecclesial repentance, dialogue and enculturation. The course includes guest speakers and mandatory co-curricular activities, including travel to residential school site(s) and archives in Ontario during reading week. The costs of these activities are supported by the University of St. Michael’s College. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, indigenous, reconciliation, truth and reconciliation, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
SMC185H1SMC One: The Christianity, Truth and Reconciliation SeminarThis seminar critically explores the complex relations of Christianity and Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, with a special focus on education. Sample topics include: settler colonialism and treaty relationships; prominent Indigenous Christians, critics and reformers; the residential school system; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; recent initiatives in ecclesial repentance, dialogue and enculturation. The course includes guest speakers and compulsory co-curricular activities, including travel to residential school site(s) and archives in Ontario during the fall reading week. The costs of these activities are supported by the University of St. Michael’s College. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. This course is restricted to newly admitted Faculty of Arts and Science students accepted to SMC One. Applications are due before the end of April (deadline subject to change). Apply via the JOIN U of T website. https://stmikes.utoronto.ca/program/smc-one-christianity-truth-reconciliation-seminarArts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, indigenous, reconciliation, truth and reconciliation, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
SMC188H1SMC One: The Gilson Seminar in Faith and IdeasThis seminar is an interdisciplinary exploration of leading scholarly, intellectual and public questions related to ecology, science, literature, and public life. From a variety of perspectives, the seminar considers how religion, and how different kinds of religious experience, figure in the broader context of human affairs. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLecologSDG13
SMC189H1SMC One: The Gilson Seminar in Faith and RomeThis course provides an intensive international learning experience in Rome, Italy. It offers contemporary and historical models of integrating faith with reason, and religious practice with intellectual, creative, and public engagement, specifically the roles that the Catholic Church and Vatican play in Rome, in ecology, science, literature, and public life. This course includes a mandatory travel component to Rome, Italy, which takes place following the Winter term exam period. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (An ancillary fee of $2,000 is required to help cover some of the travel costs.)Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearning, ecologSDG15, SDG13
SMC194H1Christianity, Truth and ReconciliationThis First-Year Foundations seminar critically explores the complex relations of Christianity and Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, with a special focus on education. Sample topics include: settler colonialism and treaty relationships; prominent Indigenous Christians, critics and reformers; the residential school system; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; recent initiatives in ecclesial repentance, dialogue and enculturation. The course will include online primary research in the archives of residential schools in Ontario. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsettler, indigenous, reconciliation, truth and reconciliation, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
SMC199H1Intelligence, Artificial and HumanWhat is human intelligence? How close are we to replicating it? How productive/reductive is the brain-computer analogy? What ethical challenges are posed by AI on workers, society, and the environment? Can we put a hold on "progress"? Is Silicon Valley the seat of a new techno-religion? What can they teach us about today's research priorities? What insight (or inspiration) can we get from works of science fiction about the future of human-AI interaction? Through reading discussion, written assignment, and workshops, this seminar will present students with the opportunity to integrate their computer science interests with philosophy, history, and literature. There is an equivalent course offered by the Department of Computer Science. Students may take one or the other but not both. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLworkerSDG8, SDG13
SMU200H1Healthy Practices for Healthy MusiciansThis course introduces students to the field of musicians' health through a blend of physical practices and theoretical discussions. Each class includes a yoga-based movement practice and a discussions of relevant concepts including basic anatomy for musicians, motor learning techniques, and strategies for addressing performance anxiety and achieving peak performance. Students will leave the course with a repertoire of stretches and exercises to counterbalance strains associated with playing their instruments, strategies to make effective use of practice time, and an awareness of available health resources in the community and online.Music, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG3
SMU400H1Introduction to Music in HealthcareThis course provides an overview of music approaches in health care contexts including: music therapy, music and medicine, community music and artists working in interdisciplinary teams. Lectures, guest speakers, video-clips, and collaborative learning experiences will enhance student knowledge with a focus on critical issues, current research and evidence based practices.Music, Faculty ofNULLhealth care, healthcare, knowledge, learning, laborSDG3, SDG8
SMU405H1Health and Music PerformanceThe course explores the relationship between health and music performance. This exploration will include factors that shape the performance of healthy musicians as well as health risks and illnesses that can be encountered by professional and amateur musicians. Social determinants of health and advocacy issues for musicians’ health will also be addressed. This course will contribute to your understanding of how health professionals, policy makers, funding agencies, arts management organizations, educators and musicians themselves can contribute to improved health outcomes in this special population. Throughout the course, cases, videos, readings and guest lectures will enhance your understanding of the complex interactions between health and music performance.Music, Faculty ofNULLillnessSDG3
SOC100H1Introduction to Sociology I: Sociological PerspectivesThis course will challenge your views on a wide range of issues that affect us all. It will also excite your interest in a unique sociological way of understanding your world. We will analyze the globalization of culture, emerging patterns of class, race, and gender inequality in Canada and internationally, criminal and deviant behaviour, and so on. You will learn to understand these and other pressing social issues by analyzing the way the social world is organized. These topics are further taken up in the sequel to this course, SOC150: Introduction to Sociology II: Sociological Inquiries.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, globaliz, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
SOC109H5Introduction to Criminology, Law & SocietyThis course provides an introduction to the overlapping areas of “criminology” and “law and society” within the Criminology, Law & Society (CLS) stream. The goal of the course is to provide a sociological foundation for subsequent CLS courses. In addition to a criminological/socio-legal introduction to theory and methods, topics may include law, inequality, intersectionality, legal institutions, legal professions, crime, criminal justice, and punishment. Note: This course is required for Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, institut, criminal justiceSDG10, SDG16
SOC150H1Introduction to Sociology II: Sociological InquiriesIn the sequel to SOC100H1: Introduction to Sociology I: Sociological Perspectives, this course will explore in more depth the topic of social inequality and the contemporary debates that animate sociology. We may like to think of ourselves as perfectly free but powerful social forces open up some opportunities and close off others, constraining our freedom and helping to make us what we are. By examining the operation of these social forces, sociology can help us know ourselves. The course is also about skills-building, skills useful not only for success at U of T, but beyond the walls of the university.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC196H1Global Cities and Urban Refugees: Connecting South and NorthThe majority of refugees and asylum seekers today live in cities, above all, in the Global South. This course will introduce and critically assess key theories and concepts on forced migration in relation to cities from a global perspective. By drawing on a wide range of literature and case studies from around the world, the course will explore and compare cities across the Global South and North around questions of law, governance, and politics related to urban refugees and asylum seekers. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofrefugee, cities, urban, governanceSDG10, SDG11, SDG16
SOC197H1Future “Agents” & Social Relations: Considering Sociology in a World of Robots, Cyborgs, Bioengineered Agents & ToolsSome people are worried that we risk becoming less human if we allow ourselves or others to engage is widespread self-transformation through the insertion of some kinds of devices into human bodies (e.g., computers, becoming cyborgs) or as a result of interventions such as genetic engineering , etc. Others are concerned that the use of some technologies, or barriers to their use, will increase global inequalities. In this course we will read, talk, and write about these and related issues. We will take a sociological approach, which means that we will attend to contextual forces that shape practices, and material flows, and the meaning of objects. Students will present their final paper in class. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofequalitSDG10
SOC202H5Cultural SociologyThis course introduces students to the field of cultural sociology, which seeks to understand how ideas, meanings, values and beliefs are created, and how they are also implicated in foundational sociological issues such as inequality, identity, social change, and social organization. These linkages are examined through topics such as popular culture, the mass media, science, religion, art, language, knowledge, public opinion, food, advertising and consumerism.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, inequality, equalit, consum, social changeSDG10, SDG12, SDG16, SDG2
SOC205H1Urban SociologyThis course reviews theories of urban genesis and urban form; the interrelationship of urbanization, industrialization and modernization, issues in urban living (housing, transportation, urban-renewal, poverty, unemployment, etc.); urban social networks (ethnic and cultural heterogeneity, neighbourhood, community and other voluntary associations).Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofpoverty, employment, industrialization, urban, housingSDG1, SDG8, SDG9, SDG11
SOC205H5Theories in CriminologyThis course will cover major theoretical paradigms in the field of criminology included, among others, classical, positivist, strain, control, social learning, critical, feminist, postmodern and critical race theories. Students are required to take this course upon entry to the Criminology, Law and Society Major and Specialist programs.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oflearning, feminisSDG5, SDG16
SOC207H1Sociology of Work & OccupationsThe nature and meaning of work in relation to changes in the position of the professions, unions and government, of women and minority groups, and in industrial societies more generally. Career choice and strategies, occupational mobility, and individual satisfaction at work.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwomen, minoritSDG5, SDG10, SDG8
SOC208H1Introduction to Social PolicyThis course introduces students to the concepts, history and development of social policy in economically developed welfare states. It examines the problems and concepts of the policy process, exploring the political, economic, and institutional frameworks that structure public choices about social policy in Canada, and compare systems of social policy around the world.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwelfare, institutSDG6
SOC210H5Canadian Criminal JusticeThis course provides an introduction to sociological and criminological analyses of crime, law, and the operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, with emphasis on how law and criminal justice are shaped by social, political and economic considerations. It will also consider how social identities such as race, class and gender influence individuals' perceptions of, and experiences in, the Canadian criminal justice system. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, criminal justiceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
SOC213H1Sociological Social PsychologyThis course provides an introduction to the systematic study of the influence of individuals, groups, and society on individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviours from a sociological perspective. The course emphasizes interaction among individuals, between an individual and a group, or among groups, all situated within particular social contexts. One core emphasis involves the ways that individual-level processes contribute to explaining social inequality in social groups and organizations. Topics include identity processes, social cognitions, attitudes, emotions, status processes, power relations, legitimacy, and justice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC214H1Sociology of the FamilyThis course examines diverse family patterns, to show the economic, political and cultural factors that influence families. A brief social history of family paves the way for an examination of the various family patterns common in Canada today. Special attention is paid to the gender relations at the heart of family.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOC216H5Sociology of LawMajor theoretical and substantive debates in the sociology of law. How race, gender and social inequality shape legal institutions, the law and the broader social context.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, institutSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC219H5Gender and CrimeThis course explores how masculinity and femininity shape and are shaped by offending, violence, and victimization. Possible topics may include the gender gap in crime, intersectionality, gender diversity, victimless crimes, survival crimes, gender-based violence, and missing and murdered Indigenous women.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, women, indigenous, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC220H1Social StratificationThis course is concerned with the causes and consequences of economic inequality. More specifically, it explores how achieved and ascribed characteristics are related to social class and related economic outcomes. Although some of the material will be comparative and pertain to modern Democracies generally, emphasis will be on Canadian society.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalit, democraSDG10, SDG, SDG8
SOC224H5Sociology of EducationThis course examines what some of our key sociological thinkers have said about the role of education in society, from socialization to sorting students into different opportunities, including along the lines of race, class and gender. The course also covers the development of the education system in Canada, the career of teaching, curriculum development, and standardized testing. Students will have the opportunity to apply sociological insights to contemporary issues in education. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG4, SDG10
SOC227H5Sociology of Work and OccupationsThis course covers work and post-industrialization in Canada today. It considers labour force participation, and social differences and inequalities across different groups, including gender, class, and ethnicity/race. It also examines managerial cultures and styles, and workers' responses and resistance to managerial control.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, labour, worker, industrialization, equalitSDG5, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10
SOC228H5Introduction to Indigenous StudiesThis survey course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Studies. Students will explore the themes, theories and methods of the discipline,and develop a foundational knowledge about Indigenous history, peoples, cultures and societies in Canada.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
SOC230H1Sociology of EducationIn advanced economies, schooling is a near-universal and highly structured institution. During the most impressionable times in their lives, children and adolescents go nearly every day to sit in the same pattern of classes with the same peers. In theory, students both within and across schools are supposed to learn the same things, at approximately the same time, and engage in similar rituals. And yet, this level of standardization often leads to substantively different outcomes across groups. This course investigates the structure of schools and the achievement hierarchies within and across them.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinvest, institutSDG16, SDG4
SOC230H5Thinking Like a SociologistThis course builds on SOC100H5 through a deep engagement with 4-5 significant new publications in Sociology, typically books by department faculty and visiting scholars. By developing reading and writing skills through a variety of assignments, including reflections, and experiential learning in classroom debates and simulations with the researchers who produced the publications, students will learn to "think like a sociologist". Possible topics covered include race/ethnicity, gender, work, immigration, political sociology, cultural sociology, and criminology, as well as other major subfields within the discipline. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oflearning, genderSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC236H5GlobalizationHow do individuals relate to the complex and over-used concept of "globalization"? This course will explore major theories and controversies in the field of globalization scholarship, looking at the phenomena from the perspective of global capitalists, anti-globalization social movements, consumers, states, and citizens. Students will critically evaluate common claims made about globalization, and acquire tools to assess the validity of competing perspectives.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcapital, globaliz, consumSDG9
SOC239H5Sociology of Health and IllnessThis course examines the social causes of illness and disease, the sociology of illness experience, and the sociology of risks to health. The course addresses only peripherally issues related to formal health care provision, health care work, and the structure of health care systems.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofhealth care, illnessSDG3
SOC240H1Sociology of LawThis course asks students to think critically about the role of law in society, and to develop a sociological understanding of law and legal institutions. The course will include theoretical approaches to understanding the role of law and legal authority, and the constitutive ways in which law affects, shapes, and is negotiated in everyday life. In addition, attention will be paid to the legal profession, including empirical research on lawyers, legal careers, and their relationship to fields of practice, with an emphasis on the relationship between the structure of the legal profession and law as a democratic institution.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinstitut, democraSDG16
SOC240H5Introduction to Social PolicyThis course will examine how human needs are met by states. It focuses on the sociological, political and economic forces that help create new policies and reshape existing social policies. The course will provide a survey of welfare state policies, economic policies and family policies. It will also focus on the outcomes of social policy as these affect various constituencies and social groups such as the economically underprivileged and disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minority groups, and people with disabilities. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofwelfare, disabilit, minorit, privilegedSDG1, SDG10, SDG16
SOC243H1Sociology of Health and IllnessThis course examines (1) the social causes of illness and disease, (2) the experience of illness, and social processes that shape both of these issues, including medicalization. It focuses on population health, the relation between agency and structure, and macro-micro connections. Professional health care is discussed to the extent that it provides context for analyses of illness patterns and experiences.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofhealth care, illnessSDG3
SOC253H5Social History of Race and EthnicityThis course examines how ideas about "race" and "ethnicity" evolved and became institutionalized on a global scale, as well as systems of exploitation, exclusion and inequality that have given rise to today's patterns of racial and ethnic inequality in the world. We focus on examples from different regions of the world, as well as examine large-scale historical events such as colonialism, slavery and immigration. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, institut, exploitationSDG10, SDG16
SOC260H1Introduction to Political SociologyAn introduction to key topics in political sociology such as social movements, electoral alignments, parties as organizations, the welfare state, revolution, policymaking, state formation, nationalism and imperialism.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwelfare, nationalismSDG1, SDG16
SOC263H5Social InequalityExamines the causes, prevalence and manifestations of social, political and economic inequalities, internationally and within Canada. The effects of gender, age, ethnicity-race, among other characteristics, are carefully analyzed in Canada and cross-culturally.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
SOC265H1Gender and SocietyThis course first explores how sociologists conceptualize gender and study gender. Then, it explores the varied nature of gender relations, with a focus on the social organization of gender today.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOC270H1Introduction to Social NetworksThis course covers the fundamentals of the social network perspective, including a short introduction to social network theory and a survey of major findings in social network research. We will study how patterns of relations between social actors develop and how they affect outcomes such as health, status attainment, and inequality. Students will write a proposal to conduct research from a social network perspective.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10, SDG3
SOC275H5Sociology of GenderThis course introduces students to the sociology of gender showing how gender is a relationship of power that structures our everyday lives from intimate relationships through global political and economic forces. We will focus on gender and gender differences as produced in historically and locally specific ways where gender differences intersect with those of race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexuality and other structures of inequality.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10, SDG8
SOC282H1Introduction to Social ProblemsExamines a variety of widely discussed social problems, including poverty, crime, substance abuse, sexism, climate change and urban sprawl, using sociological theories to understand the causes of these problems. Will also examine the “social construction” of these social problems and factors that influence public attention and concern.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofpoverty, substance abuse, urban, climateSDG1, SDG3, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
SOC301H5Canadian PrisonsThis course will examine trends and approaches within the correctional system in Canada. It will explore the historical and contemporary context of correctional practices. Attention will be paid to the differential impact of Canadian corrections on Aboriginal people and other minority groups. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofminoritSDG10, SDG16
SOC302H5Indigenous-Canada RelationsThis course analyzes Indigenous-Canada relations. Topics may include nationhood, diplomatic relations, trade, military relationships, assimilation/civilization policy, land claims, self-government, and/or education. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oftrade, indigenous, landSDG10, SDG16, SDG15
SOC303H5White-collar and Corporate CrimeThis course explores the individual, organizational, and ecological dimensions of white-collar and corporate crime. Topics generally include financial and environmental crime, workplace safety, and organizational deviance. As well, the social, political, and criminal justice responses to these crimes will be examined. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofenvironmental, ecolog, criminal justiceSDG13, SDG16
SOC304H1Status and Class MobilityShows how getting ahead or becoming downwardly mobile are affected by social as well as economic factors. Links the experience of mobility to larger scale social change.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SOC304H5Environmental SociologyThis course focuses on human-nature interactions, and the social processes that modify and threaten the natural world.Students develop a better understanding of environmental issues, the interrelationship between social problems and environmental problems, as well as the ways that humans themselves are part of nature.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofenvironmentalSDG13
SOC305H1Sociology of ProfessionsBecoming a professional (doctor, accountant, lawyer, engineer, nurse, etc.) remains a coveted goal for many young adults and their parents. But what is a profession, and what do these disparate groups have in common? This course lays the groundwork for understanding how the “professional projects” define professions, limit entry, create internal inequalities and try to maintain their prestige. The role of policy is key to our understanding of the professions, and we will focus on the role of policies in the creation of professions, in the substance of professional work such as ethics, autonomy and commercialism, and on the role of policies in addressing social concerns of inequality and diversity in the professions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC305H5Asian Canada and Asian DiasporaThe course will introduce students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on Asian Canada and Asian diaspora from transnational perspectives. We will examine the history of Asian migration to North America on the context of colonialism, the Cold War, and capitalist development, as well as the experiences of various Asian immigrant communities in the contemporary era.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcapitalSDG9, SDG10
SOC306H1Economic SociologyThis course offers a sociological account of economic phenomena. It examines the sociological perspectives on production, consumption, exchange and distribution, economic crises, and other economic matters. In addition to exploring economic behavior in the corporate and financial worlds, the course also examines behavior in households, markets for intimacy, and illegal markets.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofconsum, productionSDG12, SDG8
SOC308H1Global InequalityThis course examines the social processes that characterize stratification and social inequality across the globe, by looking at whether global inequality is growing, shrinking or stagnant and the impact of globalization on global inequality, with particular emphasis on examining disparities over time in education, income/wealth and health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofglobaliz, inequality, equalit, incomeSDG9, SDG10, SDG1, SDG3, SDG4
SOC308H5Law and Crime in Asia and Asian DiasporasThis course introduces students to the core and cutting-edge sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on law and crime in Asia and Asian diasporas across the world. It examines major topics in criminology, law and society in various Asian contexts (e.g., legal consciousness, legal pluralism, dispute resolution, policing, rights mobilization, etc.), as well as the experiences of Asian immigrant communities with legal and criminal justice systems.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcriminal justiceSDG16
SOC309H5Sociology of Mass CommunicationThis course examines the theories, methods, and findings of sociological studies of media production, content, and reception. The focus is on understanding how communication theories are adjudicated by empirical findings. Topics include race and gender in the media, bias in the news, media ownership, the film industry, and the role of the media in politics.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, production, judicSDG5, SDG, SDG16, SDG10
SOC310H1Sociology of AtrocitiesThis course focuses on the sociology of atrocities. We focus on the range of social actors and processes involved when atrocities occur, how we identify, name, and respond to atrocities (such as genocide or crimes against humanity), the behavior of bystanders and intervenors, cultural trauma and the effects of atrocities, and processes of commemoration. We investigate the collective and social dynamics to try and explain the role of individuals, groups, and institutional actors in committing atrocities, including the role of group identities, bureaucracies, collective decision-making, shared repertoires, legacies of hate, and peer networks. We study the role of other actors – in particular legal institutions, but also humanitarian bodies, journalists, and others – in identifying, naming and sometimes responding to these atrocities, along with sociological evidence about how they do so and the efficacy of any such response.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinvest, humanitarian, cities, institutSDG10, SDG11, SDG16
SOC310H5Youth JusticeThe youth criminal justice system in Canada. Topics include historical and contemporary shifts in the youth justice system, young offender legislation, public perceptions and media representations of juvenile delinquency, current research and theories on youth crime and crime prevention strategies. Particular attention is paid to the treatment of specific groups. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcriminal justiceSDG16
SOC311H1Immigration and Race Relations in CanadaExamines the economic, social, cultural and political impacts of 20th century immigration in Canada, and emerging race and ethnic relations. Topics include immigration policy; population impact; community formation; labour markets; enclave economies; welfare use by immigrants; the criminal justice system; racial conflict; multiculturalism and race; and equity policies.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwelfare, equity, labour, equit, criminal justiceSDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
SOC312H1Population and SocietyThis introductory course examines Canada's population in a global context, covering a broad range of population issues and perspectives. Topics include (a) demographic data and methods, (b) population composition in terms of age, sex, and nuptiality, (c) demographic processes of fertility, mortality, internal and international migration, (d) the relationship between population change and urbanization, and (e) the role of social policy on population change. For all course topics, the instructor will examine historical and cross-national trends and review proposed explanations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofurbanSDG11
SOC312H5Law, Race and RacismThe course investigates the relationship between law, race, and racism and the societal implications. Students will gain a stronger understanding of how law creates race for the purposes of legitimating and perpetuating racism and the ways that law can, under some conditions, generate social change that reduces racial inequality. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofracism, invest, inequality, equalit, social changeSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
SOC313H1Social ControlThis course examines how society has gone about controlling specific types of deviants (e.g., gang members, sex and drug offenders) and acts of deviance (e.g., organized crime, the deviance of social control agents). In examining these individuals and acts, attention is also directed to why they are defined as deviant and sanctioned, and why some types of deviance are less likely to be detected and sanctioned than others. Finally, consideration is also given to a range of sanctions that have been used to control deviance and the empirical evidence on their effectiveness.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oforganized crimeSDG16
SOC315H1Domestic ViolenceThis course will provide an overview of the different forms of domestic criminal violence, concentrating primarily on intimate partner violence and child abuse. We will focus on the methodological problems in assessing the nature and extent of these types of violence, the risk factors and correlates of both offending and victimization and the theoretical explanations that have been offered for these crimes. We also consider the social and legal responses to intimate partner violence and child abuse.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofviolenceSDG16
SOC316H1Sociology of Health CareExamines factors that influence the organizational structure of health care systems, how these organizations develop, how they are maintained, and how they can be change.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofhealth careSDG3
SOC317H5Shopping and SocietyThis course provides an overview of the Sociology of Consumption. The study of consumption provides an entry point for examining the intersection between culture, economics, and the environment. Potential topics include the following: the shopping experience, consumption as status, the environmental impact of consumerism, fashion cycles, and identity construction through consumption.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofconsum, environmentalSDG12, SDG13
SOC318H1Theories of StratificationWhy do some people have more resources than others? Who winds up at the top of economic hierarchies, and who winds up at the bottom? These are the primary questions for the study of stratification. In this course, we focus primarily on the most influential contemporary sociological theories of status attainment and gender inequality, with additional but briefer treatments of the central theories on other topics (e.g., poverty and the welfare state, networks, rents, racial inequality). This is a program-only course and is restricted to Sociology Majors and Specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofpoverty, welfare, gender, wind, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SOC318H5Sociology of Mental Health and Mental DisordersAn overview of the link between social inequality and inequality in distress, focusing on differences in mental health across social groups and the role of stress and coping resources in explaining group differences. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofmental health, inequality, equalitSDG3, SDG10
SOC319H1Immigration and EmploymentThis course examines the labour market and employment situation of immigrants emphasizing recent Canadian experience in comparative context. Topics include immigrant human capital, declining immigrant earnings, immigrant skill-underutilization, impact of the knowledge economy, racial discrimination, labour market structure and unionization, immigrant entrepreneurship and experiences of the Canadian-born second generation. This is a program-only course and is restricted to Sociology Majors and Specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, employment, labour, entrepreneur, capitalSDG8, SDG9, SDG10
SOC320H5Criminal Justice OrganizationsThis course uses organizational theory to examine major criminal justice institutions--including police, courts, and prisons. It examines the role of organizational goals, structure, resources, legitimacy, culture, and front-line workers in shaping organization-level decisions about policy and practice. It also examines the interactions, mutual influence, and competition between government, interest groups, and criminal justice institutions that help to initiate and sustain field-wide change. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofworker, institut, criminal justiceSDG16
SOC321H1Status and Class MobilityShows how getting ahead or becoming downwardly mobile are affected by social as well as economic factors. Links the experience of mobility to larger scale social change. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SOC321H5Law & RightsThis course investigates the promise and limitations of rights as a legal framework to safeguard citizens and residents of Canada and abroad. Topics include the framing and implementation of novel rights claims, the relationship between formal rights and social norms, and the impact of rights frameworks on civic and community ties.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinvestSDG16
SOC322H1Sociology of ProfessionsBecoming a professional (doctor, accountant, lawyer, engineer, nurse, etc.) remains a coveted goal for many young adults and their parents. But what is a profession, and what do these disparate groups have in common? This course lays the groundwork for understanding how the “professional projects” define professions, limit entry, create internal inequalities and try to maintain their prestige. The role of policy is key to our understanding of the professions, and we will focus on the role of policies in the creation of professions, in the substance of professional work such as ethics, autonomy and commercialism, and on the role of policies in addressing social concerns of inequality and diversity in the professions. This is a program-only course and is restricted to Sociology Majors and Specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC322H5Criminal Justice and InequalityThis course examines the intersections between social inequality and the criminal justice system in Canada and internationally. The course will explore the impact of practices and policies on race, class, gender and other forms of social inequality. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, criminal justiceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC323H1Economic SociologyThis course offers a sociological account of economic phenomena. It examines the sociological perspectives on production, consumption, exchange and distribution, economic crises, and other economic matters. In addition to exploring economic behavior in the corporate and financial worlds, the course also examines behavior in households, markets for intimacy, and illegal markets. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofconsum, productionSDG12, SDG8
SOC323H5Law, Culture and Social ProblemsThis course explores contemporary social problems related to law with an emphasis on cultural dynamics such as perception, group and community culture, stereotyping, and meaning-making. Topics covered may include law in everyday life, gun carrying by gun owners, workplace discrimination lawsuits, the #MeToo movement, and the Canadian government’s marginalization of Indigenous legal orders. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofindigenousSDG10, SDG16
SOC324H5Carceral Feminisms: Race, Gender and State ViolenceThis course explores how different strains of feminism shape practices of punishment. Course topics may include: intersectional debates in the regulation of domestic violence, gender-responsive policing, state regulation of gender-based violence, and prison abolition theory and praxis. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, feminis, violenceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
SOC325H1Population and SocietyThis introductory course examines Canada's population in a global context, covering a broad range of population issues and perspectives. Topics include (a) demographic data and methods, (b) population composition in terms of age, sex, and nuptiality, (c) demographic processes of fertility, mortality, internal and international migration, (d) the relationship between population change and urbanization, and (e) the role of social policy on population change. For all course topics, the instructor will examine historical and cross-national trends and review proposed explanations. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofurbanSDG11
SOC326H1Social ControlThis course examines how society has gone about controlling specific types of deviants (e.g., gang members, sex and drug offenders) and acts of deviance (e.g., organized crime, the deviance of social control agents). In examining these individuals and acts, attention is also directed to why they are defined as deviant and sanctioned, and why some types of deviance are less likely to be detected and sanctioned than others. Finally, consideration is also given to a range of sanctions that have been used to control deviance and the empirical evidence on their effectiveness. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oforganized crimeSDG16
SOC327H5Drugs and the Modern WorldThe course examines how "drugs", as well as attempts to police and control their use, have been implicated in the making of the modern world. Instead of taking drugs as inherently criminal and deviant, the course will look at how drugs have played a central role in the development of capitalism, colonialism and global inequality in the past 200 years. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcapital, inequality, equalitSDG10, SDG8
SOC328H1Domestic ViolenceThis course will provide an overview of the different forms of domestic criminal violence, concentrating primarily on intimate partner violence and child abuse. We will focus on the methodological problems in assessing the nature and extent of these types of violence, the risk factors and correlates of both offending and victimization and the theoretical explanations that have been offered for these crimes. We also consider the social and legal responses to intimate partner violence and child abuse. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofviolenceSDG16
SOC328H5Drugs in the CityThis course will explore illegal urban drug markets in Canada and the United States. Specifically, it will focus on how urban drug markets and drug use are influenced by drug cycles, moral panics, the economy, and criminal justice policy. Moreover, it will sociologically analyze the business practices, subcultures, and gendered interactions of drug market participants.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, urban, criminal justiceSDG5, SDG11, SDG16, SDG8
SOC329H1Social MovementsThis course introduces students to the sociological study of collective action. Students will explore how movements in a variety of historical and global contexts endeavor to produce social change. In this process, we will examine political and cultural opportunities and obstacles, organizational dynamics, resources, collective action frames, strategies and tactics. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SOC329H5Law & Social MovementsThis course focuses on how popular movements and legal institutions influence efforts to produce or prevent social change. Taking a comparative approach, it examines the social conditions that mobilize and sustain popular movements, factors that contribute to movement success, and the receptivity of courts to pressure from below.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinstitut, social changeSDG16
SOC330H1Sociology of AtrocitiesThis course focuses on the sociology of atrocities. We focus on the range of social actors and processes involved when atrocities occur, how we identify, name, and respond to atrocities (such as genocide or crimes against humanity), the behavior of bystanders and intervenors, cultural trauma and the effects of atrocities, and processes of commemoration. We investigate the collective and social dynamics to try and explain the role of individuals, groups, and institutional actors in committing atrocities, including the role of group identities, bureaucracies, collective decision-making, shared repertoires, legacies of hate, and peer networks. We study the role of other actors – in particular legal institutions, but also humanitarian bodies, journalists, and others – in identifying, naming and sometimes responding to these atrocities, along with sociological evidence about how they do so and the efficacy of any such response. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinvest, humanitarian, cities, institutSDG10, SDG11, SDG16
SOC330H5Criminology and ImmigrationThis course examines the intersection between immigration and crime control. More specifically, it examines immigration detention and deportation, concerns with immigrant risk, security and terrorism, as well as the impact of public policy on immigration and crime. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofterrorisSDG16
SOC331H1Sociology of TechnologyThis course invites students to critically examine the interplay between technology and society. We will discuss how our interactions with technologies, including computers and the Internet, ICTs, social media, and other digital technologies, have become central for our understanding of contemporary social life. This course provides an overview of the sociology of technology, encompassed by various topics in which technology intersects with other areas of sociological inquiry, such as social stratification, community and networks, criminology and social control, work and labour, health and aging, and many others. This is a program-only course and is restricted to Sociology Majors and Specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflabour, internetSDG8, SDG9, SDG3, SDG16
SOC331H5Gender and Criminal JusticeThis course explores how gender impacts criminalization and how gender shapes the way criminal justice is conceptualized and delivered. Possible topics may include masculinity & criminalization; gender & policing; gender & court outcomes; women's prisons, and trans issues in prisons.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, women, criminal justiceSDG5, SDG16
SOC332H5Race and Ethnicity in CanadaThis course deals with the social construction of racial and ethnic categories in the Canadian context, as well as with how Canadian institutions have used racial and ethnic categories to generate inequality and exclusion. It also addresses how individuals, social movements and institutions have at times worked to resist, challenge or modify these practices of categorization and exclusion. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, institutSDG10, SDG16
SOC333H1Quality of Institutions and LivesTheory and research on quality of life encompass studies of subjective dimensions of individual wellbeing, such as happiness, and studies that focus on objective indicators of the quality of institutions and settings, such as child mortality rates. Quality-of-life theories range from (sometimes utopian) classical sociological theories with a historical and political slant to recent interdisciplinary theories that integrate sociological, psychological, and philosophical approaches. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwellbeing, institutSDG3, SDG16
SOC334H1Sociology of Mental Health and Mental DisordersAn overview of the link between social inequality and emotional inequality, focusing on differences in mental health across social groups and the role of stress and coping resources in explaining group differences. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofmental health, inequality, equalitSDG3, SDG10
SOC334H5Aging and SocietyThis course will examine (1) theoretical and empirical issues regarding demographic, economic, and social processes of aging as they affect individuals, families, and societies; (2) the variations in the process and meaning of aging across gender, ethnicity, and class; and (3) public policy issues concerning aging with regard to the process of public policy-making and effectiveness of relevant programs and services.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG16
SOC335H1Urban HealthCities are home to particular populations (the poor, the homeless, racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and the young and old) and have distinct risks and protections relevant to health. Patterns of health in cities, historical developments, and emerging literature and methodology are used to uncover how everyday settings influence health. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofhomeless, minorit, cities, urbanSDG1, SDG10, SDG11, SDG3
SOC335H5Political SociologyThis course will introduce students to the classic and contemporary view of political processes in small groups, organizations, institutions, communities and societies. Specific topics to be covered may include revolutions, state formation, ethnic nationalism, social capital and civic participation, gender politics, the various varieties, causes and effects of welfare states and social movements. The course will have both a Canadian and international focus. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofwelfare, gender, capital, institut, nationalismSDG1, SDG5, SDG16, SDG10
SOC336H1Transnational AsiaThis course explores how transnational flows of capital, labor, ideas, and culture are reconstituting the ways in which we organize our political, economic, and cultural life by particularly focusing on Asia, the region that has been at the center of this global transformation. How has the notion of the "transnational" evolved and invited critical re-evaluations? What has been the place of Asian countries in this global process and what political, economic, social, and cultural changes do they experience? By examining these questions, this course aims to enhance our understanding of contemporary Asian societies closely tied with each other and the rest of the world. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflabor, capitalSDG8, SDG9
SOC337H1Gender RelationsThis course examines the dynamics of gender in daily life – in sexuality and intimate relations, in parenting and families, and in paid work and workplace organizations, as well as in popular culture. It examines the social construction of gender in individuals and in social organizations, in order to understand gender inequality. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
SOC338H1Sociology of Women and WorkThis course focuses on women's paid and unpaid work and the relationship between the two. It analyzes the gender gap in earnings, the sexual segregation of the labour force, the restructuring of paid work, sexual harassment, paid domestic work, and the division of housework and child care. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, women, labourSDG5, SDG8
SOC339H1Race, Class, and GenderIn this class, we analyze the ways in which race, class, gender and sexuality interact and shape communities, life opportunities, perspectives and politics. We will read contemporary ethnographies concerning work, socialization, and urban life against current sociological theories about inequality and intersectionality, and identity. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, urbanSDG5, SDG10, SDG11
SOC339H5The Indian Act: Canadian Law, Sovereignty and Indigenous WomxnIn discussions about Indigenous Peoples and law, the Indian Act is one of the most cited pieces of Canadian legislation. From explaining the history of residential schooling to violence against Indigenous womxn, critical and Indigenous scholars turn to the Indian Act as a key source and problem space. We will center the work of Indigenous feminist scholarship to understand why scholars argue that the act is still both required and a site of contestation, violence, and genocide, and how we are each affected by its governance.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department offeminis, indigenous, governance, sovereignty, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC340H5Social ChangeUnderstanding social transformation is at the heart of sociological inquiry. This course introduces students to the sociological analysis of social change - particularly how societies evolve into complex systems. The course examines how social, political and economic institutions are transformed by social change, as well as how these institutions can themselves promote social change. We also examine how citizens can affect change through social and political participation. In addition to classical foundations, the course covers a range of contemporary themes including inequality and stratification, social movements, globalization, and law and justice. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofglobaliz, inequality, equalit, institut, social changeSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
SOC342H1The Sociology of Women and International MigrationExamines the international migration of women in postindustrial economies with emphasis on Canada. Topics include: theories of female migration; the impacts of immigration policies; migration trends and entry status; integration issues pertaining to family, language knowledge, citizenship and economic status; labour market barriers and public policy considerations. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, citizenship, women, female, labourSDG5, SDG8, SDG1, SDG10
SOC343H1Neighbourhoods & Communities in CanadaUses recent and historical data to demonstrate the changing social characteristics of local neighbourhoods and larger communities, as these have been affected by industrialization, immigration and other factors and as they affect the life chances of their residents. Provides students with active learning experiences through research activities using Census data. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflearning, industrializationSDG9, SDG11
SOC343H5Urban SociologyThe course will introduce students to the core and cutting-edge scholarship in urban sociology. We will discuss theories and empirical studies related to the issue of urban politics, including the issues of food, housing, gentrification, and neighborhood change. Despite the focus on Canadian and American cities, this course also highlights global and transnational perspectives, such as immigrant experiences, “ethnic” restaurants, and forces of globalization that are intricately tied to urban lives. This course aims to open this discussion about how we connect the micro-level of our social interactions, consumption, and daily lives to macro-levels of progress, global economic forces, politics and culture. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofglobaliz, cities, urban, housing, consumSDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG8
SOC344H5Sociological Approaches to Social PsychologyThis course provides an overview of sociological approaches to social psychology, with an emphasis on how individuals' thoughts, behaviors, and emotions are influenced by both situations and larger social structures. Theoretical perspectives including symbolic interaction, group processes, and social structure and personality will be examined in depth and applied to understanding various topics; these may include self and identities, socialization, attitudes, emotions, deviance, mental health, and collective behavior. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofmental healthSDG3
SOC345H1Global InequalityThis course examines the social processes that characterize stratification and social inequality across the globe, by looking at whether global inequality is growing, shrinking or stagnant and the impact of globalization on global inequality, with particular emphasis on examining disparities over time in education, income/wealth and health. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofglobaliz, inequality, equalit, incomeSDG9, SDG10, SDG1, SDG3, SDG4
SOC346H1Sociology of Health CareExamines factors that influence the organizational structure of health care systems, how these organizations develop, how they are maintained, and how they can be changed. Topics also include the social forces that influence the relationship between healthcare providers and consumers. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofhealth care, healthcare, consumSDG3
SOC347H1Immigration and Race Relations in CanadaExamines the economic, social, cultural and political impacts of 20th century immigration in Canada, and emerging race and ethnic relations. Topics include immigration policy; population impact; community formation; labour markets; enclave economies; welfare use by immigrants; the criminal justice system; racial conflict; multiculturalism and race; and equity policies. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwelfare, equity, labour, equit, criminal justiceSDG1, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
SOC347H5Sociology of MasculinitiesIn this course students will engage with foundational material on the intersections of gender, sex, and sexuality as they relate to masculinity. This includes foundational work on hegemonic masculinity and multiple masculinities. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOC348H1Culture and InequalityHow location in socioeconomic, ethnic, gender, and generational groups shapes individual cultural repertories; how culture affects individual positions in stratification hierarchies; and the role of culture in group boundaries and struggles. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocioeconomic, gender, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SOC348H5Indigenous Rights, Resistance, and ResurgenceThis course explores Indigenous people’s confrontations with colonization through an examination of rights-based processes, resistance movements, and community-led resurgence efforts. Topics may include: rights, courts, and legal action; land reoccupation; political organizing;everyday acts of resistance and resurgence such as petitioning, social media, arts-based movements, and community initiatives.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofindigenous, land, indigenous rightsSDG10, SDG16
SOC349H1Deconstructing 'Muslim American' - Race, Nationalism, and ReligionSince the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Muslim Americans have been once again been cast as both threatening “outsiders” as well as examples of what makes the United States a “nation of immigrants.” What do these contestations teach us about how race, nationalism, and globalization shape immigrant identities? This course examines a range of topics, from everyday boundary-making to ongoing global politics pertaining to different Muslim groups in the United States, often drawing comparisons with Muslims in other Western countries. Course materials include theoretical overviews, research articles, survey reports, book chapters, newspapers, films, and T.V. shows. This is a program-only course and is restricted to sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofglobaliz, nationalismSDG9, SDG16
SOC349H5Sociology of FoodSociological analysis of food in global, regional and intimate contexts. It links cultural and structural aspects of the food system, historically and in the present. Students will investigate and report on inter-cultural food practices in Canada. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department offood system, investSDG2
SOC351H5Politics and Violence: Spot the DifferenceThis course aims to develop a critical approach to the study of violence. We will examine the linkages between politics and crime, between violence and democracy and the political context of specific forms of violence, such as vigilantism, state, collective and, structural violence. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofdemocra, violenceSDG16
SOC352H5Gender and CareThis course will examine how gender shapes the work of care, and its value in society. It will look at both unpaid and paid care and the relationship between them. It will compare how care is organized and it's value in different countries, and institutions (ranging from hospitals to homes) and consider care provided to children, elderly people and adults with disabilities. Contemporary topics include care from the recipient's perspective, and new efforts to value care work. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, gender, institutSDG3, SDG5, SDG16
SOC353H5Borders and Human RightsThis course focuses on the legal construction of international borders, with an emphasis on human rights. The course investigates a range of issues, including but not limited to, the 1951 Refugee Convention and refugee movements, the limits of citizenship rights, and the merging of criminal justice and migration enforcement, including the use of detention as a migration management tool.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcitizenship, invest, refugee, criminal justice, human rightsSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
SOC355H5Sociology of the ProfessionsBecoming a professional (doctor, accountant, lawyer, engineer, nurse, etc...) remains a coveted goal for many young adults and their parents. But what is a profession, and what do these disparate groups have in common? This course lays the groundwork for understanding how the "professional projects" define professions, limit entry, create internal inequalities and try to maintain their prestige. The role of policy is key to our understanding of the professions, and we will focus on the role of policies in the creation of professions, in the substance of professional work such as ethics, autonomy and commercialism, and on the role of policies in addressing social concerns of inequality and diversity in the professions. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10, SDG8
SOC356H1Sociology of TechnologyThis course invites students to critically examine the interplay between technology and society. We will discuss how our interactions with technologies, including computers and the Internet, ICTs, social media, and other digital technologies, have become central for our understanding of contemporary social life. This course provides an overview of the sociology of technology, encompassed by various topics in which technology intersects with other areas of sociological inquiry, such as social stratification, community and networks, criminology and social control, work and labour, health and aging, and many others.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflabour, internetSDG8, SDG9, SDG3, SDG16
SOC356H5Population and SocietyThis course will discuss interrelationship between human population and societal issues such as aging, reproductive health, gender, environment, and social policy. It will examine population structure and dynamics in relation to social, economic, political, and cultural elements of change in both developing and developed world. It will also examine historical population policy developments and the diversified national policies in relation to policy formulation, implementation, and effectiveness.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofreproductive health, genderSDG3, SDG5, SDG13, SDG16
SOC358H5Indigenous People: Legal Orders and LawThis course examines Indigenous people's traditional and contemporary legal orders and confrontations and interactions with non-Indigenous legal systems. Topics may include: treaties; land and resource rights and laws; rights; self-government; governance; restorative justice; colonial legal systems; criminalization and criminal law; and/or international law. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofindigenous, land, governance, legal systemSDG10, SDG16
SOC359H5Gendered IdentitiesThis course will focus on the production of gendered selves, femininity and masculinity, sexuality and sexual identities. We will draw from theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of gender and related disciplines, emphasizing the ways in which gender intersects with class, ethnicity, race, religion and other forces of difference in the production of identities.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, productionSDG5, SDG10
SOC360H1Social MovementsThis course examines the sociological study of collective action. Students will explore how movements in a variety of historical and global contexts endeavor to produce social change. In this process, we will examine political and cultural opportunities and obstacles, organizational dynamics, resources, collective action frames, strategies and tactics.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SOC361H1Theories of StratificationWhy do some people have more resources than others? Who winds up at the top of economic hierarchies, and who winds up at the bottom? These are the primary questions for the study of stratification. In this course, we focus primarily on the most influential contemporary sociological theories of status attainment and gender inequality, with additional but briefer treatments of the central theories on other topics (e.g., poverty and the welfare state, networks, rents, racial inequality).Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofpoverty, welfare, gender, wind, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SOC362H1Quality of Institutions and LivesTheory and research on quality of life encompass studies of subjective dimensions of individual wellbeing, such as happiness, and studies that focus on objective indicators of the quality of institutions and settings, such as child mortality rates. Quality-of-life theories range from (sometimes utopian) classical sociological theories with a historical and political slant to recent interdisciplinary theories that integrate sociological, psychological, and philosophical approaches.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwellbeing, institutSDG3, SDG16
SOC362H5Sex, Gender and WorkThis course will look at the situation faced by women in the workplace and workforce, and the implications for male employees. We will focus on classic and current research, theory and debates about sex segregation in jobs and occupations, the wage and earnings gap, and access to and exercise of authority by women in management positions.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, women, wageSDG5, SDG8
SOC363H1Sociology of Mental Health and Mental DisordersAn overview of the link between social inequality and emotional inequality, focusing on differences in mental health across social groups and the role of stress and coping resources in explaining group differences.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofmental health, inequality, equalitSDG3, SDG10
SOC363H5Sexuality and CrimeThis course focuses on the socio-legal origins, regulations,and consequences of sexuality, reproduction, and sexual violence. Possible topics may include historical and contemporary sexual and reproductive regulations, sexual violence, sex offenders, sex work, pornography, trafficking, and hate crimes against sexual minorities.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oftrafficking, minorit, production, violenceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
SOC364H1Urban HealthCities are home to particular populations (the poor, the homeless, racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and the young and old) and have distinct risks and protections relevant to health. Patterns of health in cities, historical developments, and emerging literature and methodology are used to uncover how everyday settings influence health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofhomeless, minorit, cities, urbanSDG1, SDG10, SDG11, SDG3
SOC364H5New Directions in Social InequalityThis course reviews current ways of viewing and researching social inequality. Particular attention will be paid to how foundational work on social inequality connects to contemporary patterns, especially as demonstrated through current research. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC365H1Gender RelationsThis course examines the dynamics of gender in daily life – in sexuality and intimate relations, in parenting and families, and in paid work and workplace organizations, as well as in popular culture. It examines the social construction of gender in individuals and in social organizations, in order to understand gender inequality.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
SOC366H1Sociology of Women and WorkThis course focuses on women's paid and unpaid work and the relationship between the two. It analyzes the gender gap in earnings, the sexual segregation of the labour force, the restructuring of paid work, sexual harassment, paid domestic work, and the division of housework and child care.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, women, labourSDG5, SDG8
SOC367H1Race, Class, and GenderIn this class, we analyze the ways in which race, class, gender and sexuality interact and shape communities, life opportunities, perspectives and politics. We will read contemporary ethnographies concerning work, socialization, and urban life against current sociological theories about inequality and intersectionality, and identity.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, urbanSDG5, SDG10, SDG11
SOC370H1Immigration and EmploymentThis course examines the labour market and employment situation of immigrants emphasizing recent Canadian experience in comparative context. Topics include immigrant human capital, declining immigrant earnings, immigrant skill-underutilization, impact of the knowledge economy, racial discrimination, labour market structure and unionization, immigrant entrepreneurship and experiences of the Canadian-born second generation.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, employment, labour, entrepreneur, capitalSDG8, SDG9, SDG10
SOC372H1Transnational AsiaThis course approaches Asia from a transnational perspective to enhance our understanding of the complexities involved in Asia’s contemporary transformations. By departing from traditional nation-state-oriented analyses, this class explores how Asia shapes and is shaped by trans-Pacific politics, war and colonial legacies, global capitalism, labor migration, international norms of citizenship, urban development, and flows of ideas and popular culture. By closely examining Asia’s transnational interconnectedness, we question the prevalent notion of Asia and regional studies and highlight the contradictions and challenges Asia faces in its political, economic, social, and cultural spheres. This critical approach is expected to offer a deeper investigation of Asia in and of itself while critiquing dominant assumptions and frameworks found in existing approaches to Asia.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofcitizenship, labor, capital, invest, urbanSDG8, SDG9, SDG11
SOC373H1Deconstructing 'Muslim American' - Race, Nationalism, and ReligionSince the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Muslim Americans have once again been cast as both threatening “outsiders” as well as examples of what makes the United States a “nation of immigrants.” What do these contestations teach us about how race, nationalism, and globalization shape immigrant identities? Taking Muslim Americans as a case study, this course will examine a range of topics, from everyday boundary-making to ongoing global politics pertaining to different Muslim groups in the United States, often drawing comparison with Muslims in other Western countries. More broadly, the course aims to unpack how various global and local/national forces shape the contours, dimensions, and meanings attached to an identity category. To that end, the course begins with some prominent sociological theories, such as intersectionality, double-consciousness, and Orientalism. We will apply these theoretical lenses to analyze issues of race, globalization, cultural citizenship, media representation, and political integration in Muslim American and immigrant experiences.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofcitizenship, globaliz, nationalismSDG9, SDG16, SDG10
SOC373H5Economic SociologyHow is the worth of an item determined? What do financial crises reveal about social life? How do financial traders make decisions? Economic questions, and facts, are inherently sociological. This course teaches you to connect the economy to society by examining a range of phenomena that are more readily related to the economy,such as financial crises, CEO compensation, Silicon Valley innovation, markets and firms, but also those that are not,such as love, art, doormen, the organs of dead bodies, and nature. This course will emphasize how economic transactions create, legitimate, and transform social relations, how economic behaviour needs to be understood within its social context, and how economic principles permeate aspects of social life that seem to resist or lie outside of the economic realm.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oftradeSDG, SDG9, SDG13, SDG16
SOC375H5Sociology of International MigrationThis course will analyze the forces that cause people to leave the country of their birth. We will look at why some countries become predominantly leaving countries, and other immigrant receiving countries. Possible topics include the politics of integration, multiple citizenships, refugee and settlement policies, the development of transnational social spaces and transnational governance structures. Attention will also be given to the dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in structuring international growth.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcitizenship, gender, refugee, governanceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC379H5Criminology, Urban Life, and Social PolicyThe city is an important site of human interaction, characterized by crisis and promise. Through the lens of the city, this course will examine the nature of various social problems, including their causes and impacts. In particular, we will consider how criminological scholarship can analyze and inform policy responses to these issues. Course topics will include a diverse array of issues related to criminalization, youth justice, neighbourhood-level inequality, violence, and the criminal justice system.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalit, urban, criminal justice, violenceSDG10, SDG, SDG16
SOC380H5Gender, Politics and SocietyThis course analyzes the social structural forces that produce gender and the ways in which gender affects political and social change. Possible topics include: migration, social movements, social policy and the welfare state, and globalization. We will also pay special attention to the ways in which gender intersects with class, ethnicity, race, religion and other forces of difference. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofwelfare, gender, globaliz, social changeSDG1, SDG5, SDG9, SDG16, SDG10
SOC381H1Culture and InequalityHow location in socioeconomic, ethnic, gender, and generational groups shapes individual cultural repertories; how culture affects individual positions in stratification hierarchies; and the role of culture in group boundaries and struggles.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofsocioeconomic, gender, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SOC383H1The Sociology of Women and International MigrationExamines the international migration of women in postindustrial economies with emphasis on Canada. Topics include: theories of female migration; the impacts of immigration policies; migration trends and entry status; integration issues pertaining to family, language knowledge, citizenship and economic status; labour market barriers and public policy considerations.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofknowledge, citizenship, women, female, labourSDG5, SDG8, SDG1, SDG10
SOC384H1Neighbourhoods & Communities in CanadaUses recent and historical data to demonstrate the changing social characteristics of local neighbourhoods and larger communities, as these have been affected by industrialization, immigration and other factors and as they affect the life chances of their residents. Provides students with active learning experiences through research activities using Census data.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflearning, industrializationSDG9, SDG10
SOC384H5Media Ethics and Policy: Controversies in Mass CommunicationThis course examines conflicts and controversies in the media. The goal of the course is to analyze power struggles within the realm of the media in order to understand how they both reflect and can reinforce broader social inequalities. Special emphasis is paid to the role of media policies and regulations. Topics include censorship, violence, pornography, marketing, social media and privacy.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofequalit, violenceSDG10, SDG16
SOC388H5Race and IndigeneityThis course examines how the concept of race, and the ideologies that inform it, impacts identity politics for Indigenous peoples. Special attention will be paid to the socio-cultural and legal effects of racialized knowledge production. Topics may include: human genome projects, museums, recognition politics, legal definitions, criminalization, access to resources, stereotypes and personhood.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, indigenous, productionSDG10, SDG16
SOC405H5Surveillance in a Digital WorldThis course introduces students to theories of surveillance and risk in the digital era. The era of big data has given rise to smart policing, preventative security measures, and data driven solutions which are producing new knowledge about risk. It focuses on how surveillance is shifting institutional risk practices within law and criminal justice systems and how marginalized populations and particular geographical spaces are constructed as security risks. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, marginalized, institut, criminal justiceSDG10, SDG16
SOC407H5Development and Social Change: The Case of ChinaThis course introduces concepts, theories, and policies of development and underdevelopment. With China as a case, it focuses on social, economic, political, and cultural factors shaping the nature and meaning of social change. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofsocial changeSDG16
SOC408H1Advanced Studies in OrganizationsThis course covers central issues in the field of organizational sociology. It explores different perspectives on why complex organizations look and operate the way that they do, and examines the social consequences of their behavior. The first part of the course focuses on the evolution of the modern firm. We will trace the history of different models of management and strategy, and evaluate their relative efficacy. The second part of the course examines how organizations shape, and are shaped by, their environments. The third part of the course will explore how organizational behavior influences social inequality, and how social inequality shapes the way that modern organizations function. We will make use of both social scientific analyses and Harvard Business School case studies. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC408H5The Sociology of Anti-Muslim RacismThis reading-intensive course explores historical and contemporary manifestations of anti-Muslim racism through a transnational lens, while paying special attention to scholarship from and about Canada and the United States. Issues related to gender and sexuality, race, citizenship status, Orientalism, colonialism, and military intervention cut across the readings. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofracism, citizenship, genderSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOC409H5Masculinity and the InternetIn this course we will take an in-depth look at a number of topics related broadly to masculinity and the internet, including such things as the “manosphere”, incels, and representations of masculinity on social media. These topics will be examined through the lens of the sociological literature on gender and masculinities. A recurring theme relates to the questions: “Is masculinity changing?” Students will be encouraged to critically examine and evaluate these topics and the sociological literature in multiple ways.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, internetSDG5
SOC410H5Senior Seminar in InequalityThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of inequality. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC411H5Senior Seminar in Social InstitutionsThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of social institutions. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinstitutSDG16
SOC412H1Medicalization of DevianceThis course examines the sociological implications associated with the growing dominance of psychiatry over designating and managing the margins of ‘normality’ and ‘deviance.’ It covers the evolution of the DSM and rise of deinstitutionalization, the importance of stigma and symbolic interactionist understandings of psychiatric diagnoses, and the methods of social control used to mitigate risk and reduce social deviance within the psychiatric and criminal justice systems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the social implications of mental health labels. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofmental health, institut, criminal justiceSDG16
SOC413H5Senior Seminar in the Sociology of GenderThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of gender. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOC415H5Senior Seminar in Indigenous StudiesThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Indigenous Studies. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofindigenousSDG10, SDG16
SOC417H5Senior Seminar in the Sociology of GlobalizationThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in the sociology of globalization.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofglobalizSDG9
SOC422H1Advanced Studies in Political SociologyThis fourth year course will provide an advanced treatment of selected topics in political Sociology. Specific topics to be covered are the relationship between political systems and cleavage voting, the relationship between social class and attitudes and voting, the post-materialist thesis, social capital and civic participation, gender politics, the various varieties, causes and effects of welfare states, and social movements. The course will have both a Canadian and international focus. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofwelfare, gender, capitalSDG1, SDG5, , SDG10, SDG16
SOC422H5Sociology of the BodyThe body is an inevitable part of our existence, but it has not always played a central role in sociology. This course aims to bring the body into sociology by drawing on multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body as a fundamental element of social interactions. We will work to connect the body to power, social problems and diverse forms of exploitation, but we also examine how the body serves as a source of pleasure, joy, and resistance. Fundamentally, we will study the processes by which bodies are shaped, and in turn, shape our social life. Body topics that may be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: health and illness, fatness, fitness and sport, diet culture, taste, aging, disability, sexuality, beauty, cosmetic surgery, and eating disorders.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, illness, exploitationSDG3, SDG16
SOC423H5Identity CrimeThis interactive course concentrates on identity theft and fraud. It provides a critical examination of definitions of, sociological explanations for, and responses to identity crime. Identity crime is examined in the broader context of privacy, national security and organized crime.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department oforganized crimeSDG16
SOC424H5Law, Emotions and JusticeThis course investigates emotional dynamics in law and justice. Topics will include public attitudes towards crime and punishment, the rights of victims in criminal proceedings, and restorative justice.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinvestSDG16
SOC425H5Gender in Global ContextsThis lecture course looks at gender relations from a global perspective, focusing on how the social, political and economic aspects of globalization affect gender relations within various (local) contexts. Possible topics include gender and international migration, women's activism in local/global perspective and post-colonialism. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, women, globalizSDG5, SDG9
SOC426H5Social Theory and Third CinemaThis course is an exploration of the societies of Asia, Africa, and Latin America through films created by directors living and working in the Global South. Each week, we’ll pair a social theory reading with a film made in the Global South to explore themes of colonialism, political economy, race, class, gender, power, and history.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG10
SOC427H1Families and HealthExamines the competing theoretical, policy and therapeutic responses to a variety of family health problems, including addictions, chronic physical illnesses, and mental illness, as well as the effects of illness on family life and family coping. The links between theory and practice provide the basis for discussion of knowledge transfer. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofillness, knowledgeSDG3
SOC427H5Politics, Violence, Democracy and Human Rights in Latin AmericaThis course examines the transnational, national and local historical, social and political contexts that produce, and is in turn affected by, criminal, state and other forms of violence in Latin America, and the challenges that this poses for the functioning of Latin American democracies and for the everyday life of people in the region, whose human and civil rights are frequently violated. Examples of transnational factors examined may include the legacies of the Cold War, the impact of the U.S. war on drugs, and the circulation of ideas about punishment throughout the hemisphere. We also contextualize the presence of violence into the historical and contemporary political and social realities of particular Latin American countries.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofhuman rights, democra, violenceSDG16
SOC428H5Health, Disability, and CrisisThis course will apply sociological theories of inequality, health, and disability to contemporary problems associated with economic and health crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic. This course integrates both quantitative and qualitative methods across substantive themes, providing an opportunity for students to link theories to data.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, inequality, equalitSDG3, SDG10
SOC429H5Disability, Politics and SocietyThis course situates disability within a social and political context. We focus on how disability serves as a basis for exclusion from social, legal, political and economic institutions as well as the ways in which actors (policymakers, activists, etc.) have sought to undermine this system of discrimination. We will investigate a variety of related themes including the “social model of disability,” policy and judicial transformations, the evolution of the disability rights movement (including the use of legal mobilization), disability identity, intersectionality, and the future of disability politics and the law. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, invest, institut, judicSDG9, SDG16, SDG10
SOC430H5Developments in Sociological TheoryThis course presents a discussion and in-depth analysis of strands in contemporary sociological theory from the 1920s to the present day. Topics may include race and ethnicity, gender, class, post-colonial theory, queer theory, intersectionality, symbolic interactionism, new institutionalism, post-structuralism, and culture.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, queer, institutSDG5, SDG16
SOC432H5Contemporary Issues in Genocide and State ViolenceThis advanced lecture course will provide students with the analytical tools necessary to engage in deep analysis of contemporary genocides and state violence. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofviolenceSDG16
SOC434H5Race, Class, Gender in the Global SouthThree of the most fundamental cleavages in the contemporary world-economy are those between whites and people of colour, men and women, and capital and labour. This seminar course focuses on these cleavages and analyzes each through both an historical and global south perspective. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, women, labour, capital, of colourSDG5, SDG8, SDG10
SOC452H5Contemporary Issues in Higher EducationThis course explores the debates and discussions centered on a selection of contemporary issues in postsecondary education in Canada and elsewhere. This may include topics such as the massification and corporatization of higher education, the reliance on sessional labour for instruction, and trends towards credentialism. The course combines instructor- and student-led discussions and inquiry. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofsecondary education, labourSDG4, SDG10
SOC454H5Sociology of the Global SouthThis course examines the causes and consequences of empire, imperialism, and colonization to help better understand contemporary inequalities across the globe. The first part of the course focuses on theories of the Global South and the second part of the course applies those theories to the practice of social science research. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofequalitSDG10
SOC455H5Comparative Indigenous PoliticsUsing a comparative approach, this course explores the politics of Indigeneity in settler colonial contexts. It centers critical analyses of settler colonialism and decolonization, and focuses on examples from Canada, the USA, New Zealand, and Australia to examine the differences and similarities between Indigenous peoples and politics in these places. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofsettler, indigenous, decolonization, landSDG10, SDG16
SOC459H5Science, Technology and SocietyThe focus of this lecture course will be on the varied social contexts of the emergence, development and consequences of science and technology in the modern world. In addition to critical sociological perspectives on science and technology, possible topics could include genomics, reproductive technologies, surveillance, the internet and social media, domestic technology, warfare, nuclear technologies, etc. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofinternetSDG9
SOC460H1Global Inequalities and Contentious PoliticsGlobal Inequality and Contentious Politics: This is a seminar course designed to understand global inequalities and contentious politics. Inequality has been one of the primary subjects in sociological inquiries and its scope naturally expands to a global dimension as our societies are increasingly shaped by international connections. This seminar focuses on understanding various manifestations of global inequalities intersected by international hierarchy, race, gender, and class. Yet, these divisions and injustices are neither static nor unchallenged as people react to these realities via divergent methods. This class will read major theoretical approaches to social movements and examine contentious mobilizations taking place in different geographies around the world to reshape the global order ridden with disparities. Empirical cases of contentious activism include anti-globalization protest, the Occupy movement, campaigns for migrant care workers, resistance against American military bases, and the Me Too movement. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, worker, globaliz, inequality, equalit, injusticeSDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16
SOC460H5Migrant LabourThis lecture course will focus on the intersection of citizenship status and class by examining the position and experiences of various categories of migrant labour in North America, Europe and other regions. Migrant groups include those with temporary status who come to work for a specific time frame in a particular job, those with no status (the undocumented) who work mainly in an informal, unregulated economy, and immigrants with permanent resident status who work in a range of industries and occupations. We will read and write about theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of migration and related fields. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcitizenship, labourSDG8, SDG10
SOC463H1Mental Health and EducationIn this course, we examine institutions of higher education as unique social contexts within which student mental health unfolds. In doing so, we will address mediating and moderating factors, which characterize the unique and varied socio-emotional experiences of students attending post-secondary. As such, we will distinguish and clarify social approaches to studying mental health – focusing on mentorship, funding, social support, academic demands and healthcare resources – from mental illness as characterized in medical disciplines. Students will be expected to read thoroughly and apply insights from the course to authentic mental health concerns facing institutions of higher education today. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofmental health, healthcare, illness, institutSDG3
SOC463H5The Sociology of DisastersThe modern world leans heavily on the assumption that organizations run smoothly, but often they do not and sometimes the consequences are disastrous. This course draws on a variety of sociological theories and explanatory frameworks to better understand how any why large scale disasters occur. The class will investigate high risk technologies, issues and problems related to organizational culture, deviance and misconduct, community dynamics and resilience, environmental justice, and social problems related to racialization, gender, class, and other inequalities. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, invest, equalit, resilien, environmental, resilience, environmental justiceSDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG11, SDG13
SOC465H1Advanced Studies in GenderThis course explores major questions about the nature of gender and gender inequality. The course requires a careful review of key theoretical and empirical work addressing one of these questions and the completion of a research project. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
SOC465H5Climate Change and SocietyIn this course a variety of classical and contemporary sociological perspectives will be deployed to understand the social context, factors and consequences of climate change. Possible topics include the political economy of the environment, environmental refugees, environmental movements, media representations of climate change, the social context and consequences of fracking, the politics of global protocols on carbon emissions, climate justice and social inequality, etc. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofemission, inequality, equalit, refugee, climate, environmental, emissions, climate justiceSDG7, SDG10, SDG13
SOC475H5Sociology of Legal CareersThis course examines legal careers from the sociological perspective. As one of the most elite and influential professions, lawyers are key players in economic, political, and social life. This course traces the various careers of lawyers from their experiences in law school to their jobs in law firms, courts, and other professional settings. In so doing the course will also focus on structures of inequality, such as gender, race and class. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofgender, inequality, equalitSDG5, SDG10
SOC478H1Social Context of Public PolicyThis course explores how policy processes and frameworks need to be evaluated in light of the social context in which they are developed. Factors to be considered include the interplay between public values and expectations and public policy; the implications of cultural diversity and demographic change, and understandings of ethical principles of conduct in public organizations. A related goal is to help students learn how to use empirical research to answer highly contested issues in policy circles and in public life. These objectives are pursued by introducing students to major trends in inequality in Canada, assessing these trends within a comparative context, reflecting on their normative implications, and examining alternative policy responses to these developments. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOC480Y5Internship in Sociology, Criminology, Law and SocietyThrough a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour internship, students apply sociological knowledge gained primarily through previous coursework. Students can seek internship opportunities at municipal social service departments or non-profit agencies providing social services, social movement or community-based organizations working for social change, courts or parole offices, for-profit workplaces, or other organizations. Students must confirm internship arrangements well in advance and secure departmental approval for their internship position prior to the start of term (with students and host organizations required to complete institutional documentation in order for the internship to commence). This experiential learning course also includes class meetings, written assignments and oral presentations, as well as an assessment by the internship employer. An application/interview may be required (see Department of Sociology website for details). Note: International students should visit the International Education Centre to ensure they have the appropriate documentation required to work in Canada well before the start of the course/internship.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofknowledge, learning, institut, social changeSDG16
SOC484H1Children of ImmigrantsNearly one-quarter of Canada’s population are immigrant offspring, defined as those who immigrate as children or those who are Canadian born with foreign born parents. This course examines sociological perspectives, language and bilingualism, racial and ethnic identities, family structure and relationships, marriage, education and labour market experiences of immigrant offspring. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists .Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department oflabourSDG8, SDG3, SDG10
SOC488H1Mental Health over the Life CourseThis course is a research-based exploration of mental health at all stages of life, from birth to death. It emphasizes the long-term consequences for mental health of childhood adversities and disadvantage, major life transitions, and turning points in the life course. Restricted to 4th-year sociology majors and specialists.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSociology (FAS), Department ofmental health, transitSDG3
SOCA03Y3Introduction to SociologyThis foundational skills course, which is taught over two full terms, provides a comprehensive introduction to the discipline of sociology beginning with how sociologists use theory and research methods to understand the social world. Topics covered will include culture, inequality, gender, sexualities, race and ethnicity, families, education, religion, crime, law, health, political economy, mass media, social change, and globalization.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, globaliz, inequality, equalit, social changeSDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG3
SOCB22H3Sociology of GenderThis course examines gender as a sociological category that organizes and, at the same time, is organized by, micro and macro forces. By examining how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age, and other dimensions, we analyze the constitution and evolution of gendered ideology and practice.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOCB26H3Sociology of EducationThis course offers a sociological perspective on a familiar experience: attending school. It examines the stated and hidden purposes of schooling; explores how learning in schools is organized; evaluates the drop-out problem; the determinants of educational success and failure; and, it looks at connections between school and work.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department oflearningSDG4
SOCB30H3Political SociologyAn examination of power in its social context. Specific attention is devoted to how and under what conditions power is exercised, reproduced and transformed, as well as the social relations of domination, oppression, resistance and solidarity. Selected topics may include: nations, states, parties, institutions, citizenship, and social movements.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, institutSDG16
SOCB37H3Economy, Culture, and SocietyThis course offers a sociological account of economic phenomena. The central focus is to examine how economic activities are shaped, facilitated, or even impeded by cultural values and social relations, and show that economic life cannot be fully understood outside of its social context. The course will focus on economic activities of production, consumption, and exchange in a wide range of settings including labor and financial markets, corporations, household and intimate economies, informal and illegal economies, and markets of human goods.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department oflabor, financial market, consum, productionSDG8, SDG10, SDG12
SOCB40H3Thinking Like a SociologistThis course builds on SOCA03Y3 through a deep engagement with 4-5 significant new publications in Sociology, typically books by department faculty and visiting scholars. By developing reading and writing skills through a variety of assignments, and participating in classroom visits with the researchers who produced the publications, students will learn to "think like a sociologist." Possible topics covered include culture, gender, health, immigration/race/ethnicity, political sociology, social networks, theory, sociology of crime and law, and work/stratification/markets.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG3, SDG10, SDG16
SOCB42H3Theory I: Discovering the SocialThis course examines a group of theorists whose work provided key intellectual resources for articulating the basic concepts and tasks of sociology. Central topics include: the consequences of the division of labour, sources and dynamics of class conflict in commercial societies, the social effects of industrial production, the causes and directions of social progress, the foundations of feminism, linkages between belief systems and social structures, and the promises and pathologies of democratic societies.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department offeminis, labour, production, democraSDG5, SDG8, SDG12, SDG16
SOCB43H3Theory II: Big Ideas in SociologyThis course studies a group of writers who in the early 20th century were pivotal in theoretically grounding sociology as a scientific discipline. Central topics include: the types and sources of social authority; the genesis and ethos of capitalism; the moral consequences of the division of labour; the nature of social facts; the origins of collective moral values; the relationship between social theory and social reform; the nature of social problems and the personal experience of being perceived as a social problem; the formal features of association; the social function of conflict; the social and personal consequences of urbanization.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department oflabour, capital, urbanSDG8, SDG11
SOCB44H3Sociology of Cities and Urban LifeA theoretical and empirical examination of the processes of urbanization and suburbanization. Considers classic and contemporary approaches to the ecology and social organization of the pre-industrial, industrial, corporate and postmodern cities.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofcities, urban, ecologSDG11
SOCB47H3Social InequalityA sociological examination of the ways in which individuals and groups have been differentiated and ranked historically and cross-culturally. Systems of differentiation and devaluation examined may include gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, citizenship/legal status, and ability/disability.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofdisabilit, citizenship, gender, inequality, equalitSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
SOCB49H3Sociology of FamilyThis course explores the family as a social institution, which shapes and at the same time is shaped by, the society in North America. Specific attention will be paid to family patterns in relation to class, gender, and racial/ethnic stratifications. Selected focuses include: socialization; courtship; heterosexual, gay and lesbian relations; gender division of labour; immigrant families; childbearing and childrearing; divorce; domestic violence; elderly care.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, labour, institut, violenceSDG5, SDG8, SDG16, SDG10
SOCB50H3Deviance and Normality IThis course explores how deviance and normality is constructed and contested in everyday life. The course revolves around the themes of sexuality, gender, poverty, race and intoxication. Particular attention will be paid to the role of official knowledge in policing social norms.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofpoverty, knowledge, genderSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SOCB54H3Sociology of WorkEconomic activity drives human society. This course explores the nature of work, how it is changing, and the impact of changes on the transition from youth to adult life. It also examines racism in the workplace, female labour force participation, and why we call some jobs 'professions', but not others.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofracism, female, labour, transitSDG5, SDG8, SDG10
SOCB58H3Sociology of CultureAn introduction to various ways that sociologists think about and study culture. Topics will include the cultural aspects of a wide range of social phenomena - including inequality, gender, economics, religion, and organizations. We will also discuss sociological approaches to studying the production, content, and audiences of the arts and media.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, inequality, equalit, productionSDG5, SDG10
SOCB59H3Sociology of LawThis course examines the character, authority, and processes of law in contemporary liberal democracies.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofdemocraSDG16
SOCB60H3Issues in Critical Migration StudiesWhat are the causes and consequences of migration in today's world? This course will explore this question in two parts. First, we will examine how although people decide to migrate, they make these decisions under circumstances which are not of their own making. Then, we will focus specifically on the experiences of racialized and immigrant groups in Canada, with a particular focus on the repercussions of Black enslavement and ongoing settler-colonialism. As we explore these questions, we will also critically interrogate the primary response of the Canadian government to questions around racial and class inequality: multiculturalism. What is multiculturalism? Is it enough? Does it make matters worse? Students will come away from this course having critically thought about what types of social change would bring about a freer and more humane society.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofsettler, inequality, equalit, social changeSDG10, SDG16
SOCB70H3Social ChangeThis course provides an introductory overview of the nature and causes of social change in contemporary societies. Topics covered include: changes in political ideology, cultural values, ethnic and sexual identities, religious affiliation, family formation, health, crime, social structure, and economic inequality.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, social changeSDG10, SDG16, SDG3, SDG4, SDG8
SOCC09H3Sociology of Gender and WorkExplores the interaction of gender and work, both paid and unpaid work. Critically assesses some cases for central theoretical debates and recent research. Considers gender differences in occupational and income attainment, housework, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, and the construction of gender identity through occupational roles.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, incomeSDG5, SDG10, SDG8
SOCC11H3Policing and SecurityThis course examines the character of policing and security programs in advanced liberal democracies. Attention will be paid to the nature and enforcement of modern law by both state and private agents of order, as well as the dynamics of the institutions of the criminal justice system. This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinstitut, criminal justice, democraSDG16
SOCC15H3Work, Employment and SocietyAn upper level course that examines a number of critical issues and important themes in the sociological study of work. Topics covered will include: the changing nature and organization of work, precarious employment, different forms of worker organizing and mobilization, the professions, the transition from school to work.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofprecarious, employment, worker, transitSDG1, SDG8
SOCC24H3Special Topics in Gender and FamilyA theoretical and empirical examination of different forms of family and gender relations. Of special interest is the way in which the institution of the family produces and reflects gendered inequalities in society. Themes covered include changes and continuities in family and gender relations, micro-level dynamics and macro-level trends in family and gender, as well as the interplay of structure and agency. This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, equalit, institutSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SOCC25H3Ethnicity, Race and MigrationWhy do people migrate and how do they decide where to go? How does a society determine which border crossers are ‘illegal’ and which are ‘legal’? Why are some people deemed ‘refugees’ while others are not? What consequences do labels like ‘deportee’, ‘immigrant,’ ‘refugee,’ or ‘trafficking victim’ have on the people who get assigned them? This course will examine these and other similar questions. We will explore how the politics of race, class, gender, sexuality and citizenship shape the ways that states make sense of and regulate different groups of migrants as well as how these regulatory processes affect im/migrants’ life opportunities.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofcitizenship, gender, trafficking, refugeeSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
SOCC26H3Sociology of Urban Cultural PoliciesA popular civic strategy in transforming post-industrial cities has been the deployment of culture and the arts as tools for urban regeneration. In this course, we analyze culture-led development both as political economy and as policy discourse. Topics include the creative city; spectacular consumption spaces; the re-use of historic buildings; cultural clustering and gentrification; eventful cities; and urban 'scenes'.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofbuildings, cities, urban, consum, regenerationSDG11
SOCC29H3Family and Gender in the Middle EastIn this course, students read and evaluate recent research related to the sociology of families and gender in the modern Middle East. The course explores the diversity of family forms and processes across time and space in this region, where kinship structures have in the past been characterized as static and uniformly patriarchal. Topics covered include marriage, the life course, family nucleation, the work-family nexus, divorce, family violence, and masculinities.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, violenceSDG5, SDG16
SOCC34H3Migrations & TransnationalismsExamines the relationship between contemporary modes of international migration and the formation of transnational social relations and social formations. Considers the impact of trans-nationalisms on families, communities, nation-states, etc. This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofnationalismSDG16
SOCC37H3Environment and SocietyThis course links studies in the classical sociology of resources and territory (as in the works of Harold Innis, S.D. Clark, and the Chicago School), with modern topics in ecology and environmentalism. The course will use empirical research and theoretical issues to explore the relationship between various social systems and their natural environments.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofenvironmental, ecologSDG13
SOCC38H3Gender and EducationAn examination of a number of key issues in the sociology of education, focusing particularly upon gender and higher education.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgenderSDG5, SDG4
SOCC45H3Youth and SocietyThis course examines youth as a social category, and how young people experience and shape societies. Topics include: youth and social inequality; social change and social movements, and youth and education.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, social changeSDG10, SDG16, SDG4
SOCC46H3Special Topics in Sociology of LawThe course covers various approaches to the study of law in society. Topics covered may include the interaction between law, legal, non-legal institutions and social factors, the social development of legal institutions, forms of social control, legal regulation, the interaction between legal cultures, the social construction of legal issues, legal profession, and the relation between law and social change.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinstitut, social changeSDG16
SOCC47H3Creative IndustriesAn introduction to organizational and economic sociology through the lens of creative industries. Students will be introduced to different theoretical paradigms in the study of organizations, industries, and fields. The course is divided into four major modules on creative industries: inequality and occupational careers; organizational structure and decision making under conditions of uncertainty; market and field-level effects; and distribution and promotion. This course has been designated an Applied Writing Skills Course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalitSDG10
SOCC49H3Indigenous HealthThis course will examine the healh and well-being of Indigenous peoples, given historic and contemporary issues. A critical examination of the social determinants of health, including the cultural, socioeconomic and political landscape, as well as the legacy of colonialism, will be emphasized. An overview of methodologies and ethical issues working with Indigenous communities in health research and developing programs and policies will be provided. The focus will be on the Canadian context, but students will be exposed to the issues of Indigenous peoples worldwide. Same as HLTC49H3University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofsocioeconomic, well-being, indigenous, landSDG1, SDG3, SDG10, SDG16, SDG
SOCC52H3Immigration, Citizenship and Settler ColonialismThe course examines the relationship between the displacement and dispossession of Indigenous peoples and immigration in settler-colonial states. The focus is on Canada as a traditional country of immigration. Topics considered include historical and contemporary immigration and settlement processes, precarious forms of citizenship and noncitizenship, racism and racial exclusion, and the politics of treaty citizenship. Discussion puts the Canadian case in comparative perspective.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofprecarious, settler, racism, citizenship, indigenousSDG1, SDG10, SDG16
SOCC55H3Special Topics in Race and EthnicityThis course addresses key concepts and debates in the research on race and ethnicity. Topics covered may include historical and global approaches to: assimilation, ethnic relations, intersectionality, racialization, and scientific racism.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofracismSDG10
SOCC57H3Gender, Race, and Class in Economic LifeThis course examines how the three-axis of social stratification and inequality – race, gender, and class – shape economic activity in different settings – from labour markets to financial markets to consumer markets to dating markets to household economies to intimate economies to informal and illegal economies to markets of human goods.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, labour, inequality, financial market, equalit, consumSDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG12
SOCC58H3Global Transformations: Politics, Economy and SocietyA sociological examination of contemporary global transformations including changing social, economic, and political conditions. Topics examined may include the shifting nature of state-society relations in a global context; the emergence of globally-integrated production, trade and financial systems; and the dynamics of local and transnational movements for global social change. This course has been designated as a Writing Skills course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department oftrade, production, social changeSDG10, SDG12, SDG16, SDG8
SOCC59H3Special Topics in Social InequalitySociological analyses of stratification processes and the production of social inequality with a focus on economy and politics. Topics covered may include work and labour markets, the state and political processes. Attention is given to grassroots mobilization, social movements, and contestatory politics.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department oflabour, inequality, equalit, productionSDG8, SDG10
SOCC61H3The Sociology of the Truth and Reconciliation CommissionThe Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is an historic process that now directs a core area of Canadian politics and governance. This course examines the institutional and legal history, precedents, contradictions and consequences of the commission from a sociological perspective.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofreconciliation, truth and reconciliation, institut, governanceSDG10, SDG16
SOCC70H3Models of the Social WorldThis course examines how quantitative models can be used to understand the social world with a focus on social inequality and social change. Students will learn the fundamentals of modern computational techniques and data analysis, including how to effectively communicate findings using narratives and visualizations. Topics covered include data wrangling, graphic design, regression analysis, interactive modelling, and categorical data analysis. Methods will be taught using real-world examples in sociology with an emphasis on understanding key concepts rather than mathematical formulas.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, social changeSDG10, SDG16
SOCD02H3Global Field School: Indigenous Costa RicaThe intensive international field school course is an experiential and land-based learning trip to Indigenous territories in Costa Rica, in order to learn about settler colonialism, Indigenous communities, and UNDRIP (the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples). Students will learn with Indigenous Costa Rican university students and community partners in order to draw links between policy frameworks (UNDRIP), ideologies (colonialism) and the impacts on Indigenous communities (e.g. education, health, food security, language retention, land rights). The course involves 14-16 days of in-country travel. This course has been designated as a Research Skills course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department offood security, learning, settler, land-based learning, indigenous, land, undripSDG2, SDG4, SDG10, SDG16
SOCD10H3Advanced Seminar in Gender and FamilyThis course offers an in-depth examination of selected topics in Gender and Family. Check the department website for details at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/sociology/programs.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgenderSDG5
SOCD13H3Sociology of FinanceThis is an advanced course on the sub-filed of economic sociology that focuses on money and finance. This course examines how cultural values and social relations shape money and finance in a variety of substantive settings, including the historical emergence of money as currency, the expansion of the financial system since the 1980s, financial markets, growing household involvement in the stock and credit market, and implications for social life (e.g., how credit scores shape dating).University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department offinancial marketSDG10, SDG8
SOCD20H3Advanced Seminar: Social Change and Gender Relations in Chinese SocietiesThis seminar examines the transformation and perpetuation of gender relations in contemporary Chinese societies. It pays specific attention to gender politics at the micro level and structural changes at the macro level through in-depth readings and research. Same as GASD20H3University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofgender, social changeSDG5, SDG16
SOCD21H3Immigrant ScarboroughThis course will teach students how to conduct in-depth, community-based research on the social, political, cultural and economic lives of immigrants. Students will learn how to conduct qualitative research including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Students will also gain valuable experience linking hands-on research to theoretical debates about migration, transnationalism and multicultural communities. Check the Department of Sociology website for more details.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofnationalismSDG16, SDG10
SOCD51H3Capstone Seminar in Culture, Creativity, and CitiesThis course provides a hands-on learning experience with data collection, analysis, and dissemination on topics discussed in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities. It involves substantial group and individual-based learning, and may cover topics as diverse as the role of cultural fairs and festivals in the city of Toronto, the efficacy of arts organizations, current trends in local cultural labour markets, artistic markets inside and outside of the downtown core, food culture, and analysis of governmental datasets on arts participation in the city.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department offood culture, learning, labour, citiesSDG2, SDG8, SDG11
SPA196H1Class and Work in the AmericasThis course examines economic and social inequalities in the contemporary Americas. We look at the ways in which class divisions are represented in academic studies, literature, film, and television. From Mexican maquiladoras to indigenous reservations, we consider the global poor and how recent changes in the character of work (automation, outsourcing, free trade zones) have had an impact on class divisions, especially for younger members of society. Can a renewed understanding of class and work help us to negotiate power, privilege, and inequality in this century? Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department oftrade, inequality, equalit, indigenous, outsourcSDG10, SDG16, SDG, SDG8
SPA199H1More than Nachos and Tequila: Mexican History and CultureThis course aims at studying the rich history of Mexico from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will cover a wide range of issues, such as identity, modernity race, immigration, gender, sexuality, globalization, and iconic figures. The issue of identity as construed from the inside, but also from the outside and particularly from the English-speaking world (i.e. current US presidential views on the wall), will be widely examined. Course materials will range from chronicles of conquest to modern reflections and representations by historians, philosophers, filmmakers, musicians, writers and artist, among others. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofgender, globalizSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
SPA275H121st Century Latin American CinemaThis online course examines the social, political, and cultural contexts of recent Latin American Hispanic cinema. Topics include race and indigeneity; poverty, precarity, and inequality; gender and sexuality; and memory and trauma. The representation of these themes in Latin American cinema of the 21st century has contributed to an increase in its transnational and cosmopolitan reception. Lectures in English. Students choose tutorials in Spanish or English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofpoverty, precarity, gender, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SPA375H1Latin American CinemaThis online course examines the social, political, and cultural contexts of recent Latin American cinema. Topics include: military dictatorship and its aftermath, race and indigeneity; poverty, precarity, and inequality; gender and sexuality; and memory and trauma. The representation of these themes in Latin American cinema of the 21st century has contributed to an increase in its transnational and cosmopolitan reception. Focus is given to Argentina and Mexico, though films from other countries will be included. Taught in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofpoverty, precarity, gender, inequality, equalitSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
SPA383H1Disability and Embodiment in Spanish American CulturesThis course approaches literary, visual, and multi-media texts of twentieth-century and contemporary Spanish America, focusing on the body as site of multiple differences, lived experience, exploitation, and creative expression. We will consider the roles of disability through cultural production and activism, particularly in the Mexican context, the histories that have shaped ongoing inequalities, and relationships between disability, gender, and race in these histories.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofdisabilit, gender, equalit, production, exploitationSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
SPA488H1Central America Postwar NarrativeThe end of civil and military conflicts in the last decade of the 20th century reshapes the political landscape of Central America. Through selected readings of novels and short stories from representative writers, issues of immigration, displacement, and globalization are discussed to understand these changes in the region. (Offered every three years)Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofglobaliz, landSDG9, SDG16
SPA489H1Latin American TransculturationsThis course integrates a series of contemporary debates in Latin American cultural studies with analysis of its transdisciplinary history and global permutations. Key topics of investigation within these debates may include indigeneity; coloniality, transculturation, and subalternity; empire, nation, and globalism; revolution, state discourse, and the popular; gender and sexuality; and the production of race.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofgender, invest, globalis, productionSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
STA130H1An Introduction to Statistical Reasoning and Data ScienceThis course, intended for students considering a program in Statistical Sciences, discusses the crucial role played by statistical reasoning in solving challenging problems from natural science, social science, technology, health care, and public policy, using a combination of logical thinking, mathematics, computer simulation, and oral and written discussion and analysis.Arts and Science, Faculty ofStatistical Sciences (FAS), Department ofhealth careSDG3
SWK302H1Aging, Law and PolicyThis course will examine selected areas in aging that reflect current issues and future directions with respect to law and health/social policy, and will delve into how they are impacted in the time of COVID-19. The focus will be on essential elements of the law and policy and their links to the context of aging in Canada. The course will consider "issues on the ground" where each topic will be explored from "alternative viewpoints", presenting both a legal and policy perspective with the aim of making connections between law, policy and current best practices. The longstanding debate about whether the consequences of individual and population aging should be viewed as private troubles or public issues continues to influence law and policy in the areas of health care, community services, income security and housing, especially for specific groups defined by gender, class, sexual orientation and ethnicity. Analyses of each area will include an evaluation of the main applications of the law and policies, and students will gain an in-depth understanding of the issues discussed and the significance of these issues to older adults.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealth care, gender, income, housingSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG11, SDG1, SDG16
TEP234H1Entrepreneurship and Small BusinessComplementary Studies electivePart 1 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program The age of enterprise has arrived. Strategic use of technology in all sorts of businesses makes the difference between success and failure for these firms. Wealth creation is a real option for many and the business atmosphere is ready for you! Increasingly, people are seeing the advantages of doing their own thing, in their own way, in their own time. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress and be accountable for their own success - they can fail, but they can not be fired! After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive to the business life of the next century. This course is the first of a series of two dealing with entrepreneurship and management of a small company. It is intended that the student would continue to take the follow up course APS432 as s/he progresses toward the engineering degree. Therefore, it is advisable that the descriptions of both courses be studied prior to deciding to take this one. This is a limited enrolment course. If the number of students electing to take the course exceeds the class size limit, selection of the final group will be made on the basis of the "Entrepreneur's Test". There will be a certificate awarded upon the successful completion of both courses attesting to the fact that the student has passed this Entrepreneurial Course Series at the University of Toronto. The course is based on real life issues, not theoretical developments or untried options. Topics covered include: Who is an entrepreneur; Canadian business environment; Acquisitions; Different business types (retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and services); Franchising; Human resources, Leadership, Business law; and many others. Several visitors are invited to provide the student with the opportunity to meet real entrepreneurs. There will be several assignments and a session project. It should be noted that the 5 hours per week would all be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLentrepreneurSDG8
TEP321H1Representing Science and Technology in Popular MediaHumanities and Social Science electiveThis course analyzes popular scientific communication critically, starting by establishing a historical and theoretical foundation for understanding the complex relationship between science and the public. We apply this theoretical foundation to contemporary case studies in multiple media (mis)representations of climate, environmental, and biomedical sciences, as well as breakthroughs in engineering. We develop rhetorical strategies for delivering technical information to non-technical readers, including narrative and metaphor.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLclimate, environmentalSDG13, SDG9
TEP324H1Engineering and Social JusticeThis course explores the relationship between engineering and the concepts of social justice to develop the skills needed to take practical action in a complex world. It develops personal responses to ideas of justice, bias and marginalization as these affect Engineers and Engineering in general, domestically as well as globally, in projects as well as in contexts such as the workplace and academic environment. Readings will be drawn from current writers on Engineering and Social Justice and students will rehearse action through theatre techniques developed to enable communities to practice and critique action.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLsocial justiceSDG16
TEP328H1Engineering EducationThrough both formal and informal mechanisms, engineers engage in the processes of teaching and learning across their careers. Drawing from the multidisciplinary field of Engineering Education, students will examine the various applications of educational theory to the engineering profession. Students will examine engineering education across five contexts: (1) undergraduate engineering education; (2) K-12 educational outreach and STEM education; (2) public education and stakeholder engagement; (4) professional education and training; and (5) Lifelong learning. Drawing from the learning sciences, educational philosophy and the sociology and history of education, students will deepen their understanding of their own learning processes, and engage in course activities that prepare them for teaching and learning in their future career as an engineer or engineering educator.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG4
TEP432H1Entrepreneurship and Business ManagementComplementary Studies elective Part 2 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program This is part two of the Entrepreneurship course series. The student considering taking this course would typically plan to pursue a career in small business started by themselves, or in a family enterprise. The skills acquired, however, are very useful in any business where a graduate might end up in their career, without the need for actually being an entrepreneur. Our approach to teaching is based on real-life business experiences and many years of successful practice of "what we preach". The course contains very little theoretical work or academic approaches. It is designed to familiarise you with the kinds of opportunities (problems) likely to be encountered in an entrepreneurial career. If you really want this lifestyle and are prepared to work hard, we will provide you with the practical knowledge and technical skills required to pursue this kind of career. Topics covered in this course include: Marketing and Sales; Legal issues; Financing the business; Human Resources challenges, the Business Plan and many other issues. Note that the course material may be adjusted between the two courses as required. We recognize the value of communication skills in both the classroom and in project reports. In fact, we require that you learn how to present yourself in a business-like manner. As and when appropriate, outside visitors from the business community will join in and contribute to the class discussions. The course deals with practical concepts, actual past and current events and is presented from the point of view of someone who has "done it all". This means that what you hear is the real stuff. There will be several assignments and the preparation of a full Business Plan as the session project. It should be noted that the 5 hours per week would all be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, entrepreneurSDG8
TEP447H1The Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in EngineeringThe primary objective of this course is to help engineering students navigate the ambiguous world of engineering ethics and equity using case studies drawn from the careers of Canadian engineers. In addition to being exposed to a range of ethical theories, the PEO code of ethics and the legal context of engineering ethics, students enrolled in this course will engage in ethical decision-making on a weekly basis.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLequitable, equity, equitSDG10
TEP448H1System MappingSystem mapping is a system thinking tool that is frequently used in fields such as public health and environmental policy to describe complex, multi-stakeholder problems. Students will apply system mapping techniques to describe complex problems with techical, social and environmental aspects. Students will explore fields outside of engineering that are critical to these challenges, including public policy, sociology, and law. Students will complete a team project to develop a system map of a complex problem. The emphasis will be on problem definition not problem solution, though it is expected that maps will point to potential paths for solution.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, environmentalSDG3, SDG13, SDG16
THRC20H3Theatre and Social JusticeAn examination of theatre and performance in relation to social justice. Building an understanding of power in relation to culture, the course looks at historical and contemporary examples to see the many ways performance may confront issues of social inequality and in justice.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofinequality, equalit, social justiceSDG10, SDG16
THRD60H3Advanced Seminar in Theatre and PerformanceA study of key ideas in theatre and performance theory with a focus on pertinent 20th/21st century critical paradigms such as postcolonialism, feminism, interculturalism, cognitive science, and others. Students will investigate theory in relation to selected dramatic texts, contemporary performances, and practical experiments.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department offeminis, investSDG5, SDG10
TRN135Y1Science and Social ChoiceMany of the decisions we make as a society rely on advances in scientific knowledge. In this course, we will discuss a number of contemporary medical topics that involve complex scientific discoveries about health, the human body, disease, and infection. We will consider genes and study the medical implications of our growing understanding of the human genome. We will study a number of recent cases in order to explore how scientific findings influence decision-making in hospitals and the selection of social policies. We will also discuss the background forces that shape medical research and how this affects the kinds of health problems that are prioritized. The objective of this course is to develop a solid understanding of biological concepts related to human health and consider them in their wider social and ethical contexts. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledgeSDG3, SDG16
TRN136Y1Canadian Health Policy in the Global ContextIn this course we consider when our health policies support the highest standards of medical care, consistent with the latest discoveries in medical research. We examine the ways in which debates around ethics, effectiveness and efficiency shape global and national health policy. We begin by exploring the most important advancements in global health policy over the past two decades. We then assess Canada’s experience in providing health care, identifying lessons for national policy reform and for Canada’s role as a leader in global health research and policy. We explore a range of health challenges including universal health care, anti-microbial drug resistance, HIV AIDS, tuberculosis, reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health, cardiovascular care, oncology, environmental health, indigenous health, violence against women and mental health. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLmental health, global health, health care, child health, women, violence against women, indigenous, environmental, violenceSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
TRN140Y1Ethics, Humans, and NatureThis course introduces students to ethical issues arising from the way humans interact with nature. Students will study some theoretical approaches for evaluating how human society affects the planet, ecosystems, and the other animals. Theories will be drawn from philosophy, theology, and ecology, and will include Western and non-Western approaches to living in harmony with one’s environment. Key themes may include speciesism – the idea that human needs are the most important – as well as overpopulation, extinction, vegetarianism, and responsible resource management. The course will also look at how social policy shapes human choices and whether sustainability initiatives should be pursued through the public or private sector. The course will also discuss the spiritual connection between humans and the environment and how society can be organized to promote access to nature in urban communities. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLurban, planet, vegetarian, species, animal, ecosystem, ecologSDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG12
TRN141Y1Environmental Science and Pathways to SustainabilityThis course introduces students to fundamental issues in environmental science with a multi-disciplinary focus on human impacts on physical and biological systems, and on identifying pathways to sustainability. Key themes will include energy and resources, climate change, land use, contaminants and protecting biodiversity in the context of the Anthropocene. The course challenges students to apply the scientific method to environmental monitoring, research and problem solving through project design, data collection and analysis. The course also emphases information literacy, skills to distinguish science from pseudo-science, and considerations around representation of environmental science in the media. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLenergy, climate, environmental, anthropocene, biodivers, land use, landSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG12
TRN150Y1National versus InternationalThe international system today faces extraordinary challenges. Understanding these challenges requires understanding the past. This seminar course briefly reviews the origins and development of the international system from the 17th century through the age of empires and the great wars of the 20th century. It then concentrates on the clash of nationalism with internationalism in the world since 1945, looking at such issues as what drives nationalism and what alternatives there are to it. We will study ideas and ideologies as well as the institutions that make up the current geopolitical world. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinstitut, nationalismSDG16
TRN151Y1Global GovernanceTerrorism, the proliferation of arms (including weapons of mass destruction), environmental degradation, globalization, technological change, and the rise of non-state actors all pose challenges to statecraft and the management of global order. This seminar course explores the changing dynamics of global politics and the responses to them by states (and others). Topics will include an examination of new forms of international collaboration that have developed in the wake of crises in the years following the Second World War. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlabor, globaliz, environmental, governance, terrorisSDG9, SDG13, SDG16, SDG10
TRN152Y1Justice & Global ConflictModern states face both new and familiar challenges to protecting national security. National insecurity threatens a country’s capacity to protect the well-being of its citizens while at the same time participating in international organizations and treaties. This course explores the origins and management of international conflict from the 17th to the 21st century, focusing on the precursors to war and the markers of peace. We will also consider the ways in which our current global world order promotes and preserves justice between and within nations. Students will consider different theoretical approaches to justice between nations, and apply them to recent security issues. By studying the history of conflict and the difference between justice and injustice students will gain a deeper understanding of how current geopolitical actors can structure and affect the prospects for security policy reform moving forward. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwell-being, peace, injusticeSDG4, SDG16, SDG10
TRN160Y1Public Policy and the Public GoodThis course examines the sense of the public good that undergirds Canada's domestic and international obligations. We examine the notion of the “public” through investigating possible answers to a central political question: what is the purpose of government? Drawing on readings in philosophy and political theory, the course considers a variety of approaches to defining the nature of the public good and how policy makers should respond when competing goods (e.g., freedom and security) clash with each other. In addition, the course looks at the treaties and conventions that articulate the responsibilities of signatory nations regarding challenges such as climate change mitigation, refugee resettlement, and foreign aid. Students will learn how international agreements either compel or encourage participation and multilateral cooperation in the absence of robust enforcement mechanisms. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLABS, invest, refugee, climate change mitigation, climateSDG9, SDG10, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
TRN162Y1Political Economy and Social InequalityWhat is the relationship between capitalism and democracy? How can understanding rational choice theory inform public policy? This course will introduce students to the methods of studying the interplay between economics and politics. We will focus on specific topics to guide our quantitative analysis, which may include intergenerational poverty, the transfer of wealth, efficiency, and social stratification. We will analyse empirical results while developing critical skills for interpreting economic data and research. The course also considers global economic dynamics, transnational governance regimes, as well as the political-economic dimensions of setting global policies. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of global political economy, and its connection the fields of international relations and public policy. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpoverty, capital, inequality, equalit, governance, democraSDG1, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG8
TRN170Y1Ethics and the Creative ImaginationA seminar course that explores ethical issues through the study of works of the creative imagination that pose or provoke questions of right and wrong, good and evil, justice and injustice. The selected works will be drawn from such fields as literature, film, and the visual and performing arts. Open only to students admitted to Trinity One. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinjusticeSDG16, SDG10
TRN172Y1Ethics and the LawWhat is the relationship between moral values and the law? What role does the law play in enabling people to live better lives? Are legal institutions and actors subject to higher ethical standards? In this course we will read texts from legal theory and political philosophy to try to explain the connection between ethics and the law. This will provide the basis for thinking about some historical and contemporary legal cases, as well as ethical issues judges, lawyers, and lawmakers face in their professional roles. Restricted to first-year students admitted to the Trinity One Program. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinstitutSDG16
TRN191H1Disaster and Terrorism: Religion and Ethics at Ground ZeroIn response to contemporary terrorist attacks and natural disasters, many are led to cry, “The world will never be the same!” How should such statements be evaluated? What impact do they have on social and political life? This course explores religious and cultural responses to human tragedy and cultural shock. Discussion will attend to debates over the meaning of suffering, public reactions to terrorism, the traumas of natural disasters, and the role of media in covering such events. These themes are engaged from the perspectives of ethics, cultural theory, religious studies, and theology. The course focuses on popular responses to events that include: the Lisbon Earthquake of 1755, the First World War, the Holocaust, Hurricane Katrina, the Japanese experiences of Hiroshima and Fukushima, 9/11, and more recent examples of terrorism and disaster. Attention will be given to concerns such as the impact of trauma on social and political debate, the function of religious discourse in the face of tragedy, the nature of ideology, and the relationship between religion and violence. A thematic concern throughout the course will be the nature of ethical commitment in the midst of confusion and social disruption. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLviolence, terrorisSDG16
TRN192H1Public Health in Canada: Health for the 21st CenturyThis course deals with preventive care and population health. It will also move into new areas like healthcare and the environment (climate change) and the greening of healthcare. It will look at health as an extension of democracy – of how health extends individual rights beyond the political realm to the social realm, of how it can build social capital and knit populations together. It will look at areas inimical to health, ‘detriments to health’ and how economic inequality can lead to health inequality. Along with this it will look at ways of empowering the individual, the public as agent and a role of public engagement by major institutions. It will also push beyond the popular determinants of health to engage students in a paradigm on next steps, the future challenges in population health. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, healthcare, capital, inequality, equalit, climate, institut, democraSDG3, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16, SDG8
TRN193H1Canadian Health Policy: Past, Present and FutureThis is a health systems course. It deals with illness care, individual health, and health insurance. It will take a comparative and historical approach. We will look at the genesis of Canadian healthcare, our benefits and those other countries provide (e.g., pharmacare, dental care). We will look at indirect contributors like childcare and basic income. We will examine the public-private debate. We will also take some novel approaches. One is that the university has an expanded role in the 21st century, one that involves public outreach, a role that includes healthcare. Recent academic literature on healthcare notes that it is nation-building. We will look at why. We will examine some cutting-edge ideas, like integrated care, the learning health system, the concept of customer-owners. We will explore whether our healthcare system needs to be anchored by ‘institutions of excellence’ and identify these. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealthcare, illness, learning, income, institutSDG3
TRN194H1Literature and Wicked ProblemsThis course explores contemporary literature in relation to the interdisciplinary framework of “wicked problems.” Research emphasizes that complex, entrenched problems, like government relations with Indigenous peoples or human impacts on the climate, involve interconnected systems and require approaches that cross disciplines and types of knowledge. The course examines the role of literary works (mostly 21st-century fiction) in addressing these issues of pressing concern to students as global citizens. Critical thinking, scholarly reading and database research are foundational skills that this course strengthens in order to prepare students for their writing in disciplines across the university. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, indigenous, climateSDG10, SDG16, SDG13
TRN203H1Society, its Limits and PossibilitiesKey texts from various disciplines that articulate fundamental features, limitations, and possibilities of contemporary society are introduced. Political consent, economics, governmental administration, the global / post-colonial world, historical transformation, gender politics, and media may be addressed.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5, SDG16
TRN235H1Health Policy in Canada: Past, Present and FutureThis course explores the nature and impact of public health policy in Canada. The course describes the origins of Canadian health policy, its evolution towards its current form and the choices resulting from aging populations and the increasing costs associated with a high standard of health care.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, health careSDG3
TRN236H1The Politics of Global HealthThis course explores the nature and impact of policy relationships designed to improve global public health. We explore the analytical tools necessary to study these institutional arrangements and examine successes and failures of these policy relationships across a range of global health policy challenges including infectious disease and child health.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpublic health, global health, child health, institutSDG3, SDG16
TRN250Y1Ordering International Relations in the Age of EmpireThe course examines the origins and development of three fundamental norms in international relations (sovereignty; free trade; human rights) in their historical, imperial context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLtrade, human rights, sovereigntySDG10, SDG16, SDG8
TRN250Y1Empire, Nationalism, and the History of International RelationsOur modern world has its foundations in the development of a complex and changing system of international behaviours, customs, and rules. This course explores the global and often difficult transition from a world of empires to our contemporary world of nation-states, spanning the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. Using a global lens, this course offers an introductory historical survey using multiple perspectives and diverse settings, paying special attention to the dissolution of empire, popular revolution and mass movements, and the creation of international order. How global transformations were experienced, not only at the highest levels of power, but also by the people living amidst such change, will be an abiding concern of this course.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLtransit, nationalismSDG16
TRN350H1Scarcity, Sustainability, and the Future of International RelationsInternational Relations are changing, and changing quickly. Major challenges in global affairs, including the interrelated problems of climate change, resource scarcity, great power competition, and changes in mass politics will shape our future in uncertain and possibly dangerous ways. This course seeks to evaluate the effect of these interconnected issues on our world today, and their implications for the future. Through a series of case studies, students will be encouraged to identify future international challenges and work to develop sustainable and innovative solutions to the problems that will confront our world in the next decades and beyond.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLclimateSDG13, SDG12
TRN410H1Researching Critical Cases in Contemporary International RelationsThis course allows students with majors in International Relations to apply some of the techniques and skills they have developed during their undergraduate careers to an original research project in contemporary international relations history. This course is a chronological historical survey of the world since 1968, as the origin of the present era. Within the chronology, attention is given to major developments/themes that emerged and continue to affect the present day. These include: the rise of China as a power, political dissent, the emergence of terrorism, the environment, energy as major international issues, the neo-liberal economic turn, globalization, the end of the Cold War, the human rights/humanitarian intervention revolution, and key post 2000 developments such as the War on Terror, the decline of the US “unipolar moment,” the 2008 financial crisis and the return in the 2010s of nationalism and protectionism. This course is restricted to students enrolled in the International Relations major program.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLenergy, globaliz, humanitarian, human rights, nationalism, terrorisSDG7, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
TRN421Y1Fragile and Conflict-Affected States in Global PoliticsSince the end of the Cold War, fragile and conflict-affected states have been widely viewed in the international relations field as one of the preeminent challenges to international security and global governance. Western countries have typically responded to this challenge by launching interventions aimed at building new states that can be integrated into the global, liberal order. This course will dissect the liberal peacebuilding and statebuilding project and explore its broader impact and implications for the international system.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLpeace, governanceSDG16
UNI101H1Citizenship in the Canadian CityWho belongs? Who governs? Who decides? In this course, you will examine the concepts of citizenship, public space, political membership, civic responsibility, and belonging. You will address topics such as Indigenous sovereignty claims, urban multiculturalism, public housing, and greening the city. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcitizenship, indigenous, urban, housing, sovereigntySDG10, SDG16, SDG11, SDG13
UNI103H1Gradients of Health in an Urban MosaicIn this course, you will examine how Toronto’s varied communities access and use health care, and how they may encounter barriers in doing so. You will study how economic disparities, shifting demographics, and government policies affect health policy and the right to access resources. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealth care, urbanSDG3, SDG11
UNI104H1Sex in the CityYou will learn about the sexual politics of the city and how cities and their neighbourhoods become sexualized and desexualized spaces. In Sex in the City, you will examine what “sex” means to Toronto’s varied, multicultural communities by looking at urban space, cultural productions, law enforcement, safety and health resources and more. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcities, urban, productionSDG11, SDG, SDG3, SDG5, SDG16
UNI198H1Why Go to University? The Changing Role and Purpose of Higher EducationIs higher education about job preparation or about giving students an opportunity to learn about themselves and the world around them? Can higher education in Canada achieve both these aims? This course engages with the spirited conversations and scholarly debates about the ideals of a liberal arts education and how these connect with ancient and contemporary arguments about citizenship. We explore the impact on higher education of globalization and what some call the “corporatization” of universities. Students will be encouraged to think, read, research and write about various models of higher education and explore questions suggested by these debates. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcitizenship, globalizSDG4, SDG9
UNI199H1The Construction of Race in America: A HistoryThe course will explore the origins of racial categories in America. Drawing on primary sources such as memoirs, film, and government records as well as writings by scholars, we will examine how beliefs about these categories changed over time and with what consequences for the unfolding of American history. Arriving at the present day, we will consider such contradictory developments as the accelerating influence of Black Lives Matter and the headline-grabbing white nationalism on display at the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, August, 2017. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgini, nationalismSDG10, SDG16
URB235H1A Multidisciplinary Introduction to Urban Studies I: Theoretical Foundations of City BuildingFocuses on the theoretical foundations of urbanization, urban change, and city building, with particular attention on global urban growth, history of contemporary urbanization, urban planning, governance, built form, and economic development. These topics are explored through a multidisciplinary lens, with an emphasis on understanding urban transitions over time and their meaning for contemporary urban experience.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLurban, transit, governanceSDG11, SDG16, SDG8
URB236H1A Multidisciplinary Introduction to Urban Studies II: Urban Challenges and Theoretical ApplicationCities are centres of innovation and creative energy, but they also face significant and pressing challenges. This course explores various urban issues including inequality, eroding infrastructure, and concerns arising from globalization, while also examining the ways in which municipal governments and urban citizens are imagining and implementing potential solutions to these challenges.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLenergy, infrastructure, globaliz, inequality, equalit, gini, cities, urbanSDG9, SDG10, SDG11
URB333H1Critical Approaches in Urban StudiesHow do power and dominance consolidate in urban settings? How do individuals and communities contest this consolidation, and claim spaces and rights in the city? These questions will be taken up through a range of critical approaches, including Indigenous, critical race feminist, political economy, queer, and anarchist perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to carry out interview-based research on an issue of equality and social justice that matters to them.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLqueer, feminis, equalit, indigenous, urban, social justiceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
URB333H1Social Justice in the CityHow do power and dominance consolidate in urban settings? How do individuals and communities contest this consolidation, and claim spaces and rights in the city? These questions will be taken up through a range of critical approaches, including Indigenous, critical race feminist, political economy, queer, and anarchist perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to carry out interview-based research on an issue of equality and social justice that matters to them.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLqueer, feminis, equalit, indigenous, urban, social justiceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
URB334H1Urban Field CourseStudents will have the opportunity to travel to a destination city for a week-long examination of specific social, economic, physical, and/or environmental issues. The trip will include meetings with municipal representatives and other decision-makers (public and possibly private). The findings of the trip supplemented by bibliographic research and in-class discussion will form the basis of a major research essay. Each student is required to pay the cost of transportation and accommodation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLurban, environmentalSDG11, SDG13, SDG8, SDG16
URB335H1City Challenges, City Opportunities in a 21st Century TorontoOver the last 50+ years, Toronto has become a national and international centre of economic activity, with a vibrant arts and culture scene and world-renowned research, educational, and health institutions. Additionally, the City has become one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world. That said, Toronto also struggles with deep inequalities along many different axes, an affordable housing crisis, underfunded infrastructure needs, and many other challenges. This course provides a window into how the leadership at the City of Toronto think and approach these and other issues as the City works to plan for the recovery from COVID-19.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLaffordab, wind, infrastructure, equalit, cities, housing, affordable housing, institutSDG1, SDG10, SDG9, SDG11, SDG16
URB336H1Creative CitiesA prominent thesis in the fields of planning and economic geography is that the presence of creative occupations in a city correlates positively with the overall health of urban regions. This course will investigate the nature of this link from theoretical and empirical perspectives and examine its potential usefulness in a planning/policy context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinvest, cities, urbanSDG11
URB337H1Studies in Contemporary Urban ProblemsThis course will focus on an examination of the immediate difficulties facing Toronto and by extension all Canadian cities. Instruction will consist of a combination of lectures by the instructor and by noted experts/practitioners in a range of topic areas including urban governance, finance, planning, environmental sustainability and social welfare.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLwelfare, cities, urban, environmental, governanceSDG1, SDG11, SDG13, SDG16
URB337H1Housing and HomelessnessToronto, like other global cities, is characterized by a stark dichotomy: upscale residential and commercial development transforms the landscape, even while increasing numbers of residents are forced to live on the streets, in encampments, in shelters, or crowded into unaffordable and substandard housing. This course will examine that paradox and activism that is trying to achieve the federal government’s stated goal: “By 2030, everyone in Canada has a home that they can afford and that meets their needs”. Through readings, discussions, guest presenters, and activities, we will trace the links between housing, homelessness, and urban politics; review policies and trends at the municipal, provincial/territorial and national levels; and connect with urban movements to contest displacement.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhomeless, affordab, cities, urban, housing, landSDG1, SDG5, SDG10
URB338H1Advanced Topics in Urban Studies IThis course will expose students to a range of contemporary theoretical, analytical, and policy oriented debates in Urban Studies. The emphasis will be on establishing a broad knowledge base in the multifaceted field of urban studies. The exact topics to be covered will fall broadly under the banner of urban socioeconomic change, and specific syllabi, year to year, will follow contemporary and emerging debates. This will be expanded upon in this course’s 400 level counterpart.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsocioeconomic, knowledge, urbanSDG4, SDG1, SDG16
URB339H1Divided City / United CityFocus on the impact of increased economic inequality and economic polarization trends that are reshaping Canada's metropolitan areas, changing neighbourhoods, and affecting the lives of our diverse urban population. Using the Toronto area as an example, students explore the consequences of these trends and the implications for public policy.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinequality, equalit, urban, metroSDG10, SDG11, SDG8
URB431Y1Special Topics in Urban StudiesFrom time to time, the Urban Studies Program organizes community outreach and information sessions. At the discretion of the Director, students may enroll in a special topics course and investigate these issues more deeply under the supervision of an agreeable faculty member. Proposals including a letter from an agreeable faculty member should be submitted to the Director by June 1 for a Fall or Year-long course, or by November 1 for a Spring course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinvest, urbanSDG11
URB437Y1Urban Experiential Learning in Toronto & the GTAA method of studying city issues that combines readings, seminar discussions, and field trips with an 8 hour / week internship in the office of a municipal politician, local government, or non-profit organization. Readings focus on community development, urban planning, economic development and local governance. Students must fill out a ballot for the course (available by contacting the Urban Studies Program Office) by June 1st. Enrolment in this course is competitive and at the discretion of the Urban Studies Director and/or course instructor.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearning, urban, governanceSDG11, SDG16
URB439H1Cities and Mega-events: Place-making, Contestation and Urban CitizenshipMega-events, like the Olympics, give cities the opportunity to showcase themselves to the world, but the production of television-friendly urban images do much to obscure the processes, compromises and social consequences in host cities. These events are powerful tools for city branding. They are also potential opportunities for social movements and other groups and individuals to highlight their own sets of concerns. This course will explore the challenges and opportunities that cities face in hosting such events.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcitizenship, cities, urban, productionSDG11
UTM114H5utmONE: Technology and Innovation: Historical, Social and Economic PerspectivesThis course will explore the enormous opportunities and the complex challenges presented by technological development. Topics discussed will include the history of technological changes over the last decades, their effects on the social and economic environment, including new opportunities in different industries (from publishing, to education, to information technology and pharmaceuticals), the impact on income distribution, the ethical challenges related to scientific progress and its application, and the effect on the participation of women and minorities in the workforce (especially in high-tech industries). In this course, students will interact with local technology companies as well as policymakers. As part of this course students will participate in a series of tutorials that will help them build foundations for academic success (such as understanding the value of higher education, developing a growth mindset, and finding passion). [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaNULLincome distribution, women, minorit, incomeSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG3, SDG4, SDG8, SDG9
UTM119H5utmONE: Lights, Camera, Culture: Exploration of CinemaThis course will explore how cinematic movies represent time capsules. They tell stories that embody historical events, describe political ideas, represent race and gender roles, disseminate propaganda, display economic class difference, demonstrate the technological sophistication of its day, capture styles of fashion, music and art, and propagate culturally important ideas. As movies are watched by everyone across the whole socioeconomic spectrum (both historically and currently), students will have an opportunity to evaluate and discuss how this powerful form of media has had and will continue to play an important role in representing and shaping society. As part of this course students will participate in a series of tutorials that will introduce them to essential elements of a holistic student experience (such as career exploration, health and wellness, and co-curricular engagement).University of Toronto MississaugaNULLsocioeconomic, genderSDG5, SDG10
UTM196H5utmONE Scholars: Building Global JusticeThis course focuses on themes of social justice, global change, and conflict through the lens of multiple disciplines. Through the exploration of concepts such as class, race, gender, religion, culture, and power on a global level, students will be involved in assignments and small group activities that develop and refine key skills that contribute to student success in university courses. Note: All interested students must apply and a select group of academically successful students will be accepted into utmONE Scholars. The application can be found here: https://uoft.me/utmone-scholarsUniversity of Toronto MississaugaNULLgender, social justiceSDG5, SDG16, SDG10
UTM197H5utmONE Scholars: Humans in Nature: Interactions and ImpactsThis course will explore how humans have utilized the natural world and the impacts it has had on both the global environment and human societies. We will focus on topics such as human and natural history, conservation, sustainability, resource exploitation, domestication, GMOs, and our fascination with nature. The course will include a field walk in our campus environment. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaNULLconserv, exploitationSDG14, SDG15, SDG13
UTP100H1Themes in World HistorySurveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present. Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local development. Restricted to students enrolled in the UTPrep program.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5
VCC207H5Urban Sites and SoundsIntroduces students to histories and theories of urban spaces emphasizing the modern city. Drawing from history, architecture, geography, and media studies, the course explores how urban change is evident in the spaces, forms, and sounds of the modern city. Case studies of specific urban environments depending on instructor's research emphasis.University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofurbanSDG11
VCC236H5North American Consumer Culture: 1890-PresentExamines the history and theoretical treatments of mass consumerism in North American society. We will look at the relationship between the market and cultural politics, cultural production, and mass consumption. Specific topics include: the shift from mass production to mass consumption; the growth of department stores; the rise of advertising; the relationship of race, class, and gender to consumer capitalism; the development of product brands; and the emergence of global marketing. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, capital, consum, productionSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
VCC304H5Visual Culture and the Politics of IdentityExamines the ways in which social-cultural identities are constructed by, and at times disrupt, various visual technologies, logics, and representational strategies. Issues and problems to be addressed include nationality, stereotyping, invisibility, and surveillance. Course materials will be drawn from modern and contemporary art and visual culture, and will also include readings from the fields of feminism, race studies, queer theory, and performance studies. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofqueer, feminisSDG5, SDG10
VCC338H5Picturing the SuburbsThis course considers how images of suburbia circulate between two interrelated but often counter-posed realms of visual culture: the popular genres of film, television, and new media entertainment and the iconography of "high" art practices such as painting, photography, and avant-garde film. In the process it addresses such fundamental issues as the relation between art and mass production, the aesthetics of private and public space, and the role that visual media play in constructing the socio-political space of the built environment. [24L, 24P]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofproductionSDG11
VCC410H5The Collective Afterlife of ThingsThis fourth-year interdisciplinary seminar provides students with an opportunity to examine theories of art and artistic practice in the context of contemporary visual culture, environmental devastation, global warming, climate injustice, and species extinction. Readings are drawn from eco-criticism and philosophy, visual studies and political theory, accompanied by contemporary art, film, literature in order to critically examine the concepts of “collective,” “afterlife,” and “things.”University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofclimate, global warming, environmental, species, injusticeSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
VCC411H5Real Space to CyberspaceThis course examines the re-conception of traditional understandings of architecture and space -- public and private -- brought about by digital technologies. Notions of space affect our conceptions of political, social and inner life; this course investigates the impact of hyperspace and virtual reality on real and imagined space in a global context.University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofinvestSDG9
VCC419H5Animals in Visual CultureIn 1977 the influential critic John Berger wrote an essay called “Why Look at Animals?” which framed humans’ relationship with animals as a matter of vision or, as we now say, of visual culture. More recently the humanities have been described as taking an “animal turn,” influenced by posthumanist thought and the idea that we are living in a period of unprecedented human impact on the planet, commonly (yet controversially) known as the Anthropocene. How has visual culture studies developed on or challenged Berger’s insights since he wrote that essay? Building on critiques of the category of “nature” as something that somehow pre-exists “culture” and is outside of it, which in turn challenges the terms of our distinctions between humans and animals, how does recent scholarship approach the place of images and vision in human-animal relations, and indeed the very idea of the animal itself? This seminar investigates these questions through texts that discuss key theoretical questions and examine representations of animals across a variety of media, species, historical or geographical contexts, and disciplinary approaches.University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofinvest, planet, anthropocene, species, animalSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
VIC108H1Belonging, Imagination, and Indigenous IdentityThis course will examine a number of questions related to Indigenous identities as they have been constituted through collective belonging and cultural representation. Topics covered may include: language, the arts, cinema, ecology, religion, ritual, and the enduring legacy of colonialism. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLindigenous, ecologSDG10, SDG16
VIC110H1Critical Perspectives on SocietyBy means of short texts, film or art works this course explores such themes as the effect of technology on the political, the nature of democracy, the question of resistance through art and the role of violence in the social. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLdemocra, violenceSDG16, SDG9
VIC113H1Encountering Distant Climes: The Literature of Travel and ExplorationThis course will study accounts of world travelers and explorers from the Middle Ages to the present, including representative examples drawn from the Age of Exploration, the Grand Tour, scientific and map-making expeditions, and the contemporary genre of travel writing. Particular attention will be given to the trans-cultural nature of travel, and the interactive aspects of the gulf between the observer and those observed. Students will analyze the diverse motivational factors behind excursions and expeditions, and apply a critique to written accounts in light of such factors as self-discovery, knowledge and imagination, Eurocentrism, orientalism, cultural relativism, colonialism/imperialism, race, gender, and eco-tourism. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, genderSDG5, SDG10, SDG13
VIC116H1Politics of the PenA study of how literature challenges prevailing political beliefs and social norms. We will situate our discussion in the broader context of human rights and freedoms. We will examine cases where literature has been censored and writers have been imprisoned or driven into exile. Part of this course involves a community service-learning component. We will consider how this literature contributes to debate and advocacy around issues of social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearning, social justice, human rightsSDG16
VIC122H1Scientific Evidence in Public PolicyThis course investigates issues arising from the translation of scientific evidence for public consumption, including in the development of public policy and in confronting problems of social and global significance. Areas of focus will include climate change, global health, and clinical medicine. Students will explore concepts including the perception and communication of risk, the generalizability of research findings, probabilistic and mechanistic thinking, and the use and abuse of scientific authority and “expertise” in public discourse. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLglobal health, invest, consum, climateSDG3,, SDG13
VIC134H1GlobalizationThis interdisciplinary course explores the contemporary character of globalization. The world is shrinking as money, goods, people, ideas, weapons, and information flow across national boundaries. Some commentators assert that a more tightly interconnected world can exacerbate financial disruptions, worsen the gap between rich and poor nations, undermine democracy, imperil national cultures, harm the environment, and give unconstrained freedom to predatory corporations. Others proclaim that globalization - understood as capitalism and free markets - fosters economic growth, encourages creative collaboration, inspires technological breakthroughs, and enhances human prospects for a better life, in rich and poor countries alike, in unprecedented ways. Our task is to evaluate the evidence and draw our own conclusions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLeconomic growth, labor, capital, globaliz, democraSDG8, SDG9, SDG16, SDG1, SDG10, SDG13
VIC136H1How to Study Everyday LifeAn introduction to the academic study of everyday life. A cross-disciplinary discussion class drawing on a wide variety of examples from ordinary life, fantasy, and culture. We situate the apparently innocuous within larger patterns of social relations and social change. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsocial changeSDG16
VIC150Y1School and SocietyThis course will be about the social and historical role of the school. The course will examine schools and learning as social, political, intellectual, and economic phenomena. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG4
VIC168H1Identity and Equality in the Public SphereThis course explores current legal and philosophical debates around equality, discrimination, and the shaping of individual and group identities. It addresses the way values, affiliation, and identities have an impact on the public sphere of law and policy-making – and the ways in which law and policy, in turn, shape our conceptions (and misconceptions) of people's identities. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLequalitSDG10
VIC181H1Events in the Public Sphere: World AffairsThis course will review issues in contemporary world affairs, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the present day. The course will examine the politics and practice of foreign policy decision making. Issues to be covered include the collapse of the Soviet Union, intervention in humanitarian crises, and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhumanitarianSDG10
VIC185H1Events in the Public Sphere: Social JusticeThis course uses events to discuss the nature of society including major revolutions, economic crises, and the impact of significant artistic, cultural and technological developments. Emphasis on our responsibilities towards social justice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLsocial justiceSDG16
VIC187H1Prosperity, Justice, and Sustainability: Introduction to Public PolicyThis course introduces policy applications of measurement tools and economic concepts by analyzing current issues in the news, such as public spending and debt, health care, social security, energy, climate change, innovation, and education. Concepts from the philosophy and history of economic thought will be used to address such questions as: What is the nature of economic explanations? Do they tell us the truth about reality? Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLhealth care, energy, social security, climateSDG3, SDG7, SDG10, SDG13, SDG4, SDG9, SDG16
VIC188H1Corporate Citizenship, Sustainability, and EthicsDrawing together philosophical background readings with contemporary applications, this course addresses issues of corporate social responsibility, business ethics, human rights, diversity, and equity, and considers how these topics intersect with a wide range of global practices. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLequity, citizenship, equit, human rightsSDG10, SDG16, SDG8
VIC199H1The Secret Life of Objects: Analyzing the Culture of ThingsThis course will examine the materiality of objects with a view to understanding how artefacts are made, their circulation, consumption, and the importance of things to social and cultural life. An investigation of artefacts from various collections in and around the university will be undertaken to develop basic methods for the study, description and analysis of material culture. In addition to hands-on exploration of objects, topics may include antiquarians and their methods, material culture in colonial contexts, and materials in contemporary user-friendly design. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinvest, consumSDG12
VIC278H1Modelling Evil and DiseaseModels frame our understanding and treatment of illness and are the most fundamental element of the scientific method. Theology, history, and literature may use models in different ways than natural and medical sciences but fundamentally all modelling is an attempt to accurately predict and manipulate the future.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLillnessSDG3
VIC451H1Capstone: Learning Communities and Higher EducationThis course examines higher education in Canada using Victoria University and Victoria's affiliates as a case study. Topics covered include learning communities, mentoring, experiential learning, and international contexts of education. Students gain practical mentorship experience through placement in first-year Victoria College courses. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLlearningSDG4
VIC452H1Work-Integrated Capstone CourseThis seminar provides academic support for individual work placements in a specific sector of employment, through interdisciplinary readings, integrative discussion, and critical reflection on the culture of labour and the acquisition of workplace skills and experience. Assignments will include reflective exercises and critical analyses, leading to participation in a capstone seminar. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLemployment, labourSDG8
VIC476H1Capstone Seminar in Foreign PolicyThe seminar involves a critical assessment of current foreign policy issues and contemporary world problems. Issues and case studies to be analyzed include: 1. International military interventions to respond to imminent threats or humanitarian crises, issues of legitimacy and effectiveness. e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Haiti. 2. Canada-US relations in international crisis management, the track record and the way ahead. 3. Globalization, international terrorism, and their effects on sovereignty, diplomacy and international institutions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLglobaliz, humanitarian, institut, sovereignty, terrorisSDG9, SDG10, SDG16
VIS310H1Imaging the PoliticalStudio projects complemented by seminars and readings examine plastic, social, and gender politics in contemporary visual art.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5
VIS313H1The BodyThis studio-based, open-media course challenges conventional ideas about the body by examining developments in technology, culture, and politics. Through projects, lectures and readings, this course considers the fluidity of concepts such as gender, beauty, and ability as interpreted through representations of the body.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLgenderSDG5, SDG9
VIS332H1Advanced Critical TheoryA continuation of philosophic and theoretical writings first introduced in JAV200. Concepts in epistemology, psychoanalysis, socio-political thought, economic theory, visual culture, semiotics, material culture, feminism, queer studies, postcolonial theory, critical race theory, and indigenous studies are explored through primary texts.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLqueer, feminis, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
VIS406H1Interventions: Art in Public SpacesThis course is an introduction into the complex process of public art. Through lectures, projects, seminars and field trips the student will develop a clearer understanding of the collaborative nature of public production around key issues such as advocacy, environmental ethics, and the sensual nature of space.Architecture, Landscape, and Design, John H. Daniels Faculty ofNULLlabor, production, environmentalSDG12, SDG13
VPAB10H3Equity and Inclusivity in Arts and Media OrganizationsAn introduction to equity, inclusivity and diversity as it relates to organizational development and cultural policymaking in arts and media management. This course will take students through an overview of critical theories of systemic power and privilege, including those of race, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation or identity, age, ability/disability and religion and examine how these impact varied creative working environments and institutions.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofsocio-economic, disabilit, equity, gender, equit, institutSDG3, SDG5, SDG10, SDG6
VPAD07H3Agency and Pluralism in Social and Cultural TransformationsTransformations in social and cultural institutions have been achieved through the agency of individuals who have embedded the values of pluralism in their personal and professional lives. Students will explore model examples and will develop projects they might use to advance this aim in a variety of professional situations.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofinstitutSDG16
WDW199H1Indigenous Knowledge and Storytelling in TorontoThe land now known as Toronto has a 13,000+ year old history of Indigenous presence that is still unfolding. This history is inscribed in the land – it is visible in the geographical features, place names, and contemporary urban form of the city and is represented through stories (oral and written) told by diverse members of Toronto’s Indigenous community. This course engages with stories of Indigenous history and presence in Toronto through a selection of Indigenous literary works about Toronto, Indigenous guest speakers, and a series of experiential Indigenous storytelling tours of significant locations across the city. Students will be introduced to Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing and will learn why storytelling remains a significant and culturally-appropriate means for keeping and sharing land-based Indigenous Knowledge. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of the city as a traditional Indigenous territory and will reflect on their own relationships and responsibilities within these lands. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLknowledge, worldview, indigenous, urban, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
WGS101H5Introduction to Women and Gender StudiesThis foundation course introduces the core ideas students will explore throughout their studies in Women and Gender Studies. It immerses students in a highly participatory and provocative encounter with history, social theory, politics, policy, art and culture seen through a gender lens. It provides an interdisciplinary overview of the historical 'waves' of women's movements for equality in a global context and background to the development of Women/Gender Studies as a site of learning and feminist inquiry. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department oflearning, gender, women, feminis, equalitSDG5, SDG10
WGS102H5Reading and Writing in Women and Gender StudiesUsing key feminist texts, this course advances students thinking, reading and writing in the discipline of Women and Gender Studies. The emphasis is placed on the development and application of interdisciplinary skills in the interpretation, analysis, criticism, and advocacy of ideas encountered in Women and Gender Studies. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, women, feminisSDG5
WGS160Y1Introduction to Women and Gender StudiesAn integrated and historical approach to social relations of gender, race, class, sexuality and disability, particularly as they relate to women's lives and struggles across different locales, including Canada.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)disabilit, gender, womenSDG5, SDG10
WGS200Y5Theories in Women, Gender, and Sexuality StudiesThis course provides an opportunity to engage in an in-depth examination of specialized and scholarly work within women, gender, and sexuality studies with a focus on the diverse and multidisciplinary expressions of feminist thought from the perspective of postcolonial, transnational, intersectional, diasporic, Black feminist, indigenous, and queer theories. This course situates the importance of praxis, the relationship between theory and social practice, to women, gender, and sexuality studies. Students will engage throughout with the relationship between theories of gender and sexuality as they relate to, and are inseparable from, an understanding of race and racial formations. It incorporates study of the themes and debates concerning the socially constructed categories of gender and sexuality in historical and contemporary contexts.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, women, queer, feminis, indigenousSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
WGS202H5Fundamentals of Research in Women and Gender StudiesThis interdisciplinary course focuses on the visions and methods that feminist scholars use to study women's and gender issues within and across a range of traditional disciplines. The course explores feminist epistemologies and research methods to understand how to carry out feminist research. We will focus on how feminist scholars challenge dominant theories of knowledge and the major methodologies employed in the social sciences and humanities. [24L]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofknowledge, gender, women, feminisSDG5
WGS205H5Introduction to Feminism and Popular CultureThis course explores the forms and functions of popular culture and its representation and understanding of the social category of women. It examines specific media forms including, but not limited to, film, song, visual arts, music, video, television, advertising and new media forms. It critically analyzes the impact of these portrayals on women in society while examining the cultural constructions of race, sexuality, class and ability. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofwomen, feminisSDG5
WGS210H5Women, Gender and LabourThis course covers a wide range of issues relating to female participation in public and private sectors of the today's Canadian workforce. It examines the relevance of education, perceptions, sexuality and family issues. Services and infrastructure, as well as collective bargaining are also addressed. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, women, female, labour, infrastructureSDG5, SDG8, SDG9
WGS211H5Gender, Technology and the BodyThis course engages with feminist theories of embodiment to explore the body’s intersections with gender and technology. Drawing on the interdisciplinary fields of feminist studies, science and technology studies and disability studies, it explores a range of technological and scientific policies and processes that shape and affect bodies in transnational contexts.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofdisabilit, gender, feminisSDG5, SDG9, SDG10
WGS215H5Introduction to Women, Public Policy and the LawThis course introduces students to women's position in Canada as political actors and provides gender-based analysis in relation to public policy and law in Canada. Students will study women's historical participation in and exclusion from policy decision-making processes, and evaluate the impact of feminism and women's activism on Canadian public policies. Using intersectional framework, the course will also examine different ways in which public policies can be made more responsive to gender and diversity concerns as well as the role public policy can play in overcoming gender inequalities. We will investigate key historical changes in public policies affecting Canadian women in such areas as family, workplace, education, poverty-welfare, sexuality and reproductive laws, immigration and refugee laws, and global issues. The course concludes with women's achievements in this area. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofpoverty, welfare, gender, women, feminis, invest, equalit, refugeeSDG1, SDG5, SDG10, SDG3, SDG4, SDG8, SDG16
WGS250H5Women in FamiliesThis course studies how the notion of family is conceptualized and organized transnationally and historically and examines the multiple familiar roles of women in diverse contexts. [24L, 12T]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofwomenSDG5
WGS260H1Texts, Theories, HistoriesExamines modes of theories that shaped feminist thought and situates them historically and transnationally so as to emphasize the social conditions and conflicts in which ideas and politics arise, change and circulate.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)feminisSDG5
WGS271Y1Gender in Popular CultureA critical examination of institutions, representations and practices associated with contemporary popular culture, mass-produced, local and alternative.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, institutSDG5, SDG16
WGS273H1Gender & Environmental (In)JusticeUsing a transnational, feminist framework, this course examines material and conceptual interrelations between gendered human and non-human nature, ecological crises, political economies and environmental movements in a variety of geographical, historical and cultural contexts. Does environmental justice include social justice, or are they in conflict? What might environmental justice and activism involve?Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, feminis, environmental, environmental justice, ecolog, social justiceSDG5, SDG13, SDG16
WGS275H1Men and MasculinitiesExamines how masculinities shape the lives of men, women, transgender people. Effects of construction, reproduction and impact of masculinities on institutions such as education, work, religion, sports, family, medicine, military and the media are explored. Provides critical analysis of how masculinities shape individual lives, groups, organizations and social movements.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, women, transgender, production, institutSDG5, SDG, SDG16, SDG2, SDG3, SDG4
WGS280H1Special Topics in Women and Gender StudiesSubjects will vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS281H1Special Topics in Women and Gender StudiesSubjects vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS299Y5Research Opportunity ProgramThis courses provides a richly rewarding opportunity for students in their second year to work in the research project of a professor in return for 299Y course credit. Students enrolled have an opportunity to become involved in original research, learn research methods and share in the excitement and discovery of acquiring new knowledge. Participating faculty members post their project descriptions for the following summer and fall-winter sessions in early February and students are invited to apply in early March. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofknowledgeSDG5
WGS301H5Representing IslamThe course explores historical and contemporary debates regarding the construction of gender in Islam. It examines historic and literary representations, ethnographic narratives, legal and human rights discourses, the politics of veiling, and Islamic feminism. This course situates Muslim women as complex, multidimensional actors engaged in knowledge production and political and feminist struggles, as opposed to the static, victim-centered, Orientalist images that have regained currency in the representation of Muslim women in the post 9/11 era.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofknowledge, gender, women, feminis, production, human rightsSDG5, SDG16
WGS325H5Sustainability: Society and Feminist PraxisSustainability considers humanity’s relationship to the environment. It reflects on a feminist politic of care and the specific ways people are affected along lines of race, gender, class, sexuality and citizenship. It explores how feminist scholarship seeks to direct policy change and respond to ecological and climatic crises.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofcitizenship, gender, feminis, ecologSDG5, SDG10, SDG13
WGS331H1Special Topic in Women and Gender StudiesAn upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS332H1Special Topic in Women and Gender StudiesAn upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS333H1Special Topic in Women and Gender StudiesAn upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS334H1Special Topic in Women and Gender StudiesAn upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year. Please consult the Women & Gender Studies Institute's website for more information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, women, institutSDG5, SDG16
WGS335H1Special Topic in Women and Gender StudiesAn upper level seminar. Subjects of study vary from year to year.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, womenSDG5
WGS335H5Women, Migration and DiasporaThis course examines the process of migration to Canada from a gender perspective, noting the interplay between structural impediments and women's own agency. Historical perspectives on migration and government policy, and on ways women have rebuilt lives and shaped communities.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, womenSDG5
WGS336H1Selected Topics in Cultural StudiesAn upper level course. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the Women & Gender Studies Institute's website for more information.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)gender, women, institutSDG5
WGS336H5Political Aesthetics and Feminist RepresentationThis course evaluates the ways in which the category "women" has been constructed, enacted and embodied, historically and contemporarily, in Western art forms and performance including theatre and literature. It interrogates the ways in which the art forms have been altered by feminist theoretical models and focuses on modes of representation and the possibilities, limitations and criticisms suggested by them.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofwomen, feminisSDG5
WGS337H5Special Topics in Women and Gender StudiesA special topic by guest instructor. Topics vary from year to year. Check the web site for current offerings.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofgender, womenSDG5
WGS340H1Women and Revolution in the Middle EastThis course examines the complex and conflictual relations between women and revolutionary struggles and focuses on a number of theoretical and empirical issues relevant to the Middle East and North Africa context.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)womenSDG5
WGS340H5Black Feminisms: Diasporic Conversations on Theory and PracticeThis course examines how Black Feminisms are theorized, produced and practiced, by predominantly Black women scholars, activists and cultural producers located in the diaspora - Canada, the United States and the Caribbean.University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofwomen, feminisSDG5, SDG10
WGS341H5Black Queer Cinema and Visual CultureThis course introduces students to LGBTIQ themed fil