Graduate Sustainability Course Inventory

University of Toronto’s 2022-2023 Graduate Sustainability Course Inventory

The Sustainability Course Inventory gathers information about all sustainability-related graduate courses at the University of Toronto. It includes 1,987 sustainability-oriented courses, representing 26% of all 7,744 graduate courses at U of T. The purpose of the sustainability course inventory is to increase the visibility of such courses, making it more accessible for students to add sustainability content to their educational experience. The graduate course inventory did not undergo the same rigorous manual review as the undergraduate course inventory due to time limitations, hence the numbers provided are a slight overestimation. Special topic courses were also removed due to lack of descriptions and were not included in the search and final inventory. We hope to encourage deeper understanding of the societal shift towards sustainability, to contribute to the creation of a culture of sustainability at the university. Our understanding of sustainability englobes both human and environmental concerns, and the inventory was created based on keywords from the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), see below.The SDGs were chosen as a basis for the inventory due to their comprehensiveness and widespread usage in the sustainability field. SDG 17, “Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the goal partnership for sustainable development,” was excluded from the methodology, as it encompasses the act of achieving the other goals rather than bringing a new perspective to sustainability. The first inventory was created by CECCS RA in November 2022. If you have any questions or suggestions for a course to be included in or removed from this inventory, please contact ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals and Inventory Keywords

See the SDG Keywords page for the list of keywords searched in the titles and descriptions of graduate courses in the master list of graduate courses. Methodologies and contexts for making this inventory were highlighted in an academic paper written by the ESE team and published in the journal “Sustainability”: “Expanding Student Engagement in Sustainability: Using SDG- and CEL-focused Inventories to Transform Curriculum at the University of Toronto“, January 2019, Sustainability 11(2):530.

Graduate Sustainability Course Inventory

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse DescriptionUnit Keyword(s)SDGs Covered
AER1403HAdvanced Aerospace StructuresThis course will provide instruction in three areas crucial to aerospace structural design: fiber composite materials, thin walled structures, and finite element methods. All three will be taught in a manner such that their interrelation is made clear. The course will begin with a composite materials, their mechanics and application. General theories of shells and thin walled structures, which are essential to aircraft design, will next be discussed. Finally, finite element methods of use in modelling aircraft structures and composites will be described. No specific background in any of these three topics is required, but a good knowledge of solid and structural mechanics will be assumed.Institute for Aerospace StudiesknowledgeSDG4
AER1601HAerospace Engineering and Operations ManagementAerospace is a broad field of technological activity. The course will focus on managing an aerospace enterprise with a specialization in aircraft engineering and production operations. Students in this course will work with industrial partners (examples: DeHavilland Aircraft Canada – Q400 Operations – Downsview, Safran Lading Gear Systems – Ajax, and Bombardier Aerospace – Toronto) on live projects applying the theory learned in the course. Upon course completion, the participants will be able to apply the tools and methods of Aerospace Enterprise Management Sciences and will: gain an understanding and appreciation of the principles and applications relevant to management of the Aerospace Business Enterprise; develop skills necessary to effectively analyze and synthesize the issues aerospace companies must address to scale and advance their capabilities in the marketplace; acquire the analytical skills, tools and methods to scale the enterprise including lean design, lean engineering and manufacturing, voice of customer, process management, integrated product development, group technology, concurrent engineering, programme management, phase/milestone, agility, knowledge based engineering, expert systems, and ERP for aerospace environments; learn how to design and build a Lean Aerospace Enterprise Management System from order receipt to shipping, commissioning and ongoing customer support; understand how to apply Lean Engineering and Manufacturing systems that are used in aerospace operations; increase their knowledge and broaden their perspective of the aerospace world to which they will contribute their talents as leaders in aerospace business operations; and understand the various engineering career path options available in the aerospace environment. This course can be counted toward the requirements of the ELITE program. AER 1601H is considered non-technical for the purposes of MEng degree requirements.Institute for Aerospace Studiesknowledge, production, landSDG4, SDG12, SDG15
AER510HAerospace PropulsionScope and history of jet and rocket propulsion; fundamentals of air-breathing and rocket propulsion; fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of propulsion including boundary layer mechanics and combustion; principles of aircraft jet engines, engine components and performance; principles of rocket propulsion, rocket performance, and chemical rockets; environmental impact of aircraft jet engines. Prerequisite: AER 310H “Gasdynamics” or equivalentInstitute for Aerospace StudiesenvironmentalSDG13
AER1604HAir Accident InvestigationThis course will provide students with an introduction to the methods, processes and technologies of air accident investigation: what happens after there is an incident or accident involving airplanes in Canada. The course will begin by explaining what happens at the site of an air accident, and will then provide a concrete demonstration by creating a mock air accident using real aircraft wreckage. Students will use their observations of the accident site and other information that they acquire or derive to understand and report on what has occurred. The course will take students through the full investigative process and culminate in the production of an accident report using the techniques and information they have been given during the course. Warning: Air accidents are inherently dangerous events, and students will be exposed to information, images and material associated with injury or death.Institute for Aerospace Studiesinvest, productionSDG9, SDG12
AER1717HApplied Plasma Physics IA second and third course in plasma physics and fusion energy for the student intending a career in these fields. Numerous problems are assigned from the text “Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion “, Vol. 1 by F. F. Chen, Plenum Press, 1984 (AER 1717H ) and “The Plasma Boundry of Magnetic Fusion Devices ” , by P.C. Stangeby, Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol,U.K., 2000. (AER 1720H)Institute for Aerospace Studiesenergy, institutSDG7, SDG16
AER501HComputational Structural Mechanics and Design OptimizationIntroduction to the theory of linear elasticity: stress, strain and material constitutive laws. Variational principles and their application: stationary potential energy, stationary complementary potential energy, Reissner’s Principles. The finite element technique: problem formulation; element properties; applications to displacement, vibrations and buckling problems. Introduction to structural optimal design.Institute for Aerospace StudiesenergySDG7
AER1517HControl for RoboticsThis course presents optimal, adaptive and learning control principles from the perspective of robotics applications. Working from the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman formulation, optimal control methods for aerial and ground robots are developed. Real world challenges such as disturbances, state estimation errors and model errors are addressed and adaptive and reinforcement learning approaches are derived to address these challenges. Course project involves simulated control of an aerial vehicle, with aerodynamic models and wind disturbances.Institute for Aerospace Studieslearning, wind, urbanSDG4, SDG7, SDG11
AER1820HDirected Reading in Aerospace StudiesThis course involves reading assigned by a professor to a graduate student on a mutually agreed topic. The student's knowledge is subsequently assessed for course credit. The total work load is consistent with a standard 0.5 FCE lecture course. Students are limited to counting a maximum of one reading course toward their degree requirements.Institute for Aerospace StudiesknowledgeSDG4
AER1319HFinite Volume Methods for Computational Fluid DynamicsIntroduction to upwind finite-volume methods widely used in computational fluids dynamics (CFD) for thehe solution of high-speed inviscid and viscous compressible flows. Topics include: Brief review of conservation equations for compressible flows; Euler equations; Navier-Stokes equations; one- and two-dimensional forms; model equations. Mathematical properties of the Euler equations; primitive and conserved solution variables; eigensystem analysis; compatibility conditions; characteristic variables, Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and Riemann invariants; Riemann problem and exact solution. Godunov’s method; hyperbolic flux evaluation and numerical flux functions; solution monotonicity; Godunov’s theorem. Approximate Riemann solvers; Roe’s method. Higher-order Godunov-type schemes; semi-discrete form; solution reconstruction including least-squares and Green-Gauss methods; slope limiting. Extension to multi-dimensional flows. Elliptic flux evaluation for viscous flows; diamond-path and average-gradient stencils; discrete-maximum principle. High-order methods; essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes.Institute for Aerospace Studieswind, conserv, conservSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
AER1304HFundamentals of CombustionThis course starts with a review of chemical thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, equilibrium chemistry, chemical kinetics, and conservation equations. Then, the following subjects are covered: chemical and dynamic structure of laminar premixed, diffusion, and partially premixed flames; turbulent premixed combustion; turbulent diffusive combustion in one and two-phase flows; aerodynamics and stabilization of flames; ignition, extinction and combustion instabilities; non-intrusive combustion diagnostics and flame spectroscopy.Institute for Aerospace Studiesconserv, conservSDG14, SDG15
AER1216HFundamentals of Unmanned Aerial VehiclesUnpiloted aircraft, known as UAVs, drones or aerial robots, are very quickly becoming a major sector of the aerospace industry. They are increasingly used in aerial photography, inspection of infrastructure, delivery of small packages and other applications requiring inexpensive and flexible flight. The basic physical, scientific and engineering principles necessary to design a remote-controlled fixed-wing or quad-rotor UAV are explained in this course. These include aerodynamics, propulsion, structures and control. A key part of this course will be a group project to create a detailed design of a UAV that is capable of performing a specific function.Institute for Aerospace StudiesinfrastructureSDG9
AER507HIntroduction to Fusion EnergyNuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distribution, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) magnetic confinement methods. Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.Institute for Aerospace StudiesenergySDG7
AER1324HIntroduction to TurbulenceThis course is aimed to provide an overview of the fundamental physical processes in large Reynolds number turbulent flows. Topics include review of tensors, probabilistic tools, and conservation laws. Free shear flows: turbulent kinetic energy transport and dissipation. Scales of turbulent motion: Kolmogorov hypothesis, structure functions, Kármán-Howarth equation, 4/5th law, Fourier modes, Kolmogorov-Obukhov spectrum, intermittency, and refined similarity hypothesis. Turbulent mixing: scalar transport and dissipation. Alignments of vorticity, scalar gradient, and strain rates. Diagnostics in turbulent flows.Institute for Aerospace Studiesenergy, conserv, conservSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
AER1301HKinetic Theory of GasesIntroductory discussion of significant length dimensions; different flow regimes, continuum, transition, collision-free; and a brief history of gas kinetic theory. Equilibrium kinetic theory; the article distribution function; Maxell-Boltzmann distribution. Collision dynamics; collision frequency and mean free path. Elementary transport theory, transport coefficients, mean free path method. Boltzmann equation; derivation, Boltzmann H-theorem, collision operators. Generalized transport theory; Maxwell’s equations of change; approximate solution techniques, Chapman -Ensog perturbative and Grad series expansion methods, moment closures; derivation of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, higher-order closures. Free molecular aerodynamics. Shock waves.Institute for Aerospace StudiestransitSDG11
AER1520HMicrosatellite Design IThis is the first of a series of two courses, which are intended to provide graduate students with practical space systems engineering experience. Through two consecutive courses, students can participate in a real Canadian Space Agency ‘MicroSat’ mission, gaining a year’s worth of training under some of the leading spacecraft designers in North America. This two-term apprenticeship allows students to learn and play an active role in spacecraft design, prototyping, assembly, integration, and test. Depending on the stage of the project when students join, they will be exposed to anything from preliminary subsystem design to actual on-orbit operations of a real satellite. Depending on when the student takes the course, he or she will join a coordinated team involved in spacecraft design, prototyping, assembly, integration or test. Students will be exposed to one or more of the following areas: Systems Engineering; Mission Analysis; Power; Communications; Telemetry/Telecommand; Thermal Control; Structure; Attitude Control; On-Board Computers. This course is open only to students enrolled in the research program at the Space Flight Laboratory. Prerequisite: AER 407 “Space Systems Design” or a suitable equivalentInstitute for Aerospace StudieslaborSDG8
AER1521HMicrosatellite Design IIThe second course permits the student to obtain new and in-depth experience in a particular spacecraft area. In addition, the student is exposed to more elements of the project, considerably increasing the value of the student’s training with time. This course builds on experience gained in AER 1520, and broadens the student’s understanding of practical spacecraft development. Depending on what the student contributed in AER 1520, the student will take his or her work to the next level of maturity. Course assignments may include the following tasks: Building of Prototypes; Prototype Testing and/or Test Planning; Detailed Design; Assembly, Integration and Test; Launch preparations; On-orbit commissioning of satellites; Satellite operations. This course is open only to students enrolled in the research program at the Space Flight Laboratory. Prerequisite: AER 1520H “Microsatellite Design I”Institute for Aerospace StudieslaborSDG8
ROB521HMobile Robotics and PerceptionThe course addresses fundamentals of mobile robotics and sensor-based perception for applications such as space exploration, search and rescue, mining, self-driving cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, etc. Topics include sensors and their principles, state estimation, computer vision, control architectures, localization, mapping, planning, path tracking, and software frameworks. Laboratories will be conducted using both simulations and hardware kits. It is not recommended to take both AER 521 and AER 1514. Recommended Preparation: AER 372H “Control Systems”Institute for Aerospace Studieswater, laborSDG6, SDG8
AER1512HMultibody DynamicsThis is a seminar course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of multibody dynamics with particular emphasis on the dynamics of robotic systems. Each student, in consultation with the course coordinator, will be required to select two topics in the area, investigate them thoroughly and present a seminar on each to the other members of the class. Students may choose topics well-treated in the mechanical literature or ones which are more research-oriented, perhaps requiring some original input on the part of the student.Institute for Aerospace StudiesinvestSDG9
AER525HRoboticsThis course extends the fundamentals of analytical robotics to design and control of industrial and aerospace robots and their instrumentation. Topics include forward, inverse, and differential kinematics, screw representation, statics, inverse and forward dynamics, motion and force control of robot manipulators, actuation schemes, task-based and workspace design, position and force sensors, tactile sensing, and vision and image processing in robotic systems. Course instruction benefits from the courseware technology that involves a Java-based on-line simulation and other multimedia means for presenting realistic demonstrations and case studies in the context of teaching advanced notions. A series of experiments in the Robotics Laboratory will also enhance the practical notions of the course content.Institute for Aerospace StudieslaborSDG8
AER506HSpacecraft Dynamics And Control IRigid body kinematics and dynamics. Orbital dynamics and control: the two-body problem, orbital perturbations, orbital maneuvers, interplanetary trajectories, the restricted three-body problem. Attitude dynamics and control: torque-free motion, spin stabilization, dual-spin stabilization, disturbance torques, gravity-gradient stabilization, active spacecraft attitude control, bias-momentum stabilization.Institute for Aerospace Studiesurban, planetSDG11, SDG13
AER1513HState Estimation for Aerospace VehiclesThis course introduces the fundamentals of state estimation for aerospace vehicles. Knowing the state (e.g., position, orientation, velocity) of a vehicle is a basic problem faced by both manned and autonomous systems. State estimation is relevant to aircraft, satellites, rockets, landers, and rovers. This course teaches some of the classic techniques used in estimation including least squares and Kalman filtering. It also examines some cutting edge techniques for nonlinear systems including unscented Kalman filtering and particle filtering. Emphasis is placed on the ability to carry out state estimation for vehicles in three- dimensional space, which is complicated by vehicle attitude and often handled incorrectly. Students will have a chance to work with datasets from real sensors in assignments and will apply the principles of the course to a project of their choosing.Institute for Aerospace StudieslandSDG15
AER1310HTurbulence ModellingThis course presents an overview of numerical modelling techniques for the prediction of turbulent flows. The emphasis is on the capabilities and limitations of engineering approaches commonly used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the simulation of turbulence. Topics include: Introduction to turbulent flows; definition of turbulence; features of turbulent flows; requirements for and history of turbulence modelling. Conservation equations for turbulent flows; Reynolds and Favre averaging; velocity correlations, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) ; Reynolds stress equations; effects of compressibility. Algebraic models; eddy viscosity and mixing length hypothesis; Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax models. Scalar field evolution models; turbulence energy equation; one- and two-equation models; wall functions; low-Reynolds-number effects. Second-order closure models; full Reynolds-stress and algebraic Reynolds stress models. Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) Methods.Institute for Aerospace Studiesenergy, conserv, conservSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
ANT3033HADV RES SEMINAR IIIThis course challenges students to explore the genetic variation between and within populations. Topics covered include evolutionary forces, quantitative genetics, and Bayesian statistics as they apply to molecular evolution, evolutionary biology, and forensic and investigative genetics. Students will utilize and evaluate different software tools available to the evolutionary biologist/population geneticist to test and summarize complex -omics data.Department of AnthropologyinvestSDG9
ANT3031HAdvanced Research Seminar IThis course is an overview of our current understanding of primate sleep ecology and function with particular focus on how these elements drove the evolution of human sleep. Specifically, the aim of the class will be to provide students with a strong, theoretical background of the function of sleep in the animal kingdom with particular attention paid to primate lineages. This will serve as a springboard for the application of several innovative methods measuring the spectrum of behaviors on the inactive-active continuum. As an overview, the course will be presented in four sections: (i) Sleep: descriptions, functions, and mechanisms from eukaryotes to humans, (ii) The evolution of primate sleep, (iii) Methods: measuring sleep and activity in primates, and (iv) Evolution’s legacy on human sleep. The first section provides students with an overview of the mechanisms and functions of sleep and circadian rhythms, as well as a historical approach that fills in the context for which most of these fundamental discoveries were made. The second section presents a phylogenetic perspective on how sleep is expressed in extant species, in both human and non-human primates. The third section, departs from presenting background information and will focus on the application of the current scientific methods used to measure sleep-wake behavior throughout mammals. Finally, the fourth section provides the most up to date evolutionary narrative of the major transitions of human sleep and the consequences of these derived characteristics to our understanding of modern sleep disorders within an evolutionary mismatch framework. The course will conclude with a forward thinking series of predictions on how science and technology will fundamentally alter the way humans sleep in the 21st century and beyond.Department of Anthropologytransit, species, animal, ecolog, species, animalSDG11, SDG14, SDG15
ANT6032HAdvanced Research Seminar IIThe aim of this graduate seminar is twofold: (1) to examine the potential and challenges of “more-than-human” approaches to ethnography; and (2) to explore what more-than-human ethnographies could offer to the social debates about the Anthropocene, or the time that demands a critical and fundamental rethinking of the position of the human in the world. More-than-human approaches to ethnography have gained growing attention in the last two decades as a critical response to anthropocentric frameworks in documenting and analyzing culture and society. Based on the realization that human exceptionalism has contributed to abrasive resource extraction and industrialization, colonialism, planetary scale environmental degradation and a variety of injustices associated with the above, more-than-human ethnographies start from the premise that the human is inseparable from what is called “the environment”. Various strategies have been experimented with in order to focus on the “entanglement” among various actors, including humans, and to examine how specific entanglements shape particular social relations and politics. We will first trace some key genealogies of more-than-human ethnography, including multispecies anthropology, nonhuman agency in Science and Technology Studies, multiple ontologies, and feminist/indigenous/decolonial/postcolonial critiques of the Anthropocene. Then, we will read ethnographies that highlight the entangled relationship between human and other beings–such as animals, plants, insects, fungi, microorganisms, land, water, wind, technological devices–that together shape the world.Department of Anthropologydecolonial, feminis, water, wind, industrialization, indigenous, environmental, planet, anthropocene, species, animal, species, animal, land, injustice, indigenousSDG4, SDG5, SDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ANT6060HAnthropology and Indigenous Studies in North AmericaDepartment of Anthropologyindigenous, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
ANT6065HAnthropology in/of Troubled TimesRising sea levels, climate emergencies, global displacements, energy finitude, poverty, precarity, racism, mediated mass-surveillance, conspiracies, alternative facts, populism, pandemics – all provide unsettling markers of our times. As chroniclers and theorists of the moment, anthropologists are providing key insights into some of today’s most pressing problems, as well as new analytic tools with which to grasp them. This advanced seminar surveys a range of contemporary concerns and explores some of the ways current anthropologists are engaging – methodologically, analytically, theoretically – with them. Specific topics will vary from year to year. The seminar’s second concern is less with an anthropology of troubled times than with an anthropology in them. This concern arises from the observation that anthropology is part of the world it seeks to apprehend: a world that enables and constrains, incites and inhibits particular modes of anthropological thinking, theorising and practice. The seminar thus interrogates anthropology’s own grounds of knowledge, dwelling on some of the epistemological, ethical and political conundrums that anthropology’s real-world entanglements inevitably entail. This concern takes us well beyond “troubled times,” inviting students to probe and situate that curious set of Euro-American knowledge practices we call “Anthropology.”Department of Anthropologypoverty, precarity, knowledge, racism, energy, climate, sea levelSDG1, SDG4, SDG7, SDG13
ANT6029HAnthropology of CapitalismDepartment of AnthropologycapitalSDG9
ANT6063HAnthropology of InfrastructuresDepartment of AnthropologyinfrastructureSDG9
ANT6061HAnthropology of Sexuality & GenderDepartment of AnthropologygenderSDG5
ANT6027HAnthropology of ViolenceDepartment of AnthropologyviolenceSDG16
ANT4070HArchaeologies of Place, Urbanism and InfrastructuresDepartment of Anthropologyinfrastructure, urbanSDG9, SDG11
ANT4038HArchaeology of Urban DevelopmentDepartment of AnthropologyurbanSDG11
ANT4020HArchaeology TheoryThis seminar offers an in-depth examination of the history of archaeological theory and the major theoretical approaches defining the discipline today. Students explore competing schools of archaeological thought concerned with the study of material culture, past social formations, and historical process. From functionalist and natural science-focused positions to poststructural and postmodern inquiries into meaning, representation, and politics to more recent archaeological attempts to de-center humans in hopes of liberating things, this seminar covers a diverse set of perspectives. Emphasis is placed on how shifting positions on human nature, social organization, alterity, gender, and power directly shape archaeological reconstructions and representations of the past. Ultimately, the seminar should provide students with a rich understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underpin contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems inherent in archaeological efforts to represent and interpret the material record.Department of AnthropologygenderSDG5
ANT4051HArcheaology and Climate ChangeDepartment of AnthropologyclimateSDG13
ANT4030HArtifactsArtifacts are a class of objects that sit at the interface of the material and the socio-cultural. While we often think of artifacts as dusty museum objects this is in fact an entire domain that profoundly structures our experience of the world. From the stone tools that provided much of the context for the evolution of our species to the pacifier that the infant internalizes in early developments artifacts are an essential component of our becoming human. In this course we let go of our interdisciplinary and disciplinary boundaries to examine artifacts as a type of object spanning early prehistory to modern times. Our goal is to develop new ways to think about artifacts and thus by extension the human engagement with materiality. Among topics we will explore are the definition of artifacts, the agency or vibrancy of material, the distinctiveness of art as a type of artifact, and the linkage between artifacts the body, the mind, and the conception of the self. Our aim is to develop a context for lively conversation and engagement with a wide range of theoretical writing. Students will also develop an independent research project on a topic of their choosing. As an instructor I come to this course as an archaeologist but also with the conviction that in a society undergoing the transformative impact of digital technology understanding artifacts is critical to our well being and of some of the most pressing issues facing society today. This course is open to students regardless of subdiscipline and students in cognate disciplines such as history, art, and museum studies are very welcome.Department of Anthropologywell being, species, speciesSDG3, SDG14, SDG15
ANT6003HCritical Issues in Ethnography IThis reading-intensive course offers a graduate-level introduction to ‘ethnography’ as both genre of writing and practice of thought. It has two aims: one, to conduct close readings of how contemporary English-language anthropologists have treated subjects (or objects of study) that have been central to disciplinary knowledge production as a whole; and two, to demonstrate what diverse ethnographic approaches to understanding our world might look like. Although students are encouraged to think critically about form, convention, and interdisciplinarity, readings are primarily single-author monographs by writers who locate themselves within the discipline of Anthropology. In turn, the course seeks to familiarize students with modes of ethnographic analysis that have been part of the development of the discipline in recent decades.Department of Anthropologyknowledge, productionSDG4, SDG12
ANT6056HDecolonizing Diversity Discourse: Critical and Comparative Accounts of Multiculturalism and Settler ColonialismDepartment of AnthropologysettlerSDG4
ANT6062HDisability AnthropologyDepartment of AnthropologydisabilitSDG3
ANT6064HEvidence & Uncertainty: The Politics of Law and ScienceThis seminar explores the production and politics of legal evidence, scientific proof, and uncertainty. It unpacks the ways in which technical-scientific knowledge production processes are mobilized within the legal field, and enable certain legal and political outcomes, while making others impossible. Drawing on the fields of political and legal anthropology, science and technology studies and critical human geography, the seminar brings foundational texts investigating epistemological and ontological conditions of evidence, certainty, and uncertainty together with the recent ethnographies of controversies in the fields of law and science. The seminar will examine various cases that include, but are not limited to, injury claims, environmental contaminations, systematic human rights violations, and political asylum cases.Department of Anthropologyknowledge, contamination, invest, production, environmental, human rightsSDG4, SDG6, SDG9, SDG12, SDG13, SDG16
ANT3047HEvolutionary Anthropology TheoryThis course is an intensive exploration of the ideas that form the foundation of evolutionary anthropology. We will read historically important theoretical texts and critically examine leading concepts in the field. Through guest lectures by scholars in our department we will discuss topics such as molecular clocks, species concepts, signatures of selection, niche construction, genetic drift, sexual selection, human behavioural ecology, epigenetics, and population genetics. We will actively engage with historical and current issues of diversity and decolonization in the discipline of Evolutionary Anthropology throughout each weekly discussion.Department of Anthropologydecolonization, species, ecolog, speciesSDG10, SDG14, SDG15
ANT7003HGlobal Health: Anthropological PerspectivesDepartment of Anthropologyglobal healthSDG3
ANT6100HHistory of Anthropological ThoughtAs an introduction to the history of anthropological thought, this MA-level core course aims to familiarize students with the key thinkers, theoretical approaches, and ethnographic innovations that shaped the discipline in the twentieth century. It likewise considers the kinds of knowledge, ethics, and modes of both representation and analysis these different approaches have demanded. An understanding of the historically situated character of our discipline is a crucial component of our contemporary practice, and this includes taking seriously the intellectual genealogies out of which–and often against which—contemporary thought has emerged.Department of AnthropologyknowledgeSDG4
ANT4066HHousehold ArchaeologyHousehold archaeology, as the name implies, takes the household as the fundamental unit of study, and considers issues that are primary to households such as production, consumption, and social organization. Gordon Willey once called the household the most important unit of study in archaeology because in most pre-industrial societies the household was at the core of socioeconomic organization. The course is organized into four sections. By way of introduction, we will review anthropological models of the household developed by scholars such as Yanigasako, Netting, and Wilk. How are households constituted? What are the rules of membership? What sorts of social relations and obligations exist among household members?What kinds of work do households do? In the next section, we will look at some anthropological perspectives on the household, including ethnicity, identity, gender relations, and craft specialization. In section three, the focus will be on the main archaeological correlate of households: the house. We will examine topics such as the built environment, space syntax, and site formation processes. Finally, we will conclude the course with a consideration of the “living house.” Classes will be organized around a set of readings for each weekly meeting. Each student will present a seminar on one of the categories from the last three sections of the course. Students who are not presenting will submit short reviews or annotations of the readings for the week at the beginning of each class. In addition to the reviews, students will write an essay, due at the end of term. In the essay, students will discuss how household archaeology has contributed to our understanding of prehistory in a defined archaeological culture or culture area of the world. The results of this essay research will also be presented briefly in class at the end of term (time permitting).Department of Anthropologysocioeconomic, gender, consum, productionSDG1, SDG5, SDG12
ANT3010HHuman Osteology: Theory and PracticeThis course is directed towards people who already have some knowledge of human osteology and will provide a comprehensive overview of how researchers analyze human skeletal remains. The methods and tools used to study human skeletal remains will be critically examined and the ethical implications of osteological research across the history of the discipline will be discussed in depth. This course will explore diverse theoretical challenges in the field, as well as the limitations and advantages of newly emerging lines of research.Department of AnthropologyknowledgeSDG4
ANT4041HLandscape ArchaeologyDepartment of AnthropologylandSDG15
JSA5147HLanguage, Nationalism and Post-NationalismDepartment of AnthropologynationalismSDG16
ANT3046HPaleoecology in Primate and Human EvolutionDepartment of AnthropologyecologSDG15
ANT6021HPolitical Anthropology: State, Power and SovereigntyDepartment of AnthropologysovereigntySDG16
ANT6017HPost-colonial Science Studies and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge TranslationDepartment of AnthropologyknowledgeSDG4
ANT3438HSkeletal Trauma and Violence: Theory and PracticeDepartment of AnthropologyviolenceSDG16
ANT3050HSpecies Concepts and Human EvolutionDepartment of Anthropologyspecies, speciesSDG14, SDG15
ANT4065HSpecific Problems: New WorldThis seminar delves into archaeological research on human-animal relationships through time in order to highlight the diverse ways that researchers identify and interpret these interactions archaeologically. The emphasis will be on methods and theories for understanding hunting and butchery practices, management and domestication, pastoralism, as well as ritual and ideological practice associated with fauna. Students will be graded on participation, reading syntheses, a presentation somehow relevant to their own field of research, and a final essay.Department of Anthropologyanimal, animalSDG14, SDG15
ANT6005HThe Politics of Distribution: Work, Welfare and Abandonment in Precarious TimesDepartment of Anthropologywelfare, precariousSDG1
APD3202HA Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences [RM]This doctoral-level course serves as an introduction to program evaluation used in education, psychology, and social sciences. Program evaluation aims to systematically investigate the process, effectiveness, and outcomes of programs. Its primary goal is to inform decision-making processes based on answers to why it works or doesn't work and improve the quality of the program. In this course, students will learn the craft of program evaluation at various stages, including: critically appraising evaluation research; assessing program needs, developing a logic model, evaluating the process and outcomes of the program, evaluating efficiency, dealing with ethical issues, warranting evaluation claims, and communicating with stakeholders. This course will focus on both theoretical and practical issues in designing, implementing, and appraising formative and summative evaluations of various educational and invention programs. In this course, we will consider the effects of various social, cultural, and political contextual factors underlying the program.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentinvestSDG9
APD1295HAdolescent Mental Health: An Examination of Risk and ResilienceAdolescence is a developmental period characterized by both vulnerability and opportunity. This course will examine research and theory on the development of mental health and well-being in adolescence and emerging adulthood (ages 18-25 years), and examine common mental health concerns in adolescence. In addition to examining contributing developmental factors to adolescent mental health (e.g., physical, social, emotional changes and transitions in adolescence), this course will also explore risk and protective factors across various contexts (e.g., family, peers, schools, media) that influence adolescent risk and resiliency.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentvulnerability, well-being, mental health, resilien, transit, resilience, resilienceSDG1, SDG3, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APD3178HAdvanced Cognitive Behaviour TherapyThis course provides in depth knowledge and advanced training in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will acquire an enhanced understanding of current cognitive behavioural theories and master skills needed to implement evidence-based cognitive behavioural interventions across a wide range of mental health conditions and within diverse contexts. These include depression, anxiety disorders, psychological trauma, psychotic disorders, and a variety of complex presentations. A key aspect of the course is developing an understanding of how theory and research are used to inform current clinical practice in cognitive behaviour therapy.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental health, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4
APD3160HAdvanced Family TherapyThis is an advanced level doctoral course that will build on the knowledge and clinical skills acquired in the introductory course in the theory and practice of Family Therapy. This course is for students enrolled in the EdD in either the adult or the adolescent emphasis. Students will be expected to be familiar with a number of different models of family therapy, including systemic, strategic, structural and behavioural. The course will focus on one of these models in depth, including conceptual frameworks, methods of assessment as well as intervention strategies. Issues related to the formation and maintenance of the therapeutic alliance in family therapy as well as specific challenges related to working with families will be addressed. The course will take a developmental perspective in terms of the family from early formation through maturity taking into account the developmental needs of different family members. Thus students will have the opportunity to focus on children, adolescents, young and older adults within a family context.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD3163HAdvanced Multicultural Counselling and PsychotherapyThis seminar course will familiarise students with current issues and debates concerning research and practice of counselling psychology and psychotherapy in a multicultural society. The course seeks to define, redefine and locate multicultural counselling and psychotherapy research within the broader economic, social and political contexts of health care provision and practices (particularly in Canada). Through a post-colonial critique of psychiatry, clinical and counselling psychology, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy and counselling, the seminar attempts to raise questions regarding the theory, practice and research with ethnic minority clients. The seminar also offers a critical examination of the concepts of multicultural, multiethnic, and other nomenclatures, particularly assessing the epistemological and ontological histories and complexities in relation to ways in which theory, practice and research is undertaken in counselling psychology. The seminar is appropriate for students considering a dissertation proposal in critical multicultural counselling and psychotherapy. Students will review, analyse and redesign representative studies in the critical multicultural counselling psychology and psychotherapy literatures and methodology which will eventually lead to a thesis proposal.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmenthealth care, minoritSDG3, SDG10
APD3224HAdvanced Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural InterventionsThis course will provide an advanced examination of proactive behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches used with children for the remediation of skill deficits associated with defiance, aggression, impulsivity, depression, and anxiety. Students will be required to develop treatment approaches to case presentations and/or develop clinical workshops for use with parents, teachers or other intervention agents.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentremediationSDG6
APD3302HAdvanced Study of Critical Issues in Special Education, Mental Health, and Child SecurityThis course is designed to provide an in-knowledge of critical issues in special education and the mental health of children and adolescents that will enable the learners to think broadly about the issues and interconnections and their relevance for policy and decision-making. This course will draw on a bioecological model of development (Bronfennbrener, 1992) to guide discussions as we will investigate the effects of systems (e.g., community, family, school) and culture on mental health promotion and risk as well as on children’s access and support through special education services. Students will examine the contribution of key theoretical learning models that often guide research design and practice. Students will be able to analyze key policy and practice issues that affect children and youths’ wellbeing and mental health as well as be able to synthesize points of intersection between the special education system, mental health, and social systems. This course will engage students in an in-depth examination that influence the implementation of programs or practices designed to support students with special education needs (including early risk and intervention) as well as those to promote wellbeing and mental health. Students will gain expertise in their knowledge of the complex and interrelated factors affecting student success in general and special education systems as well as in-depth knowledge of risk and resilience frameworks for mental health in children.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwellbeing, mental health, knowledge, learning, invest, resilien, resilience, ecolog, resilienceSDG3, SDG4, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APD3303HAdvanced Study of Tools and Research Methods for Investigating Problems of Practice: Data-Driven Research for Decision-MakingDepartment of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentinvestSDG9
APD2221YAdvanced Teaching PracticumSecond year Child Study and Education students carry out a single practicum placement called an internship during either the fall or winter term for a total of 320 practicum hours. Supervised by a mentor teacher on site and a staff member from the Institute of Child Study in an assigned setting from preschool through grade six, students have an opportunity to consolidate developing skills and attitudes as they apply their teaching skills.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentinstitutSDG16
APD1222HAPPR TO PSYCHOTHERAPY-LIFESPANThis course introduces the major theories of psychotherapy with children and adults including cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and humanistic approaches. Issues related to gender and to individual and cultural diversity are also considered. A practical component assists students in developing basic psychotherapy skills. NOTE: Targeted to School and Clinical Child Psychology students. Others by permission of instructor. DPE MEd students interested in this course must have pre-requisite course APD1297H, prior experience in therapeutic work with children and youth, and permission of instructor.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentgenderSDG5
APD1296HAssessing School-Aged Language LearnersWith increasing globalization and mobility across countries, student populations in urban schools include various groups of language learners, including immigrant children, indigenous language-speaking students, and second- or third-generation children who enter the school with fluent oral proficiency but with limited literacy skills in a language used as the medium of instruction at school. This course is designed for graduate students who wish to develop competencies in assessing additional language learners' language proficiency in K-12 curriculum learning contexts. The use of assessment is the central theme. We will consider theoretical bases and empirical evidence that educators and teachers should know in using assessment of school-aged language learners. Various cognitive and non-cognitive factors that influence students' language proficiency development will be examined. We will examine validity, reliability, and fairness issues arising from the use of standardized tests as well as classroom assessment.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, globaliz, indigenous, urban, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
APD5284YAssessment and Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth and FamiliesThe purpose of this course is to explore, from a multidimensional perspective, assessment and intervention issues and techniques arising when learners in second language or multicultural contexts experience learning difficulties. Through readings, classroom discussion, case studies, and client-work, the course is intended to help students become better aware and better prepared for work with individuals in culturally and linguistically diverse settings. Students are expected to integrate and apply such diverse areas as second language acquisition, learning disabilities, cognitive and affective functioning, and to consider alternative assessment and intervention practices.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD3401HAssessment with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and FamiliesThe purpose of this course is to learn about the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children and youth who are English language learners (ELL), come from multicultural contexts demanding culturally sensitive strategies for assessment and intervention, or are in other bilingual programs such as French Immersion. The course is intended to provide doctoral students with a repertoire of strategies for dealing with the complex array of cognitive, linguistic, affective, social-emotional and cultural issues involved in assessment of CLD children and adolescents. This is achieved through readings, lectures, class discussion, case presentations, hands-on experience with a client and family, and school consultation. Each student will conduct an assessment with a CLD student who is learning difficulties. The goals of this assessment is to establish the client's’ learning and social-emotional needs, the strategies that support their learning and adjustment, and consult with their schools in order to enhance the likelihood that these strategies will be implemented there.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD1266HCareer Counselling and Development: Transition from School to WorkThis course aims at preparing the counsellor for an expanded role in career guidance. It deals with all major aspects of career development. The topics covered are: social and economic context, theories of career development, the role of information, assessment of career development, career guidance programs, and recurring issues in career guidance. This course is limited to students in a U of T graduate degree program. Others by permission of instructor.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmenttransitSDG11
APD1268HCareer Counselling and Development: Transitions in AdulthoodThis course will focus on the theories of career development and counselling techniques to deal with major career transitions. Topics will include mid-life career changes, career psychology of women, career planning and development in the workplace, relocation counselling, and retirement and leisure counselling. This course is limited to students in a U of T graduate degree program. Others by permission of instructor.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwomen, transitSDG5, SDG11
APD1256HChild Abuse: Intervention and PreventionAn examination of the nature and consequences of child maltreatment. Theory and research in physical, sexual, and emotional abuse will be reviewed. Coverage includes recent therapeutic interventions and promising prevention initiatives. The objective of this course is to provide a knowledge base for more effective practice and inquiry.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD2200YChild Study: Observation, Evaluation, Reporting, and ResearchA course designed to develop the skills and knowledge fundamental to a developmentally oriented systematic study of children through observing, recording, interpreting, and reporting in a professional manner the behaviour and development of children in diverse practice and research settings. A range of methods from direct observation to standardized testing will be surveyed. The role of the teacher-researcher and issues in connecting research and practice will be emphasized. The research component of the course will draw heavily on the Health and Physical Education curriculum to support an understanding of key elements of the curriculum including living skills (e.g., relationship skills), active living, and healthy living and research to inform teaching of these domains.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD2201YChildhood Education Seminar IThis is a seminar course that examines the interactions between teachers and children in kindergarten, primary and junior grade educational settings. Emphasis is placed on the integration of teaching practice with Social Studies curriculum and social learning theories. Students learn instructional methods (planning, learning environment, classroom management) and pedagogies for elementary teaching. The law, legislations and government policies for education are explored and tied to professionalism and professional practice. This course draws on students’ experiences from practicum placements and is connected to the practicum course. Theory and practice are well connected through scholarly readings and practicum experience.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD2202HChildhood Education Seminar II: Advanced TeachingThis seminar will provide for discussion of topics and issues that emerge during the students' internship (APD2221Y Advanced Teaching Practicum) and that relate to employment preparation.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentemploymentSDG8
APD1233HCognitive Development and ApplicationsThis course provides an introduction to a variety of topics in cognitive development that are of contemporary interest. Major theories of cognitive development will be explored. We cover both classic and current experimental findings, and on how they address centuries-old debates surrounding the origin and nature of human knowledge. These topics currently include concepts and conceptual change in infants, core domains in conceptual development, the organization of action in infancy, the onset of symbolic functioning, memory development, the use of the imagination, theory formation as a model for conceptual change, and scientific reasoning.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD1207HCounselling Topics in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity DiversityThis course will review the research findings and clinical case literature in selected areas of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender psychology with reference to their implications for professional practice in counselling psychology. Particular emphasis will be given to the clinical and research implications of sexual orientation identity acquisition, bias crime victimization, same sex domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, gender dysphoria, and alcohol and substance use. Students will come to a greater appreciation and understanding of the special counselling needs of clients from differing sexual orientations and gender identities through a combination of lectures, seminar presentations, discussions, bibliographic and Internet research, and original student research projects.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentgender, transgender, internet, violenceSDG5, SDG9, SDG16
APD1214HCritical Multicultural Practice: Diversity Issues in Counselling and PsychotherapyThe course is designed to introduce students to the field of counselling in the context of a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-faith, multi-racial, multi-gendered and multi-abled society. The course seeks to define and locate multicultural counselling studies within the broader historical, economic, social and political contexts of mental health care. Through a critical examination of 'race', gender , ethnicity, sexual orientations, disability and social class students would establish an understanding of the theoretical and conceptual ideas that form the basis of practice with minority clients. Key concepts such as identity and multiple identities, power, stereotyping, discrimination, prejudice and oppression will be explored in relation to women, Aboriginal, ethnic minorities, lesbian, gay men and disabled clients. Through discussions, seminar presentations and experiential learning, the course will support the development of appropriate counselling skills and competencies to practice in a clinically anti-oppressive way.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental health, health care, disabilit, learning, gender, women, minorit, anti-oppressive, judicSDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
APD2214HCurriculum and Pedagogies for Cross-Curriculum TeachingThis course will provide students with an introduction to a broad range of curriculum areas important to elementary education. These areas include Health and Physical Education curriculum (movement competence strand), the Arts curriculum (music, drama, visual arts, dance), as well as the integration of these domains with other elements of the elementary curriculum. Students will have the opportunity to examine issues related to diversity and equity as well as the application of technology within these curriculum domains. The course will discuss how to design and implement instruction in these areas that is consistent with the learning expectations in the Ontario Curriculum (early childhood, primary, and junior years).Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, equity, equitSDG4, SDG10
APD3274HEarly Learning and the ThesisBuilding on the research methods course, this course will support students in developing a rough draft outline of the first three chapters of their theses. It will enable students to gain a broader understanding of various research methods/data analysis; coherent to the thesis development with clear alignment of the over-arching research question, sub questions, methodology(ies), results and analysis. It will also provide students initial understanding of related materials including the ethical review process and formation of thesis committees.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD3270HEdD InternshipAll students completing an EdD in Counselling Psychology for Community Settings will be required to complete the doctoral internship course. This course requires the completion of at least 500 hours of internship under the supervision of an experienced psychotherapist or counsellor approved by the Counselling Psychology Internship Coordinator. EdD students in the Counselling Program have been completing this 500-hour internship requirement since the inception of this program. We wish to ensure that the completion of this requirement appears on the student's transcript as a completed course requirement. Students will register in the course once the placement has been arranged and approved by the course instructor. The internship may be accomplished on either a full-time or part-time basis. The internships may be served in a variety of settings and will normally involve case conceptualisation, treatment planning, counselling interventions, consultations with other professionals, report writing, case conferences, and other activities relevant to professional training. It is also generally expected that, where possible, students will have contact with clients reflecting a range of diversity (e.g., clients who derive from various cultural, ethnic, social or linguistic groups and/or who bring other types of diversity issues, such a gender identity or disability).Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, genderSDG3, SDG5
APD1281HEducation Exceptionalities, Special Education, and Adaptive InstructionStudents will be introduced to the various special education exceptionalities in Ontario schools and will be provided with opportunities to analyze and reflect upon key issues in special education such as inclusion and universal design for learning. They will have the opportunity to gain skills and evidence-based knowledge regarding the identification, instruction, and progress monitoring of students with special education needs. The emphasis will be on using well-founded research to inform instructional practices and decision making. Given that students with exceptionalities are often at risk for mental health difficulties, we will discuss the intersection between mental health and learning as well as the intersection between special education and diversity.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental health, knowledge, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD1267HEmotion-focused TherapyThis course is an introduction to the theory and practice of emotion-focused psychotherapy. The theoretical underpinnings and historical development of emotion-focused psychotherapy will be presented along with the practical application of the approach to facilitate clients’ emotional processing in the session. Students will be introduced to different ways of working with emotion using empathic reflections, focusing, exploratory tasks, and chair-dialogues. The role of the therapeutic relationship will be emphasized and specific emotional processing tasks will be explored. Students will receive three hours of instruction once a week consisting of lectures, video presentations, demonstrations, and in-vivo exercises. Students are expected to engage in in-vivo counselling exercises with their peers during class time under the supervision of the instructor. By the second class, students will be expected to form small process learning groups within which they will have the opportunity to experiment with different roles as counsellor, client and observer to practice using emotion focused and experiential techniques.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD1226HFoundations in Inquiry and Data-Based Decision MakingThis course provides students with an introduction to the role of inquiry in teacher learning and professional development with a particular emphasis on the role of collaborative inquiry models in this process. Students will develop an understanding of the cycle of inquiry and how to engage in inquiry of their own professional practice. They will develop their understanding of how to use a broad range of data sources to inform their understanding of key issues and questions embedded in the classroom and school context. Students will also gain insight into core principles of data-based decision making and its role in classroom instruction and the development of effective learning environments.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
APD1286HFoundations of Literacy Development for School Age ChildrenThe course will provide the student with a better understanding of current theoretical and applied issues in language and reading development. It will target primarily first language learning but will cover second language learning whenever appropriate. A cognitive-developmental approach will be used to examine topics such as: the development of basic language reading skills including speech perception and phonological awareness, morphological awareness, orthographic processing and their respective contributions to reading, lexical learning and vocabulary development, the role of vocabulary in reading comprehension, comprehension strategies, reading disability, cross-language transfer of language and reading skills between first and second language in bilingual children, and cognitive effects of bilingualism. Implications of theories on instruction will be discussed whenever relevant. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research and/or applied projects. The course will be conducted in a seminar format. A different topic will be discussed in each session. Key issues pertaining to research methodology and data analysis will be addressed as needed.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD1217HFoundations of Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention with ChildrenThis course provides a basic overview of current behavioural and cognitive-behavioural approaches to the management and remediation of maladaptive behaviour, such as aggression, disruption, and noncompliance, in clinical, educational and residential settings. A conceptual model of behaviour and cognitive-behaviour therapy and learning principles relevant to this model will be considered. The model focuses on proactive, nonintrusive, and success-based approaches to remediation of problem behaviour. Topics will include assessment of maintaining variables, teaching of adaptive skill clusters, building tolerance to difficult environmental circumstances, moderating severe behaviour to enable skill-teaching, and evaluating clinical progress.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, remediation, environmentalSDG4, SDG6, SDG13
APD1277HGlobal Indigenous Healing in Counselling and PsychotherapyDepartment of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentindigenous, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
APD1298HImagination, Reasoning and LearningThe mainstream view of developmental psychologists has been that early childhood is a 'high season of imaginative play'. Watching children at play seems to bear this out. However, both the purpose and the nature of children's imagination have recently been subjects of debate. We will examine fundamental questions about the nature and purpose of children's imagination, play, and narrative comprehension in development. We will also ask whether 'imagination' and 'play' have been appropriately conceptualized: are the explicit and tacit assumptions that developmental psychologists have made about the nature of 'play' convincing, and are they well-defined? We will also ask questions about future thinking and counterfactual reasoning and whether and how they impact children's learning and development.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD1290HIndigenous Healing in Counselling & PsychoeducationThis course seeks to define, redefine and locate Indigenous and traditional healing in the context of Euro-North American counseling and psychotherapy. In particular, the course will examine cultural and traditional healing within the broader economic, social and political practices of mental health care and in Canada. While the focus is in counseling psychology and psychoeducation (pedagogy), it also provides a critical site to highlight challenges and transformations within health care, thus the course will draw attention to the use of traditional healing in mental health care and counselor education. Explorations of the currents issues and debates concerned with the contemporary practices of Indigenous healing will be a key features of the course, for example, cultural respect and appropriation, ethics and confidentiality, competence of Indigenous healers and their qualifications and training. Through an in-depth analysis of international Indigenous helping and healing practices, with particular focus on Canadian Indigenous perspectives, the course will undertake to raise questions regarding the theory, practice, and research of Indigenous mental health and healing in psychology and education. As part of the exploration of Indigenous healers and healing, the course will also focus on how peoples from non-dominant cultures construct illness perceptions and the kinds of treatments they expect to use to solve mental health problems through individual and community psychology interventions. In this respect the course is also intended to contribute to community development and community health promotion.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental health, health care, illness, pedagogy, indigenous, indigenousSDG3, SDG4, SDG10, SDG16
APD3268YInternship in Clinical and Counselling PsychologyThis course requires the completion of at least 1,600 hours of internship under the supervision of a registered psychologist. Students will register in the course once the placement has been arranged and approved by the course instructor. Placements are generally expected to fulfil the criteria of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centres (APPIC). The internships may be served in a variety of settings and will normally involve instruction in psychopathology, training in differential diagnosis and assessment, case conceptualisation, treatment planning, a variety of psychotherapeutic approaches, case management, and other related tasks. All students must have a formal diagnosis and assessment component as part of their internship hours. It is expected that students will involve themselves in such activities as diagnosis and assessment, case conceptualisation, treatment planning, psychological interventions, consultations with other professionals, report writing, case conferences, and other activities relevant to professional training. It is also generally expected that, where possible, students will have contact with clients reflecting a range of diversity (e.g., clients who derive from various cultural, ethnic, social or linguistic groups and/or who bring other types of minority issues, such a gender identity or disability). Students are expected to find placements at training sites accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), or equivalent.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, gender, minoritSDG3, SDG5, SDG10
APD3402HIntervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth and FamiliesThe purpose of this course is to learn about the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children and youth who are English language learners (ELL), come from multicultural contexts demanding culturally sensitive strategies for intervention, or are in other bilingual programs such as French Immersion. The course is intended to provide doctoral students with a repertoire of strategies for dealing with the complex array of cognitive, linguistic, affective, social-emotional, and cultural issues involved in intervention of CLD children and adolescents. This is achieved through readings, lectures, class discussion, case presentations, hands-on experience with a client and family, and school consultation. Each student will conduct an instructional intervention with a CLD or bilingual child or adolescent who is experiencing learning difficulties and who may have a learning disability. The goals of this intervention is to address the client's learning and social-emotional needs, find strategies that support their learning and adjustment, and consult with their schools in order to enhance the likelihood that these strategies will be implemented past your work with the student.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD1282HIntroduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling PsychologyThis introductory course is designed to engage students in a critical understanding of the mental illness, mental health and well-being issues facing globalization, mental health practices and counselling psychology. The course will facilitate a critical reflection of the research and wellness practices that places a priority on improving equality of mental health and well-being for all people worldwide. The course seeks to define and locate critical counselling psychology within the broader historical, economic, social and political contexts of global mental health (GMH) care. Through a critical examination of the various ways in which Western mental health is practiced globally, students would establish a critical understanding of the economic and political engagements that underpin clinical practice globally. A critical examination of the various ways in which Western models of diagnosis and treatment - DSM5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., and the ICD 10 International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO) - students will get an appreciation of how Western models dominate an determine Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) mental health trajectory of care. Western narratives about mental illness, mental health and well-being tend to dominate over local LMIC traditional and indigenous healing practices. The course will focus on diagnosis and culture, transcultural psychiatry, cross-cultural counseling psychology, and the political economy of global mental health and well-being. An in-depth analysis of a number of individual country vignettes using a critical lens will be undertaken. Key concepts such as: globalization of mental health, cultural representation and presentation of mental illness and health, cross-cultural counselling and psychotherapy; Indigenous knowledges and traditional healing; political-economy of mental health and wellbeing will be critically understood and appreciated. This course will offer students an opportunity to learn about essential GMH current issues, discuss innovative cross-cultural counselling psychology collaborations, and critically examine strategic Indigenous initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of mental illness around the globe.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwellbeing, well-being, mental health, illness, knowledge, knowledges, labor, globaliz, equalit, indigenous, income, indigenousSDG3, SDG4, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
APD2270YIntroduction to Special Education and Adaptive InstructionA critical analysis of current issues related to identification and programming for children with special needs. The emphasis is on using well-founded research to inform instructional practices and decision-making. This course is designed to promote reflective thinking about key topics in Special Education that educators must conceptualize from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It is intended to provide students with knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will enable evidence-based understanding of what is involved in working with exceptional learners across a variety of settings, but primarily in an inclusive classroom situation. Focus is placed on curriculum being flexible in responding to diversity, so that teachers are guided to make appropriate accommodations and modified expectations for the various categories of exceptionality. Since characteristics of special needs and second language learners are often inter-related, ESL support will also be addressed. This course includes a service-learning experiential component to enable students to make connections between theory, research, and practice and to offer them an opportunity to connect with a community or organization where they may support students with learning needs and reflect on their experience.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentknowledge, learningSDG4
APD3301HIssues in Child Study and Education: Research, Policy, and Problems of Practice (RM)Child Study is the systematic interdisciplinary investigation of the way children adapt and change in order to provide them with more supportive learning environments and increase the likelihood of positive outcomes. Child study is a professional practice skill, a critical attitude, and a belief system based on inquiry, best evidence and reflection. This course offers an advanced consideration of how child study history, concepts, and research are related to issues and challenges in childhood education. The aim of the course will be to provide students with an advanced understanding of the field of child study through an examination of the history, theories, and breadth of research in child study. Students will analyze issues in child study and education, apply a child study framework to their area of interest, articulate a researchable problem of practice of interest in their organization/community, and identify policies that influence/connect with their problem of practice. Students will also gain specialized knowledge and competencies in utilizing action research frameworks to engage in professional inquiry, policy analysis, and research drawing on child study lens.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentknowledge, learning, investSDG4, SDG9
APD2001YMajor Research PaperA core element of the Research Intensive Training in Psychology and Education field of study within the Master of Arts in Child Study and Education program is the production of a Major Research Paper (MRP). The MRP represents a student's ability to engage in the production of a novel piece of research. The MRP will follow the OISE guidelines for the components of a M.A. thesis in terms of its design and layout. Students who complete an MRP will be assigned a primary faculty supervisor who will support the student through the research process and the development of a research proposal and MRP. A second faculty member will act as the "second reader" who must read and review the final MRP and provide formal approval of the MRP along with the primary supervisor.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentproductionSDG12
APD1297HMental Health in the Classroom: How Educators can Help Our Most Vulnerable StudentsRecent research suggests that one out of every five school-aged children suffers from a mental health issue (e.g., anxiety, depression), and that children who experience mental health issues are at increased risk for poor academic outcomes in schools. Educators are uniquely positioned to assist in the early identification of students struggling with mental health problems in the classroom. By learning about the signs of mental health problems, and understanding how to refer students to appropriate services, educators can facilitate children and youth's timely access to effective assessment and intervention. This course will provide an overview of the conceptualization, prevalence, and course of commonly occurring mental health disorders among school-aged children and youth, and explore risk and protective factors for mental health problems. Moreover, this course will examine the signs and symptoms of these disorders (to facilitate early detection by educators), as well as provide educators with information about empirically supported recommendations for preventing and responding to mental health issues in the classroom. Additionally, broader evidenced-based strategies and programming for preventing mental health concerns, and promoting mental health and well-being in the classroom will be discussed.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwell-being, mental health, health issues, learningSDG3, SDG4
JOI3229HMeta-Analysis for Research in Psychology and Education (RM)This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the concepts related to systematic review and meta-analysis and develop their skills in this research methodology. Specifically, this course covers the topics of formulating the research questions that can be answered with systematic reviews, perform the literature search, select the studies and critically evaluate them using the quality, inclusion and exclusion criteria, extract data on key elements of the studies, outcomes and relevant statistics, compute and convert various effect size indices, synthesize the results of the studies with meta-analysis techniques, and present the results. The focus of the course is both methodological and practical.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD1206HMind, Brain, and InstructionThe aim of this course is to provide a graduate level overview of a rapidly emerging field of research and application: Mind Brain and Education, also called Science of Learning, or Educational Neuroscience. The goal of this field is to bring together the theories, findings and methodologies of cognitive science, developmental science, education and neuroscience to understand the human mind/brain and its development and to devise effective ways to support learning and education.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD1231HMindful Self-Compassion for EducatorsThis experiential course explores the concepts underlying mindful self-compassion and their application to education. We will engage in various mindful self-compassion exercises to gain direct insight on the benefits these experiences can have on teacher well-being. From this gained insight, we will examine how mindfulness and self-compassion can be integrated into the curriculum and contribute to both children’s individual emotional well-being as well as to the creation of a positive learning community in the classrooms that we teach in.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwell-being, mindfulness, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD1232HMindfulness Interventions in Counselling and PsychotherapyThis course will explore historical, theoretical, experiential, psycho-educational, research and clinical applications of mindfulness-based interventions and approaches. Some of the topics will include: Historical context, development of mindfulness as a psychotherapeutic intervention, overview of multiple approaches to mindfulness, key concepts, evidence-based applications in health and well-being, mindfulness in the context of systemic approaches to health, compassion- based practices and integration of mindfulness in daily living. The course will provide opportunities to experience a variety of mindfulness practices, applications and interventions.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentwell-being, mindfulnessSDG3
JOI3228HMixed Methods Research Design in Social Sciences (RM)Mixed methods research is increasingly being used as an alternative to the traditional mono-method ways of conceiving and implementing inquiries in education and social sciences. In conceptualizing mixed methods studies, various paradigmatic assumptions are still being debated. However, many researchers have stated that the paradigmatic differences have been overdrawn and that paradigmatic incompatibility makes dialogue among researchers less productive. Researchers further acknowledge that philosophical differences are reconcilable through new guiding paradigms that actively embrace and promote mixing methods. Mixed methods researchers reject traditional dualism and prefer action to philosophizing by privileging inquiry questions over assumptive worlds. In this course, students will be introduced to various mixed methods design alternatives that allow researchers to link the purpose of the research to methodologies and integrate findings from mixed methods. This course covers various phases of mixed methods research, including theoretical frameworks of mixed methods research designs, strategic mixed methods sampling, data collection methods, integrative data analysis strategies, and a mixed methods research proposal. This is a doctoral level course designed to serve students who plan to conduct independent research. I anticipate that students will have had prior research experience or course work in research methods.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD1283HPeer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental HealthThis course introduces students to the skills, theory, and practice of counselling interventions in persons experiencing mental health problems, as well as in mental health settings. It aims to develop peer-counselling skills and deepen self-awareness and interpersonal communication competencies. Basic counselling interventions such as empathic responding, exploration of client's affect and cognitions, and problem solving will be explored. The course emphasizes the therapeutic relationship as well as the importance of ethical and legal issues in the provision of therapy. The course will use a combination of video-based counselling techniques, to assist students in developing basic counselling skills and increase their conceptual understanding of theoretical perspectives of counselling through practice, including counselling processes and case conceptualizations. The instructor will also present cases, including using video-taped counselling sessions, in addition to extensive counselling simulation. Unique to this program, is a cohort model of learning, where participants build trust with one another and build on their in-class relationships and discussions. Through presentations, experiential learning, class discussion, group exercises, counselling practice and videotaping, participants will: gain personal awareness of their own values and views and how they impact on the counselling experience gain a broad understanding of counselling theories learn to assist clients to develop their personal potential for growth and change practice basic counselling, problem-solving, decision-making and communication skills, and learn communication and conflict resolution approaches. In addition, there will be a 250-hour placement in an approved field setting.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental health, learningSDG3, SDG4
APD1204HPersonality TheoriesCurrent theories and research on personality are reviewed from several perspectives, including psychoanalytic, interpersonal, humanistic, trait, psychobiological, operant, and social cognitive. Topics include personality development and consistency, personality change, conscious and unconscious functioning, aggression, learned helplessness, personality disorders, sex and gender issues, and cross-cultural personality theories. Major theoretical approaches to personality within the context of clinical counseling psychology. This will include philosophical assumptions, key concepts, the process of change, and applications. Designed for those interested in personality development, change, and treatment issues. Specific content relevant to diverse socio- cultural contexts has been included. Upon completion of this course students will be able to: Understand the development of various Western psychology personality theories; understand the issues relevant to personality theory and development in culturally diverse contexts; and articulate a critical understanding of one of the major theories presented in class.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentgenderSDG5
APD1271HPerspectives on Executive Functions in Education: From Theory to PracticeThis course provides graduate students with an introduction to the topic of executive functions. The course enables students to better understand theoretical models of executive functions, executive function development, the associations of different domains of executive functions with social and scholastic functioning in school age children and youth, and recent findings related to the relations among executive functions, academic performance and achievement, and behaviour. In this course students will also develop an understanding of how various individual difference factors (e.g., language proficiency) as well as environmental contexts (e.g., classroom context) can impact executive function development. Finally, this course will explore diverse types of interventions designed to support students with executive function difficulties drawing on multitiered models of support.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentenvironmentalSDG13
APD1203YPracticum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and PsychotherapyThis course is intended to provide students with basic skills in clinical assessment and counselling interventions. Among others, issues related to the assessment of risk, history taking, clinical formulation, and the relationship between assessment and intervention will be addressed. Basic counselling interventions such as empathic responding, exploration of client's affect and cognitions, and problem solving will be explored. The course emphasizes the therapeutic relationship as well as the importance of ethical and legal issues in the provision of therapy. While the course presents didactic material, students have extensive opportunity to role play, and self-knowledge as well as issues related to boundary maintenance, power relationships in the provision of therapy and future self-development are also examined. This course involves sequenced skill training, with extensive counselling simulation and supervision of practice in a field setting. In addition to regular class meetings and time spent in group supervision with the instructor, M.Ed. students in Counselling are required to be in attendance one full day per week at their practicum settings. Some students may spend two full days in their practicum setting. MA students are required to be in attendance at least 2 full days per week at their practicum settings. All full- and part-time students must arrange their practica in consultation with the department's Coordinator of Internship and Counselling Services. Continuing students should plan to contact the Coordinator by March 15, and new students by May 15, in order to arrange the best match between student needs and field placement availability. The Counselling committee reserves the right to make any final decisions when questions arise concerning the placement of a student in a setting.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD1279HPreventative Interventions for Children at RiskThis course examines evidenced based efforts to prevent problems that place children and youth at risk. Focus will be on ways of reducing risk and increasing protective factors. Coverage includes interventions that effectively deal with health, social, and educational issues impacting well being and life chances. Poverty, chronic illness, and intentional and unintentional injury are some of the areas surveyed.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentpoverty, well being, illnessSDG1, SDG3
APD1227YProfessional Practice ProjectThrough a guided experience based on their school internships, students will implement the professional learning cycle in authentic contexts of practice to complete a professional practice project. The course is grounded in two of the Ontario College of Teachers Standards of Practice: Ongoing Professional Learning and Leadership in Learning Communities. Students will gain experience as "activators" of their own continuous professional learning processes as they work to improve their practice as beginning teachers, and as "facilitators" who actively create the conditions for the impactful professional learning of others.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD2222HProfessional Practice Project: Role AStudents will take this course in their second year of the MA CSE program, and will either directly implement or facilitate a professional learning cycle in authentic contexts of practice to complete a professional practice project. The course is grounded in two of the Ontario College of Teachers Standards of Practice: Ongoing Professional Learning and Leadership in Learning Communities. Students in their internship term (approximately half the students in the class) will gain experience as "activators" of their own continuous professional learning processes as they work to improve their practice as beginning teachers, while students in their academic term (approximately half the students in the class) will develop skills as "critical friends" who actively create the conditions for the impactful professional learning of others.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD2223HProfessional Practice Project: Role BStudents will take this course in their second year of the MA CSE program, and will either directly implement or facilitate a professional learning cycle in authentic contexts of practice to complete a professional practice project. The course is grounded in two of the Ontario College of Teachers Standards of Practice: Ongoing Professional Learning and Leadership in Learning Communities. Students in their internship term (approximately half the students in the class) will gain experience as "activators" of their own continuous professional learning processes as they work to improve their practice as beginning teachers, while students in their academic term (approximately half the students in the class) will develop skills as "critical friends" who actively create the conditions for the impactful professional learning of others.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD3260HPsychodiagnostic SystemsThis course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding and working knowledge of the defining characteristics of major clinical/psychological disorders as well as current diagnostic systems and practices. Students will develop skills in synthesizing clinical material and formulating/making differential diagnoses based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders (DSM-5). The course will also provide some opportunity to critically examine current theories and etiological perspectives on psychopathology with attention to gender and cultural issues. The course material will include video recordings for illustration of diagnostic issues and clinical syndromes as well as for practice purposes. [For PhD students in CCP and SCCP only.]Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentknowledge, genderSDG4, SDG5
APD1211HPsychological Foundations of Early Development and EducationThis course examines research on the psychological foundations of early development and relates those foundations to programs and policy in the preschool and primary years. The course follows an ecological framework beginning with child and family factors that affect development (brain development, coping and competence) then moves to relationships among families and services (child care, school) and finally considers broad factors such as adversity, resilience, culture and policy. Young children's physical, cognitive, communicative, social and emotional development are explored as contributors to and consequences of early learning.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, resilien, resilience, ecolog, resilienceSDG4, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APD1285HPsychology and Education of Children with Learning DisabilitiesPsychological and educational characteristics of children and adolescents with learning disabilities and ADHD with an emphasis on the constitutional and environmental factors that contribute to these disabilities and enable optimal functioning. Emphasis is placed on the concept of learning disability and on the educational implications of the research literature in the field.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, learning, environmentalSDG3, SDG4, SDG13
APD3201HQualitative Research Methods in Human Development and Applied PsychologyThis course provides an overview of qualitative research methodology and techniques. Coverage includes major philosophy of science, historical, and contemporary (critical, post modern, hermeneutic, constructivist and feminist) perspectives. Ethnographic, life history, individual and multiple case study, and focus group methods will be reviewed in relation to a narrative framework. Observational, interview, personal record, and archival data management will be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to design, implement, analyze, and report a micro qualitative study. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of computers and visual imaging techniques.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentfeminisSDG5
APD2296HReading and Writing DifficultiesThis course focuses on prevention and intervention in the area of reading and writing difficulties and disabilities. It is designed to prepare special educators and classroom teachers to implement evidence-based practice in the assessment and instruction of children with reading and writing problems. Half of the course is concerned with assessment, including informal and standardized approaches, and the remainder is concerned with research-based interventions to meet specific programming needs. Both parts involve hands-on strategies with children and adolescents who have serious reading and writing difficulties.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentdisabilitSDG3
APD1251HReading in a Second LanguageThis course will provide the student with a better understanding of current theoretical and applied issues in reading in a second language (L2). A cognitive-developmental approach will be used to examine topics such as: the development of L2 basic reading and spelling skills, the role of L2 oral proficiency in reading, comprehension related processes, the role of background knowledge, text structure and cultural background, sources of individual and developmental differences, and reading disability. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research and/or applied questions/projects. The course will be conducted in a seminar format. A different topic will be discussed each week. Key issues pertaining to research methodology and data analysis will be addressed as needed.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentdisabilit, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4
APD3304HResearch Proposal Development (RM)This course focuses on supporting students as they prepare their research proposal. The course aims to advance the research, writing, and practice elements and at the same time create an academic community. Students will be asked to complete a preliminary literature review and identify and describe a proposed problem of practice with the class to receive feedback and guidance within this collaborative setting. Students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of ethical guidelines for research, and identify potential research challenges they may face in their research. This course will complement the students’ work with their thesis advisor as this course provides a community of learners who can support the critical thinking processes embedded within creating a research proposal. The course will include in class seminars where students will spend part of the class working in small groups with others who are at the same stage of the journey; online support; individual meetings. The course provides supportive feedback on their key skills such as synthesizing research findings, writing analytically, and creating clear statements of issues and problems of practice. Students will also have the opportunity to present their work in a friendly, supportive community to build their oral and written communication skills.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlaborSDG8
APD3115HResearch Proseminar in Counselling & PsychotherapyThis is a doctoral course that will provide foundational knowledge in developing as scholar practitioners and completing a dissertation in practice. The course will provide an overview of research methods and practices that are relevant to EdD students. Special topics that will be covered include a review of practice, policy, research and theory relevant to the students' focus of interest. Students will be introduced to the requirements of ethical reviews and working in the community as well as how to apply for funding and liaise with various agencies. Students will be introduced to program evaluation, action research, as well as other methodologies to support the development of proposals and programs of study to support their research with a focus on adults and adolescents.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD3200HResearch Proseminar in Human Development and Applied PsychologyThis course provides a doctoral-level survey of developmental psychology and the role of formal education in human development. At the end of the course, students are expected to have sufficient knowledge of the history and theories of developmental psychology and the role of education in development to be able to teach an introductory course in developmental psychology and education.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD3273HResearching Early Learning: An overview course of quantitative and qualitative methodology [RM]The course will provide students with the essential knowledge and skills to conduct all stages of the research process using qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods approaches. The topics discussed in this course include formulation of research questions, working with the literature, research design and design of the data collection instruments, methods of data collection, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, interpretation of the results and report writing.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentknowledge, learningSDG4
APD2252HS: Individual Reading and ResearchSpecialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing upon topics that are of particular interest to the student but are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentinvestSDG9
APD1218HSeminar and Practicum in School-Based Assessment, Consultation, and InterventionThis course supports and monitors the development of students' clinical skills (assessment, consultation and intervention) in their 250 hour-field placement in a school setting. Seminars are typically scheduled on alternate weeks for the academic year. They focus on issues related to working as a psychologist in school settings including the school context, psychological assessment, individual and cultural diversity, consultation, prevention, and mental health intervention. The seminars will include explicit teaching of behavioural observation, interviewing and consultation skills.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentmental healthSDG3
APD1280HSymbolic Development and LearningThis is a graduate level seminar that will address fundamental questions regarding symbolic development and media-based learning in young children. We will explore recent findings in relation to questions such as the following: (1) What does symbolic understanding entail? (2) What is the developmental trajectory with respect to symbolic understanding? (3) What social-cognitive processes underlie symbolic development? (4) What can young children learn from media? (5) How well can young children learn from media? (6) What features of the media affect learning? (7) How can we facilitate children's symbolic learning? We will explore these questions by examining children's learning from a variety of symbolic media: pictures, scale-models, maps, TV, and electronic games.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD2220YTeaching PracticumFirst year Child Study and Education students are placed in classrooms in the Institute's Laboratory School, in public and separate schools, and in other settings. Students are under the joint supervision of an associate teacher on site and an academic staff member at the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study. There are three practicum sessions, each providing 96 hours of practicum experience in three, eight-week, half-day blocks. This course is normally open to students in the MA in Child Study and Education program only.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlabor, institutSDG8, SDG16
APD2275HTechnology for Adaptive Instruction and Special EducationThis course will examine the potential of microcomputer-based technology in various types of learning environments. The focus is on the use of adaptive and assistive technology as a tool to increase the teacher's ability to handle a wide range of student learning needs in main streamed classrooms. The course is suitable for students in the departments of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning and Applied Psychology and Human Development.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlearningSDG4
APD1235HTechnology, Play and Social Media in AdolescenceThis course examines the intersection of technology, social media and play during adolescence from a developmental and educational perspective. Topics include: social interaction, emotional development, gamification, collaboration, social media, and the role of technology in education. This course is designed to have students critically examine contemporary research to better understand the implications of technology on social emotional development, interaction, and learning in adolescence.Department of Applied Psychology and Human Developmentlearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
APD1294HTechology, Psychology and PlayThis course examines psychological theories of play and has a focus on the role of technology in play across the life span (e.g., Vygotsky, Huizinga, Brown) in relation to the role of technology in play (e.g., Resnick, Gee, Squires) from both human developmental and educational perspectives. Topics addressing play include: gamification, trust, collaboration and passion to learn. In addition, we will address the growing role of technology in 'eduplay' and emerging social implications (e.g., concerns of addiction to gaming, social media, and networked-connectedness).Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentlaborSDG8
APD1902HTheories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global ContextThis is an introductory course intended to provide students an overview of the theoretical and clinical application of the theories and techniques of counselling and psychotherapy. It will also critically explore the use of these theories and techniques across culturally diverse settings. This knowledge provides a foundation for further development in clinical skills and training in a global context.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
APD2211HTheory and Curriculum I: Language and LiteracyThis course provides a foundation of understanding for language and literacy instruction, translating current theory and research into evidence-based practice. The course considers reading and writing acquisition in terms of the component processes involved at various stages of literacy development. The goal of the course is to engender thoughtful, critical, informed decisions about the teaching of language and literacy in the schools. Teachers successfully completing the course will be prepared to develop and implement theoretically-sound, practical and motivating classroom literacy programs for the primary and junior grades.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentgenderSDG5
APD2212HTheory and Curriculum II: MathematicsA detailed study of the design, implementation, and evaluation of the elementary curriculum in the area of mathematics. The practical issues are informed by theoretical considerations of children's cognitive development from infancy onwards, particularly the ways in which implicit knowledge becomes explicit, and naive theories become formalized.Department of Applied Psychology and Human DevelopmentknowledgeSDG4
URD2041HBusiness and Land Use Planning in Real Estate DevelopmentJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designland use, landSDG15
VIS1020HContemporary Art: Theory and CriticismWith close attention to the breath, this graduate seminar investigates the complexities of breathing through art, philosophy, geopolitical theory and the design of closed worlds and controlled environments. The current sensitivity to the air we breathe prompts this seminar, including the air of a respiratory pandemic, racial injustice (“I can’t breathe”), forest fires, carbon emissions and uncertain futures. The breath, on the one hand, binds all human experience making us interdependent, and on the other hand, proves that inequality and difference exists in our varied access to breathable air. This course is shaped around a developing exhibition and book titled BREATHLESS (The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery) – an architectural and curatorial research project that provides the critical content for this course with a set of carefully selected historical and contemporary references. Students will have the unique behind the scenes opportunity to engage with BREATHLESS while expanding their own interests on the topic. The course is taught in parallel with Prof. Ala Roushan, as part of the Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Histories program, OCADU, sharing international guests and a jointly run symposium at the Power Plant at the end of the semester combining work from both university students.John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designemission, invest, inequality, equalit, emissions, forest, injusticeSDG7, SDG9, SDG10, SDG13, SDG15, SDG16
LAN2037HContemporary Landscape TheoryJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
ARC2014YDesign Studio 4The fourth and last in the sequence of core studios, the Comprehensive Building Project takes on integrated design practices to arrive at advanced building design as inseparable from the design of its site, urban, cultural, and environmental contexts. The studio takes place in the current context of the climate emergency and is intended to be a framework to reimagine how buildings should be built/unbuilt and programmed for the future given we have 8 years left to decarbonize our industry. It asks the students to rethink the social and material dimensions of buildings to create a Net Zero Climatorium in Manhattan’s Financial District.John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designbuildings, urban, decarboniz, climate, environmental, net zeroSDG9, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13
ARC2015HGlobal Architecture: Urban Analysis and DocumentationJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1041HINTRODUCTION TO URBAN DESIGN THEORYJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
LAN3051HLandscape Architecture Research MethodsJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
LAN3016YLandscape Design Studio ResearchJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
LAN2045HLandscape Ecology IJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designecolog, landSDG15
LAN2046HLandscape Ecology IIJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designecolog, landSDG15
LAN2047HLandscape Hydrology IJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
LAN2048HLandscape Hydrology IIJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
LAN2042HLandscape, Materials, Assemblies, TechniquesJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlandSDG15
VIS2102HMVS Curatorial Studies CollaborationJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignlaborSDG8
ARC1042HSite Engineering and EcologyJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignecologSDG15
ARC2042HSite Engineering and EcologyJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignecologSDG15
URD1031HThe History of Toronto Urban FormThis course will present a history of the development of the urban form of the city and the urban region of Toronto from the late eighteenth century to the present. In each session of the course, a presentation will be made by the instructor (sometimes by a guest lecturer instead), and this will be followed in each session by class discussion. It is hoped also that it will be possible to organize a series of walking tours of significant parts of the city, but the tours in question will need to take place outside the regular times of the sessions of the course, and will depend on the availability of students to participate in them. The course will explore the characteristic relationships that have grown up over the years between the distinctive topography of the city; it’s pre-settler indigenous patterns, early European settlement, and the evolution over time of its successive infrastructures, including railways, port facilities, expressways, transit lines and pedestrian walkway systems. These characteristic infrastructures will be described in terms of their gradual, systematic impact on the evolving form of the city. At the same time, the architecture of the city will also be described, but this description will demonstrate primarily how buildings became typological in the historical evolution of Toronto. One might say that the buildings will be depicted to the extent that they demonstrate the typical relationships of the city’s building typologies to its emergent urban morphology. The course has been conceived to be of particular interest to urban design and planning students, but it is open as an elective to students in the architecture and landscape architecture programs as well.John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & Designsettler, infrastructure, buildings, indigenous, urban, transit, land, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11, SDG15
ARC1035HToronto Architecture and Urban FormJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1044HUrban Design and DevelopmentJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1032HUrban Design in the History of the Post-Industrial WorldJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1011YUrban Design StudioJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1012YUrban Design Studio OptionsJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD2013YUrban Design Studio ResearchJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD2015YUrban Design Studio ThesisJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
URD1021HUrban Design Visual CommunicationsJohn H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, & DesignurbanSDG11
ASI1000YIssues in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian StudiesThe core seminar in Asia-Pacific Studies examines the dynamics of transformation in the Asia-Pacific in relation to a number of theoretical debates in history and the social sciences. The seminar is required of graduate students in the Collaborate Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.Contemporary East and Southeast Asian StudieslaborSDG8
ASI4300HNationalism and Revolution in AsiaContemporary East and Southeast Asian StudiesnationalismSDG16
AST1430HCosmologyThis is the AST 1430 cosmology graduate course for students interested in cosmology. The goal of this course is to provide a more complete coverage of cosmology, and to develop concepts to the point of calculation. The topics to be covered include a brief introduction to relevant con_x0002_cepts from General Relativity, we will cover our model of an isotropic, homogeneous, expanding Universe, inflation, the origin and nature of the Cosmic Microwave background, Big-Bang Nucle_x0002_osynthesis and baryogenesis, dark matter, linear perturbation theory, large-scale structure beyond linear perturbation theory, and dark energy.Department of Astronomy and AstrophysicsenergySDG7
AST1420HGalactic Structure and DynamicsThis course provides an introduction to galaxies and their properties. The focus of the course is on the physical understanding of the fundamental processes that shape galaxies and their constituents and much attention will go to various manifestations of the gravitational force, arguably the most important force shaping galaxies. We will also focus on learning the basic theoretical tools and observational data sets used in the study of galaxies.Department of Astronomy and AstrophysicslearningSDG4
AST2030HInterstellar Medium and Star FormationThis course combines the ISM topics covered in the pre-1999 AST1540H Galaxies II course and star formation in both the Galaxy and external galaxies. Course Synopsis: I. The Interstellar Medium: Inventory of the ISM: components , locations, structures, scales. Observing the ISM: Emission and Absorption Properties. Theory of the ISM: Heating and Cooling, Subsonic and Supersonic Motions, Ionization and Excitation Balance. Details: Chemistry, Dust, Magnetic Fields, and Cosmic Rays. II. Star Formation Properties of Star-Forming Clouds: Size, Temperature, Turbulence, Angular momentum, Magnetic Fields. Collapse: Gravitational Instability, Pressure Confinement, Magnetic Support Protostars: Mass Accretion Rates, Pre-Main Sequence Evolution, Observational Signatures. Circumstellar Disks and Outflows: Observational Signatures, Theoretical Models, Formation of Planets, Lifetimes. Star formation in external galaxies, issues in the star formation history of the universe.Department of Astronomy and Astrophysicsemission, planetSDG7, SDG13
AST1501YIntroduction to ResearchAST1501Y is the first in a two part series of directed research projects for first-year graduate students in the Direct-Entry PhD program. It serves as an introduction to graduate research, and it is also meant to help graduate students integrate into the Department, and introduce them to potential advisors for the 1501Y and next (AST 1500Y) research project. Another goal is to provide experience and advice on scientific expression and communication, helping to develop a `scientist’s toolkit’ for future success. In the first two months, to learn about research being undertaken in the department, a series of informal seminars is held with various faculty members (with style depending on their preference). Each of these will include a reading assignment. Students will identify and contact potential research advisors, and should have chosen their supervisor by early November. Any research faculty member of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics (DAA), Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA), the Centre for Planetary Sciences (CPS), or Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, can serve as an advisor. The AST1501Y course instructor will help match students to advisors, but the most effective strategy is to meet with potential advisors after preliminary email contacts. The research project spans the fall and winter sessions. The project should be feasible and interesting, clearly defined, and ultimately publishable.Department of Astronomy and Astrophysicsplanet, institutSDG13, SDG16
AST1440HRadiation Processes and Gas DynamicsThis course discusses the fundamental physical processes that produce and modify radiation from astrophysical sources. The astrophysical contexts within which these processes occur will also be discussed. The focus is on connecting basic electromagnetism theory with astrophysical observations. Outline: 1. Basic Concepts * basic radiometry; specific intensity and source function; equation of radiation transport; equivalent width and curve of growth; * including scattering in radiation transport equation; random walk; equation of radiative diffusion, Rosseland mean opacity; blackbody radiation; * matter LTE and radiation LTE; Einstein coefficients and inter-relation; detailed balance * Saha-Boltzman distribution; photoionization and recombination; * collisions: roles in reaching LTE; cross sections; critical density and critical temperature; 2. atomic and molecular transitions 3. dipole radiation and its applications * retarded potential; * electron scattering; scattering by dielectric medium; * dust, Mie theory; * Bremstruhlung;Department of Astronomy and Astrophysicstransit, landSDG11, SDG15
AST1410HStarsStellar astrophyiscs – the success story of 20th century astronomy — requires a synthesis of most of basic physics (thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear physics). It underlies nearly all of astronomy, from reionisation to galaxy evolution, from interstellar matter to planets, and from supernovae and planetary nebulae to white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. In this course, we will review these successes (roughly first four weeks) and then discuss current topics and remaining puzzles (in four two-week series, detailed content depending on interest).Department of Astronomy and AstrophysicsplanetSDG13
JTB2020HApplied BioinformaticsIn this course we explore systems biology of human genes with computational means in project oriented format. This will proceed in three phases: Foundations first: we will review basic computational skills and bioinformatics knowledge to bring everyone to the same level. In all likelihood you will need to start with these tasks well in advance of the actual lectures. This phase will include a comprehensive quiz on prerequisite material in week 3. We will explore data-sources and you will choose one data-source for which you will develop import code and document it in an R markdown document within an R package; Next we'll focus on Biocuration: the expertise-informed collection, integration and annotation of biological data. We will each choose a molecular "system" to work on, and define an ontology and data-model in which to annotate our system's components, their roles, and their relationships. The outcome of your curation task (together with your data script) will define the scope of this course's Oral Test; Finally, we will develop tools for Exploratory Data Analysis in computational systems biology. We will jointly develop code for a team-authored R package where everyone contributes one mini workflow for data preparation, exploration and interpretation. Your code contributions to the package will be assessed; There are several meta-skills that you will pick up "on the side" these include time management, working according to best practice of reproducible research in a collaborative environment on GitHub; report writing, and keeping a scientific lab journal.Department of Biochemistryknowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
BCH1441HBioinformaticsBCH441H (graduate program code BCH1441H) is an introduction to current bioinformatics. The course provides an overview of the sources of biomolecular data, annotation and integration, and the most important strategies for computational inference and the interpretation of results. This includes the “components” – sequence, structure, and function, the “relationships” in phylogeny and in the networks of interactions and regulation, and the “systems” through which we conceptually organize our knowledge. Practical, hands on assignments will introduce public data resources and analysis tools. Along with improving general computer literacy, you will learn to use the programming language and statistical workbench R, with a special emphasis on the kind of everyday tasks of data preparation and analysis that have become indispensable for any life-science laboratory.Department of Biochemistryknowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
BCH2207HCollaborative Science: Student Centered Interdisciplinary StudiesThe course will comprise of six lectures. The first lecture will include an introduction of the course layout and a presentation of various historical discoveries that arose from conglomeration of interdisciplinary research such as the discovery of insulin by a physiologist and a biochemist. Students are assigned a one page summary of their project’s description and of their future research objectives to be emailed in one week after. Following the first lecture, with the help of the course lecturer (Paris Boroumand), the students are given one month to find, and meet a faculty member outside of their department working on their research topic. Together they will organize a lecture on a topic that forms the basis of a collaborative project. On the assigned date, the faculty member gives a 20 min talk of their work, then the student follows with a 20 min presentation of a proposal on how their project may be expanded through collaboration with their faculty partner. Students will be asked to submit a grant on Dec 3rd (3 pages, following a guide that will be given to the students) that incorporates methods or concepts learned in class and through working with their chosen faculty member. Students will then be assigned to be first and second readers for their classmates’ grants and will need to fill out a peer review form. On the last day, a mock panel is set up where each grant is reviewed. The discussion starts with the first reader summarizing his review, followed by the second reader, followed by a group discussion. During the discussion, a Scientific Officer (SO) (each student will take turns being a SO) will take notes. The reviews and SO notes are submitted to both the grant applicant and to the class coordinator.Department of BiochemistrylaborSDG8
BCH2200HDesign Thinking for ScientistsThis is a graduate level course focused on developing entrepreneurial, design thinking skills and its application to graduate research and/or lab productivity, and other scientific, business, education, organizational, communication or start-up pursuits in basic biomedical sciences such as biochemistry or in any discipline the student would like to pursue. Interactive lectures will include classroom discussions regarding design thinking, team brainstorming and ideation techniques, and methods of idea development. Students will develop entrepreneurial skills by a) Identifying problems as observers in their own research, lab, departmental, career environment or via another person while also considering feasibility and potential impact, b) narrowing the focus to one problem with a clear market analysis, and c) Ideating, prototyping, testing and pitching to facilitators. Some examples which students may choose to ideate for may be annual lab goals, lab meetings for designing experiments, skills development, course or workshop development, student group initiatives. The skills learned in this course will enable the student to lead meaningful engagements throughout graduate school and enhance EQ skills in self-awareness, motivation, and empathy to potentially become Canada’s future scientific thought and entrepreneurial leaders.Department of BiochemistryentrepreneurSDG8
BCH2024HFocused Topics in BiochemistryProfessional Development BCH2024H – Focused Topics In Biochemistry This is a graduate level course focused on developing the academic and professional skills required to succeed during and beyond graduate education in basic biomedical sciences such as biochemistry. Interactive lectures will include classroom discussions regarding the practical aspects of succeeding in graduate school, mentoring, leadership, finding successful collaborations, developing strong written and oral communication skills, further training as a postdoctoral fellow, effective networking, integrating family commitments, career transitions, cvs and resumés, career options in and out of academia, best methods of searching for and landing the job, creating the career pathway, maintaining career development and other core competency skills. Students will develop communication skills through writing assignments and oral presentations related to their research. Classes will include interactive assignments or an interactive panel discussion with guest speakers from various industries and careers such as those from Academia, Law, Research Ethics, Management Consulting, Science Writing, Industry, Innovation, Government, and Education.Department of Biochemistrylabor, transit, landSDG8, SDG11, SDG15
BCH2135HMitochondria and Metabolism in Human Health and DiseaseThis class will cover a wide variety of topics revealing the complex connection between mitochondrial metabolism and cellular/organismal function, as outlined below. The course will be capped at 12 students with the following format: There will be a brief (30 minute) organizational class where each students will choose a topic from the list below (the references are supplied as a starting point only, more reading will be required to formulate your topic). The course format will be discussed as follows: Each student will have a one hour presentation to introduce their chosen topic, highlighting the state of the field, identify a key knowledge gap that exists in the field (the first 30-40 minutes) followed by a discussion of a research proposal (20-30 minutes) to attempt to fill in the knowledge gap identified. We expect the presentations to be accompanied by a healthy discussion among the class, especially the proposal portion of the presentation. The students will also compose a short (4 page) written research proposal detailing what they presented in class, incorporating feedback during the presentation.Department of BiochemistryknowledgeSDG4
BCH1426HRegulation of Signalling PathwaysA variety of questions relating to signal transduction are investigated. How are extracellular signals such as morphogens, growth factors or insulin, received and transmitted by intracellular proteins including kinases and phosphatases to control cellular proliferation and differentiation? Topics to be covered Liliana Attisano: General signal transduction, TGFβ signalling and pathway cross-talk Amira Klip: Pathways that regulate glucose transporters and their metabolic implications Daniela Rotin: PhosphatasesDepartment of BiochemistryinvestSDG9
BKS2000HAdvanced Seminar in Book History and Print Culture2021-2022 seminar: Critical Approaches to Digitized and Born-Digital Texts This seminar combines two topics which specialists often treat as separate: 1) the digitization of printed and manuscript books and documents from the past; and 2) the study of born-digital texts from the present (and very recent past). By now, however, many digitization projects have themselves become historical artifacts, and their curation requires many of the same forensic skills that other scholars have been honing in their study of born-digital texts. Digital archives in all forms thus require us to think holistically and across disciplines. The intersection between book history and the digital humanities is populated by numerous subfields, including platform studies, critical code studies, media archaeology, publishing studies, digital curation, and archival studies—not to mention the flourishing industry of digitization projects, large and small. Yet all of these fields engage with the production, transmission, and reception of texts, which places them in continuity with the older textual disciplines (e.g. bibliography, book history, textual criticism, and scholarly editing). Whether we are considering a digitized medieval manuscript or contemporary literary app, we face the challenge of understanding a digital object as both text and artifact. Students in this course will adapt methods and principles from the various branches of textual scholarship to understand how digitized and born-digital texts work, who shapes their construction and reception, what meanings they make, and why they matter as digital heritage. Students will be encouraged to introduce their own examples in the class, reflecting their own disciplinary and historical interests. We will also explore subtopics including the politics of digitization, the gendering of technologies and labour, the hazy borderline between digitization and art, definitions of digital materiality, theories of cultural memory, and recent changes in the printing, publishing, and bookselling industries (especially in light of COVID-19). No prior coding knowledge is expected, but students will be encouraged to work in both technical and theoretical modes, and as a class we will explore beyond our historical and disciplinary comfort zones.Book History and Print Cultureknowledge, gender, labour, productionSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG12
BKS1001HIntroduction to Book HistoryThis foundational course, required for all BHPC students in their first term, will introduce students to basic topics such as the semiotics of the book; orality and writing systems; book production from manuscript to computer technology; the development of printing; the concept of authorship; copyright; censorship; the economics of book production and distribution; libraries and the organization of information; principles of bibliographical description; print in other formats (newspapers, magazines, advertisements, etc.); reading and readership; editorial theory and practice.Book History and Print CultureproductionSDG12
BKS2001HPracticum in Book History and Print CultureAn individual project for PhD students intended to serve as a bridge from coursework to the dissertation, taken under the supervision of a BHPC-affiliated faculty member. The practicum project may lead directly into dissertation research, or may allow the student to explore a side project, and the student’s approach should be decided in consultation with the PhD supervisor and BHPC Director. The primary learning outcome of any BKS 2001H project should be for the student to be able to translate individual research interests into scholarly projects that engage with methods and concepts from the field of book history, broadly defined. Proposals from BHPC Master’s students may be considered under exceptional circumstances; interested Master’s students should email the Director and Program Coordinator well in advance of the deadline to consult about eligibility. Types of Projects. Examples of BHPC practicum projects include exhibitions and/or accompanying catalogues, online exhibitions or other digital projects, bibliographies, scholarly editions of short works and other forms of in-depth case studies, and printing or other projects in conjunction with the Massey College Library’s Bibliography Room. A list of completed practicum projects may be found here. Students are welcome and encouraged to expand upon the forms of previous practicum projects, and to propose hands-on projects that take advantage of the resources available through Massey College, the University of Toronto, and the city’s book arts community, and are advised to consult with librarians and archivists as they plan their projects. It is possible for a student to work closely with a non-faculty mentor or collaborator, as long as the official practicum supervisor holds an SGS appointment and BHPC affiliation. (The BHPC Director can add new faculty members to the affiliated list upon their request, provided the faculty member’s research has a demonstrable connection to BHPC’s fields of study, broadly defined.)Book History and Print Culturelearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
BME1802HApplying Human Factors to the Design of Medical DevicesThis course will apply human factors engineering principles to the design of medical devices. Testing medical devices in a health care setting, with realistic users, will be emphasized to understand why devices fail to perform adequately. Students in this course will work in teams to complete an evaluation of a medical device design, existing prototype, or commercial product by conducting usability studies, with realistic users, to uncover use errors. Human factors engineering analysis will be used to propose and make design changes to improve the design and validation testing will be used to prove that design modifications yield a reduction in use-related errors. Throughout the course, topics will be covered as they relate to applicable medical device industry standards (e.g. quality and risk management of medical devices and usability and human factors engineering of medical devices) through lecture activities, examples, case studies, and the overarching design project.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringhealth careSDG3
BME1477HBiomedical Engineering Project Design and ExecutionThis course aims to provide students with practical research and academic skills by: 1) practicing fundamental research questioning, hypothesis generation, and research goals to define an individual research approach; 2) exploring project management and research planning to increase individual productivity; 3) comprehending the philosophy of research and ethical considerations pertaining to biomedical engineering in order to produce high quality research; and 4) disseminating individual work in written and oral formats to translate individual knowledge and to share multidisciplinary research in creative ways. To achieve these aims, aspects of academic communication will be practiced through interactive workshops that cover literature searching, proposal writing, peer review, the visual display of information, and knowledge mobilization/translation. Throughout the semester, independent study will be centred on the student’s own research topic with written, oral, and graphical communication; while team work will explore a multi-disciplinary project that encourages the translation of scientific knowledge to broader audiences. Students will develop these skills while learning how to position themselves and their research for employment purposes.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringknowledge, learning, employmentSDG4, SDG8
BME1800HBiomedical Product Development IThe goal of this course is to be able to understand the fundamental theories behind the development of biomedical products from idea to commercial release. At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to: 1) understand the theory behind the development of biomedical products from idea to commercial release; 2) apply the theory to critically analyze the relevant processes; 3) integrate the above knowledge with real world examples and solve practical problems; 4) deliver projects in a team through interactions and group projects; and 5) appreciate the translational link between the fundamental concepts of biomedical engineering knowledge and its practical application in the development of commercial medical products, the processing of such products and the design considerations for clinical use of such products. The main themes of the course are: developing proper requirements design control regulatory requirements IEC 60601 medical device standard risk management (ISO 14971) verification and validation The course will emphasize fundamental engineering principles that will allow students the ability to become productive team members and give them the background necessary to assume leadership roles in product development. Guest experts, case studies, and real world examples augment the learning experience. Each theme incorporates fundamental engineering principles that will allow you to work effectively in a medical device company or to bring your own product to market.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringknowledge, learningSDG4
BME1801HBiomedical Product Development IIThe objective of this course is to provide students with regulatory body and ethics considerations by which they engineer safe medical device products intended for use as implantable devices or in contact with body tissue and fluids. A top down approach will be taken where the regulatory path for product approval and associated costs with product development and validation are reviewed for different biomaterials and devices. This path is then assessed in the context of product specific reimbursement, ethics, safety, competitive positioning and regulatory concerns. Students will be required to use their existing knowledge of biomaterials and devices, and their biocompatibility to frame the questions, challenges and opportunities with a mind to re-engineering products in order to capitalize on niche regulatory pathways. The resulting regulatory path gives a good idea of the kind of trial design the product must prevail in and ultimately the design characteristics of the device itself. Decision making will be made with ethical considerations. The discussion model will focus mostly on the United States regulatory office with some comments on Canada and Europe. Lastly, quantitative product development risks estimates are considered in choosing a product path strategy for proof of concept and approval of safe products. Ethical issues can also impact design since in biomedical engineering they are currently studied in the fields of bioethics, medical ethics and engineering ethics. Yet, professional ethical issues in biomedical engineering are often different from the ones traditionally discussed in these fields as they need to align with the engineering profession. Biomedical engineers differ from medical practitioners, and are similar to other engineers, in that they are involved in research for and development of new technology, and do not engage in the study, diagnosis and treatment of patients. Biomedical engineers differ from other engineers, and are similar to medical practitioners, in that they aim to contribute to good patient care and healthcare. The ethical responsibilities of biomedical engineers thus combine those of engineers and medical professionals, including a responsibility to adhere to general ethical standards in research and development of technology and to do R&D that adheres to the specific standards set forth by medical ethics and bioethics. This course focuses on products currently for sale as case studies, or may be approved for sale within the next two years consistent with its practical commercial focus.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringhealthcare, knowledge, capitalSDG3, SDG4, SDG9
BME1405HClinical Engineering Instrumentation IThis course provides a contemporary sampling of clinical technologies deployed in the continuum of health care. Recent topics include: MRI physics, guided therapeutics, hemodialysis, clinical information technology, human factors engineering in healthcare, infusion therapy and devices, physiological pressures, laser interaction and medical device tracking. The course focuses on (1) the scientific principles underlying the clinical instrumentation, (2) the clinical applications of the technologies reviewed, and (3) merits and limitations of current technology. Lectures are given by faculty and clinical scientists who are experts in their respective areas. All lectures will take place in the teaching hospitals and may include tours of various instrumentation suites, laboratories, and patient care areas. Students are evaluated on the basis of a midterm and a final exam.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringhealth care, healthcare, laborSDG3, SDG8
BME1439HClinical Engineering Instrumentation IIThis course continues from BME1405 Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I and provides a contemporary sampling of clinical technologies deployed in the continuum of health care. Recent topics include: electrosurgery, metabolic measurement technology, magnetoencephalography (MEG) imaging, patient safety, radiotherapy, CT imaging, whole blood analysis, anesthesia technology and rehabilitation technologies. The course focuses on (1) the scientific principles underlying the clinical instrumentation, (2) the clinical applications of the technologies reviewed, and (3) merits and limitations of current technology. Lectures are given by faculty and clinical scientists who are experts in their respective areas. All lectures will take place in the teaching hospitals and may include tours of various instrumentation suites, laboratories, or patient care areas. Students are evaluated based on a midterm and a final exam.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringhealth care, laborSDG3, SDG8
BME1472HFundamentals of Neuromodulation Technology and Clinical ApplicationsElectrical neuromodulation can be defined as the use of electrical nerve stimulation to control the ongoing activity of one or more neural circuits. This course will cover the fundamental topics related to electrical neuromodulation devices, such as the mammalian nervous system, neural excitation predicted by cable theory, principles of neural recording, long-term performance of implanted devices, and advanced techniques for controlling nervous tissue activation. The class will also cover selected literature of important clinical applications of electrical neuromodulation, where each student will present and lead the discussion of assigned papers. Finally, there will be group projects (typically consisting of two students) in which students will be provided a choice of topics to investigate under the guidance of the instructor or graduate students. The project may involve the design and testing of novel methods of nerve stimulation/recording or it may involve the implementation of neural circuits using computer software (e.g., neuron).Institute of Biomedical EngineeringinvestSDG9
BME1453HGenomics and Synthetic Nucleic-Acid TechnologiesThis course will provide an overview of different research areas in the field of functional DNA nanotechnology and their intersections with the fields of genomics, biophysics, and healthcare. The course is organized into four modules: (i) DNA in The Post-Genomics Era, (ii) Nucleic Acids as Enzymes and Binders, (iii) Molecular Programming with DNA, and (iv) Structural DNA nanotechnology. Through these modules, students will familiarize with different biophysical and biochemical properties of our genetic material. Evaluations will be based on in-class participation, paper presentations, reports, and drafting of a mock grant.Institute of Biomedical EngineeringhealthcareSDG3
BME1460HQuantitative Fluorescence Microscopy: Theory and Application to Live Cell ImagingFluorescence microscopy and associated biophysical methods are integral to many areas of biological research including biomedical engineering, cell biology, and molecular biology. This course covers the theory, mechanics, and application of fluorescent microscopy. Students will gain expertise in basic and advanced quantitative fluorescence microscopy in the context of working with living samples. The course topics include sample preparation (immunofluorescence-, dye-, and fluorescent protein-labeling), multidimensional imaging, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and other advanced imaging techniques. The course will also cover the associated biophysical methods used to probe live cell dynamics such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). By centering on applications to living samples, students with gain the theoretical background and practical knowledge to design and implement live cell imaging experiments.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringknowledge, energySDG4, SDG7
BME1010H / BME1011HGraduate SeminarAll research program (MASc and PhD) students are required to attend a minimum of six graduate student seminars per semester (i.e. twelve per year) and four invited seminar series talks per year to fulfill BME 1010/1011Y attendance requirements. Attendance is tracked for all seminars. Graduate student seminars consist of two 25-minute presentations given by graduate students registered in either the BME or the Collaborative Specialization in Biomedical Engineering. Seminars are held every Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, with Distinguished Lectures held the first Tuesday of every month. This course provides students exposure to the breadth and depth of research activities in biomedical engineering, assists in the establishment of a biomedical engineering identity within the student population and externally to the University and to funding agencies, and provides students with the opportunity to present their work in a formal setting and receive feedback (on both presentation style and content) prior to their final defense. The primary goal of this course is to provide practical experience and guidance in the clear, concise oral communication of research results to an audience of educated, although not specialist, peers. This is an essential skill for anyone intending to seek a career in scientific research. The emphasis is different from a group-meeting or conference style talk to a specialist audience, but rather on the skills that are important ultimately for job talks or teaching situations. Another important goal of the series is to provide a broad knowledge of all aspects of research undertaken by other students in BME. A good, interactive audience is essential to the success of this series — so ask questions. Participation in this series is a core requirement of the BME graduate program. Students are expected to attend regularly, and anyone failing to attend at least eight seminars per academic year will be considered as non-participating. Please be sure to notify your supervisor and supervisory committee members as soon as you have confirmed a presentation date so that they can allocate time in their schedules to attend.Institute of Biomedical Engineeringknowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
BME1454HRegenerative Medicine: Fundamentals and ApplicationsThis course integrates relevant aspects of physiology, pathology, developmental biology, disease treatment, tissue engineering and biomedical devices. The first part of the course will stress basic principles in each of these disciplines. The second portion of the course will integrate these disciplines in the context of specific organ systems. For example, the physiology of the cardiovascular system, the development of the system, cardiovascular disease, the relationship between developmental defects and adult disease, current disease treatment, cardiovascular devices, and the current progress in cardiovascular tissue engineering will be presented. The teaching material will be gathered from various textbooks and scientific journals. This course will be delivered in a group discussion format. Whenever possible, experts in the relevant field will teach guest lectures. This integrative approach will be reflected by a problem-based learning approach to testing and a written report.Institute of Biomedical EngineeringlearningSDG4
BME1471HRehabilitation EngineeringRehabilitation and biomedical engineering are closely linked in various aspects and need to be studied together. For example, electrical stimulation and robotics technologies have recently been proven to facilitate rehabilitation outcomes. Knowledge of the state-of-the-art engineering technologies is required for students in biomedical engineering research. Furthermore, developing new technologies that assist rehabilitation requires thorough knowledge of physiological systems and understanding how they link to those technologies. This course will introduce various state-of-the-art technologies in rehabilitation engineering. To cover diverse research topics in the field, expert guest lecturers in each field will be invited. The physiological basis of each technique will be emphasized, to encourage students to understand fundamental principles of each technique and to seek applications in their own areas of research.Institute of Biomedical EngineeringknowledgeSDG4
ERE1179HIlliberalism in East-Central Europe“Illiberal democracy” is the term used by Viktor Orbán, the Prime Minister of Hungary, for his vision of a conservative, nationalist society. We will be studying how East Central Europe has been thrust into the forefront of the illiberal rebellion now taking place throughout the Euro-Atlantic world. The course covers the “Visegrád Alliance” of Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. The former East Germany will also be frequently discussed as a post-socialist area with many of the characteristics of its eastern neighbors. The varied course topics deal with where illiberalism in the area comes from, how it feels, and why we should care.Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studiesconserv, conserv, land, democraSDG14, SDG15, SDG16
ERE1175HOne Hundred Years of Cultures of Refugees in Europe, 1920- 2020Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian StudiesrefugeeSDG10
CHE1134HAdvances in BioengineeringThis course, designed for graduate students whose research is at the interface of Engineering and Biology, will review recent advances in molecular and analytical methods relevant to bioprocess engineering, environmental microbiology and biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and other related topics. Following fundamental instruction on specific molecular and analytical methods, students will be required to prepare a critical review of chosen, peer reviewed articles that demonstrate the utility of discussed methods for the advancement of bioengineering concepts and applications. Discussion of the scientific, technological, environmental, economic, legal, and ethical impacts of the research will follow.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
JCR1000YAn Interdisciplinary Approach to Addressing Global ChallengesIn order to create sustainable solutions to the world’s most important challenges, global development professionals must reach beyond the traditional boundaries of their field of expertise combining scientific/technological, business, and social ideas in an approach known as integrated innovation. In this project-based course, students from multiple disciplines (engineering, management, health and social sciences) will work together – using participatory methods with an international partner – to address a locally relevant challenge. Students will be expected to communicate with and understand team members from other disciplines, integrate their knowledge and experience of global issues in order to: (a) identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of existing technical approaches to addressing the challenge, (b) analyze the characteristics of existing social frameworks (ethical, cultural, business, political) (c) identify gaps and needs (d) propose an appropriate integrated solution approach that incorporates an analysis of the challenge through these disparate lenses. The final deliverables for addressing the challenge at the end of the school year will include: a prototype of the end product, a business plan, a policy analysis, and analysis of impact on global health.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryglobal health, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4
CHE1142HApplied Chemical ThermodynamicsThis course has the objective of reviewing the basic concepts of thermodynamics with specific applications to processes involving phase equilibrium or equilibrium in chemical reactions. The course is divided in three parts. In the first part we will review the laws of thermodynamics, and the thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of pure substances. In the second part we will review the thermodynamic properties in mixtures and multiphase equilibria in non-reactive systems. In the last part of the course we will review the energy balance and equilibrium in chemical reactions. The evaluation will consist of a midterm at the end of the review section, and a final exam that will evaluate the last two parts of the course. This course also involves a term project where the student uses some of these concepts in a specific example related to his/her thesis project.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryenergySDG7
CHE1335HApplied Colloid ScienceThis course introduces the composition, methods of production and characterization, and uses of colloidal systems, including suspensions, emulsions, foams, aerosols and gels. The thermodynamic-based and kinetic-based theories of colloid formation and stability are introduced. The hydrodynamics of colloids and complex fluids is also discussed along with the connection between colloid composition, its rheological properties, its mass transfer properties and the connection between these properties and the performance of colloid-based products. The course will also introduce fundamental concepts towards characterization emulsion structures using light scattering, microscopy and spectroscopy. Finally, the chemistry and formulation principles of colloid-based products is also revised, in particularly the selection of solvents, surfactants, and polymers required.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryproductionSDG12
CHE1107HApplied MathematicsReview of basic modelling leading to algebraic and ordinary differential equations. Models leading to partial differential equations. Vector analysis. Transport equations. Solution of equations by: Separation of variables, Laplace Transformation, Green’s Functions, Method of Characteristics, Similarity Trans­formation, others time permitting. Practical illustrations and exercises applied to fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, reactor engineering, environmental problems and biomedical systems. Lecture notes provided.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHE1475HBiocomposite MaterialsThis course will teach students about structure, properties and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre reinforced composites including composites based on renewable resources. The course has a strong focus in fundamental principles related to polymeric material linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence that are critical to understand the functional performance of these types of materials. Novel concepts about comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and ecological impact are discussed. Key processing methods and testing and characterization techniques of these materials are also covered.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryrenewabl, ecologSDG7, SDG15
CHE1333HBiomaterials Engineering for NanomedicineOverview of principles of nanoengineering for biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. This course will study the formulation and manufacturing processes for producing nanomaterials for medical applications; pharmacokinetics, biocompatibility, immunogenicity of nanobiomaterials. The course will also introduce basic concepts in entrepreneurship and regulatory affairs associated bringing nano/bio-technologies from a lab environment to commercial products. In addition to course lectures, students will complete two laboratory exercises that will provide hands-on learning in emulsified formulations and characterizations involving nanostructures.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrylearning, labor, entrepreneurSDG4, SDG8
CHE1133HBioprocess EngineeringIn this course, students will learn theoretical and practical aspects of Bioprocess Engineering which uses biological, biochemical, and chemical engineering principles for the conversion of raw materials to bioproducts in the food, pharmaceutical, fuel, and chemical industries, among others. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of biomanufacturing principles and processes during the upstream production and downstream purification of bioproducts. Microbial and mammalian cell processes will be discussed. Basic concepts of scale up and the types of bioreactors used in industry will be introduced. Challenges in biomanufacturing and process validation will be discussed as well. The course includes (5) labs in which students will apply some of the concepts learned in class.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryproductionSDG12
APS1033HBusiness Innovation Leading to the Future, Based on ImagineeringThis course will demonstrate how an entrepreneurial person could get ahead of the curve as the future of technology develops. Instructors and guests will train the students to use their technical skills and problem solving abilities to identify where the world around them will be 10 or more years from now. The future is where the students in this course will have to live and prosper. However, the skills learned here will be immediately useful when getting a job now – your accomplishments in the course will show how ready you are to tackle problems now and in the future. The core goal is to assess opportunities many years in the future and using “Imagineering” to identify startup possibilities and how to pick the best ones. Topics covered will all be designed to increase the student's competence in the Canadian business world. Such aspects include the assessment of what future technological challenges will emerge and how to find the business opportunities to solve such problems in both private and public contexts. The students will learn how seek business opportunities for their firms or themselves and communicate such vision to decision makers. Thus, they will improve their marketability when seeking a job. The delivery is via 12 three hour sessions with a mix of lectures, outside speakers, group work and presentations on topics on emerging/future opportunities. There is an emphasis on technological leadership as the course teaches you how to be out front and be seen as a leader. Topics may include the social problems of wastewater engineering, air/particulate emissions, traffic engineering, project definition and financing and others. A highly interactive environment will encourage out of the box thinking and innovative approaches to large problems which impresses potential employers and your co-workers. There will be a number of assignments, projects and a term report. Class interaction with grading will be done in 6 of the sessions where both individual and group presentations will be required. Cases will be used for some of the projects. There will be no written final examination.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrywater, emission, worker, entrepreneur, waste, emissionsSDG6, SDG7, SDG8, SDG12, SDG13
APS1088HBusiness Planning and Execution for Canadian EntrepreneursThe key to entrepreneurial success is focused execution of a great business plan. APS1088 teaches aspiring entrepreneurs how to start a business in Canada. That business could be a start-up, a franchise, or an acquired or inherited business. The business could be for profit or non-profit. Each lecture focusses on an important aspect of starting and running a business, and supports a component of the business plan each student writes as the course project. • Start-up financing taught addresses all forms from bootstrapping to seeking funding from VCs and Angel investors. • If you already have a business idea the course will assist you in making that business idea a success and if you don’t have an idea the course will teach you how to find and develop a successful business idea. The instructors may introduce students with exceptionally good business plans to The Hatchery, or one of the many incubators on campus, or even businesses that might be interested in their idea. • The lecturers who present this course have all started and sold at least one successful business and have contributed their experience to the class notes. Interestingly, we are all immigrants to Canada like the majority of our students and that fact strongly influences the course material and our approach to teaching. • At strategic points during the course, subject matter experts are invited to address the students in their area of specialty such as marketing strategy, sales, finance & accounting and law.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryentrepreneur, investSDG8, SDG9
APS1010HCognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective LeadershipTEP1010HS: Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership (Formerly APS1010H) This course has been completely redesigned for life in our quarantined world. This semester's theme is Self-Leadership (because you can't lead anyone until you can lead yourself (!), and who better to practice your leadership skills on during quarantine than you?!) The class is completed in teams of 4, (but worry not - there are no graded team assignments!). Together your team will work through themes related to self-leadership like self-discipline (why can't I keep my new year's resolutions?), resilience (how can hard times and failures make me stronger?), and motivation (how can I stay engaged when I don't feel like it?). You'll also embark on 3 wild self-leadership quests that will challenge you to walk your talk in practical ways. I designed this course to be highly challenging, but stress free. It's full of fun activities and deep, meaningful conversations with your classmates to help get you through life off-campus.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryresilien, resilience, resilienceSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APS1011HConcepts and Application of Authentic LeadershipTEP1011HF: Authentic Leadership: Engineering A Vibrant Future (Formerly APS1011H) This course challenges the notion that leadership is a prescribed set of behaviours and allows students to explore their own authentic leadership. The exploration will start with students working through their value systems, reflecting on their own meaningful experiences, and compiling common elements into their 'purpose'. Students will identify their gifts, abilities and skills, and gain an understanding of their natural approach to working. Students will be provided with a number of tools and models to understand their own behaviour, patterns and stories. The middle section of the course will shift to leaders shaping their environments and providing feedback and coaching to others. As an outcome, students will be able to create for themselves the environments and dynamics in which they do their best work and be able to do the same for others. The final section of the course will help students translate their natural authentic leadership into strategies for change thereby enabling them to become change agents. Students will learn an approach to see new possibilities, to develop strategies for sustainable change, and to articulate these strategies in ways that will engage and align others. This course is aimed at helping engineering students to combine their knowledge and practical skills with their natural authentic leadership in order to create meaningful and sustainable work for themselves and those around them.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryknowledgeSDG4
CHE1213HCorrosionThe following topics amongst others, are treated: the various types and forms of corrosion, electrochemical theories of corrosion, corrosion testing methods, corrosion behaviour of iron, steel, and other common engineering metals, corrosion of steel and aluminum in reinforced concrete, passivity, atmospheric corrosion, underground corrosion, seawater corrosion, effects of stress, corrosion in the chemical process industries, the use of Pourbaix diagrams and methods of corrosion protection and control (selection of materials, coatings, corrosion inhibitors, cathodic protection, anodic protection). A number of problems (with worked solutions) are provided to clarify the concepts.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistrywaterSDG6
CHE1147HData Mining in EngineeringExtracting useful knowledge from data requires interdisciplinary skills in scientific computing methods and algorithms. The broader term that captures all the skills is called data science or data mining. Data-driven organizations leverage their data effectively and generate business insights that enable better decision-making and problem solving. In this course, we will present both the theoretical background and practical application of data science including programming, machine learning algorithms and data engineering. Students will gain hands-on experience on major data science techniques and tools and how they are applied to real-world data sets. Some basic knowledge of programming and statistics is expected. Python is the programming language that will be used in class.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryknowledge, learningSDG4
CHE1053HElectrochemistryThis course provides a working knowledge of modern electrochemistry. The topics dealt with include, the physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions, ion transport in solution, ionic conductivity, electrode equilibrium, reference electrodes, electrode kinetics, heat effects in electrochemical cells, electrochemical energy conversion (fuel cells and batteries), and industrial electrochemical processes. Numerous problems are provided to clarify the concepts.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryknowledge, energySDG4, SDG7
APS1030HEngineering Careers - Theories & Strategies to Manage your Career for the FutureTEP1030HS: Engineering Careers - Theories and Strategies to Manage your Career for the Future (Formerly APS1030H) 21st century career management skills and knowledge are critical success factors for engineers, to develop their own careers for the future, and as leaders and project managers, to help develop others’ careers. Especially in engineering where career engagement influences innovation and productivity, talent management is arguably the most important learning to bridge the gap between an engineering education and an engineer’s ability to apply their learning in the real world. In this course, students will learn about contemporary theories and issues in career development and talent management so they can apply their knowledge and skills, to benefit their own career wellbeing, their teams, organizations, and society. Students will learn an evidence-based framework for career clarification and exploration. Using this framework, students gain talent management skills, increase hope and confidence, expand their network and use practical tools. In an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous (VUCA) world of work, students will consider career paths, hear and tell career stories, and understand talent management in the broader scope of careers in organizations and self-employment, and related issues of mobility, professionalization, dual careers, and more.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrywellbeing, knowledge, learning, employmentSDG3, SDG4, SDG8
CHE1151HEngineering Systems SustainabilityThis is a multidisciplinary course that provides the necessary components, concepts and frameworks of sustainability and its relation to engineering projects. It introduces the basic ideas of systems thinking that are used to understand and model complex problems, such as input, output, control, feedback, boundary and hierarchy. It then describes sustainability as a complex challenge of interacting technical, social, economic and environmental systems, and introduces systemic sustainability frameworks such as The Natural Step. It then focuses on the sustainability of organizations and the standards (e.g. ISO 26000 and GRI) that can help design effective sustainability improvement initiatives and strategies. A primary focus of the course is on life cycle assessment (LCA) and related standards (ISO14044, ISO14025) as a tool to understand the broad impacts of engineering projects, unit processes, products and services and the inevitable trade-offs in design decisions. Specific process case studies are examined related to chemical engineering and their relation to promoting a circular economy, including recycling of energy and material flows. Finally, the course presents the economic aspect of sustainability and how to create the business case to secure the support of decision makers in the implementation of sustainable processes in organizations.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryenergy, trade, recycl, environmentalSDG7, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13
CHE1431HEnvironmental AuditingThe goals of the course will be to: (a) understand fundamental concepts and principles of environmental auditing; (b) understand relevant federal and provincial environmental legislation; (c) understand environmental management system and similar standards; (d) improve audit skills and knowledge of principles; (e) understand the Environmental Management System (EMS) auditing and certification/registration process. The course will be structured to provide sufficient background in the concepts of environmental management, due diligence, environmental protection, and the process of auditing these topics for verification purposes. The course material will be presented in a combination of lecture and workshop formats.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryknowledge, environmentalSDG4, SDG13
JCC1313HEnvironmental MicrobiologyThe objective of this course is to develop fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry as they relate to energetics and kinetics of microbial growth, environmental pollution and water quality, bioconversions, biogeochemical cycles, bioenergy and other bioproducts.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrypollution, water, energy, environmental, pollut, pollutSDG3, SDG6, SDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
JNC2503HEnvironmental PathwaysThe objective of this course is to convey an appreciation of the sources, behaviour, fate and effects of selected toxic compounds which may be present in the environment. Emphasis is on organic compounds, including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and pesticides. The approach will be to examine, for each compound, physical and chemical properties, sources, uses, mechanisms of release into the environment, major environmental pathways and fates (including atmospheric dispersion and deposition), movement in aquatic systems (including volatilization, incorporation into sediments, biodegradation, photolysis, sorption), movement in soils, and bioconcentration. Toxicology and analytical methodology will be described very briefly. Each student will undertake a detailed individual study of a specific toxic compound.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryenvironmental, soilSDG13, SDG15
APS1036HFormative Experiential Entrepreneurial LearningThe overall objective of this course is that students increase their confidence in their ability to create a start-up by solving high impact problems and defining its business model. The FEELTM methodology, used in this course, provides students with a hands-on opportunity and a real world application of the entrepreneurship mindset. The course will help students define a start-up that creates value for co-founders while creating a forum for mentorship and knowledge exchange. The course is structured as a process to define the startup’s business model, the creation of a business canvas and an investor pitch deck. Students will be guided on the use of tools to manage team building/dynamics, market fit, scaling, user insight generation, pitching and the FEELTM’s modified business model generation canvas(*). Students will be working in teams. Team members can be fellow students or outside the classroom partners. This course will also provide students with an understanding, guidance and access to resources in the University of Toronto’s start-up eco-system, featuring the Entrepreneurship Hatchery at the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. *The FEEL Business Model Generation Canvas uses principles originally created by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves PigneurDepartment of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryknowledge, learning, entrepreneur, investSDG4, SDG8, SDG9
CHE1435HFundamentals of Aerosol Physics and ChemistryThis course is concerned with physical and chemical properties of aerosols and their impacts on earth’s climate, air quality and human health. This course will cover the fundamentals of aerosol physics and chemistry, and relate these principles to the overall impacts. The first section will cover single particle processes (particle drag, gravitational settling, diffusion) and evolution of an aerosol population (new particle formation, condensation and coagulation, deposition and cloud droplet formation). In the second section, the various components in atmospheric aerosol will be discussed in detail, including kinetics and thermodynamics of organic and inorganic compounds. Applications to industrial processes, such as drug delivery and chemical manufacturing, will also be explored. This course is critical to those students pursuing careers in atmospheric science and air pollution control, who will need to measure, model and control airborne particles.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrypollution, climate, pollut, pollutSDG3, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHE1430HHydrometallurgy, Theory and PracticeThe course focus in on metals recovery from mineral recourses by hydrometallurgical technology. Ore formation, geology and mineralogy is reviewed. Mining techniques are also briefly reviewed and generic hydrometallurgy flowsheets are discussed. Mineral upgrading methods are discussed followed by leaching fundamentals (chemistry-thermodynamics-kinetrics), including bioleaching technology, and equipment. Solid-liquid separation and solution purification techniques such as by chemical precipitation, ion exchange and solvent extraction are also discussed. Examples from pure metal recovery and effluent treatment; residue disposal technologies for environmental compliance are presented. Finally, process development, plant design, plant control strategies, Economic, Social and Environmental Considerations, followed by several industrial examples is offered.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHE1118HIndustrial CatalysisThe course covers adsorption, the nature of the catalyst surface, kinetics of catalytic reactions, catalyst selection and preparation, deactivation and poisoning, and specific catalytic reactions. The types of reactions and the examples considered will depend to some extent on the particular interests of those selecting the course but will include, in any case, nitrogen fixation, Cl chemistry, catalysis in petroleum refining (cracking, reforming, alkylation, hydrorefining, etc.), and catalysis by transition metal complexes.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistrytransitSDG11
CHE1150HIndustrial Water TechnologyThis is a basic course on technologies used for Produced Water in the resource sector. The course will cover theory and practice of membranes (UF, NF, RO), ion exchange, lime softening, demineralization, and filtration as applied in this sector. The lecture material delivered by professionals in the field will be supplemented by a hands-on project operating a triple membrane water treatment system.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistrywaterSDG6
APS1502HLeading Engineering Design ProjectsTEP1502HF: Leadership in Product Design (Formerly APS1502H) The objective of this course is to prepare students for the type of teams, processes and decisions they will be a part of on complex socio-technical engineering design projects. The course will equip students with tools and strategies for leading and following other leaders in this context. Students will have the opportunity to apply their learning on three hybrid team-individual assignments. The course readings will be sourced from real industry cases and experiences.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistrylearningSDG4
CHE1123HLiquid BiofuelsAn introduction and overview of bioenergy production technologies, including: first generation biochemical technologies to produce biofuels (e.g, from sugarcane, starch, and oilseeds). The course will then describe second generation technologies to produce biofuels (e.g., from lignocellulosics) followed by advanced technologies as well as the so-called “drop-in fuels.” It will include the theory and process aspects of hydrogenation-derived renewable diesel. An overview of fuel properties will also be given. Finally the course will conclude with environmental impacts – benefits and issues, economic aspects as well as infrastructure requirements and trade-offs.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryenergy, renewabl, biofuel, infrastructure, trade, production, environmentalSDG7, SDG9, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13
CHE1471HModelling in Biology and Chemical SystemsTo review the methodology for the analytical modeling of physical systems with emphasis on chemical engineering applications. The course will cover the following topics: Analysis and Modelling of Physical Systems Review of ODEs’; Mass Balance and Continuity Equation Species Balance, Stoichiometry and Reaction Kinetics; Force Balances and Mechanics of Materials; Fluid Mechanics and Navier-Stokes Equations; Flow Through Porous Media; Conservation of Mechanical Energy; First Law of Thermodynamics and Thermal Energy Balance Heat Transfer, Fourier Law, and Equation of Energy; Mass Transfer, Fick’s Law, and Species Continuity Equation; Probabilistic Modelling.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryenergy, conserv, species, conserv, speciesSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
APS1026HPositive Psychology for EngineersTEP1026HF: The Happy Engineer - Positive Psychology for Engineers (Formerly APS1026H) Many disciplines have explored happiness - philosophy, anthropology, psychology, sociology, neurobiology and art to name a few. Engineers, it’s your turn. During the first part of the course we will play catch-up, examining the scholarly and creative ways that people have attempted to understand what makes for a happy life. Then we turn our attention to our own domain-expertise, applying engineering concepts like balance, flow, feedback, amplitude, dynamic equilibrium and others to explore the ways that your technical knowledge can contribute to a deep understanding of happiness. This course is designed to challenge you academically as we analyse texts from a variety of disciplines, but it is also designed to challenge you personally to explore happiness as it relates to yourself and your own personal development.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryknowledgeSDG4
CHE1148HProcess Data AnalyticsThe driving force of the fourth industrial revolution is the processing and analysis of big data to extract knowledge, patterns and information. Chemical, biologics/pharma, oil/gas, financial and manufacturing organizations are in a unique position to benefit from this data revolution, as they collect and store massive amounts of heterogeneous data. Big data is characterized by the 5 V’s: volume, velocity, variety, veracity and value and distributed computing architectures are used to process the data. The first part of this course will be on Apache Spark, a big data processing and computing engine. In the second part, special topics in analytics such as visualization, data quality, interpretable/fair ML and MLOps will be discussed. Prerequisites: An introductory course in data science or machine learning (e.g. CHE1147 or other similar courses). Familiarity with Python.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryknowledge, learningSDG4
CHE1102HResearch Methods and Project Execution for Graduate Studies in Chemical EngineeringThis course provides core graduate training in critical research, argumentation, implementation, and communication skills. Through facilitated activity-based tutorials students will develop their research and project management skills, acquiring strategies to identify and articulate a research hypothesis, set research goals and plan their approach (including quantification of results and validation of quantitative metrics), and share research findings effectively via oral, written and graphical communication. Students will develop these skills while learning how to position themselves and their research for employment purposes.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrylearning, employmentSDG4, SDG8
CHE2222HSafety Training WorkshopThe University of Toronto has a duty under both the common and the statute law to ensure a safe environment for all workers. For this reason, the Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry provides manditory safety training for all faculty, administrative and research staff, researchers (post-docs, visiting researchers, volunteers), undergraduate students (summer, 2nd year and 4th year), and graduate students (MASc, PhD, MEng project students). This includes anyone working in the Wallberg Building (computer work only or laboratory research projects) or registered with the Department working in others buildings on campus or elsewhere off-campus. Faculty, staff, researchers and students have a parallel responsibility to avail themselves of the safety training provided by the Department, and to govern their laboratory behaviour accordingly. Those who do not are placing themselves and others in the vicinity in danger. The University is committed to minimizing or eliminating that danger. All faculty, staff, and students, have to complete the mandatory department safety training, EHS101 (WHMIS), and EHS002 (Basic Mandatory Health & Safety training) and successfully passed the exams, and attend the annual WHMIS Refresher session as required. If they have not completed the required safety trainings or behaved in unsafe ways in a laboratory, can and will have lab privileges suspended by the Department’s Chair on the recommendation of the Department’s Health and Safety Co-Chairs and/or the lab supervisor concerned. Students are reminded that such suspensions may well have academic consequences. Such consequences are the responsibility of the student concerned. If you have missed your required trainings, please contact Alex Dean or CHE H&S Committee to get access to our online training material.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrylabor, worker, buildingsSDG8, SDG9
CHE1432HTechnical Aspects of Environmental RegulationsEnvironmental regulations are based on the existence and/or likely occurrence of adverse effects. This course will examine the legal definitions of adverse effects and present possible scientific methods that can be used to establish the presence/absence of adverse effects. The specific regulations for Air, Waste, Contaminated Sites, and Water will then be examined to establish scientific methodologies that can be applied to show compliance with the letter and intent of the regulations. Particular emphases will be placed on the existence of variable scientific interpretations of the key general statements in the respective regulations.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrywater, waste, environmentalSDG6, SDG12, SDG13
APS1035HTechnology Sales for EntrepreneursThis course introduces the main theoretical approaches of systems thinking, organization structure and crisis management for understanding catastrophic accidents. Highlighting the socio-technical limits to the prevention of severe accidents, it emphasizes the importance of incorporating such insights in engineering design with the aim of reducing the likelihood of disasters.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryentrepreneurSDG8
APS1420HTechnology, Engineering and Global DevelopmentThis is a joint graduate/undergraduate course, which explores a broad range of topics centered on the role of technology and engineering in global development. The course format is a combination of lectures by the instructor and guest speakers, discussion of assigned readings (academic journals, book excerpts, popular press, etc.), review of case studies, and student presentations. Topics covered include: (1) a brief history of international development, foreign aid, and major players involved (e.g. UN, World Bank, government agencies, NGOs), (2) technological innovation and diffusion theory and practice, (3) new international development models (e.g. social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches) and finance organizations involved (e.g. Grameen Bank, Gates Foundation, Acumen Fund, etc.), (4) implication of major global trends (e.g. globalization, urbanization) for sustainable development. The above topics are addressed in the context of specific case studies of technologies and technology sectors involving health, energy, infrastructure, finance, and communications. The goal of this course is to inform students of the various causes and consequences of global poverty, and to highlight ways that they can apply their technical, engineering, and entrepreneurship knowledge towards addressing complex global challenges.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrypoverty, knowledge, energy, sustainable development, entrepreneur, infrastructure, capital, globaliz, urban, sustainable developmentSDG1, SDG4, SDG7, SDG8, SDG11, SDG9
APS1018HThe Engineer in Society-Ethics , History and PhilosophyThis course has been designed for the reflective engineer with experience in the workplace. Though those without real world industry experience are welcome. Designed by a professional engineer for engineers, technologists, applied scientists and engineering executives, it will help practitioners reflect on their role in society and understand how that role has been shaped and is constantly changing. Most of the world’s leading employers depend on engineers, technologists, and applied scientists to design new technological systems, products and services and effectively operate and sustains these systems. Human resource leaders are charged with attracting, motivating, developing, and retaining these individuals, as well as partnering with them on large-scale systems change. This course provides insider insight into the way engineers think and feel about the work they do. It begins by studying the history of medieval and modern technology and proceeds to explore the rise of engineering science, the engineering disciplines and 19th century professionalization. And finally we explore how engineering ethics, culture, philosophy and identity has been shaped and forged in various countries, and how this impacts the role of the engineer in society. Each term we adapt themes across many aspects of society including, Military Industrial Security Complex, Big Pharma, Cyber Security, Technology and Privacy, Industry-Banking-Power-Politics, Globalization, Engineering Profession and Politics. We also look at futurism, and ethical implications - 4th industrial revolution and smart cities, telecommunications, mass media control, robotization of the military, biological engineering, transhumanism, war, business, and profit. What also comes to mind for me is the concept "I wished I had known then what I know now". This is often a sentiment by older people (50 plus) who look back on their careers or life in general and wish they had the "wisdom" to make a different decision or choose a different path but lacked the awareness at the time to explore other choices.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryglobaliz, citiesSDG9, SDG11
APS1029HThe Science of Emotional Intelligence and its Application to LeadershipTEP1029HF: The Science of Emotional Intelligence and its Application to Leadership (Formerly APS1029H) A growing body of social science research offers clear evidence that emotional intelligence (EQ) plays a crucial role in leadership effectiveness. We know that the most successful managers are able to motivate and achieve best performances through the ability to understand others, and the key to this is to first understand yourself. In this course, you will complete the most scientifically validated EQ assessment available, The Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and receive a detailed report that identifies your leadership strengths and targets areas for development. You will acquire an enhanced level of self-knowledge and a deeper awareness of your impact on others. This will form the basis of a personal development plan that will help you improve your leadership effectiveness. In this course we will also examine evidence-based research that links leadership effectiveness to authenticity and mindfulness, both of which can be enhanced through mindfulness training programs. Simply defined, mindfulness is the awareness of one’s mental processes and the understanding of how one’s mind works. Using case studies, we will discover why companies such as Carlsberg, Google, Sony and General Electric have trained hundreds of employees in mindfulness.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistrymindfulness, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4
CHE1143HTransport PhenomenaMomentum, heat and mass transfer. General balances: continuity, species continuity, energy, and linear momentum equations. Rate expressions: Newton’s law of viscosity, Fourier’s law of conduction, and Fick’s law of diffusion. Applications to multi-dimensional problems, convective transport, transport in turbulent flow, interphase transport, boundary layer theory. Discussion of transport analogies.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistryenergy, species, speciesSDG7, SDG14, SDG15
CHM1488HAdvanced Experimental MethodsExperimental physical chemistry / chemical physics are obviously huge subjects, much too large to cover in a single course (indeed, even in a lifetime). At the same time, they are very active areas with significant cutting-edge opportunities: energy storage, cleaning our environment including our water and air, novel optoelectronics, state of the art spectroscopies, quantum materials and technologies are just a few applications.Department of Chemistrywater, energySDG6, SDG7
CHM1410HAnalytical Environmental ChemistryCHM410H is an analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of trace concentrations of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues. The course will begin with techniques involved with obtaining a representative sample, data analysis and handling, and a detailed look at sample preparation (extraction, clean-up, concentration, derivitization) which will be followed by extensive theory and application of the techniques of gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, immunochemistry, atomic spectrophotometry, electrochemistry, and mass spectrometry. Discussion sessions will pursue integrative material. Lab sessions will allow students to directly apply lecture material in handson experimentation using all the modern analytical instrumentation utilized in modern measurement science. The lab sessions will utilize the new ANALEST facility featuring state-of-the-art gas, liquid, and ion chromatographs, atomic absorption, and inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP) spectrophotometry. Students will be involved in field measurements as part of the laboratory exercise.Department of Chemistrywater, emission, labor, environmental, pollut, pollut, soilSDG6, SDG7, SDG8, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHM1005HApplications of Spectroscopy in Organic Structure DeterminationThis course will discuss the application of several spectroscopic methods available to chemistry students and researchers, including mass spectrometry (MS), infrared (IR), 1H, and 13C NMR. The fundamentals of two-dimensional NMR techniques, such as COSY and HSQC, and their importance in structural elucidation will be highlighted. Practical aspects of each method will be emphasized and students will learn how to operate instruments. The classes teach theory and problem-solving approaches in interpreting data to elucidate the structure of complex organic molecules. CHM441H/1005H builds on material taught in CHM343H, CHM247H/249H, and CHM136H/CHM151Y. We hope that you will find CHM441H/1005H an exciting and practical course. The teaching team is here to support your learning and are invested in your success. We encourage and appreciate comments and suggestions so that we can make the course as helpful and interesting as possible. Feel free to discuss any matters with the instructors or laboratory teaching assistant. The importance of spectroscopy cannot be overstated. Whether you work in academia or industry, proper analysis and identification of synthesized material is of paramount importance. The problem solving and analysis skills obtained by performing complex molecule structural elucidation are useful in fields beyond chemistry.Department of Chemistrylearning, labor, investSDG4, SDG8, SDG9
CHM1415HAtmospheric ChemistryThis course considers the chemistry occurring in the Earth's atmosphere, with emphasis on developing a molecular-level understanding of the photochemistry, free-radical kinetics, and heterogeneous chemistry that occurs. Topics include stratospheric ozone depletion, trace gas oxidation, urban air pollution, acid rain, and the connections between aerosols and climate.Department of Chemistrypollution, urban, climate, pollut, pollutSDG3, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHM1006HBioorganic ChemistryMechanisms in biochemical systems: Examples of biological catalysis are considered in terms of chemical mechanisms and their extensions, overcoming barriers catalytic groups in active sites, stereochemical applications, energy transfer, kinetic patterns, inhibitors, drug design, cofactors, ribozymes, proteosomes. Related current issues are noted and discussed. The format includes lectures integrated with in-class discussions.Department of ChemistryenergySDG7
CHM1447HBiophysical ChemistryThe course will review protein and polynucleotide structure and electronic levels. This will be followed by a detailed discussion of Levinthal's paradox with respect to the mapping problem onto active structures. This discussion will be based on recent progress on identifying a very limited class of topologically distinct domains for the plethora of macromolecules studied to date. This issue will be addressed within the context of proteomics and the search for gene sequenced activity. This subject mater will be complemented by a treatment of energy transduction in biological systems, from energy transport involved in photosynthesis, ATP interconversion and coupling to reaction coordinates, and motor protein driven conformational feedback loops. Other topics to be covered in the context of recent research advances.Department of ChemistryenergySDG7
CHM1420HEnvironmental Chemistry of SoilThis course will explore advanced topics in the structure and environmental reactivity of soils and sediments. Students will gain an appreciation for application of thermodynamic principals to open, natural systems. The structure, characterization, and analytical research methods for the mineral and non-living organic fractions in soils and sediments will be covered in detail.Department of Chemistryenvironmental, soilSDG13, SDG15
CHM1270HFrontiers in Inorganic ChemistryInorganic Chemistry faculty members will present exciting current topics that span the breadth of the field Inorganic Chemistry: Materials, Main group, Transition Metal, Organometallic, Catalytic, Biological, and Physical. Each topic will be covered in 4 h of lectures. The topics will be different from those of CHM1261H "Topics in Inorganic Chemistry I" so that students can take both courses if they wish.Department of ChemistrytransitSDG11
CHM3000HGrad Professional Development for Research and Teaching in ChemistryThis is a modular course that includes a series of interactive workshops on topics including: oral and written communication, ethics in teaching, research and scholarship, interpersonal skills and conflict resolution, time management and strategies for supporting good mental health. The course will culminate in each student crafting an Individual Development Plan to identify priorities for the future career objectives. The course will be a formal part of the M.Sc. and Ph.D. program requirements in Chemistry at U of T. In addition, Ph.D. students will be required to participate in a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for Direct Ph.D.) of additional professional development training over the course of their Ph.D., spread evenly among the categories of: Communication Skills; Personal Effectiveness; and Research/Teaching Skills.Department of Chemistrymental healthSDG3
CHM1205HInorganic Reaction MechanismsThis course focuses on modern theory of inorganic reaction mechanisms. Topics covered include: - Formal kinetics and rate laws; transition state theory; activation parameters - Modern experimental techniques - Introduction into computational methods - New discoveries in ligand substitution - Recent findings for oxidative addition/reductive elimination - Electron transfer mechanisms - Inorganic Photochemistry - Mechanisms of selected important homogeneous reactionsDepartment of ChemistrytransitSDG11
CHM1443HIntermediate Quantum MechanicsThe course will cover central methodologies in the area of open quantum systems, along with the introduction of relevant mathematical tools and the discussion of applications. The course will begin with a detailed analysis of quantum relaxation processes: particle decay and vibrational relaxation. Continuing with the Liouville von Neumann equation, the course will cover the derivation of the quantum master equation, Nakajima Zwanzig equation, Quantum Langevin equation and Feynman’s path integral representation of time evolution. Methods will be discussed in light of various applications, including charge transfer in condensed phases (Marcus theory), pure decoherence, exciton and vibrational energy trDepartment of ChemistryenergySDG7
CHM1106HLab InstrumentationThis course provides an introduction to building and using optics- and electronics-based instrumentation for laboratory research, as well as for implementing custom software control. Lecture topics include passive electronic components, diodes and transistors, operational amplifiers, light sources and detectors, reflectors, refractors, polarizers, and diffractors, LabView programming and many others. Lectures are supplemented by laboratories in which students work in teams to build fluorescent detection systems for chromatography over the course of several weeks.Department of ChemistrylaborSDG8
CHM1108HMass Spectrometry Fundamentals and InstrumentationMass Spectrometry is today best-known for the significant role that it plays in biological analysis (proteins, peptides, drug discovery). This relatively new-found eminence derives from a long history of discovery and innovation in environmental monitoring, air quality, materials identification, quality control, even extraterrestrial atmospheric determination. Mass Spec can be broadly classified as Organic or Inorganic, for which the instrument configuration and methods are very distinct. The course will focus on the technology of mass spectrometry rather than the applications: theory, structures, modes of operation, strengths and weaknesses of various mass analyzers, ionization sources and detector systems. It will deal extensively with ion dynamics in electrostatic and dynamic fields, and the considerations for ion optical design. Extension of the capabilities of mass spectrometry will be introduced through the thermodynamics and kinetics of ionmolecules reactions that can be employed for the resolution of both organic and inorganic isobars.Department of ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHM1425HModelling the Fate of Organic Chemicals in The EnvironmentThis course will give an introduction to quantitative approaches to describing the behaviour of organic chemicals in the environment. Building upon a quantitative treatment of equilibrium partitioning and kinetically controlled transfer processes of organic compounds between gaseous, liquid and solid phases of environmental significance, it will be shown how to build, use, and evaluate simulation models of organic chemical fate in the environment. The course will provide hands-on experience with a variety of such models.Department of ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHM1040HModern Organic SynthesisThe course consists of two parts: A) Transition Metal Catalysis, and B) Reactive Intermediates. In the first part of the course, we will discuss transition metal-catalyzed transformations for carbon-carbon bond formation. Aspects of reaction development, catalyst design and mechanistic information will be discussed. Selected topics (tentative) will include i) basic concepts in transition metal catalysis, ii) palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings and modern developments in this area, iii) C-H bond functionalization reactions, iv) Heck reactions, v) alkyl cross-couplings, and vi) sustainability in transition metal catalysis. In the second part of the course we will outline various aspects of the chemistry of reactive intermediates, including radicals, cations, carbenes, nitrenes, ketenes and benzynes.Department of ChemistrytransitSDG11
CHM1045HModern Physical Organic ChemistryMechanistic studies on reactions of interest to organic chemists will be investigated (C-C bond formation, catalytic mechanisms, stereoselectivity etc. discussed in publications by for example, E. Jacobsen, S. L. Buchwald, J. F. Hartwig, G. Fu, P. Guthrie, D. Evans, E. Carreira etc.).Department of ChemistryinvestSDG9
CHM1404HMolecular Analysis of Natural SystemsThe course will encourage students to consider how they can utilize traditional and emerging analytical chemistry techniques synergistically and design new analytical approaches to address the role of complex systems in the environment. It will introduce environmental applications of NMR spectroscopy, hyphenated NMR, imaging and related computation techniques (prediction, simulation, elucidation), such that students have a basic grasp of the subjects, and can relate the potential of the approaches to their own research. The emphasis will be on environmental applications and not theory.Department of ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHM1269HNanochemistry: A Chemistry Approach to NanomaterialsA chemistry approach to nanomaterials is presented through the eye of chemistry. The goal is to provide a leading-edge description of the emerging and exciting field of nanochemistry. The content of the course has been selected and organized to establish the basic principles of nanoscience through the subject of nanochemistry. Because of the interdisciplinary non-mathematical approach adopted in teaching this course the lecture material should be useful to a broad student interest group. To amplify, nanoscience today involves bottom-up chemistry and top-down engineering physics techniques or a creative amalgamation of both. We are currently witnessing an explosion of novel ideas and strategies for making and manipulating, visualizing and interrogating nanoscale materials and structures. An aim of this course is to describe the concepts and methods, developed mainly by chemists, for synthesizing a range of nanoscale building blocks with strictly controlled size, shape and surface functionality, structure, composition and properties. A further aim is to explain how these nanoscale construction units can be organized and integrated into functional architectures, both simple and complex, using a combination of self-assembly and directed self-assembly using chemical lithography and template based methods. Nanochemistry will be a valuable course for students planning an academic or industrial research career in any area related to nanoscience and nanotechnology. It provides a global perspective of the subject of nanochemistry, written with sufficient breadth and depth to make it suitable as the basis of a final year undergraduate course or a graduate course for students in chemistry and physics, materials science and engineering, biology and medicine. This course will provide a readily accessible road map of nanochemistry, beginning with its roots and extending to its branches, emphasizing throughout the connection of ideas from discovery to application, from within and between the science disciplines. It provides a unique perspective through chemistry, which will make it invaluable for those witnessing, participating in, and trying to remain at the forefront of the nanoscience and nanotechnology explosion. The course material is designed to get students excited and thinking about nanochemistry, and what they can do with it.Department of ChemistryaccessibSDG11
CHM1258HReactions of Coordinated LigandsStudy of how the reactions at coordinated ligands change as the ligands, metal and metal oxidation state are changed. This knowledge provides insight into the functioning of homogenous catalysts. The material is based mainly on articles from journals.The preparation for this course would be undergraduate course(s) covering organometallic and transition metal chemistry.Department of Chemistryknowledge, transitSDG4, SDG11
CHM2532HResearch in Environmental ChemistryDepartment of ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHM1105HSeparations, Chromatography, and MicrofluidicsSeparation science will be explored by building on a survey of fundamental physical principles to understand processes of extraction, and technologies such as solid phase microextraction, supercritical fluid extraction, immunoaffinity extraction and molecularly imprinted polymers. Plate and rate theory will be developed to consider various forms of gas and liquid chromatographic methods, including hyphenated techniques that bridge to information detectors such as mass spectrometers. New opportunities for chromatography and separations by movement to small scale size will be considered by focusing on microfluidics, electro-osmotic flow and chip based microdevice applications. Applications examples will focus on problems in life sciences, forensics and environmental chemistry.Department of ChemistryenvironmentalSDG13
CHM1307HSoft Materials for Life, Energy, and the EnvironmentIn the framework of a dry lab, students will analyze and interpret characterization data, extending their existing knowledge of chemical fundamentals and experimental techniques to polymeric systems. Through a combination of lectures, dynamic group collaborations, and self-paced assignments, students will actively engage with peers to understand course materials (including published literature), explore how polymer innovations are commercialized, and develop a toolkit for leveraging instrumentation to investigate hypotheses in researchDepartment of Chemistryknowledge, energy, labor, investSDG4, SDG7, SDG8, SDG9
CHM1444HStatistical Mechanics of Condensed PhasesThe course will cover various topics relating to the structure and dynamics of systems in condensed phases. Possible subjects of study include phase transitions and critical phenomena, stochastic and microscopic descriptions of the dynamics in condensed phases both in and out of equilibrium, and recent progress in the development of fundamental principles in non-equilibrium systems. The course assumes an elementary knowledge of equilibrium and non-equilbrium statistical mechanics.Department of Chemistryknowledge, transitSDG4, SDG11
CHM1401HTransport and Fate of Chemical Species in the EnvironmentIntroduction to the physical environment. Fundamentals of chemical kinetics. Gas-phase reactions. Reactions in the environment. Reactions in the environment. Reactions in the environment. Chemical thermodynamics. Photochemistry. Environmental influences on chemistry. Phase partitioning. Phase partitioning. Sorption of organic contaminants to soils and sediments. NMR or OM characterization.Department of Chemistryenvironmental, species, species, soilSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CHM1268HX-Ray CrystallographyAn introduction to single crystal X-ray crystallography as a method of determining the structure of small molecules. The principal theme will be a description of the X-ray experiment from obtaining the crystal through to publishing the final structure. The objective of the course is to give students a working knowledge of the single crystal X-ray experiment. This will allow students to become more involved in the Xray experiment and to read the crystallographic literature intelligently. Introduction to Crystals and Symmetry. Space groups (Triclinic, P2, P21, C2, Pc,P21/c, orthorhombic, tetragonal, others). Miller Indices, Reciprocal Lattices, and Diffraction. Intensity of Scattered X-rays, Data Acquisition, Data Reduction, and Structure Factors. Structure Solution, Structure Refinement, Evaluation of a Crystal Structure.Department of ChemistryknowledgeSDG4
CIN1102HKEY DEVELOPMENTS IN FILM HISTORYThis course will examine a limited number of important developments in the history of cinematic media. It will extend the in-depth study of these developments in technique, technology, and text to include considerations of the sociocultural forces, economics, theories of the cinematic and aesthetics that have played a role in their development, or in the ways in which we have studied them. The course will cover a wide range of distinct time periods, geographical areas, and stylistic tendencies, and will engage with a range of scholarly approaches to key developments in cinematic media. The course aims to ensure that students' knowledge of the history of film and media is enhanced, and that they have the opportunity to engage more critically with the issues surrounding the historical study of cinema and related media that are of interest and importance to them.Cinema Studies InstituteknowledgeSDG4
CIN3006HMedia and PhilosophyThe category of aesthetic form known as melodrama holds a strange distinction: it is defined above all by its excessive relation to most traditional categories of form. To call a film, a play, or even a person melodramatic is to evoke a sense of gendered overindulgence that is emotional, moral, and aesthetic all at once—one that reflects not only on the quality of the work or the person in question, but on the sensibility and judgment of the implicitly reactive, feminized audience that enjoys it. In other words, the term melodrama has often served a pejorative function in western culture, indicating an “over-the-top” display of female artifice, affect, and stylization that exploits only base and irrational people and feelings. This rather unusual aspect of the form has made it notoriously difficult for scholars to define, but it has also positioned the unstable category of entertainment known as melodrama at the center of debates about the politics of popular aesthetic form. While an important body of literary theory ties the politics of melodramatic form to the emergence of modern democracy writ large, and regards it as a medium through which the oppressed have found new modes of expression when silenced, many other traditions of critical thought point to the role the form has played in the historical construction of those very same oppressions, and regard the form as an exploitation of mass sentiment with grave implications for the disenfranchised people whose suffering it so often thematizes. The pivotal role the form plays in the feminist and queer film theory of the 1980’s and 1990’s, and the debates around the politics of aesthetic form this moment launched for the field more broadly, only further underscore the intractable nature of this debate. What has never been seriously in question is the political significance of melodrama itself—that it carries some volatile yet fundamental bond with that which exceeds, expands, forms, or contains the very limits of the social and its sufferings. This course will undertake an intensive exploration of the nature of this bond and its implications for contemporary understandings of the relation between politics, aesthetics, and affect—especially as they delimit the terrain of modern liberal democracy and its values. On the one hand, we will seek to form a more rigorous grasp of the theoretical and philosophical arguments that underpin this relation as it is conceptualized today, taking melodrama as a particularly formative medium for the discourse of aesthetic politics more broadly—one that pushes the very concept of aesthetic form to its limit, allowing it to morph into different configurations over time. On the other hand, however, we will consider what this genealogical examination of the relation between politics and melodrama stands to teach us about a phenomenon of contemporary political culture and media that simultaneously reproduces and transforms the basic coordinates of this relation on the terrain of digital media technology: namely, the rise of what is pejoratively referred to as “cancel culture,” “call-out culture,” “clap-back culture,” and so on, and the equally extreme displays of emotional and moral outrage it elicits in conservative “shock” media. Although a wide range of emergent frameworks for the study of new media technologies insist on the obsolescence of formalistic and subject-oriented approaches, we will take the twisting, ever-transforming limit case of aesthetic form instantiated by melodrama, and the excessive dynamics of affect, form, and morality that define it as such, as an opportunity to explore more fully what it means to talk about the politics of popular form today. Screenings will range from works of classical Hollywood cinema and global art film to YouTube rants and television news broadcasts, but with an emphasis on cinematic texts; readings will likewise move between an array of disciplinary formations, including film studies, critical race theory, continental philosophy, and political theory, but with a steady emphasis on the meeting point of affect and form. Throughout all of it, we will try to make sense of the liminal relation between politics, affect, form that melodrama coordinates across these shifting configurations of popular discourse—and just as importantly, what to do about it now, both as scholars and political actors.Cinema Studies Institutegender, queer, female, feminis, conserv, conserv, democra, exploitationSDG5, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
CIN2101HPRESSURES ON THE CINEMATICThis course examines a range of factors that shape and contest the field of cinema studies. It maintains a focus on pressures exerted on our conception of what constitutes “cinema” as they are inflected in current scholarly debates, including institutional pressures on steady and gainful employment in the field. Rapid changes in technology; shifts in modes of delivery; individual, embodied, and communal spectatorial practices, experiences and uses of cinema; globalization and industrial consolidation—all of these forces work to alter both the forms of cinematic media and their place in social, cultural, and political life. This course will study how cinema’s mutable nature remains a central issue in debates about medium specificity, the role and toll of digitalization, and the shapes and purposes of different viewing communities, among other topics.Cinema Studies Instituteemployment, globaliz, institutSDG8, SDG9, SDG16
CIN6153HRace and CinemaBlack Studies is an intentionally undisciplined project that centers Black life as a way to, first, understand the relationship between Blackness and the humanist subject and, second, gather around alternatives ways of living in and knowing the world. This seminar aims to identify the generative possibilities of utilizing this collection of theoretical and analytic tools in cinema studies. We will explore key concepts in Black Studies including black feminist thought, debates between Afro-pessimism and black optimism, black geographies, and the Black Radical Tradition as a way to understand the political potential of film aesthetics and filmmaking as an artistic practice. As we develop a sense of Black Studies as a field with overlapping and diverging methods, objects of study, and aims, this course will consider the critique of disciplinarity that is intrinsic to the project and its implications for cinema studies as a field.Cinema Studies InstitutefeminisSDG5
CIN2999HResearch Seminar in Cinema StudiesThis course is required of all second-year PhD students in the Cinema Studies Institute. Structured as a workshop, it aims to develop students' skills for surviving and thriving in the doctoral program, as researchers and teachers in the fields of cinema and media studies, and as professionals in the academy and beyond.Cinema Studies InstituteinstitutSDG16
CIN1101HTHEORIES & PRACTICES OF CINEMAOrganized around a series of issues that have incited ongoing discussion and debate among scholars, cultural critics, and filmmakers, this course takes a topical approach to the study of film theory. In the process it both revisits some of the most canonical texts in the field and attends to more recent attempts to think through our contemporary moment, when digitality and transnationalism are radically changing the nature of film as well as the manner in which it is produced, distributed, exhibited, and viewed. Among those issues to be discussed are medium specificity, spectatorship, narrativity, affect, and the relationship between aesthetics, economics, and politics.Cinema Studies InstitutenationalismSDG16
CIV1311HAdvanced and Sustainable Drinking Water TreatmentThis course covers sustainability issues as they apply to the provision of safe drinking water. Water reclamation and reuse topics focus on strategies that allow wastewater to be treated for indirect potable reuse as well as many other purposes. Other major topics include: risk assessment associated with emerging pathogens and chemical constituents present in source waters, advanced drinking water treatment processes including membranes (UF, NF and RO), advanced oxidation and activated carbon. Throughout the course, case studies, application examples and numerical problems will be presented.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwater, waste, reuseSDG6, SDG12
CIV1508HAirport Planning and EngineeringThe objective of this course is to provide an overview of the planning, design and operation of the airport component of a modern air/highway inter-modal transportation system including airside, terminal and groundside elements. Students will be introduced to current trends in the air transportation industry as these impact on air travel demand and the requirement for airport facilities and services. Aviation demand forecasting and management will be studied, as will aircraft and passenger characteristics. A central focus of the course will be airfield (runways and taxiways) and terminal design, both passenger and cargo. While Canadian standards will be used in all design examples and exercises, these are generally compatible with ICAO recommended practices and the analytic methods broadly applicable elsewhere. Case Studies will draw heavily on the current Master Plan being developed for Pickering Airport and the ongoing development program at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport. The course will conclude with a brief look at the critical environmental issues facing airports, particularly noise and water pollution, and at airport economics and finance.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringpollution, water, environmental, pollut, pollutSDG3, SDG6, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
CIV1504HApplied Probability and Statistics for Civil EngineeringA lecture and tutorial course designed to build on the prerequisite introduction to probability in the form of applied probability and statistics with emphasis on techniques appropriate for investigating the random behaviour of complex civil engineering systems. Topics include: a review of probability theory; extreme value distributions; engineering reliability; conditional distributions; applications of common probability models; parameter estimation and confidence intervals; significance testing; elementary Bayesian analysis; simple stochastic processes.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringinvestSDG9
CIV1319HChemistry and Analysis of Water and WastesThis course deals with the major chemical processes occurring in aqueous environments, in both natural systems and treatment systems. The topics covered include: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; acid/base chemistry; quantitative equilibrium calculations; acid-base titrations; dissolved CO2 chemistry; mineral solution chemistry; complexation; redox reactions; and the solid-solution interface. The lectures are complemented by laboratory experiments in which students learn some of the standard analysis techniques of aquatic chemistry.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwater, labor, waste, co2SDG6, SDG8, SDG12, SDG13
CEM1004HCities as Complex SystemsCities are “problems in organized complexity” (Jacobs, 1961). This course will explore this theme and its implications for city engineering and management in terms of: introduction to complex systems theory; exploration of cities as systems (physical, economic, social, etc.); holistic and reductionist approaches to 'a science of cities'; approaches to city planning and design in the face of complexity; challenges to sustainable design; and decision-making under uncertainty. Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringcities, sustainable designSDG11, SDG12
CEM1000YCities Engineering and Management PracticumDepartment of Civil and Mineral EngineeringcitiesSDG11
CIV1201HConcrete Technology and Non-Destructive Testing PrinciplesThis course is focused on theory, principle, practical application, standardization, benefits, and limitations of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods applied to steel reinforced concrete. Techniques to be covered include: condition assessment, surface hardness, penetration resistance, pullout, break-off test, maturity method, pull-off permeability, resonant frequency, UPV, magnetic/electrical, radioactive/nuclear, short pulse radar, acoustic emission, infrared thermography. A review of the role of statistics in experiments, testing and design of experiments in addition to application of significance testing, linear regression analysis and assessment of adequacy of regression models in context with non-destructive techniques will be covered. This course will also include the study of practical case studies and hands on usage of selected NDT testing equipment.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringemissionSDG7
CIV1175HDesign of Tubular Steel StructuresThis course covers contemporary structural design with an extremely popular material ­tubular steel. An overview of international specifications and design guides is given and "state­-of-the-art" limit states design procedures are presented, discussed and illustrated with worked examples. Offshore structures are given some treatment but the course concentrates on onshore structures made from manufactured tubing or Hollow Structural Sections (HSS). Specific topics deal with: materials, testing and properties; columns and poles; concrete filling; fire protection; fabrication, including bolting, welding and nailing; plastic analysis of connections; welded tube- to-tube connections; braced frames and bracing design; bolted connections; finite element analysis of tubular structures; truss design for 2D triangulated or Vierendeel trusses; 3D space frames; moment-resisting frames and connections; and fatigue of connections.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringoffshorSDG12
CIV1422HDynamic Response of Engineering MaterialsFundamental theories and applications of response and failure of engineering materials (e.g. rocks, concretes, steels, polymers and glass) under highly dynamic loading. Topics include elastic and plastic stress wave propagation, failure and fracture theory under rapidly varying loads, dynamic fracture toughness, nucleation and propagation of damage in materials and their theoretical and experimental quantification. Lectures will be supplemented by selected laboratory exercises involving the newly built state-of-the-art Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar facilities, to illustrate the physics of dynamic loading, strain-rate effects, and high velocity fracture in engineering materials.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringlaborSDG8
CIV1171HEarthquake Engineering and Seismic DesignThe objectives of the course are to acquaint graduate students and practicing engineers with the basics of earthquake engineering and seismic resistant design of structures. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be able to interact with seismologists and understand the fundamentals behind seismic hazard maps contained in our codes, apply basic dynamics principles to seismic design, understand the seismic design philosophy that is implemented in all codes and apply the main steps that are involved in the seismic design of buildings made of steel or reinforced concrete. Special emphasis will be given to the real behavior of structures under seismic loading, more specifically the formation of ductile mechanisms, and the assessment of performance under different intensities of seismic input. Common pitfalls in seismic design will be extensively discussed, and the underlying assumptions and code requirements related to the detailing of a number of RC and steel lateral load resisting systems will be presented.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringbuildingsSDG9
CEM1002HEmpirical Study of CitiesThis course provides students with an introduction to the topic of cities, how they are measured, and the methods used to measure them. The strengths and limitations of various measures are examined including issues related the cost of collecting data and the challenges in ensuring its integrity. After reviewing the most commonly used statistical analysis methods, student will calculate and use metrics to compare cities in Canada, North America, and around the world. Metrics of interest include, but are not limited to, those related to city services, public health and well-being, environmental sustainability, and economic vitality. Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwell-being, public health, cities, environmentalSDG3, SDG11, SDG13
CIV1430HEngineering Rock MechanicsThis course is aimed at students who have studied soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering at undergraduate level, and who wish to expand their knowledge to include rock mechanics and rock engineering. The course covers fundamental components of rock mechanics (in situ stress, discontinuities, intact rock, rock masses, heterogeneity) before moving on to rock engineering topics (rock excavation and stabilization, foundations and slopes, underground excavations). Course delivery is via lectures, tutorials, and laboratory sessions.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringknowledge, labor, soilSDG4, SDG8, SDG15
CIV1506HFreight Transportation and ITS ApplicationsEfficient movement of freight is crucial for national economic viability. This course introduces the structure of the freight industry and relates it to business logistics and planning of supply chains. Planning of freight services at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels is presented and models of international, inter-city, and urban freight movements are introduced. Shipper behavior related to mode choice, carrier selection, adoption of 3-PL and information technology options is considered. The course also introduces the role of advanced technologies (ITS) in improving freight operations, and the implications of e-commerce on planning of freight services. The course concludes by providing an overview of policy issues, data sources and needs, and the particularities of the Canadian freight transportation context.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringurban, supply chainSDG11, SDG12
CIV1532HFundamentals of ITS and Traffic ManagementThis course focuses on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) with emphasis on Advanced Traffic Control and Management Systems (ATMS) and applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in ATMS. Topics include: Overview and Introduction to ITS - Traffic Flow Modeling for ITS: Macroscopic, Microscopic and Mesoscopic - Transportation Networks Modeling and Traffic Assignment - Genetic Algorithms (GA) for Optimization (Artificial Intelligence Part I) - Applications of GA: Emergency Evacuation Optimization, Origin-Destination Estimation, Dynamic Congestion Pricing - Artificial Neural Networks (Artificial Intelligence Part II) - Applications of NN: Automated Incident Detection (AID), Short-Term Traffic Flow Forecasting, - Traffic Control and Optimization Theoretical Primer - Reinforcement Learning (Artificial Intelligence Part III) - Introduction to Deep Learning (Deep NN + RL) - Freeway Traffic Control and Optimization - Street Traffic Control and Optimization - Other Research Topics (time permitting), e.g. Modelling and Exploiting Vehicle Automation and Connectivity for 21s Century Traffic Control.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringlearningSDG4
APS1004HHuman Resource Management: An Engineering PerspectiveThis course analyzes the relationship between management and workers in an engineering (including construction and manufacturing) environment. The course takes a holistic and strategic view of how industrial relations affect the business environment. Students will study industrial relations from the context of engineering-related industries, economics, sociology, and psychology. Students will develop an historical appreciation and perspective of the evolution and development of labour relations through concepts presented by figures such as Adam Smith, Fredrick Taylor, Charles Deming, and J.M. Juran. The goal of the course is to provide a general manager with a thorough understanding of how they can develop a competitive advantage for their organization through effective and thoughtful human resource management practices. In the context of how they relate to engineering and industrial relations, the course topics include: organizational behaviour including methods of motivation, scientific management, quality control, employment and economics, employment as a social relation, unions and other forms of employee representation, internal labour markets, strategic planning and the formulation of human resource strategy, practices and policies.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringemployment, labour, workerSDG8
CIV1320HIndoor Air QualityContaminants in indoor air have enormous impact on human health, productivity, building energy use and sustainability. This course focuses on important contaminants, fundamental tools and methodologies to measure and model the indoor environment, and on engineering solutions to improve indoor air quality. The course covers a rationale and motivation for the investigation of indoor contaminants, important contaminants and sources, the use of mass balances to assess indoor concentrations, fundamental transport and transformation processes that occur indoors, indoor exposure assessment, and methodologies to assess costs and benefits for technologies and techniques to improve indoor air. The course explicitly links the air inside of buildings to building materials, energy use, outdoor air quality, and human health.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringenergy, buildings, investSDG7, SDG9
CEM1003HInfrastructure and Urban ProsperityThe course explores the evolution of great cities over time, looking at form and function to understand urban economic growth and accumulation of wealth. Drawing from various strands of economic thought, topics include: value theory; quantification of urban wealth; microeconomics of real estate markets; infrastructure for competitive financial centres; macroeconomics of urban form; growth theory; and evolutionary economics applied to urban systems. Using current and historical examples of urban development, the implications of infrastructure planning and management on the health/wealth of cities is examined. Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringeconomic growth, infrastructure, cities, urbanSDG8, SDG9, SDG11
APS1031HInfrastructure PlanningThis course is a guided exploration of infrastructure planning through a fundamental understanding of first principles and discussion about their application to various aspects of the discipline. This will include strategic planning, cost, finance, risk, resilience, design and the different applications from facilities to utilities, disaster relief and policy development. Guest presentations by recognized Subject Matter Experts round out the practical appreciation with case studies. The course is accessible to undergraduates, while providing an essentially post-graduate perspective. Given the enormity of this field, detailed exploration of any of the lecture topics is not possible. Instead, students will be encouraged to read further into the topics of interest and directed to existing courses that explore the topic in greater detail.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringinfrastructure, resilien, accessib, resilience, resilienceSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APS1025HInfrastructure ProtectionA fully integrated protection scheme is necessary to efficiently implement an Infrastructure Resilience Plan to assure operational survival following a catastrophic event. Building on the first principles of security integration and fortifications practice, illustrated with case studies through history, the students explore site security surveys, different tools, mitigation methods and models in common use and the assumptions and technology behind them in order to make informed decisions on how to approach and solve an infrastructure protection problem for the full range of event types. This is then practised in partnership with industry, analysing real security integration issues for real clients, to whom the students will present their protection schemes.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringinfrastructure, resilien, resilience, resilienceSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
APS1024HInfrastructure Resilience PlanningPlanning for resilience is a fundamental of strategic and operational planning of infrastructure and requires an in-depth understanding of the operation one wishes to make resilient, its context and operating environment. This course teaches resilience planning from first principles, including the development and application of international and Canadian infrastructure resilience and investment policy, demand and dependency management, all-hazards and mitigation strategies and its relationship to Enterprise Risk Management and Business Continuity Planning.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringinfrastructure, invest, resilien, resilience, resilienceSDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CIV1321HLarge Scale Infrastructure and SustainabilityThe next 15 years will see major changes in the global infrastructure system. To meet local, national and international sustainability goals, this next generation of infrastructure must be planned, designed and built in new ways. Large scale infrastructure projects have impacts well beyond their stated primary purpose: they consume significant amounts of natural resources and, once built, change how we live, work and move. As key players in planning, designing, constructing and commissioning large infrastructure projects, engineers have a special responsibility to understand the myriad ways infrastructure interacts with our natural and social systems. This course will explore what sustainability means in the context of infrastructure development, examine infrastructure needs and sustainability at the global and project scale, and provide students with skills and techniques to have an impact on infrastructure sustainability in their future work. At the end of this course, students will be able to think critically about the wider impacts of large-scale infrastructure projects and use this knowledge alongside their technical engineering skills to develop better outcomes. Students will learn approaches and skills for analysing (and influencing) the sustainability of infrastructure systems at the project and system scale.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringknowledge, infrastructure, consum, natural resourceSDG4, SDG9, SDG12
CIV1302HLow Impact Development and Stormwater SystemsCivil Engineering is the oldest branch of engineering. In ancient times, architects, engineers and planners were one and the same. In landscape design, these three disciplines are still closely linked particularly in the design and construction of green infrastructure, low impact develop and stormwater infrastructure. In this course the design of stormwater management systems will be taught with a multi-disciplinary approach. Impacts to the flow regime, water balances, flow paths, water quality and aquatic habitats will be discussed. The low impact development (LID) design approach will be examined as a tool for sustainable urban planning. Some topics covered in this course include: • Conventional systems (stormwater management ponds) • Vegetated stormwater systems (green roofs, bioretention) • Infiltration systems (permeable pavements, exfiltration cells • Treatment systems (oil-grit separators, filter strips) • Modelling approaches. • Sediment and erosion control and operational considerations.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwater, stormwater management, low impact development, green infrastructure, infrastructure, urban, green infrastructure, low impact development, land, erosionSDG6, SDG11, SDG9, SDG15
CIV1262HMicroscopy Applied to Concrete and GeomaterialsThis laboratory course covers visible light, electron, and x-ray microscopic methods for the characterization of concrete and geo-materials, including methods of sample preparation. Topics include fluorescent dye impregnation to characterize cracks/grain boundaries/pores, chemical staining procedures, image and quantitative chemical analysis using free software packages (ImageJ, MultiSpec, and DTSA-II). After taking this course students will be able to take a geologic or concrete sample through the entire process of stabilization, preparation (cutting, grinding, polishing) and examination by microscopic methods.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringlaborSDG8
APS1009HNatural Resources ManagementThis course focuses on management of projects on Natural resources and offer graduate engineering students the opportunity to learn specific management skills and management tools, from a holistic view of issues related to the management of natural resource projects and enterprises, and the required knowledge to identify and develop sustainable solutions to the interdisciplinary challenges related to the sustainable management of natural resources projects. The course also considers the management of public enterprises that are in charge of planning and developing national resources and important sustainable national and regional natural resources projects, such as water, environment, energy, minerals resources, or biological resources, not only in Canada, but also internationally. This course will help students to develop the necessary skills and capabilities needed and required in real life from graduate engineers, to be able to work successfully in natural resources management and natural resources projects and enterprises, whether working with the public sector or private sector, or in P3-Public Private Partnership and projects or working with a non-governmental organization, These skills will enable the students to work with different stakeholders,thinking strategically and keeping in mind always, the social responsibility as a core of all the projects related to natural resources. The course utilizes lectures, guest speakers,class discussions and analysis on real cases, and requires students to write and present a final team project report.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringknowledge, water, energy, natural resourceSDG4, SDG6, SDG7, SDG12
CIV1308HPhysical and Chemical Treatment ProcessesTheory and application of physical and chemical operations and processes for the treatment of water and wastewater. Specific processes covered include sedimentation, coagulation, filtration, and disinfection, with an overview of reactor theory. Laboratory experiments are designed to support and demonstrate the lecture material.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwater, labor, wasteSDG6, SDG8, SDG12
APS1001HProject ManagementCourse intro here. Project management has evolved from being an accidental job title into being a chosen profession with career paths and a body of knowledge. This course covers most of the knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute: integration, scope, cost, time, risk, human resources, procurement and communications management. We take a practical, applied approach, with the “PMBOK Guide” textbook, in-class exercises, and a team paper on “lessons learned” from an actual project. This a completely asynchronous online course.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringknowledge, institutSDG4, SDG16
CIV1252HRepair and Maintenance of Concrete StructuresThis course deals with the assessment maintenance and repair of concrete structures. Topics covered include: inspection and monitoring of concrete structures (including instrumentation and non-destructive testing); identification of material failure mechanisms; residual service life prediction; life cycle cost analysis; and methods of repair and rehabilitation. Case studies of problems in structures due to reinforcement corrosion, alkali-aggregate reaction and free-thaw cycling will be investigated in detail. Recent advances in inspection and repair techniques will be critically evaluated.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringinvestSDG9
APS5500HResearch Methods and Project Execution for Graduate Student SuccessSuccessful completion of your graduate program relies on strong research, critical thinking and communication skills. These qualities will continue to help you achieve success as you transition into the workforce, whether you enter industry or pursue a career in academia. This course provides training in these areas while focusing on your current research project, simultaneously providing you with future training and immediately applicable strategies to help you complete your thesis research project. Through facilitated activity-based workshops you will develop your research and project management skills, acquire strategies to identify and articulate a research hypothesis, set research goals and plan your research approach (including quantification of results and validation of quantitative metrics), and share research findings via oral, written and graphical communication.Department of Civil and Mineral EngineeringtransitSDG11
CIV1420HSoil Properties and BehaviourThe fundamental concepts of soil mechanics and foundation engineering presented at the undergraduate level will be further developed in the context of advanced topics including: undrained loading and soil liquefaction; coupled hydro-mechanical modeling using Biot theory; cemented soils; unsaturated soil mechanics; constitutive models and laboratory test methods; and field monitoring techniques. Extensive reading assignments will be given. Research papers, numerical modeling assignments, and class presentations will be used as the basis for evaluation.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringlabor, soilSDG8, SDG15
CIV1190HStructures under Blast and ImpactThe behaviour of structures subjected to accidental or intentional blast or impact loading is exemplified beginning from understanding the nature of threats and blast loading evaluation, to dynamic analysis and specific structural design considerations. Topics presented include: 1. Threat and risk assessment; 2. Explosive processes. Detonation and deflagration; 3. Explosion effects. Loads on structures; 4. Dynamic analysis of structures; 5. Material behaviour under high-strain rate loading; 6. Design of reinforced concrete structures; 7. Design of steel structures; 8. Behaviour of glazing systems; 9. Pressure-impulse diagrams; 10. Industrial explosions; 11. Design for impact loading; and 12. Progressive collapse. The course addresses the existing lack of expertise in the area of extreme loading on structures and resilience of critical infrastructure, at a time when the need for knowledge in protective design is continuously increasing worldwide. At the forefront of engineering science, the course is unique in Canada and enhances the area of Structural Engineering, in general, and Physical Infrastructure Protection, in particular.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringknowledge, infrastructure, resilien, resilience, resilienceSDG4, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CEM1001HThe Challenges of Urban Policy-MakingAddressing societal and engineering challenges in the 21st century requires engineers to think holistically about the systems we design and build. Public policy often dictates what engineering projects are commissioned and what values are being optimized for in engineering practice (e.g. cost, beauty, environment, safety, equity). However, too few engineers understand the drivers of public policy, how public policy is developed, and the role it plays in engineering. Similarly, too few policy makers understand the applied science of engineering. The interplay between policy and civil engineering is particularly acute in the urban environment, where civil engineering works (transportation, housing, water services, libraries, etc.) are concentrated and where, in Canada, the public policies of three levels of government influence engineering practice. This seminar course challenges engineers to think about how public policy is made and how it guides the practice of engineering both directly and indirectly. Particular focus is placed on urban policy and urban engineering. The first month of the course will deal with the process of urban policy making examining how issues emerge, how important ideas are framed, priorities are established, and agendas are set and managed. Factors to be considered include the role of bureaucratic and political actors, organized interests and non-governmental groups, the importance and influence of networks, and the potential for new models and options for the engagement of stakeholders and citizens at large. The second and third month of the course will focus on the relationship between public policy and the practice of civil engineering. The focus of the course will be to examine the myriad ways public policy and priorities intersect with the development of the built environment. The relationship between public policy and engineering in housing, transport, energy and sustainability will be discussed. The focus of the course will be on Canadian cities with examples from cities located elsewhere in the high-income world; examples and experiences from other parts of the world are welcomed. Registration in this course is reserved for MEngCEM students. Other students wishing to register must request permission from the Office of Student Services.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringequity, citizen, water, energy, equit, income, cities, urban, housingSDG4, SDG6, SDG7, SDG10, SDG11
CIV1535HTransportation and DevelopmentThe land use - transportation interaction is the focus of this course. Basic concepts underlying urban spatial processes are introduced. Land use forecasting models used to project future land use (principally population and employment distributions) for input into transportation planning studies are presented. Models reviewed include the Lowry Model, econometric-based models and urban simulation techniques. The remainder of the course deals with the qualitative and quantitative assessment of impacts of major transportation facilities on land use patterns. A term project dealing with the analysis of the impact of a current transportation proposal within the Greater Toronto Area on adjacent land use constitutes an important component of the course work.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringemployment, urban, land use, landSDG8, SDG11, SDG15
CIV1538HTransportation Demand AnalysisThis course deals with the quantitative analysis and modeling of transportation demand for planning purposes. The course principally deals with urban passenger demand, but an introduction to freight and intercity travel demand is also provided. A theoretical framework for the study of transportation demand is developed from basic micro-economic principles of consumer behaviour. The primary modeling approaches considered are: disaggregate choice models; entropy-based models, and an introduction to the activity-based approach to travel demand modeling. An understanding of the theory of the demand for transportation is coupled with practical experience in the specification, estimation, and use of transportation demand models.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringurban, consumSDG11, SDG12
CIV1540HUrban Operations ResearchThis course focuses on quantitative methods and techniques for the analysis and modelling of urban transportation systems. Major topics include probabilistic modelling, queuing models of transport operations, network models, and simulation of transportation systems. The application of these methods to modelling various components of the transportation system (including road, transit and pedestrian facilities) is emphasized in this course.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringurban, transitSDG11
CIV1303HWater Resources Systems ModellingWater resources systems are physically complex and the solution of appropriate mathematical models is computationally demanding. This course considers physical processes in water resource systems, their mathematical representation and numerical solutions. Newton's 2nd law and the equations of mass and energy conservation are developed and applied to closed-conduit, open-channel and groundwater flow problems. Procedures for efficient numerical solution of the governing equations are presented. Problems of non-linearity, sensitivity to data and computational complexity are introduced.Department of Civil and Mineral Engineeringwater, energy, conserv, conservSDG6, SDG7, SDG14, SDG15
CIV1330HWater, Sanitation, Hygiene and Global HealthThis course focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in low-income settings from an engineering and environmental health perspective. With respect to water, the course will cover drinking water quality and quantity, water access, and appropriate water treatment and storage options. The course will cover aspects of sanitation promotion, sanitation in challenging environments, and fecal sludge management. Hygiene topics will include disease transmission, handwashing station design, and theory and practice of hygiene behaviour, education and behaviour change. Local and national governance in WASH will also be exploredDepartment of Civil and Mineral Engineeringlow-income, mental health, global health, water, sanita, hygien, income, environmental, governanceSDG1, SDG3, SDG6, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
CLA5010HVergil‘Vergilius noster, qui non quid uerissime sed quid decentissime diceretur aspexit, nec agricolas docere uoluit sed legentes delectare.’ (Seneca the Younger, Ep. 86. 15). Ostensibly a handbook in verse intended to serve the practical needs of farmers, the Georgics offer a profound, if sometimes mysterious, meditation on the human condition and humanity’s place in nature, on love, loss and longing, on ethics and on politics, on creation and destruction. In form and style they bear witness to the remarkable transformation of Roman literature in the first century BC under the influence of the learned Greek poetry of the Hellenistic age. Their often melancholy tone, however, and their depiction of the fragility of all that Virgil considers valuable also bear the imprint of the terrible upheaval of the civil wars through which he and his contemporaries lived. Topics to explore include the nature, theory, and function of didactic poetry as a genre; Virgil’s engagement with his predecessors in the genre, both Latin and Greek; the poem’s negotiation of Roman politics and the establishment of a new regime; the astonishing variety and novelty of Virgil’s style; and the perennial question of whatever the ‘Aristaeus episode’ with which the poem concludes is actually ‘about’. Evaluation will be based on one or more class presentations, an assessment of one or more items of secondary literature, and a research paper. Advanced knowledge of Latin is indispensable, the ability to read scholarship in French and/or German and/or Italian desirable.Department of ClassicsknowledgeSDG4
COL5136HAesthetics of Space, Place, and PowerThis seminar provides an overview of scholarship in the spatial humanities, with a focus on the ways that theorizations of space and place have informed aesthetics, culture, and politics. The “spatial turn” in critical theory designates an increased focus on space, place and spatiality across various disciplines to emphasize a geographic dimension as an essential aspect of the production of culture and experience. In the first half of the course, we will read seminal theorists of space whose work reinserted spatiality as essential to the discursive constructions of the categories of modernity and postmodernity. We will then examine how their challenges to historicism transformed understandings of the space-time experience of global capitalism and provided frameworks for expanded and revised theorizations of colonialism and imperialism, gender and sexuality, urbanization and architectural history, geocriticism and ecocriticism, and literary studies. We will investigate how the spatial turn has in recent decades resulted in attempts to map new historical geographies of literary production, and we will consider the methodological implications the spatial turn has had on the transformation of theoretical interventions in literary studies, particularly in postcolonial theory. Authors will include Gaston Bachelard, Michel Foucault, Henri Lefebvre, Frantz Fanon, David Harvey, Fredric Jameson, Edward Said, Jean Rhys, Tayeb Salih, Nuruddin Farah, Amitav Ghosh, Assia Djebar, and Mahasweta Devi.Centre for Comparative Literaturegender, capital, invest, urban, productionSDG5, SDG9, SDG11, SDG12
COL5141HBeyond the Anthropocene: New Directions in Environmental HumanitiesThe humanities have been instrumental in critiquing the idea of the Anthropocene and in interrogating questions of responsibility and human-nonhuman relations. It seems, however, that these examinations do not afford us tools that can respond to the scale and urgency of climate change. Youth mobilizations, worldwide protests, and the Extinction Rebellion enact different forms of response. What then, is the role of Environmental Humanities today? What will be next in the examinations and advances that emerge from scholars in the field? Is cultural and literary criticism effective in awakening activism and shifting societal norms? How is the scholarly field shifting in order to respond in a more timely fashion to climate change and loss of biodiversity? In this course, we will examine the work of scholars, critics, artists, and writers in order to navigate this shifting field. Focus will be given to the energy humanities, new materialisms, and climate fiction studies.Centre for Comparative Literatureenergy, climate, environmental, anthropocene, biodivers, biodiversSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
JLV5143HCensorship, Culture, ArchiveThis course looks at how and why states seek to control culture and how creative projects may disrupt the action of political and commercial forces. The course begins by considering totalitarian regimes and cultural policy, along with examples of art labeled “healthy” or “degenerate” in Nazi Germany and the USSR. Case studies from the Soviet Union, the Eastern bloc and post-Communist successor states illustrate how censorship, education and technology may be used to control cultural production and knowledge of the past. Seminar participants will look at the policy of Socialist Realism and consider official and unofficial art and literature to explore the potential for transforming culture into a site of resistance. Readings in theory of the archive will be used to support analysis of how nonconformist works complicate or subvert established views of the past and open new potentials for the future. The course will facilitate in-depth research of major examples of nonconformist poetry, art, fiction and archival projects from these countries and provide a basis for analysis of cultural resistance in other repressive contexts.Centre for Comparative Literatureknowledge, productionSDG4, SDG12
JCO5121HClassics and TheoryThis course takes a long-range view of Greek literary thought by focussing on orality and textuality as modes of discourse. Equally fundamental will be the concept of hypertextuality — the obsession and overproduction of text as exemplified by the profusion of specialist compendia, encyclopedia, and commentaries of the Imperial Greek period. Rather than approach orality, textuality, and hypertextuality teleologically, we explore their interdynamics, their potentialities and limits, the social and intellectual institutions and practices undergirding them, as well as the distinct forms of authority inherent in each mode. Some guiding questions include: How does occasional performed poetry already intimate the textual? Why do inscriptions and technical scholarly texts routinely take recourse to aspects of orality? Indeed, how do we purport to access Greek oral tradition when the evidence is largely, if not entirely, mediated by the textual? What happens to the speaking voice when rendered textual? We will read representative original Greek texts (not only selection of archaic poetry, historiography, philosophy, and public inscriptions and sacred laws, but also inscribed hymns, Totenpässe, curses and prayers recorded on various materials, and written oracles) to recover how the Greeks themselves theorized the oral, textual, and hypertextual. We will integrate into our discussions pertinent secondary scholarship from comparative literature, linguistics, anthropology, and the sociology of knowledge (e.g., Goody, Vansina, Ong, Havelock, Rosalind Thomas, Benveniste, Certeau, and Latour).Centre for Comparative Literatureknowledge, production, institutSDG4, SDG12, SDG16
COL5135HClimate GenresIn the era of the Capitalocene, we find ourselves increasingly seeking new forms through which to understand the effects of climate change, loss of biodiversity, and industrial agriculture. Many cultural producers across the globe are seeking new forms and genres to portray the scope and scale of anthropogenic climate change. This year, the course focuses on food security and agricultural systems, examining various genres from different geographic locations in order to discuss the limits and possibilities of communication, knowledge dissemination, affective response, prescription, or witnessing that each one affords. Genres such as fiction, solar punk, film documentary, manifesto, policy documents, memoir, lyric essay, nature writing, environmental reportage, critical and cultural theory, and visual art will be included.Centre for Comparative Literatureagricultur, food security, knowledge, solar, capital, climate, environmental, anthropogenic, biodivers, biodiversSDG2, SDG4, SDG7, SDG9, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
COL5133HComparative ModernismsThis course critically examines the spatial, temporal, and aesthetic parameters of global literary modernism. The “global” turn in modernist studies has expanded the spatial terrain of the field and the time of modernism itself. In this course, we will read a range of modernist fictions that break our geographical and temporal expectations of what qualifies as a modernist text. Our focus will be on how interpreting modernism as a movement of multidirectional flows and exchanges has fundamentally reconstituted the traditional canon and has redrawn notions of modernist style, genre and periodization. The course’s transnational approach considers how the contact zones of the colonized “periphery” were instrumental to the making of European modernism, and how interrogations of discourses of primitivism have been central to the project of “globalizing” modernist studies. In our examination of non-European modernisms, we will focus on the relationship between anti-colonialism and modernism and the ways that colonial intellectuals repurposed modernist notions of aesthetic autonomy to agitate against colonial domination. By reading modernist texts from a range of colonial literary traditions (African, Arabic, Caribbean), we will excavate how the aesthetic qualities of modernism have been redefined to accommodate anti-colonial and post-colonial literary modernisms. Colonial writers and artists appropriated indigenous cultural forms to stylistically dissociate their aesthetic production from European art and literature. Therefore, a significant component of the course addresses how stylistic qualities traditionally associated with modernist aesthetics—self-consciousness and interiority, formal adventurousness and textual obscurity, fragmentation and ambiguity—are reconstituted and often abandoned in modernist fictions of the colony and postcolony.Centre for Comparative Literatureglobaliz, indigenous, production, indigenousSDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12
COL5101HDiasporic Cities: Itinerant Narratives of Metropoles by Travellers and ExpatriatesThis course will look at six metropoles (Berlin, London, Paris, New York, St. Petersburg, Shanghai) from the perspectives of Japanese visitors such as Mori, Natsume, Nagai, Yokomitsu, Tanizaki, Gotô, Tawada, and Horie, and from those of natives and immigrants (e.g., Benjamin, Döblin, Nabokov, Woolf, Conrad, Rilke, Pushkin, Gogol, Shi). Those writers’ accounts of cities in the span of time between the late nineteenth century and late twentieth century are inflected by the itineraries of their movement before and after their experience of the cities and by their peripatetic as well as optical experience of urban spaces of varied historical, social, material and geopolitical conditions. They reveal cities not as cartographical spots but as sites in the traffic of bodies and sensations. The readings (all assigned are available in English, with additional materials to be introduced by the instructor) shall be arranged in such a way that participants can compare each city’s literary mediations by variably invested observers. Accompanying theoretical, critical and photographic texts (e.g., Apter, Atget, Benjamin, Brandt, Brassaï, Burgin, de Certeau, Doisneau, Gleber, Maeda, Ronis, Walker) shall define a conceptual framework for each session.Centre for Comparative Literatureinvest, cities, urban, metroSDG9, SDG11
COL5143HDramaturgies of the Dialectic Part I: Hegel: The End of Art and the Endgame of TheaterWe’ll be thinking about some repercussions of Hegel’s infamous pronouncement of the “end of art.” Why does Hegel say that art “no longer counts” as the expression of truth and what does this obsolescence imply for the practice of philosophy and for political practice? We’ll look at the ways in which art, according to Hegel, stages its own undoing at every stage and in every art form (sculpture, painting, music, etc), but especially in theatre, which Hegel presents both as the “highest” art form and the scene of art’s ultimate undoing. Why does theater occupy this privileged position? And what comes next? We’ll be focusing on selected portions of Hegel’s Aesthetics and the Phenomenology of Spirit, alongside other contemporary writings, such as Lessing, Schelling, and Hölderlin. And we’ll be reading some of the plays –mostly, but not always, tragedies — they were watching (or at least reading, or imagining watching): Sophocles, Euripides, Schiller, Goethe, Diderot, Aristophanes. And finally, we’ll consider the peculiar afterlife of theatre in philosophy – as a scene of pedagogy, a performance, and a political spectacle.Centre for Comparative Literaturepedagogy, privileged, giniSDG4, SDG10
COL5144HDramaturgies of the Dialectic Part II: Tragedy and Philosophy after HegelPhilosophy has always had a special interest in tragedy, and has often used it as either a negative or positive foil (sometimes both at once) to construct its own self-image. Plato famously banned tragedy; Aristotle recouped it; German idealist philosophers saw in “the tragic” a mirror-image of philosophy’s own preoccupations; Nietzsche blamed philosophy for tragedy’s demise; Marx saw in tragedy’s own (tragic) slide into farce a symptom of practical-theoretical enervation. In this semester we’ll explore the entanglement of philosophy and tragedy after Hegel, and in the light of the failed 1848 revolutions, with focused attention on how later thinkers raise the political stakes of this entanglement. We’ll be exploring the links between tragedy and sovereignty; tragedy and revolution; tragedy and gender; the predicaments of decolonial tragedy; the relationship between genre and medium. Readings to include: Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit and Sophocles, Antigone; Marx, Eighteenth Brumaire; Nietzsche, Birth of Tragedy; Brecht, Short Organon and selected plays; Benjamin, Origin of the German Trauerspiel and “What is Epic Theatre?”; Adorno, “Trying to Understand Endgame and Beckett’s Endgame; Eisenstein’s Notes towards his (unrealized) film version of Capital; C.L.R James, The Black Jacobins and his Toussaint Louverture (the play); Nicole Loraux, Mothers in Mourning; Judith Butler, Antigone’s Claim; Raymond Williams, Modern TragedyCentre for Comparative Literaturedecolonial, gender, capital, sovereigntySDG4, SDG5, SDG9, SDG16
ETH1000HEthics of Artificial Intelligence in ContextThis year-long, half-credit graduate course exposes students to advanced methods employed in the analysis of ethical issues related to the production, dissemination, and application of AI in a variety of contexts. A diverse team of speakers from a range of academic disciplines including, for instance, computer science; criminology; engineering; law; literary studies; media studies; philosophy; or political science, will model various methodological approaches and modes of analysis.Centre for Comparative LiteratureproductionSDG12
JFC5025HFeminism and Postmodernism: Theory and PracticeThis course will examine the complex and controversial relationship between feminism and postmodernism, as this encounter is staged in both theoretical and fictional writings. While many of the «canonical» theoretical texts on postmodernism were penned by male scholars (Lyotard, Baudrillard, Vattimo, Hassan, Scarpetta, etc.), who largely ignored questions of feminism, gender, and women’s artistic practices, feminist critics (Jardine, Butler, Suleiman, Nicholson, Yeatman, and others) soon intervened in the debate. As these latter theoreticians demonstrated, many of the notions characterizing postmodern theories and literary texts were in fact concerns common to feminist thought : the crisis of patriarchal master narratives and the ensuing emphasis on localized, small narratives; the criticism of binary, hierarchical oppositions (center/margin, life /art, culture /nature, mind/body, masculine/feminine); the endeavour to privilege the heterogeneous, the plural, and the hybrid; and the problematization of the subject, of representation, and of language. Doubtful as to whether disseminated subjects are capable of agency and effective political action, other feminist scholars (di Stefano, Hartsock) still question the possibilities of constructive intersections between feminism and postmodernism. Drawing on the principal feminist theories in the postmodern debate, we will study the contentious theoretical issues outlined above, before turning to an analysis of an international corpus of postmodern literary narratives written by women, which construct « strategic subjectivities » (Kaplan) and « forms of common action » (Mouffe), combining ethical perspectives and aesthetic experimentation. Our close readings of these texts will pay careful attention to textual devices typical of postmodern texts (see Hutcheon), such as the extensive use of intertextuality, the recycling and rewriting of mythological, religious, and historical figures and events, the questioning of major binary oppositions underpinning Western thought, genre hybridity, the representation of the author in the text, and so on. Since this course will deal with feminist theories of postmodernism, as well as with feminist supplements to and criticisms of postmodern thought, it would be most helpful for students to have some prior knowledge of « male » theories of postmodernism (see certain references listed below) before beginning the course, although this is not a prerequisite.Centre for Comparative Literatureknowledge, gender, women, feminis, recyclSDG4, SDG5, SDG12
COL5032HFeminist Approaches to Medieval LiteratureThis course will explore how feminist theory has influenced the way medieval literature is read. The pluralistic and shifting nature of a feminist theoretical orientation which struggles with the politics of subject and gender identity, race, class, sexuality and the body is particularly apt for the exploration of the medieval literary text whose instability and variability render it resistant to critical authority and open to multiple readings. We will attempt to understand how gender structures medieval thought and its literary expression through selective readings from a variety of feminist theoretical perspectives such as psychoanalytic theory, French feminism, and postmodern theory of the body. The main focus of the course, however, will be on opening up medieval literary texts to new meanings. Texts to be studied will be drawn from a wide crosssection of medieval literary discourses such as epic, romance, courtly lyric, fabliaux, Marian literature, hagiography and drama and will include examples from writings by medieval women such as The Book of Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pizan’s The Book of the City of Ladies.Centre for Comparative Literaturegender, women, feminisSDG5
COL5117HFreud and PsychoanalysisIn this seminar, we will examine the writings of Sigmund Freud in their historical context, starting with the intellectual and political milieu of fin-de-siècle Vienna that set the stage for the invention of psychoanalysis. From here we will investigate aspects of Freud’s entire career, grouped roughly in four stages: his early 1890s writings on hysteria and his experiments with hypnosis, leading to his discovery of the “talking cure” and eventually the “secret of dreams” (The Interpretation of Dreams); his 1900s creation of the major concepts of sexual theory (his early case studies as well as Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality); his central writings before, during and after World War I, from Totem and Taboo and The Uncanny through to his seminal work on shell shock, repetition compulsion, and the death drive in Beyond the Pleasure Principle; and his attempts to diagnose wide-ranging pathologies of society and culture in the late 1920s and 1930s (e.g., The Future of an Illusion, Civilization and Its Discontents, and Moses and Monotheism). The goal is to present a broad critical introduction to Freud’s work and to investigate key concepts of psychoanalytic theory.Centre for Comparative LiteratureinvestSDG9
JFC1813HLiterature of Contact and Anthropological Thought 16th-18th CenturyThis course analyzes the link between contact literature (travel literature, discovery literature, colonial literature) and the establishment of modernity and its discourses of knowledge. Taking into account the philosophical and political debates between the 16th and 18th century, the course seeks to account for the European expansion, in particular the colonization of the Americas, and the emergence of discourses of knowledge about other cultures. Two aspects ought to be singled out here: the knowledge produced about «others» and the new consciousness of Europe’s own identity which was profoundly transformed in this very contact. The course follows the hypothesis that the philosophical and modern definition of modern Man is itself a result of the contact between Europe and its others. The discussions of the texts privilege epistemological aspects and anthropological and political thought. More precisely, the goal is to trace the various ways the emergence of the modern subject is tied to its construction of alterity. Literary texts for example will therefore be questioned about their social and political dimensions within the episteme of the time. A prominent issue will be the intercultural dynamic between the 16th and 18th centuries between Europe and the rest of the globe, but also within Europe itself. The development of new discourses of knowledge will involve texts of very different nature : literary, ethnographic, political, philosophical, historical, etc. Other aspects to be discussed are the issue of literary genres and canon formation, the conditions which make anthropological writing possible and the conceptualization of the «other» (ethnicity, race, religion, gender, etc.)Centre for Comparative Literatureknowledge, genderSDG4, SDG5
COL5125HLiterature, Trauma, ModernityIn this course, we will examine literary representations of trauma from the early nineteenth century (the Industrial Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars) to the aftermath of World War I, when “shell shock” brought trauma irrevocably into the public eye. We will begin by examining the discourse of unrepresentability and doubt in nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century medical literature, especially in Freudian psychoanalysis: if we can find no somatic source for trauma, how do we know that it exists? We will then investigate how the literature of this period – “modernism” – both reacted to and helped to shape this discourse. Rarely focusing explicitly on traumatic events, this literature only hints at traumatic occurrences – foregrounding instead the problem of representability at the heart of the modern age. Just as the traumatized body no longer points back to a physical pathology, so too does language itself seem to be severed from the object it aims to describe.Centre for Comparative LiteratureinvestSDG9
COL5145HPoetics of Personhood“Poetics of Personhood” considers a problem raised several decades ago by Barbara Johnson, which remains under-studied: what is the relationship between the poetic person and the legal person? Students in this course will examine theories of personhood, drawing on Enlightenment and liberal accounts by John Locke, John Stuart Mill, G.W.F. Hegel, and C.B. MacPherson; and critiques of personhood leveraged within the interdisciplines of critical race theory and Black studies by Sylvia Wynter, Cheryl I. Harris, Hortense Spillers, and Alexander Weheliye. Alongside these, we will read key texts on lyric poetry that consider the place of the person within this genre: selected critics will include John Emil Vincent, Jonathan Culler, Virginia Jackson, and others. The course will culminate with three case studies of poems drawn from different national/linguistic traditions: possible texts include Zong! by M. NourbeSe Philip (Tobago/Canada), Freedom & Prostitution by Cassandra Troyan (US/Sweden), and Ban en Banlieue by Bhanu Kapil (India/UK).Centre for Comparative LiteratureginiSDG10
COL5124HPublic Reading: Literature and the Formation of Critical PublicsThis course considers the formation of publics and public intellectuals, according to some leading theorists. We will examine the nature of a public, its constitution and elaboration through shared texts, private reading, public interventions, media and social networks. Participants will be encouraged to look critically at assumptions about public vs. private, author vs. reader, and producer vs. consumer, as we think about how autonomy and a critical stance toward power could be forged in historical contexts and in the contemporary globalized world of social networks. We will talk about how filiation and affiliation work, consider the way citizenship and membership in a community are constituted, and ask what publics might mean for the past and future of democracy.Centre for Comparative Literaturecitizen, labor, globaliz, consum, democraSDG4, SDG8, SDG9, SDG12, SDG16
COL5127HQueer Ethics & Aesthetics of ExistenceThis course examines recent work in Queer Theory, Philosophy, Literature, and Visual Culture, in which questions of ethics and aesthetics are of principal concern in thinking about friendship; sexual pleasure; intimacy; decision; anonymity and identity; social encounters and relations. We will read works by: Leo Bersani, Tom Roach, Tim Dean, William Haver, Michel Foucault, Herve Guibert, Jean-Luc Nancy, Lauren Berlant, and others.Centre for Comparative LiteraturequeerSDG5
JCD5135HRace, Politics and JewishnessThis course will trace the complicated history of Jewish racialization from the Spanish conception of limpieza de sangre (“the cleanness of blood”) to the “whitening” of (some) Jewish Americans and Jewish racial positioning today; we will also follow the tensions and coalitions of Jews and other racialized others, including Indigenous peoples, Palestinians, and Black, paying particular attention to Jewish-Black relations from the slave trade to the labor movement, the Women’s March, and Black Lives Matter. Alongside these historical studies, we will collaboratively build a theoretical apparatus for understanding the often-charged nexus between Jewish Studies and Critical Race Theory, reading Max Weinreich’s mobilization of the W.E.B. Du Bois’s “double consciousness”, Frantz Fanon’s dialogue with Sartre’s Anti-Semite and Jew, the controversy around Nadia Abu El-Haj’s The Genealogical Science, and Jewish responses to Frank Wilderson III’s Afropessimism. We will watch Al Jolson’s 1927 The Jazz Singer and Anna Deveare Smith’s 1992 Fires in the Mirror, and read early-twentieth-century Yiddish anti-lynching poetry, Toni Morrison’s 1977 Song of Solomon, and Philip Roth’s 2000 The Human Stain. Other readings include selections from the following books: - Henry Goldschmidt, Race and Religion among the Chosen Peoples of Crown Heights (2008) - Geraldine Heng, England and the Jews: How Religion and Violence Created the First Racial State in the West (2018) - Maria Elena Martinez, Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico (2008) - Noah Tamarkin, Genetic Afterlives: Black Jewish Indigeneity in South Africa (2020) - Frank Wilderson III, Afropessimism (2020)Centre for Comparative Literaturegender, women, labor, trade, indigenous, land, indigenous, violenceSDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
COL5122HText and Digital MediaThis course examines new forms of textualities and textual practices that are emerging in the digital era. It highlights an understudied dimension of the text, i.e. the medium that forms its material and technological infrastructure such as scroll, codex, book, CD, e-book, the Internet, and smartphone. The course starts with a historical investigation into the printed text and print culture. Then it moves on to the question of how digital technologies shape reading and writing as well as other text-based cultural practices. While the course revolves around the mediality of the text, it distances itself from technological determinism by stressing the facts that digital technologies are always embedded in and shaped by historically specific political, social, and cultural conditions. This course is designed for students who are interested in questions and issues related to literary production in the digital era and more generally the materiality of the text. Theoretical and scholarly works we will engage with in this course include, but not limited to, Understanding Media: Extensions of Man (McLuhan, 1964), The Nature of the Book: Print and Knowledge in the Making (Adrian Johns, 2000), Writing Machines (N. Katherine Hayles, 2002), Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print (Jay David Bolter, 2001), Bodies in Code: Interfaces with Digital Media (Mark Hansen, 2006), The Interface Effect (Alexander R. Galloway), The Language of New Media (Lev Manovich, 2002), Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies (Noah Wardrip-Fruin, 2009).Centre for Comparative Literatureknowledge, remediation, infrastructure, invest, internet, productionSDG4, SDG6, SDG9, SDG12
COL5142HWomen and Sex and TalkThis seminar reads a series of contemporary novels and short stories by women authors in the context of current discussions and debates on intimacy and violence; misogyny; desire, fantasy, and the pornographic. The course will consider the ambiguity of desire and pleasure’s contradictions; transgression and consent; rape; female friendship; sex talk; the stories of young women; and readership and audience. African-American, Indigenous, Canadian, Irish, Moroccan, and American authors will be read: Roxanne Gay, Kathleen Collins, Katherena Vermette, Miriam Toews, Eimear McBride, Leila Slimani, Diane Williams, Jamie Quatro, and Mary Gaitskill, amongst others. The focus will be on stories that are intentionally unsettling and operate without clear moral lessons. What is it that fiction can do, that non-fiction cannot, precisely when absent of general accusation, but instead is filled with detailed observations of the “inconsistencies and incoherence” of sex?Centre for Comparative Literaturewomen, female, indigenous, indigenous, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG16
COL5146HWritten in Blood: Caribbean Readings in Conflict and HealingBlood, both as subject and method, provides highly productive opportunities for reading the Caribbean. Blood, bloodlines, bloodshed and bloodwork are indispensable as conceptual conduits through which to explore the complex histories and intricate cultural processes which constitute the Caribbean. Working with blood as the principal investigate strategy, this course will examine the pivotal role that questions of genealogy and violence occupy in the literatures of the English, French and Spanish Caribbean. We will also study Caribbean literary responses to imperialist medical discourses and colonialist approaches to epidemiology which located the Caribbean of the nineteenth century as a pernicious site of disease, a locus of bad blood. Reading the Caribbean through blood invites comparative reflection on other societies within the global south whose literatures bear witness to similar histories of cultural or political violence. Additionally, this method facilitates reading connections between wider experiences of conflict and the restorative potential of cultural production. The course will focus on specific Caribbean histories, but it will also engage with a wide range of related fields such as memory studies, peace studies, trauma studies and the medical humanities. Alongside the main literary texts, we will read essays by scholars such as Frantz Fanon, Achille Mbembe, Hannah Arednt and Hortense Spillers. Key texts to be studied include Abeng, (Michelle Cliff), Sweet Diamond Dust (Roasario Ferré), The Book of Night Women (Marlon James), The Drifting of Spirits (Gisèle Pineau), Love, Anger, Madness (Marie Vieux-Chauvet) and Cecilia Valdés (Cirilo Villaverde) [trans. by Helen Lane].Centre for Comparative Literaturepeace, women, invest, production, peace, violenceSDG4, SDG16, SDG5, SDG9, SDG12
CRI1020HLaw and State Power: Theoretical PerspectivesThis seminar surveys core readings in sociolegal studies, including classical sociological approaches to law and legal institutions, as well as more contemporary approaches to studying the relationship between law and society. A central focus of this research is the divide between the “law on the books” and the “law in action,” but rather than focusing on specific empirical effects, much of this seminar will focus on specific empirical effects, much of this seminar will focus on the production of law, the ubiquitous place of law and its relationship to other social institutions, and the often competing processes through which law comes to “know.” Readings tentatively include the production and evolution of law, legal decision-making, the constitutive ways in which law shapes everyday life, law and globalization, law as a professional project, and legal knowledge as the product of (often competing) claims to authority and expertise.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesknowledge, globaliz, production, institutSDG4, SDG9, SDG12, SDG16
CRI3220HOrganized Crime and CorruptionThe course will examine selected topics in organized crime (OC) and corruption, including the definition of OC and corruption; criminal structures within OC, related phenomena, including terrorism, white collar crime, gendered organized crime, mutual legal assistance to target transnational organized crime; money laundering, the prosecution of organized crime, and countermeasures and policies to combat corruption and OC.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesgender, corrupt, organized crime, terrorisSDG5, SDG16
CRI3240HPenologyThis course is designed to give students an overview of the sociology of punishment. It will provide students with a theoretical foundation in the sociology of punishment/penology and explore contemporary innovations and developments since the golden age of prison sociology. This course moves beyond a strict analysis of imprisonment to explore the broader meaning and role of punishment in modern society. In this vein, we will explore the empirical realities of the nature of punishment (e.g., sites, targets) and the experience of punishment (including how it is gendered and racialized). In moving beyond conviction and sentenced imprisonment, students will have a greater capacity to engage with the realities and contradictions in punishment. We will treat the seminar room as a “learning community” – so sharing thoughts, points of disagreement, and engaging in discussion (also with me!) is crucial for learning. Being in graduate school, you are expected to come to class prepared and ready to share your critical thoughts on the assigned readings.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studieslearning, genderSDG4, SDG5
CRI3130HPolicingPolice will be examined as one of the state institutions providing normative regulation and social order in connection with other institutions like politics, economy, and culture. The course will include three main parts: i) Police: origin, structure and functioning, ii) Police in changing social environment and iii) Police: continuous change and innovation. Students will receive knowledge on the origin and short history of the police, its structure and operation as well as about major challenges, organized crime, and terrorism. Last developments such as community, private and problem-oriented policing, a problem of reforming also will be examining. Additionally to Canadian police during this course police of some other well-established, developing and transition countries will be studied with the focus on comparative policing.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesknowledge, transit, institut, organized crime, terrorisSDG4, SDG11, SDG16
CRI3110HQualitative Research MethodsQualitative methods for social science research entail systematic collection and analysis of data found in observations, interactions, and texts. Qualitative research methods generally are inductive, interpretive and labor intensive, and involve small samples and populations situated in a specific context. They also tend to require deeper and longer-term engagement with participants than most studies using quantitative methods. Qualitative research may allow understanding and explanation of some complexities of human practice, thought, and experience that elude enumeration or statistical analysis; it also may help discover new problems or provide scientific insights that work beyond the prediction of particular outcomes. In this course, we will examine and practice using various qualitative methods to consider how different approaches may be applied to answer specific questions, and to better understand and appreciate their potential contributions to building social theory and empirical knowledge.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesknowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
CRI3355HSentencingThis course examines various aspects of the Canadian sentencing system. While this course is primarily legal in its orientation, the aim is to augment the discussion of sentencing issues with philosophical and criminological literature. The course commences with a consideration of the philosophical dimensions of sentencing and an examination of certain empirical issues, such as problems in assessing the efficacy of deterrence theory. During the course, considerable emphasis is placed on legislative and judicial approaches to the sentencing function and the procedural aspects of the Canadian sentencing system. Other topics for consideration include: the role of the victim, social context, sentencing Indigenous offenders, anti-Black racism, mandatory minimum sentences, and plea arrangements. The course also offers the opportunity to attend a busy plea court and a discussion a provincial court judge.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesracism, indigenous, indigenous, judicSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CRI3356HYouth Crime and Youth JusticeThis course examines contemporary issues in youth culture, youth crime and youth justice. The course will begin by discussing the definition of “youth” and how this concept has changed through time. The course will then address a number of contemporary youth-related topics including: 1) Trends in youth crime and reporting to the police; 2) The impact of television, movies and video games on youth behaviour; 3) The relationship between Hip Hop music, youth resistance and youth violence; 3) The causes and consequences of street gangs; 4) Race, policing and criminal justice; 5) Perceptions of social injustice, youth radicalization and crime; 6) Cyberbulling; 7) Sexting and Youth Gender Relations; 8) Recent developments in youth justice; and 9) The implementation of evidence-based youth punishment and crime prevention policies.Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studiesgender, injustice, criminal justice, violenceSDG5, SDG16
CSB1021HCell Biology of Gastrulation LEC 0107Gastrulation in different animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates, is used to illustrate biological processes and to discuss basic concepts in animal development. This course will explore cell behaviours that occur during migration, tissue rearrangement and spreading as well as tissue separation. In addition to discussing these cell behaviours in the context of gastrulation, we will explore other contexts in which these same or similar behaviours also occur.Department of Cell and Systems Biologyanimal, animalSDG14, SDG15
CSB1472HComputational Genomics and BioinformaticsRecent technological advances have driven a revolution in genomics research that has had a direct impact on both fundamental research as well as direct application in nearly biological disciplines. These advances have made the generation of genomic data relatively straightforward and inexpensive; nevertheless, the data are meaningless if they cannot be properly analyzed. Computational genomics and bioinformatics are the tools we use to extract biological information from complex genomic data. CSB1472 will teach you the fundamentals of analyzing genomic data. This course emphasizes understanding how core bioinformatic analyses work, the strengths and weaknesses of related methods, and the important parameters embedded in these analyses. CSB1472 is not an applied methods course, nor a course to for developing new bioinformatic tools, but rather a course designed to provide you with a basic understanding of the principles underlying genome analyses. We will examine the fundamentals of sequence alignment, phylogenetic analyses, genome annotation, gene prediction, and gene expression data analysis. Theoretical, applied, and statistical issues will be addressed. The material is presented as an inverted course. Lectures are pre-recorded and available prior to class. Class time is devoted to review of the lecture material, discussion of the primary literature related to the course material, and hands-on analysis laboratories.Department of Cell and Systems BiologylaborSDG8
CSB1020HCurrent Techniques in Neuroscience LEC 0124This course will examine emerging cutting-edge techniques that are revolutionizing fundamental neuroscience research. Techniques to be investigated include: optogenetics, chemogenetics, current strategies for cell-type-specific transgene expression and virus-based circuit tracing, large scale electrophysiology, next generation fluorescent indicators, new imaging techniques such as two photo imaging and super-resolution microscopy. Students will take an active role in researching these techniques and presenting their theoretical foundations as well as practical applications, including advantages and disadvantages, to the class.Department of Cell and Systems BiologyinvestSDG9
CSB1020HData Visualization and Advanced Graphics in R LEC 0141This is an intermediate to advanced level introduction to R and the packages associated with visualizing large or complex data sets. Participants are strongly encouraged to have prior experience in R (i.e., Introduction to R, CSB1020). Individuals who complete the course will be able to manipulate and prepare large datasets to produce publication-quality graphics. The goal of this course is to introduce the proper use and interpretation of simple, popular and complex data visualizations. Topics will include A deep dive into building relatable figures with the ggplot package. Analysis and visualization of large datasets from differential expression experiments. Popular visualization methods and packages for genes and genome analysis. Each class will consist of a short introductory section followed by ‘code-along’ hands-on learning that will gradually build up the lecture’s topic(s). Students are expected to have access to a computer during class and are encouraged to ask questions while coding-along with the instructor. A homework assessment will be assigned after each class to reinforce the skills learned. The course will be provided through Quercus using Bb-collaborate.Department of Cell and Systems Biologylearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CSB1021HFundamentals of Genomic Data Science LEC 0131The rise of next-generation genomics has changed the way we think about, study, and employ genetic data, enabling applications that were, until recently, merely the stuff of science fiction. These advances have dramatically increased both the size and scope of biological datasets, and consequently, increased the need for basic computational literacy for nearly all biologists. This course is designed to serve as an introduction to genomic data science for students who do not have a background in bioinformatics. Students in the course will learn to perform several basic genomic data analyses using Galaxy, an open, web-based platform that incorporates multiple bioinformatics tools into a friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI). Students will then learn to scale up these genomic analyses using the Unix command line to tackle larger and more complex datasets. During the course, students will learn how to: Use Galaxy and command line tools to process and manipulate data Use the Integrative Genomics Viewer to visualize genomes Work in a Unix terminal Install bioinformatics software Connect and work on remote servers Understand common genomics file formats Perform de novo genome assembly, reference-based genome assembly, genome annotation, variant calling, and RNA-seq data analysis. The course will take advantage of online resources for background material, while spending class time analyzing real data sets. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of genomics and molecular biology, but no prior computational knowledge is required. Each class will consist of a short introductory section followed by ‘code-along’ hands-on learning that will gradually build up the lecture’s topic(s). Students are expected to have access to a computer during class and are encouraged to ask questions while coding-along with the instructor. A homework assessment will be assigned after each class to reinforce the skills learned. The course will be provided through Quercus using Bb-collaborate.Department of Cell and Systems Biologyknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CSB1020HIntroduction to Python LEC 0140This is a beginner’s introduction to R and the Jupyter Notebook environment for individuals with no prior experience or background. Individuals who complete the course will be able to: Work with the Jupyter Notebook environment and navigate the R programming language. Understand data structures and data types. Import data into R and manipulate data frames. Transform ‘messy’ datasets into ‘tidy’ datasets. Make exploratory plots as well as publication-quality graphics. Use string searching and manipulation to clean data. Perform basic statistical tests and run a regression model. Use flow control and build branching code. Each class will consist of a short introductory section followed by ‘code-along’ hands-on learning that will gradually build up the lecture’s topic(s). Students are expected to have access to a computer during class and are encouraged to ask questions while coding-along with the instructor. A homework assessment will be assigned after each class to reinforce the skills learned and a final project will test overall knowledge and application. The course will be provided through Quercus using Bb-collaborate.Department of Cell and Systems Biologyknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CSB1021HIntroduction to Python LEC 0140This is a beginner’s introduction to Python for data science applications. The course is intended for students with no computer science background who want to develop the skills needed to analyze their own data. Students who complete this course will be able to: Perform data analysis in Python using the Jupyter Notebook environment. Understand Python data structures and data types. Manipulate Python objects such as lists, data frames, and dictionaries. Import data into Python and transform ‘messy’ datasets into ‘tidy’ datasets. Use flow control to develop branching code. Use regular expression and string manipulation to explore and clean data. Make exploratory plots. Each class will consist of a short introductory section followed by ‘code-along’ hands-on learning that will gradually build up the lecture’s topic(s). Students are expected to have access to a computer during class and are encouraged to ask questions while coding-along with the instructor. A homework assessment will be assigned after each class to reinforce the skills learned and a final project will test overall knowledge and application. The course will be provided through Quercus using Bb-collaborate.Department of Cell and Systems Biologyknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CSB1025HMethods in Genomics and ProteomicsGenomics and proteomics have revolutionized biological research. It is now theoretically possible to fully characterize the structure, organization, regulation and interaction of all genes, proteins and small bioactive molecules in an organism. CSB 1025H/S is an intensive and rigorous laboratory course that will teach students how to produce and analyze data that are central to the fields of genomics and proteomics. The course is divided into three modules, the first of which focuses on genomics, the second on transcriptomics, and the third on proteomics. Each module begins with at least two wet labs where students generate data and end with computer labs where students analyze the data. In this way students will learn how to conduct an experiment from beginning to end. Techniques taught include DNA and RNA extraction, shotgun library construction, PCR, DNA sequencing, expression profiling using microarrays, 2D-gel proteome analysis, mass spectrometry and associated bioinformatics analyses such as sequence analysis and assembly, and statistical analysis of microarray and mass spectrometry data. This is an advanced laboratory and computer-based course, and assumes a strong background in molecular genetics and some prior laboratory experience.Department of Cell and Systems BiologylaborSDG8
CSB1482HReadings in Genome Biology and BioinformaticsThis course will focus on close reading and detailed discussion of landmark papers in genome biology and bioinformatics. Focus will be on the context of the paper, technological developments exploited (or reported) and impact on the field. Topics include: comparative, population and functional genomics, single cell genomic technologies, genome browsers, alignment and clustering algorithms. Evaluation will be focused on class discussion and presentations.Department of Cell and Systems BiologylandSDG15
CSB1021HStructural Biology in Drug Development & Biotechnology LEC 0144Biological, disease, and drug mechanisms are all determined by the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within biological macromolecules. Therefore, knowledge of molecular structure is fundamental to protein engineering and the development of new therapeutics and vaccines. This course will cover the application of structural biology methods to drug development and biotechnology. Students will be introduced to the modern tools of protein structure determination including Cryo electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, and NMR through lectures and tutorials. Lectures will focus on theory, techniques, and the advantages and limitations of each method. The applications of these methods to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries including protein engineering, target selection and drugability, lead identification and optimization, rational drug design, and drug mechanism of action will be explored through student presentations and discussions.Department of Cell and Systems Biologyvaccine, knowledgeSDG3, SDG4
CSB1021HThe Biology of COVID-19 LEC 0143In December 2019, there was a coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan China that lead to the global pandemic disease COVID-19 with hundreds of millions of people infected and millions of deaths. The pandemic has had a tremendous effect on worldwide economies, employment, education, social activity, and human health and wellbeing just to name a few. This course aims to give students a good understanding of: virology including the SARS-CoV2 virus that causes COVID-19; innate and acquired immunology and how our immune system combats viral infections; and vaccines including the leading vaccines being developed against SARS-CoV2. The course will cover some the basics of epidemiology with an emphasis on the epidemiology COVID-19. Several lectures will also be spent on COVID-19 itself including the science behind the tests for the virus, disease symptoms and etiology, and various treatments.Department of Cell and Systems Biologywellbeing, vaccine, employmentSDG3, SDG8
CSC2501HComputational LinguisticsComputational linguistics and the processing of language by computer. Topics include: context-free grammars; chart parsing, statistical parsing; semantics and semantic interpretation; ambiguity resolution techniques; reference resolution. Emphasis on statistical learning methods for lexical, syntactic, and semantic knowledge.Department of Computer Scienceknowledge, learningSDG4
CSC2612HComputing and Global DevelopmentThis course will introduce students to the challenges and opportunities in computational initiatives to address problems in international development. They will learn the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the history of computational initiatives to achieve them. The students will have weekly reading assignments and in-class design/discussion sessions. They will be asked to submit one midterm paper at the middle of the semester. The students will also submit a project at the end of the course. The final grade will be based on the reading responses, in-class participation in the discussions, midterm paper, and final project.Department of Computer Sciencesustainable development, sustainable developmentSDG8, SDG11
CSC2547HCurrent Algorithms and Techniques in Machine LearningTo fully understand a scene, a computer needs a rich, 3-dimensional representation of the world. Such representations have been developed for computer graphics programs, so it is natural to use similar representations in scene understanding programs. The main difference is that scene understanding is the inverse of computer graphics: whereas computer graphics generates a 2-dimensional image from a 3-dimensional representation, scene understanding infers a 3-dimensional representation from a 2-dimensional image. Note that once a 3-dimensional representation has been inferred, it should be possible to answer many common-sense questions about an image. It should also be possible to use a graphics program to regenerate the image from the 3-dimensional representation, and moreover, to generate modified versions of the image, in which objects have been moved or rotated and illumination or camera positions have changed. This view of scene understanding is known as inverse graphics. Inverting the graphics process to generate a 3-dimensional representation of an image is a difficult, non-deterministic problem. This course approaches it with machine learning. That is, we investigate techniques for learning programs that do inverse graphics, as well as related techniques for overcoming the limitations of convolutional neural networks for vision. This is an advanced graduate course in machine learning. It includes some lectures, especially at the beginning, but is primarily a seminar course in which students will read and present papers from the literature. There will also be a course project and possibly some assignments. The goal is to bring students to the state of the art in this exciting field. Tentative topics include generative and discriminative models for vision, convolutional and deconvolutional neural nets, variational inference and autoencoders, capsule networks, group symmetries and equivariance, visual attention mechanisms, vision transformers, differentiable renderers, and applications. Mathematical maturity is required.Department of Computer Sciencelearning, investSDG4, SDG9
CSC2526HHCI: Topics in Ubiquitous ComputingThis course will examine the growing prominence of mobile health over the past twenty years. After briefly discussing various definitions of mobile health, we will focus our attention on how people are using the sensors embedded in ubiquitous and novel devices to capture indicators of physical and mental health. More specifically, we will study how sensors are being used to measure physiological signals, psychomotor function, and disease-specific symptoms. We will also explore the how human factors play an important role in these technologies. This course requires an undergraduate-level understanding of machine learning and programming, although familiarity with computer vision, signal processing, and human-computer interaction will also be beneficial. Beyond weekly readings, students will be expected to complete and present a course project at the end of the term.Department of Computer Sciencemental health, learningSDG3, SDG4
CSC2537HInformation VisualizationThis course will study techniques and algorithms for creating effective visualizations based on principles from graphic design, visual art, perceptual psychology, and cognitive science. The course is targeted both towards students interested in using visualization in their own work, as well as students interested in learning about cutting edge research in the field. Students will conduct reading and critical analysis of scientific research papers, that will be discussed in class. A final project will make‐up most of the grade, while student presentation and critical analysis skills will also be emphasized.Department of Computer SciencelearningSDG4
CSC2515HIntroduction to Machine LearningMachine learning (ML) is a set of techniques that allow computers to learn from data and experience, rather than requiring humans to specify the desired behaviour manually. This course introduces the main concepts and ideas in ML, and provides an overview of many commonly used machine learning algorithms. It also serves as a foundation for more advanced ML courses. The students will learn about ML problems (supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning), models (linear and nonlinear, including neural networks), loss functions (squared error, cross entropy, hinge, exponential), bias and variance tradeoff, ensemble methods (bagging and boosting), optimization techniques in ML, probabilistic viewpoint of ML, etc.Department of Computer Sciencelearning, tradeSDG4, SDG10
CSC2502HKnowledge Representation and ReasoningRepresenting knowledge symbolically in a form suitable for automated reasoning, and associated reasoning methods. Topics from: first-order logic, entailment, the resolution method, Horn clauses, procedural representations, production systems, description logics, inheritance networks, defaults and probabilities, tractable reasoning, abductive explanation, the representation of action, planning.Department of Computer Scienceknowledge, productionSDG4, SDG12
CSC2516HNeural Networks and Deep LearningIt is very hard to hand-design programs to solve many real-world problems, e.g. distinguishing images of cats vs. dogs. Machine learning algorithms allow computers to learn from example data, and produce a program that does the job. Neural networks are a class of machine learning algorithms originally inspired by the brain, but which have recently have seen a lot of success at practical applications. They’re at the heart of production systems at companies like Google and Facebook for image processing, speech-to-text, and language understanding. This course gives an overview of both the foundational ideas and the recent advances in neural net algorithms.Department of Computer Sciencelearning, productionSDG4, SDG12
CSC2224HParallel Computer Architecture and ProgrammingThe goal of this course is to build a strong understanding of the fundamentals of the architecture of parallel computers and efficient programming for them. We will examine how architectures are designed to exploit and extract different types of parallelism. The focus will be on fundamentals, tradeoffs in parallel architecture design, and cutting-edge research. Architectures studied may include parallel microprocessors, GPUs and FPGAs.Department of Computer SciencetradeSDG10
CSC2506HProbabilistic Learning and ReasoningAn introduction to probability as a means of representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. Qualitative and quantitative specification of probability distributions using probabilistic graphical models. Algorithms for inference and probabilistic reasoning with graphical models. Statistical approaches and algorithms for learning probability models from empirical data. Applications of these models in artificial intelligence and machine learning.Department of Computer Scienceknowledge, learningSDG4
CSC2532HStatistical Learning TheoryThis course covers several topics in classical learning theory. Required background for this course includes probability, linear algebra, and multivariate calculus. Minor coding will be required, i.e., the course will provide guidance for verifying the mathematical concepts using numerical experiments/simulations. Topics include: - Asymptotic statistics - Uniform Convergence - Generalization and complexity measures - Kernel Methods - Online Learning - Sampling and optimizationDepartment of Computer SciencelearningSDG4
CSC2702HTechnical EntrepreneurshipThis course introduces fundamental concepts from business and management that are relevant to technical entrepreneurs who are starting their own business or bringing new ideas and products to fruition within existing ones. The course is structured around case studies and discussion with leading practitioners from industry. The specific topics covered will vary from offering to offering, but will usually include marketing, product planning, short-term and long-term business plans, intellectual property rights, product liability, project management, human resource management, and basic accounting principles.Department of Computer ScienceentrepreneurSDG8
CSC2527HThe Business of SoftwareThis course will examine the growing prominence of mobile health over the past twenty years. After briefly discussing various definitions of mobile health, we will focus our attention on how people are using the sensors embedded in ubiquitous and novel devices to capture indicators of physical and mental health. More specifically, we will study how sensors are being used to measure physiological signals, psychomotor function, and disease-specific symptoms. We will also explore the how human factors play an important role in these technologies. This course requires an undergraduate-level understanding of machine learning and programming, although familiarity with computer vision, signal processing, and human-computer interaction will also be beneficial. Beyond weekly readings, students will be expected to complete and present a course project at the end of the term. CSC2527H/CSC454H1 — The Business of Software This course introduces you to the nature, structure, and dynamics of the contemporary software industry. It focuses on the key factors involved in ideating, hypothesizing, validating, and executing a viable and investable/return driven business model to launch a sustainable, scalable and profitable tech-based (software and/or hardware) business venture as a company founder or as an employee of an established company. The course will be a team effort of four students per team. The scope of the course does not include not-for-profit or charity business models. Course objectives include a meaningful understanding of: The high-technology business environment in general and the software industry in particular. The business concepts and principles behind creating and launching a successful tech venture. How to produce, present, and critique business proposals and plans for ventures, and how to develop business simulation and forecasting models in support of these plans. How to converse with and present to investors, executives, judging panels, incubators and accelerators. Upon successful completion of the course, you will have first-hand experience of the stages, processes, and challenges involved in transforming an idea into an investable and scalable business venture, and will be ideally positioned to begin launching your own tech venture. In this course, you will learn techniques and methodologies that will give you a distinct career advantage after graduation, whether or not you intend to work in a tech field. It is designed to give you a true-to-life experience of the thought processes behind successful tech business ventures, which apply whether you are planning on creating your own startup or working for an established employer. You and your team will devise a cool, innovative solution to a significant market problem. This will involve researching your customer base, forming and testing hypotheses, and producing a value proposition that will form the basis for your business model. You will investigate your customer base and market by identifying the key activities, resources and partners needed for fulfillment. This process culminates in a business model that both makes sense in a financial context and resonates with a venture capital (VC) or funding audience—the kind of audience who will eventually be visiting the class to critique your final product and business model. This course sets very high standards for you because the business world demands nothing less. We have an obligation to ensure that your business education is thorough and demanding, and only students who are exceptionally dedicated and committed to developing mastery over the techniques and methodologies in this course will excel. To apply to take the course please follow this link www.dcsil.ca/student-courses.Department of Computer Sciencemental health, learning, capital, investSDG3, SDG4, SDG9
CSC2559HTrustworthy Machine LearningThe deployment of machine learning in real-world systems calls for a set of complementary technologies that will ensure that machine learning is trustworthy. Here, the notion of trust is used in its broad meaning: the course covers different topics in emerging research areas related to the broader study of security and privacy in machine learning. Students will learn about attacks against computer systems leveraging machine learning, as well as defense techniques to mitigate such attacks. The course assumes students already have a basic understanding of machine learning. Students will familiarize themselves with the emerging body of literature from different research communities investigating these questions. The class is designed to help students explore new research directions and applications.Department of Computer Sciencelearning, investSDG4, SDG9
CTL1321HAboriginal Civilization: Language, Culture and IdentityThis course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on language, culture, and identity while looking at how this knowledge can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the tangled historical, socio-cultural and - political issues. We will also develop an understanding of FNMI peoples as a complete civilization (a complete way of being in the world) that includes the complex interplay of various aspects of civilization such as culture, literacies, language, arts, architecture, spiritual practices, and philosophical themes. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, urban, ruralSDG4, SDG11
CTL3039HAcademic English Research and AcquisitionThis course is designed primarily for graduate students whose first language or dominant language is not Standard English. In this course students will use an action research approach to analyze their own progress in actively acquiring Academic English proficiency. They will learn about the research, theories, and practices which inform our understanding of academic language skills necessary for success in graduate studies, and how they are acquired by learners of English as a Second Language. This will be achieved through a combination of critically reviewing scholarly articles/lectures on the acquisition of academic English proficiency and the sub-skills this comprises, applying second language acquisition research methods in a self-study project, and engaging in collaborative learning to develop graduate level academic language and literacies. Learning outcomes are assessed on the basis of students’ progress, self-evaluations, peer-to-peer feedback, and language acquisition; as such, grades for the class are credit/no credit only.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1223HActivist Science & Technology EducationThis course, open to Masters and Doctoral students in education, addresses theory and practice regarding relationships among various powerful individuals and groups in societies (e.g., corporations, transnational organizations, banks, financiers, politicians, think tanks, technologies, advertisements) and fields of professional science and technology regarding the extent to which they may contribute to the wellbeing of individuals, societies and environments. Attention also is paid to citizens' roles in conducting research and using findings to inform socio-political actions to influence powerful people/groups and fields of science and technology promoting a better world.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningwellbeing, citizenSDG3, SDG4
CTL7009HAnti-discriminatory EducationThis course inquires into a range of equity issues including: teacher candidates' (TC) own biases, dispositions, ideas and positionality; relationships between and among students, teachers, community, administrators and families; the ways in which systemic oppressions operate within K-12 schooling in Ontario and beyond; and the interlocking social, economic and political (re)production of inequalities (including but not limited to race, indigeneity, class, gender, sexuality, ability, language, age and religion). The course develops TC capacity to interrogate and challenge multiple forms of discriminatory practices within education, seeking to develop TC's understandings of theories and practices of pedagogies of liberation within daily life in schools. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequity, gender, equit, equalit, anti-discriminatory, productionSDG4, SDG5, SDG10, SDG12
CTL1011HAnti-Oppression Education in School SettingsIn this course we will identify ways that systems of oppression and oppressive educational practices manifest themselves in school settings - for example, within interactions between teachers and students; administrators and students; students and students; students and the curriculum; teachers and the curriculum; administrators and teachers; teachers and parents; parents and administrators - and we will discuss how we can use these spaces or locate new ones to do anti-oppressive educational work in school settings. Emphasis in the course will be placed on integrating anti-oppressive educational theory with anti-oppressive educational practice. We will attempt to link our discussions of practice to theory and our discussions of theory to practice.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninganti-oppression, anti-oppressiveSDG4, SDG10
CTL1064HApplied Theatre and Performance in Sites of LearningThis course will examine the research of, and different approaches to, applied and socially engaged theatre. Practitioners engaged in forms of applied theatre, such as drama in education, theatre for development, Verbatim theatre, participatory theatre etc. often believe creating and witnessing theatrical events can make a difference to the way people interact with one another and with the world at large. The 'social turn' in theatre is understood politically, artistically, and educationally to be in the service of social change, although there is certainly no single nor consistent ideological position that supports the expansive use of theatre in classrooms and communities. Theatre has been consistently used in formal and informal educational settings as a way to galvanize participation and make learning more relational, or more a student/participant-centred rather than teacher/facilitator- centred proposition. In addition to exploring the educational value of applied theatre in a range of contexts and through a variety of interventions and intentions, the course will also contemplate the ethics and poetics of representation in performance and in research.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, social changeSDG4, SDG16
CTL7013HArts in EducationAn introduction to research-informed teaching and professional learning in Music Education, Visual Arts Education, and Health and Physical Education for students in grades 4 to 10. For each of these disciplines, the course explores Ministry curriculum, lesson design and planning, pedagogy, assessment and evaluation, and research in light of contemporary educational theory and practice. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching Program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learningSDG4
CTL1100HArts in Urban SchoolsThis course explores different approaches to the arts in urban schools, with a focus on how the arts might play a role in teaching for equity and social justice. Using a critical lens, students will explore the role that the arts might play pedagogically and in the curriculum in urban schools. Among other themes, students will explore how to incorporate the arts for teaching in non-arts classrooms, critical issues in curriculum and instruction in various arts disciplines, as well as non-curricular and community-based approaches to the arts in school related contexts. Students will have an opportunity to explore different artistic disciplines and consider how they might incorporate the arts as a strategy in teaching for social change.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequity, equit, urban, social justice, social changeSDG4, SDG10, SDG11, SDG16
CTL7007HAuthentic AssessmentThis course presents an overview of the basic concepts, practices, and current research associated with effective assessment and evaluation in Ontario classrooms. Teacher candidates will develop an understanding of Ontario curriculum and policy documents as relevant to the professional obligations of student assessment and evaluation, grading and reporting. Examination of effective strategies of assessment for, as, and of learning is at the core of this course. Drawing on current research, attention may be given to topics such as validity and reliability, assessment tool design, success criteria, quality feedback, performance assessment, authentic assessment, portfolios, self-evaluation, data gathering and management, standardized testing in provincial or large-scale assessments, as well as assessment related beliefs, attitudes, and issues of psychological well-being. Related issues of equity and a critical stance are infused and discussed throughout the course.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningwell-being, learning, equity, equitSDG3, SDG4, SDG10
CTL1616HBlended Learning: Issues and ApplicationsThis course examines current issues and applications of blended learning, where some learning is facilitated in a face-to-face environment and some is facilitated within a digital environment. Purposeful and pedagogically sound methods of digital teaching and learning in a blended learning environment are explored. This course examines applications and issues related to blended learning at all levels of education. Underlying this examination are the theoretical frameworks of constructivist learning and TPACK, and the issue of technology transience as it affects the design and incorporation of a digital learning environment. The digital tools available to facilitate blended learning are explored from the perspective of how such applications can support, inform and enhance the design of digital learning environments and methods of teaching. Included in the course is a discussion of related terminology, the current state and trends of blended learning, and future predictions about teaching in digital environments that facilitate blended learning. Assessment, competencies, Universal Design for Learning and inclusion in blended learning are also examined. The readings will focus on the theoretical ideas themselves, along with the integration of digital tools and instructional methods to support student learning in a blended learning environment. The key, overarching question we’ll be considering in this course is: In times of technology transience, how can we best support student learning in blended learning environments? In other words, how do we design blended learning opportunities in ways that reflect what we know about how people communicate and learn through digital interactions?Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1899HC&P Doctoral Proseminar in Curriculum & PedagogyThe proseminar half-course will be organized into three-hour sessions. These sessions will often involve two parts, which may be organized in any order from week to week. First, some classes will feature a member of the Curriculum and Pedagogy (C&P) faculty who will be asked to introduce her or his research to the students and to speak to the question of how her or his work is situated within curriculum studies. Invited faculty will be able to choose one or two readings for that week, in order to give students an introduction to their work prior to the class. Second, each class session will focus on a topic of interest to doctoral students related to academic work in general and doctoral work in particular. The course will introduce students to the details of being a PhD student in C&P and will provide a forum for exchanging resources and ideas among students. In tandem, the proseminar will provide students with an introduction to academic life in general, including issues such as conferences, publications, teaching experience, academic job markets, etc.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL7011HChild and Adolescent Development and LearningThis course addresses issues and developmental changes in children and the factors involved in child development. Infancy, the preschool period, early school years, intermediate years, and adolescence are covered. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3031HChildren's Literature within a Multicultural ContextThis course explores ways to bring children, cultural diversity and literature together in an interactive manner. Stories - whether traditional folktales or contemporary multicultural works - not only help define a child's identity and understanding of self, but also allow others to look into, appreciate, and embrace another culture. Class discussions revolve around an annotated bibliography of articles and books concerned with multicultural children's literature prepared specifically for the course and designed primarily for teachers in mainstream as well as ESL (English as a Second Language) and heritage language classes. The practical aim is for teachers to learn how to take advantage of the cultural diversity and interests that children of varied backgrounds bring to the classroom and to explore themes in folklore in order to open up the world of literature to all their students. The focus is to develop strategies for engaging students in classrooms in meaningful dialogue about diversity using the medium of personal interaction with the multicultural text. Throughout the course, we focus on how to encourage students to share their own cultural stories and ''border cross'' from one world to another. Particular emphasis is placed on the relevance of multicultural children's literature to minority students' self-esteem and literacy formation and to the school's relationship to minority and majority communities in addition to its relevance in confronting issues of human rights and social justice.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningminorit, social justice, human rightsSDG10, SDG16
CTL3411HCinema and Historical LiteracyThis course considers how viewers "read" historical cinema. Its focus is on the divergent demands of the production of historical films and the ways in which those demands distort (or just change) historical events in order to produce a consumer product. Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period. Students write weekly reports and a term paper.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningconsum, productionSDG12
CTL1325HCitizenship Education, Pedagogy, and School CommunitiesThis course is designed to explore and analyze evolving and contrasting characterizations of citizenship education in school communities, primarily in Canada. Particular attention is given to the ways in which teachers translate varying theoretical perspectives and curricular intentions into pedagogical practice as they address such themes as informed citizenship, civic identity, civic literacy, controversial public issues, and community engagement and activism. Instruction for this course includes a mixture of directed and interactive presentations, discussion, and inquiry modes. In doing so, candidates are provided with opportunities to deepen their language of conceptualization, their skills of analysis and critique, and their research abilities. Candidates will also be encouraged to take a personal stance on curricular and pedagogical perspectives in relation to citizenship education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, citizenSDG4
CTL1427HCommemorating Canada, 1800's - 1900'sThis course will examine historical literature that looks at the different ways in which historical commemorations and historical memory have been forged, the hegemonic meanings of the past created by elites, and the contestation of those meanings by those often formally excluded from these processes: women, members of ethnic and racialized groups, and the working classes. We will look at areas such as state commemorations and the creation of 'tradition', the development of museums, historical tourism, and the designation of monuments and battlefields as sites of national memory. The course will conclude with an exploration of current debates over the place of 'history' in the schools and universities.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningwomenSDG5
CTL3100HCommunication and Second Language Learning in the WorkplaceA huge proportion of workers in Canada utilize at least one language which is not their mother tongue in order to carry out their work. In this course, we will investigate a wide variety of questions and topics related to second language speakers and learners in the workplace. What is workplace communication? Who does it? Why? What impact do factors have on the conversations that occur in the workplace, including: - second language ability - sociolinguistic competence - intercultural communication - one's institutional role (e.g., employee, employer, supervisor, entry-level worker) - type of workplace (e.g., medical, legal, university, warehouse, construction, etc. - types of speech events that occur (e.g., meetings, interviews, email memos, internet chatrooms, lectures, workplace ESL classes, etc.) We will use sociolinguistic tools to understand workplace settings and to investigate what makes for successful multicultural/intercultural workplace interactions. We will analyze authentic examples of written and spoken language in a variety of workplace settings.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, worker, invest, internet, institutSDG4, SDG8, SDG9, SDG16
CTL1608HConstructive Learning and Design of Online EnvironmentThis course will examine the theory and research that underlies constructivist learning and its historical and philosophical roots. The educational applications that have developed out of these ideas, like problem based learning, collaborative learning and knowledge building will be explored in regards to how such concepts can inform and enhance the design of online environments and methods of teaching. We will look at different learning environments, both research projects and applications current in the field that instantiate various elements of these ideas.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1016HCooperative Learning Research and PracticeThis course provides for practical experience of as well as understanding of innovative practices in cooperative learning (CL). We explore rationales for and current developments (synergy, shared leadership). Topics include: What is CL (principles, attributes); how to organize CL (structures and strategies); how does CL work (basic elements, types of groups); teacher and student roles; benefits (positive interdependence, individual accountability, social skills, cohesion); evaluation (forms and criteria); obstacles and problems; starting and applying CL in your classroom (teachers' practical knowledge; collegiality; parental involvement); independent learning and collaborative inquiry; Ministry and Board requirements; and resources and materials Group (response trios) projects and joint seminars.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1047HCourse-Self-AssessmentThis course examines the concept of self-assessment and its relationship to learning and other psychological constructs, construction and validation of self-assessment measures, psychometric properties of self-assessment, how learners assess their learning, and how teachers and professionals in social and health services assess the quality and effects of their practices. The course emphasizes practice as well as theory and research. Some of the topics include methods of self-assessment; cognitive processes; psychometric issues and sources of bias in self-assessment; correlates of self-assessment; learner self-assessment and teacher or professional self-assessment.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1099HCritical approaches to arts-based researchThis course examines how creative practices can be employed to generate innovative research in the humanities and social sciences. Course participants will analyze current debates on representation, rationale, and ethics, and in particular they will examine how arts-based practices/processes can move educational research towards more critical, democratic, and participatory forms of research by attending to issues of social justice and equity.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequity, equit, social justice, democraSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CTL3035HCritical Literacy in ActionThis course focuses on critical literacy and the theories that underpin it. Throughout the course participants are asked to explore issues raised by critical literacy in relation to their own circumstances, particularly as these pertain to educational issues within society. This course challenges participants to develop critical questions with application to personal/professional contexts. Video clips of interviews with renowned scholars in literacy studies form the basis of this interactive course. Major questions discussed throughout the course are: What is literacy? What is critical literacy? What is the history of critical literacy? - What is so critical about critical literacy? What are the theoretical underpinnings of critical literacy? How do critical literacies converge and diverge with multiliteracies? What does critical literacy look like in practice? Graduate students will be asked to generate additional critical questions that contribute to individual or collective critical inquiry projects such as a critical literature review, a thesis research project or a curriculum analysis that investigates burning questions about critical literacies.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL3008HCritical Pedagogy, Language, and Cultural DiversityLinguistic and cultural diversity have always characterized human societies and have usually played a central role in mediating power relations between dominant and subordinate groups. In recent years, theorists working within the framework of Critical Pedagogy have begun to describe how societal power relations are manifested in schools both through interpersonal interactions and the hidden curriculum. In particular, theory has focused on how language use and language learning interact with dimensions such as class, race, ethnicity, and gender in mediating power relations within the educational system. The course will focus on this body of theory and research and explore its applications to current educational issues related to minority students in both Canadian and international contexts.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learning, gender, minoritSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
CTL1049HCritical Practitioner Research in EducationThis course explores inquiry as a methodological stance on practice, a framework for investigating and addressing critical issues in school, classroom, and community-based research. What Cochran-Smith and Lytle (2001; 2009) have theorized as an inquiry stance invites educators to regard educational projects as sites of knowledge generation, occurring within social, historical, cultural, and political contexts. With its emphasis on the intimate relationship between knowledge and practice, this concept foregrounds the role that practitioners can play—individually and collectively—in generating understandings, rich conceptualizations, in the service of enacting new educational possibilities. Taking an inquiry stance involves constructively problematizing conventional educational arrangements, interrogating how knowledge is constructed, evaluated and used in various settings, and re-imagining the roles practitioners might play in actualizing change in their work contexts. Drawing on this notion of inquiry as stance, this course will explore what it means to be a practitioner researcher in educational institutions and community-based organizations. This course is intended for MA and PhD students interested in exploring the possibilities and the potential of developing new understandings and research within actual educational contexts that they shape daily. This may include a range of initiatives, from developing small-scale studies to inform ongoing practice to developing larger research projects, including practitioner inquiry dissertations. The course will pay particular attention to the conceptual and experiential frameworks that practitioners bring to site-based educational research. We will consider critical practitioner research in relation to other methodological approaches as well as educational conversations about the nature of research, with special consideration of how research might shape practice and inform policy and the potential contributions practitioners can make.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, invest, gini, institutSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
CTL1304HCultural Studies and EducationThe study and concept of ''culture'' has emerged from a number of different disciplines over the past century. ''Cultural studies'' is a recent synthesis and critical re-evaluation of some of these approaches, one with important implications for educators in the area of the humanities. Through a discussion of key texts and issues generated within this tradition, the course examines struc- turalist, ethnographic, feminist, and postmodern versions of cultural studies in order to understand how these approaches reformulate an educational practice concerned with contemporary culture.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningfeminisSDG5
CTL1218HCulture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science and Technology EducationThis course explores the fundamentally cultural nature of all learning, but specifically learning of mathematics, science, and technology disciplines. The course is roughly split into three major sections. We begin with a brief overview of cultural-historical approaches to understanding learning and cognition. These theoretical frameworks begin with the assumption that cognition is fundamentally social and cultural, always grounded in activity, practices and communities. Secondly, we will focus on empirical research on mathematical, scientific and technological thinking in various contexts, ranging from elementary school mathematics classes to grocery shopping to carpet laying to theoretical physics. Finally, using the theoretical and empirical work as a foundation, we will study approaches to instruction based on the assumption that all learning is cultural.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1209HCurrent Issues in Science and Technology EducationThe course focuses on the design of effective strategies for exploring students' personal frameworks of meaning in science and addresses issues of contemporary international debate about science and technology education, including the ''Science for All'' movement, the ''new'' psychology of learning, the language of science and technology education, politicization of science and technology education, the role of laboratory work, computers in science education, and issues in environmental and health education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninghealth education, learning, labor, environmentalSDG3, SDG4, SDG8, SDG13
CTL1817HCurrent Issues in Teacher EducationThis course examines various issues of teacher education, including the longstanding criticisms (e.g. program is disjointed) while others are more recent concerns (e.g. defining a knowledge base for teachers). Specific topics will be examined in light of the current context of education with an effort to understand the complexity of becoming a teacher. This course will systematically examine the current research on teacher education. We will consider teacher education both within Canada and internationally. We will systematically work through various topics by reading widely, discussing issues, and trying to determine ways to reform and renew teacher education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL7087HCurriculum and Teaching in Drama and DanceThis course develops an awareness of and practice in the arts as a means of personal development and as a learning technique. The philosophy and practice of Dance and Drama in education will be explored. The possibilities of conceptual development and expansion of THE CREATIVE PROCESS through the art of Dance and Drama with a particular focus on the cognitive, social, and artistic development of the child. This course is designed to assist teachers in the Primary/Junior Division in the development, implementation and assessment/evaluation of Dance and Drama focused learning experiences. Candidates will participate in work that involves games, movement, tableau, role-playing, storytelling, playmaking, writing in role, improvisation, interpretation and presentation. They will learn to explore the elements of dance through creative movement that may be inspired by picture books, visual images, and artworks and music. Candidates will also explore various forms of global dance and genres. Current theories of arts in education will be incorporated as participants plan drama lessons, consider expectation(s) and implement assessment strategies as outlined in the Ministry documents. The use of Dance, Drama and Music as art forms as well as an INTEGRATIVE methodology for learning across the curriculum will provide a framework for the course.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7033YCurriculum and Teaching in Dramatic Arts - Intermediate/SecondaryThis course prepares teacher candidates to be effective instructors of dramatic arts the Intermediate/Secondary level. During this course, you will learn about the Ontario dramatic arts curriculum, lesson planning, assessment, and techniques for preparing learning experiences that foster creativity and nurture artistic growth. You will also study pedagogical practices related to each of the three inter-related strands of the Intermediate/Secondary drama curriculum: 1. Creating and Presenting; 2. Reflecting, Responding, and Analyzing; and 3. Foundations. The impact of different dramatic styles and traditions, drawn from different social and cultural contexts, will also be examined.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7034YCurriculum and Teaching in French as a Second Language - Intermediate/SecondaryThis course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge, and professionalism expected of beginning core French teachers at the Intermediate and Senior levels. We will focus on: methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media, technology, literature, and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education guidelines; electronic conferencing to support a collegial learning environment; the creation of a professional electronic portfolio. Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning. This course is offered in French.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL7031YCurriculum and Teaching in Health and Physical Education - Intermediate/SecondaryThis course examines the underlying principles of teaching Health and Physical Education in the Intermediate/ Senior division for the 21st century learner by drawing on current research, current philosophies and the overarching goals of Health and Physical Education. This course of study prepares future teachers to enable their students to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to become both physically and health literate in order to lead healthy active lives and promote healthy active living for others. Attention will be paid to the importance of supporting students in making positive personal health choices, enhancing their personal fitness and further developing movement skills, strategies and tactics to promote their participation in a wide variety of physical activities. Effective teaching strategies and practices in Health and Physical Education will be addressed. The importance of quality instruction as it fits into a comprehensive school health model will also be explored.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL7021YCurriculum and Teaching in History - Intermediate/SeniorThis course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching History in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Adapting the history program to meet the needs of a diverse student body will be highlighted. Course methods include demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities and field studies. Assignments will require candidates to develop practical applications and to link theory and practice. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7051HCurriculum and Teaching in Junior/Intermediate French (Second Language)This course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge, and professionalism expected of beginning core French teachers at the junior/ intermediate levels. We will focus on: Methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/ learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes. Integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media, technology, literature, and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education guidelines. Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning. This course is offered in French.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL7052HCurriculum and Teaching in Junior/Intermediate GeographyThe purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to basic knowledge, skills/techniques, attitudes and methodologies applicable in the successful teaching of geography and social studies at the J/I level. The course will, therefore, deal with both the practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of geography and environmental education in Ontario's schools. The course is an enabling process to help you develop your own teaching and learning beliefs through experiencing and experimenting with the ways geography's concepts and skills can help students learn. It stresses that reflection and analysis about their own teaching are critical elements in the life-long developmental process of being teacher first, geographer second. Geography is not a collection of arcane information. Rather, it is the study of spatial aspects of human existence. People everywhere need to know about the nature of their world and their place in it. Geography has more to do with asking questions and solving problems than it does with memorization of isolated facts. So what exactly is Geography? It is an integrative discipline that brings together the physical and human dimensions of the world in the study of people, places, and environments. Its subject matter is Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the relationships between people and environments, and the connections between people and places. The world facing students on graduating will be more crowded, the physical environment more threatened, and the global economy more competitive and interconnected. Understanding that world, that environment, and that economy will require high levels of competency in Geography, because Geography means a sensitivity to location, to scale, to movement, to patterns, to resources and conflicts, to maps and geographics.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, environmental education, environmentalSDG4, SDG13
CTL7058HCurriculum and Teaching in Junior/Intermediate Science - GeneralThis course is designed to prepare teachers of science in the intermediate division (Grades 7-10). It explores the teaching of selected units in all four strands from the Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum guideline. Attention is paid to the skills of lesson planning, laboratory techniques, teaching strategies, and assessment and resources, through workshops, lectures and lab activities. This course will consider important contexts as they relate to science and technology in education as outlined in: Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow - A Policy Framework for Environmental Education in Ontario Schools (a policy document on Environmental Education and ways to infuse Environment and Sustainability education into our classrooms) Equity and Inclusive Education in Ontario Schools, 2009: (guidelines for school boards- Equity and inclusive education aims to understand, identify, address, and eliminate the biases, barriers, and power dynamics that limit students' prospects for learning, growing and fully contributing to society) Growing Success, 2010; Explore the seven fundamental principles and what they mean for instructional decisions Connecting the Dots, Key Learning Strategies for Environmental Education, Citizenship and Sustainability. These learning strategies involve students as engaged learners, learning within the context of their communities and addressing relevant, local issuesDepartment of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, equity, citizen, sustainability education, environmental education, labor, equit, environmentalSDG4, SDG8, SDG10, SDG13
CTL7059HCurriculum and Teaching in Junior/Intermediate Visual ArtsThe focus of the course is on becoming visual arts teachers in the intermediate grades. The course is structured to intersect theory, practice, and studio work in order to explore a) contemporary art and elementary education; b) contemporary issues in pedagogy; c) lesson planning at the elementary level d) the above in relation to Ministry guidelines, assessment, and curriculum development.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL7022YCurriculum and Teaching in Mathematics - SecondaryThis course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Mathematics in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Course methods include discussion of objectives, teaching methods, instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and selected topics from the Ontario Ministry of Education Guidelines. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7086HCurriculum and Teaching in Music and DanceThis course develops an awareness of and practice in the arts as a means of personal development and as a learning technique. The philosophy and practice of Music and Dance in education will be explored. The possibilities of conceptual development and expansion of THE CREATIVE PROCESS through the art of Music and Dance with a particular focus on the cognitive, social, and artistic development of the child. This course is designed to assist teachers in the Primary/Junior Division in the development, implementation and assessment/evaluation of Music and Dance focused learning experiences. Candidates will explore music through singing, movement, musical games, playing instruments (recorder, percussion, djembes and boomwhackers) and developing their listening skills while at the same time creating, composing and improvising. Current theories of arts in education will be incorporated as participants plan lessons, consider expectation(s) and implement assessment strategies as outlined in the Ministry documents. The use of Music and Dance as art as well as an INTEGRATIVE methodology for learning across the curriculum will provide a framework for the course.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7017HCurriculum and Teaching in Music, Dance and DramaAn introduction to research-informed teaching and professional learning in Music, Dance and Drama Education for students in grades K to 6. For each of these disciplines, the course explores Ministry curriculum, lesson design and planning, pedagogy, assessment and evaluation, and research in light of contemporary educational theory and practice. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching Program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learningSDG4
CTL7029YCurriculum and Teaching in Music: Instrumental - Intermediate/SeniorIn this course, you will acquire the knowledge, skills/techniques, attitudes and methodologies necessary to be effective teachers of geography at the Intermediate/Senior level. You will study the Ontario geography curriculum, learn how to prepare effective geography lessons, develop a repertoire of different pedagogical strategies, examine a variety of assessment techniques, and extend your knowledge of practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of geography in Ontario's schools. As you engage with the material in this course, you will be expected to take an active and reflective stance toward your growth as a geography teacher.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL7030YCurriculum and Teaching in Music: Vocal - Intermediate/SeniorThis course investigates approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal performance, composition, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-12. A range of music education philosophic orientations, Ministry of Education policies, music technologies, research-informed pedagogies, and those emerging the field are considered while learning to design of curriculum lessons and units. Recent research questioning the music education paradigm of the past 25 years is examined. A practitioner research stance is the basis for all assignments, which curriculum development, and practical learning in Japanese lesson study format as well as philosophic writing.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, investSDG4, SDG9
CTL7089HCurriculum and Teaching in Physical EducationAs a part of the Curriculum & Instruction course, this module is designed to introduce you to strategies and approaches for teaching Health & Physical Education (HPE) to Primary and/or Junior learners. This course is designed to help OISE MT students (re)discover the theory and practice of HPE, as well as understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for effective teaching and learning that meets the diverse needs of students. Over the course you will become more competent and confident in working with learning tools and resources in each of these areas of the curriculum; developing lesson themes and ideas; and devising questions and learning activities for students. You will become familiar with the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Health & Physical Education (2010), core concepts and teaching techniques, methods for integrating HPE with other disciplines, including social justice, environmental education and indigenous approaches to knowing. Current ways of thinking about and teaching HPE may differ significantly from when beginning teachers were students; therefore one of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about these disciplines and their role in contemporary approaches to teaching and learning.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, environmental education, indigenous, environmental, social justice, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
CTL7041YCurriculum and Teaching in Religious Education (Catholic Schools)- Intermediate/SeniorPrimarily intended to prepare teachers of Religious Education in Catholic secondary schools, the focus of the course is the discipline of Religious Education rather than religious doctrine. This course examines contemporary theories and issues of pedagogy, analyzes present guidelines and support materials, and addresses teaching models and assessment practices relevant to the field of Religious Education. It asks students to present research-based findings from explorations of theorists, strategies, and resources in the discipline of Religious Education. In particular, graduates from this program will have a strong sense of how Catholic Social Teachings can animate the Religious Education curriculum.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL7018HCurriculum and Teaching in Science and Environmental EducationThis course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Science Education and Environmental Education in PJ and JI. This course consists of lectures, discussions, learning activities and workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content of Science and Technology, and Environmental Education across the curriculum in the primary, junior and intermediate (PJ, JI) grades, based on the Ministry of Education curriculum found in The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8, Science and Technology (2007), The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 & 10, Science (2008) and Ministry policy, Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow (2009). As an overview, it will introduce theory and practices from a range of related fields, including Science and Technology Education, Environmental Education (EE), Outdoor Education, and Ecojustice Education, drawing on concepts such as Inquiry-based Learning, Sustainability, Systems-Thinking, Equity, Interdisciplinary Design, and Integration. The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning, effective use of teaching resources, digital technology, assessment/evaluation strategies, and an exploration of related educational research literature.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learning, equity, environmental education, ecojustice education, equit, environmental, ecojusticeSDG4, SDG10, SDG13, SDG16
CTL7023YCurriculum and Teaching in Science: Biology - Intermediate/SeniorThis course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Biology in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL7024YCurriculum and Teaching in Science: Chemistry - Intermediate/SeniorThe I/S Science-Chemistry course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Intermediate Science (Grades 7 to 10 Science) and Senior Chemistry (Grades 11 and 12 Chemistry). This course consists of a series of lectures, seminars and laboratory workshops designed to emphasize the research in teaching and learning of chemistry The course expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content of science in the intermediate and senior grades are guided by the Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8, Science and Technology (2007), The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 & 10, Science (2008) and The Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 & 12 Science(2008). The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and candidates will be encouraged to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL7026YCurriculum and Teaching in Science: General - Intermediate/SeniorThis course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Intermediate and senior Science. It consists of a series of lectures, seminars, and laboratory workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology, and content of science. The course is designed to assist students to explore: the teaching and learning process, the pedagogical considerations in teaching science; and the challenges of teaching science as a curriculum subject in schools with a diverse student population and research in science education. It is also designed to help develop the knowledge and skills of curriculum development within the context of curriculum theory and to support personal reflection within the context of contemporary classrooms or other education settings.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, knowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL7025YCurriculum and Teaching in Science: Physics - Intermediate/SeniorDesigned to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions (Grades 7-10 Science and Grades 11-12 Physics), this course deals with the Overall and Specific Expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum. The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL7027YCurriculum and Teaching in Social Science: General - Intermediate/SeniorThis course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach students Social Science at the Grade 7-10 level in a thoughtful and interactive way. It focuses on Social Science at the Intermediate level. Teacher candidates will explore a variety of teaching techniques, which are useful in teaching and assessing today's students as they experience the current Social Science curriculum. Teacher candidates will also have an opportunity to engage in inquiry and examine unique ways for presenting Social Science content. Examining classroom practice and methods, curriculum and program materials are an important component of the process. As well, the interdependence of these components, their link with theory and contemporary issues will be considered. Techniques such as discussion, presentations, inquiry, and active participation that incorporate individual and group learning will be employed. Opportunities for sharing of ideas and experiences from field placements will be provided in the context of the classroom setting. Two important ideas that will be emphasized throughout the program are: how to make Social Science meaningful for children, and how to promote positive attitudes.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7072HCurriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Indigenous EducationThe Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies and Aboriginal Education course explores the shared histories of Indigenous and settler relationships across Turtle Island and, while recognizing the US/Canadian divisions as colonial constructs, will focus more specifically on the Canadian context. This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Social Studies (Grades 4-6), History and Geography (7-10) within the context of Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) understandings. This course consists of a series of seminars and workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content integrating both Social studies and Aboriginal Studies in the junior/intermediate grades. The course provides opportunities to develop practical understandings relating to instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning, including practical assessment strategies, in a variety of classroom contexts as well as the incorporation of Indigenous and Western knowledges and understandings. It seeks answers to questions of identity, meaning-making, complex issues concerning community and nation, past and present. It looks to bring local histories and traditional ecological knowledges- and to provide a template for understanding the complex interplay relating to constructions of identity (personal, local, and national) and sovereignty.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, knowledge, knowledges, settler, indigenous, ecolog, land, indigenous, sovereigntySDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
CTL7088HCurriculum and Teaching in Visual ArtsAs a part of the Curriculum & Instruction course, this module is designed to introduce you to strategies and approaches for teaching Visual Arts Education to Primary and/or Junior learners. This course is designed to help OISE MT students (re)discover the theory and practice of Art Education, as well as understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for effective teaching and learning that meets the diverse needs of students. Over the course you will become more competent and confident in working with learning tools and resources in each of these areas of the curriculum; developing lesson themes and ideas; and devising questions and learning activities for students. You will become familiar with the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Arts (2009), core concepts and teaching techniques, methods for integrating Art Education with other disciplines, including social justice, environmental education and indigenous approaches to knowing. Current ways of thinking about and teaching Art Education may differ significantly from when beginning teachers were students; therefore one of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about these disciplines and their role in contemporary approaches to teaching and learning methodology for learning across the curriculum will provide a framework for the course.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, environmental education, indigenous, environmental, social justice, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
CTL7071HCurriculum and Teaching in Visual Arts and Physical EducationAs a part of the Curriculum & Instruction course, this module is designed to introduce you to strategies and approaches for teaching Visual Arts Education and Health & Physical Education (HPE) to Primary and/or Junior learners. This course is designed to help OISE MT students (re)discover the theory and practice of Art Education and HPE, as well as understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for effective teaching and learning that meets the diverse needs of students. Over the course you will become more competent and confident in working with learning tools and resources in each of these areas of the curriculum; developing lesson themes and ideas; and devising questions and learning activities for students. You will become familiar with the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Arts (2009), and Health & Physical Education (2010), core concepts and teaching techniques, methods for integrating Art Education and HPE with other disciplines, including social justice, environmental education and indigenous approaches to knowing. Current ways of thinking about and teaching Art Education and HPE may differ significantly from when beginning teachers were students; therefore one of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about these disciplines and their role in contemporary approaches to teaching and learning.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, environmental education, indigenous, environmental, social justice, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
CTL1808HCurriculum Innovation in Teacher EducationThis course critically explores innovations in teacher education associated with promoting coherence, maintaining relevance, addressing complexity, and serving increasingly diverse communities. Program content, designs, practices, pedagogies, partnerships and policies developed in response to enduring challenges and competing conceptions of 'learning to teach' will be examined. Students will be encouraged to consider and develop potential innovations to initial and ongoing teacher learning that are supported by evidence and research.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1224HCurriculum Issues in Science EducationThis course aims to illuminate contemporary Canadian and international debate in science education by providing insights into the nature of curriculum change through a critical analysis of episodes in science curriculum history. Students will have an opportunity to explore K-12 school science curricula at global, national, provincial, and classroom levels. The course has a metacognitive focus where students are encouraged to reflect on their own learning processes as well as those of science learners in other contexts. The course is framed by the question: How can an examination of the ways that science education has developed and been mobilised in different classroom contexts inform our focus for the future of science education?Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1212HCurriculum Making in Science: Some Considerations in the History, Philosophy and Sociology of ScienceThis course will address some key issues in the philosophy and the sociology of science and their implications for science education at the elementary and secondary levels. Attention will also be directed towards (i) a critical appraisal of the role of the history of science in science education , and (ii) a consideration of pseudosciences and their role, and the distortion and misuse of science for sociopolitical goals. Course members will have the opportunity to explore ways in which lab work, computer-mediated learning, language activities and historical case studies can be used to present a more authentic view of science, scientific development and scientific practice.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1622HData Gathering and Assessment in Online CoursesFormative and summative assessment are critical components of teaching and learning. This course introduces you to the theory and practice of assessing students online. Key topics include: a) the goals of assessment; b) systematic practices for the development of assessment instruments; c) the strengths and weaknesses of different online assessment instruments and their suitability for different instructional goals; d) how to effectively communicate online assessment criteria and procedures; and e) how to design online assessments to be fair, culturally-sensitive, equitable and effective. During the course, you will use an assortment of free web-based tools to develop, test, and refine assessment instruments of your own design. This course will explore assessment strategies both for use in elementary and / or secondary contexts and in adult education contexts.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequitable, learning, equitable, equitSDG4, SDG10
CTL1312HDemocratic Citizen Education: Comparative International PerspectivesWhat social identities and roles are included in the ‘citizenships’ to be taught in various political and social contexts, and why? How might democratic citizenship be taught and learned? This course examines contrasting approaches to political (governance), social and cultural (identity and justice), local and transnational education for democracy (democratization), in light of comparative international and Canadian scholarship. The course addresses implicit and explicit citizenship curriculum/ teaching, primarily in relation to youth and state-funded formal (school) education. Themes include: agency in relation to social structures; participation in social institutions and collective decisions; territory and environment; social conflict, dissent and peacebuilding; diversely-positioned identities (gender, culture, nation…), values and motivations, rights, relationships, community and justice. Participants will learn to analyze and assess educational proposals and experiences in relation to theory, research, and their own democratic education goals. This course serves as a core course for the Institute's graduate studies specialization in comparative, international, and development education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpeace, citizen, gender, institut, governance, peace, democraSDG4, SDG16, SDG5
CTL1621HDesign and Development of Online Content, Media and ArtifactsThis course involves a combination of theory and project design. Students will be introduced to key educational theories that inform how we design instructional media: cognitive load theory, dual coding theory, and Mayer’s Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning. Using the ADDIE model as an overarching framework, this course will focus on techniques for designing and developing educational media, including how to make effective use of colour, text, audio, video and different interface elements (menus, buttons, icons, etc.). The course will also examine principles of accessibility and the University Design for Learning (UDL) standards, which students will incorporate in their final projects.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, of colour, accessibSDG4, SDG10, SDG11
CTL1625HDigital Media and Practices for a Knowledge SocietyA visionary document put out by UNESCO stated ‘Nobody should be excluded from knowledge societies, where knowledge is a public good, available to each and every individual.’ Standing in the way of that vision is education’s failure to democratize knowledge. The rich-get-richer story of modern times is as true for education as for the economy; those who enter with more knowledge leave with disproportionately more. In the meantime, a free, plentiful and equalizing resource—students’ capacity to work creatively with ideas—remains underdeveloped. Taking advantage of this resource requires that education adopt cultural norms that are prevalent in innovative, knowledge-creating organizations of all sorts: collective responsibility for community, not simply personal knowledge; sustained idea improvement; a “surpassing ourselves” mindset; and students taking charge at levels customarily reserved for teachers, curriculum, and technology designers. This class will function as a workshop to advance innovative knowledge practices and digital media attuned to UNESCO’s vision of an inclusive knowledge society.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, democraSDG4, SDG16
CTL3007HDiscourse AnalysisThis seminar focuses on discourse and discourse analysis, and their application to the field of second language education. We will review various approaches to discourse analysis, such as pragmatics, ethnomethodology, conversation analysis, interactional analysis, critical discourse analysis. We will consider language and discourse from the perspective of political economy and the construction of identities. Attention will also be paid to gender, gender performance and sexuality as identity constructs, as these are interrelated with language use and language acquisition.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninggenderSDG5
CTL1330HEducation and Peacebuilding in Conflict Zones: International Comparative PerspectivesThis course examines education's role in exacerbating, mitigating, or transforming direct and indirect (systemic) violence, and in building sustainable democratic justice and peace, in different kinds of conflict zones around the world (such as divided and post-colonial societies, post-war reconstruction, refugee education, and societies suffering escalated gang criminality). We address conflict, justice, relational and peace-building learning opportunities and dilemmas embedded in various curricula and local/international initiatives. Themes include: education in 'emergency' and 'fragile state' contexts; securitization and colonization vs. humanization and restorative/transformative justice in education; history education for violence or peace; education for human rights and social cohesion; inter-group contact and integrated schooling; conflict resolution capability development; and teacher development for democratic peacebuilding. Participants will gain competence and confidence in conflict (transformation) analysis and in applying contrasting theories to contrasting examples of practice.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, peace, refugee, peace, human rights, democra, violenceSDG4, SDG16, SDG10
CTL1060HEducation and Social DevelopmentThis course examines the linkages between education, both formal and non-formal, and the social development of nations, with particular focus on the process of educational policy formation for both developing nations and developing sub-areas within richer nations. The course aims to acquaint students with the main competing ''theories'' or conceptualizations of the development process and, through examination of a representative set of recent empirical studies and ''state of the art'' papers, to develop an understanding of the relationships between educational activities and programs and various aspects of social development, with an overall focus on problems of social inequality. The overarching objective is to help develop a better understanding of how, in confronting a particular educational policy problem, one's own theoretical preconceptions, data about the particular jurisdiction, and comparative data about the problem at hand interact to produce a policy judgment.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninginequality, equalitSDG10
CTL1221HEducation for Human Goals Local and Global: How's Science Education Helping?The role of science education in positively impacting life conditions globally is perhaps the most intriguing and urgent problem for science education. In this regard, a recurring theme in local and international deliberations on science education is the role of school science in social, economic, and cultural conditions, that is, in everyday life. This course will facilitate a systematic analysis of the role of school science in everyday life along five themes: The context for the issues that pertain to science education and social economic development; Emergent constructs for school science; How people learn and knowledge transfer; The realities of science teaching and learning; The notion of knowledge, school science, other sciences, and social economic development; and, Historical reflections and critique of the science education endeavor.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CRE1001HEducation, francophonies et diversiteThis seminar proposes to study, from a range of perspectives, Francophone minorities within local, national and international spaces. It will discuss the processes of minoritization and exclusion existing within and towards francophone minorities. The study of issues structuring the French-speaking space is an opportunity to bring to light the transformative processes that have taken shape, have been contested, and which have succeeded each other as debates have evolved over time and to identify the actors involved, their motivations, the context of their actions and the categories of classification that emerged from these debates. Similarly, the study of linguistic minorities has led to the exploration of a large number of theoretical concepts and advances stemming from various disciplines and traditions. This seminar will thus serve as a forum for examining how to achieve a better understanding of the issues facing linguistic minorities and to formulate new research questions by using various theoretical orientations and putting them to work.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningminoritSDG10
CTL1609HEducational Applications of Computer-Mediated CommunicationA survey of the use of computers for human communication for educational purposes. Applications and issues of teaching and learning in the online environment, related to all levels of education, are examined. The course is conducted via OISE's computer conferencing system.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7006HEducational Research 1Educational Research 1 is a graduate seminar designed to foster MT candidates’ research literacy and deepen their understanding of the role that research plays in the field of education. Candidates learn how to access, interpret, synthesize, and critically evaluate research literature. This course is designed to develop candidates’ identities as teacher-researchers who engage in critical inquiry as a key component of their professional practice. Research for educational equity and social justice is integral to the course. The course facilitates examination of the politics of knowledge production and use, as well as citation practices. Candidates learn how to examine power dynamics between researcher and researched, and are guided toward deepening their understanding of researcher subjectivities and research as relational. Candidates are provided with opportunities to critically reflect on how their positionality shapes their identities and practices as teacher-researchers. Throughout the course, candidates review the research literature in an area of education that interests them. The culminating assignment of the course is a 3750-5000-word research paper. Educational Research 1 (CTL7006H) is a prerequisite for Educational Research 2 (CTL7015H).Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, equity, equit, production, social justiceSDG4, SDG10, SDG12, SDG16
CTL7015HEducational Research 2In Educational Research 2 candidates draw on the research literacy they developed in CTL 7006 to learn some of the foundational skills of doing research. They conduct a small-scale qualitative research study using either semi-structured interviews or document analysis methods. Special attention is given to the topics of research design, data collection, data analysis, and mobilizing knowledge in one’s own practice and beyond. Students deepen their understanding of how their own positionalities and experiences affect their identities as teacher-researchers. The course format includes a combination of whole class instruction, research methods workshops, and independent work periods. The culminating assignments of the course include a 3750-5000-word research paper and a presentation at the annual MT Research Conference.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL3025HEducational SociolinguisticsThis course addresses the influences of community, home, school, and cultural heritage on (second) language acquisition and language use. Social and educational implications of language variation are addressed, particularly as they relate to language policy and social and linguistic change. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic background are studied as they relate to language use and perception. The current status of different language minority groups is considered, and related cultural and pedagogical issues are raised. Students will acquire an understanding of basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in sociolinguistics as they relate to second and foreign language learning, teaching, and use. They will develop a sociolinguistic perspective for the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages and obtain experience in the use of sociolinguistic techniques for the description of language in society as it pertains to second language learning, teaching, and use.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsocioeconomic, learning, gender, minoritSDG1, SDG4, SDG5, SDG10
CTL1120HEffective Teaching Strategies in Elementary Mathematics Education: Research and PracticeDuring this highly interactive course, graduate students will investigate in depth, current research on effective teaching strategies in elementary mathematics focusing on student communication and its implications for classroom practice. This course will also provide opportunities for graduate students to deepen their understanding of the research literature through hands-on activities, student work samples, and classroom-researched videos. We will examine the research related to student discourse and communication in order to explore not only students' understanding of mathematical concepts, but also the use of mathematical language and the social interactions that take place between students. No experience in teaching mathematics or previous coursework related to mathematics is required.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL7050HEnglish (First Language)This course engages students in the practices, resources and theories of English/Language Arts to prepare them for teaching in the intermediate grades (Grades 7-10). Explorations of written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media, and technology define the content. Since language is fundamental to thinking and learning, students engage in reading, writing, viewing, talking and representing strategies as the practical grounding for understanding and reflecting on English/Language Arts practices, and for creating sound language curricula. The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements of the course will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education and Training guidelines.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1222HEnvironmental Studies in Science, Mathematics and Technology EducationIn this course we will explore teaching and learning about environmental education (EE) through science, mathematics and technology education. Environmental education is a particularly timely topic given the recent changes to Ontario curriculum and the renewed interest in environmental issues nationally and internationally. Central to this course is a commitment to a teaching and learning continuum that includes the use of schools, school grounds, the local and broader community, and outdoor education centres. All of these 'places' become contexts in which educators can explore environmental education. In this course, we will attempt to link our discussions to the theory and practice of EE education. Specifically, we will examine the notion of environmental literacy and citizenship, current changes in Ontario curriculum and policy, the relationship between EE and nature, sustainable development and social justice, place-based education, outdoor education, and EE and Indigenous knowledges. The course also examines the philosophical and ideological orientations and competing frameworks that underpin the EE movement in Canada and elsewhere, and identifies some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding its implementation.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, knowledges, citizen, environmental education, place-based education, sustainable development, indigenous, sustainable development, environmental, social justice, indigenousSDG4, SDG8, SDG11, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
CTL1214HEquity Issues in Science EducationThis course deals with issues of gender bias, Eurocentrism and other forms of bias and distortion in science and science-technology education. It seeks a generalized approach to equity issues and examines ways in which border crossings into the subcultures of science and science education can be eased for all those who currently experience difficulties.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequity, gender, equitSDG4, SDG5, SDG10
CTL1122HExploring the Praxis of Environmental & Sustainability EducationThis course explores the theory and practice (praxis) of Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) in school and community settings. Students will investigate the historical roots, theoretical foundations and pedagogical traditions of ESE from personal and organizational perspectives, contextualizing these in recent developments in research, policy, and practice in Canada and internationally. The praxis of ESE will be situated in relation to equity, social justice, Indigenous ways of knowing, health and wellbeing, and transformative learning. Students will use this as a starting point to explore and develop practices in ESE in classrooms and community settings as a means to better position and integrate ESE in their own work as educators and researchers.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningwellbeing, learning, equity, sustainability education, invest, equit, indigenous, environmental, social justice, indigenousSDG3, SDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13
CTL3036HExpressive Writing: Practice and PedagogyThis course focuses on the pragmatics of expressive writing in a range of pedagogical settings. Students will experience the ways in which a range of styles and modes of expressive writing operate in various prose forms including personal narratives, arguments, evaluations, interviews, and reports. Students will consider the implications of this expressivist pedagogy for educational practice from elementary to post-secondary learning. Students will work both independently and collaboratively. Assessment will be portfolio-based.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL3000HFoundations of Bilingual and Multicultural EducationFoundation course for the Language and Literacies Education Program, also open to students from other programs. The course is offered for students particularly concerned with issues of second language instruction, education for minority populations, and pluralism in education, defined in terms of language, culture (including religion), or ethno-racial origin. The emphasis is on study of major foundational writings that have shaped current thinking about these topics and on deriving implications for reflective teaching practice. Registration preference given to LLE students.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningminoritSDG10
CTL1000HFoundations of Curriculum & PedagogyThis is a required course for master's students (and doctoral students who did not take it in their masters programs). The aim of this course is to apply theory and research to the study of curriculum and teaching. The course (a) provides a language for conceptualizing educational questions; (b) reviews the major themes in the literature; c) provides a framework for thinking about curriculum changes and change; and (d) assists students in developing critical and analytical skills appropriate to the scholarly discussion of curriculum and teaching problems.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL1620HFoundations of Online Teaching and LearningThis course examines the theoretical foundations of teaching and learning, and how that theory informs the design and delivery of online instruction. The course utilizes a textbook that is entitled, “How Learning Happens: Seminal Works in Educational Psychology and What They Mean in Practice” by Paul A. Kirschner and Carl Hendrick (2020). Kirschner and Hendrick’s book is organized around a set of 28 significant studies in educational psychology that illuminate different aspects of how learning takes place. Each week, students in this course will read one or two of these seminal articles and discuss its implications for online education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7014HFundamentals of Teaching and LearningThis course will explore the complexity of schools and place of the school in the community. Practical issues around lesson planning, unit planning, classroom management, and the class as a community are addressed. This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of students and will introduce student teachers to many of the philosophies, methods, and materials relevant to teaching. It provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the process of becoming a teacher, insight into the role of ethics in research, and to acquire the skills and attitudes to be a thoughtful and reflective practitioner. In these respects, this course enables the student teacher to build a foundation for continuing professional growth as an individual and as a member of the teaching community. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1119HGaining Confidence in Mathematics: A Holistic Approach to Rebuilding Math Knowledge and Overcoming AnxietyIt has been well documented that many adults experience mathematics anxiety, possibly due to the traditional way they have been taught math in their own schooling. This course utilizes a holistic approach in helping elementary teachers to reconstruct their foundational math knowledge and overcome their anxieties. Utilizing reform-based approaches, participants will work in small groups on selected mathematics problems and hands-on explorations at an appropriate level of difficulty. Journal writing, group reflection and guided visualization activities will be used to help participants become aware of, and start dealing with their emotional and cognitive blocks in relation to mathematics. Such work opens the door to accessing one's mathematical intuition and creativity. A discussion of how the strategies used in the course, or reported in the literature, can be adapted for mathematics-anxious students will also be included.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL1313HGender Equity in the ClassroomThis course is designed for practising educators to develop and enhance their knowledge of how gender is produced in our educational system. It examines the different stages of the educational system: elementary, secondary, community college and university. The classroom is the focus because it is the central work setting of educational institutions. What happens in the classroom is not simply the result of what a teacher does but involves interactions between and among students and between teachers and students. The classroom has its own dynamic and is also interconnected to outside relationships with parents, friends, educational officials etc. The course has as its main objectives to examine the dynamics of inequality in the classroom and to discuss and develop strategies for change. While the primary focus is on gender inequality, course readings also draw on resources that make visible the intersections of gender with other inequalities based on race, class and sexual orientation.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, equity, gender, inequality, equit, equalit, institutSDG4, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CTL1065HGender, Sexuality and SchoolingThis course will focus on matters of equity, inclusion, and school reform as these pertain to differences of sexual orientation and gender identity among students in elementary and secondary schools. Course content and instruction will focus on understanding and addressing educational and schooling issues confronting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer (LGBTQ) students. It will also explore strategies and resources for challenging homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia in classrooms and schools. We will examine the ways homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia intersect with multiple identities, other forms of oppression and our history of white settler colonialism. We will also examine curriculum materials and community support services that promote sensitivity, visibility and social justice.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsettler, equity, gender, queer, lgbtq, transgender, equit, social justiceSDG4, SDG5, SDG10, SDG16
CTL1430HGendered Colonialisms, Imperialisms and Nationalisms in HistoryThis course explores the ways in which gender relations have been an integral part of colonial and imperial expansion and national identities, from the mid-18th to the mid-20th centuries. We examine both how gender relations helped structure these historical developments and how gender relations were subject to change in various colonial contexts (including 'settler societies' such as Canada). The course readings explore the uneven and historically contingent ways in which processes of colonial and national expansion created new forms of gender asymmetry in both colony and metropole.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsettler, gender, metro, nationalismSDG4, SDG5, SDG11, SDG16
CTL7053HHealth and Physical EducationThis course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary Intermediate level (grades 7-10) Health and Physical Education programs. It is consistent with the national and provincial trend towards de-emphasizing competitive team sports and focuses on wellness and the process of guiding youngsters to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that lead one to become physically active for a lifetime. Participants relate social, cultural, economic and political factors to teaching and student learning and their ability to work collaboratively within the school setting, systems and the community. One of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about Health and Physical Education and its role in schools, thereby supporting beginning teachers as they construct their vision for teaching Health and Physical Education. The importance of quality instruction as it fits into a comprehensive school health model will also be explored.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1307HIdentity Construction and Education of MinoritiesThe course is designed to examine the contradictory role of the school as an agent of linguistic and social reproduction in a school system where students are from diverse linguistic and cultural origins. In this context, the majority-minorities dichotomy will be critically examined. The course will focus particularly on how school contributes to the students' identity construction process. In this critical examination, identity will be understood as a socially constructed notion. Key-concepts such as identity, ethnicity, minority, race, culture and language will be first analyzed. The process of identity construction will then be examined within the educational context of Ontario.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningminorit, productionSDG10, SDG12
CTL1623HImmersive Technology in EducationThis course deals with the appropriate use of immersive technology (virtual reality, augmented reality, 360° video, 3D learning environments) as it pertains to curricula and education. This course examines the novel role of immersive technology as tools for educators and students to engage, enhance, and extend curricula beyond conventional methods. Also included is a discussion of issues related to educational trends and initiatives, theoretical frameworks, as well as subject and classroom integration. The major emphasis is on assessing the specific academic context (of students, the teacher, the learning environment, and curriculum objectives) that immersive technology can address in an educational and safe manner. This course will consist of twelve (12) lessons which will offer a variety of study methodologies, approaches, and activities: online videoconferencing with lectures, small-group student discussions, and student-led tech insights. Student reflection exercises will be conducted via online peer feedback forms, academic readings, online discussion forums, and exploration of digital resources.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7073HIndigenous Experiences of Racism and Settler Colonialism in Canada: An IntroductionWith a focus on teacher preparation, this course seeks to understand the experiences of Indigenous people in Canada with regard to racism and settler colonialism, focusing on implications for classroom-based, programmatic, and pedagogical practice and reform. Because schooling has a historical and contemporary role in facilitating racism and settler colonialism, especially through the creation of residential schools, this course encourages teachers to become familiar with the consequences of this ongoing history, and to learn strategies to rethink relationships between schools and Indigenous learners and communities.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsettler, racism, indigenous, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CTL3798HIndividual Reading & Research in Language and Literacies Education: Master's LevelSpecialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student. While course credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to propose an Individual Reading and Research course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL1624HInstructional Design: Beyond the LectureInstructional design is important aspect of education. Today, we see many job postings for instructional designers in both the education and the corporate sectors. This course aims to equip students with both the foundational knowledge and skills necessary to become a successful instructional designer in the 21st century. The course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of instructional design using technology in flex-mode, and fully online delivery modes. Students will have the opportunity to apply their understanding of instructional design principles through the assessed learning experiences. Online discussions will explore current issues in instructional design, and assessed learning experiences will provide students with individual and collaborative opportunities to develop their instructional design skill set.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1217HIntegrating Science, Mathematics and Technology CurriculaThis course focuses on curriculum issues associated with integrating school science, mathematics and technology. Participants will examine the contemporary literature on curriculum integration. Topics include the history of curriculum integration and school subjects, theoretical and practical models for integration, strategies for teaching in an integrated fashion, student learning in integrated school settings, models for school organization, and curriculum implementation issues. During the course, participants will be required to interview a colleague, and to arrange access to a classroom or instructional setting to conduct some action research on their own integrated teaching practices.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7060HIntermediate Teaching Subject - DramaThis course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary dramatic arts instruction for Intermediate level (grades 7-10) learners. Teacher candidates will examine both the research on adolescent development and strategies for effective dramatic arts pedagogies. The course will also explore how teachers can promote student engagement and how to foster a positive, supportive classroom culture. Special attention will be given to such topics as role playing, improvisation, techniques for infusing drama in other disciplines, and the special role that the dramatic arts can play in examining issues of equity, inclusivity and diversity.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningequity, equitSDG4, SDG10
CTL7054HIntermediate Teaching Subject - HistoryThe purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to basic knowledge, skills/techniques, attitudes and methodologies applicable in the successful teaching of History. The course will, therefore, deal with both the practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of History in Ontario's schools. The course is an enabling process to help you develop your own teaching and learning beliefs through experiencing and experimenting with the ways history's concepts and skills can help students learn. It stresses that reflection and analysis about their own teaching are critical elements in the life-long developmental process of being teacher first, historian second. History is not a collection of arcane information. People everywhere need to know about the nature of their world and their place in it. History has more to do with asking questions and solving problems than it does with memorization of isolated facts. A primary objective of the course is to equip you with practical, innovative strategies around which to build an effective history program. As well, you will be exposed to a wide variety of learning resources that can be used to enhance classroom learning. In the end you will leave the course well prepared to deliver an exciting and success-based history curriculum to a diversity of learners.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL7055HIntermediate Teaching Subjects - MathematicsThis course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach students mathematics at the Grade 7-10 level in a thoughtful and interactive way. It focuses on mathematics at the Intermediate level. Teacher candidates will explore a variety of teaching techniques, which are useful in teaching and assessing today's students as they experience the current mathematics curriculum. Teacher candidates will also have an opportunity to engage in inquiry and examine unique ways for presenting mathematics content. Examining classroom practice and methods, curriculum and program materials are an important component of the process. As well, the interdependence of these components, their link with theory and contemporary issues will be considered. Techniques such as discussion, presentations, inquiry, and active participation that incorporate individual and group learning will be employed. Opportunities for sharing of ideas and experiences from field placements will be provided in the context of the classroom setting. Two important ideas that will be emphasized throughout the program are: how to make mathematics meaningful for children, and how to promote positive attitudes.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1320HIntroduction to Aboriginal Land-centered Education: Historical and Contemporary PerspectivesThis course is designed as an introductory course for both Aboriginal (FNMI) and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners focusing on issues related to teaching and learning in Aboriginal contexts in both urban and rural communities in Canada and more generally across Turtle Island (North America). We will be examining Indigenous ways of knowing and consider the ways this knowledge may inform teaching and professional practices for the benefit of all. Historical, social, and political issues as well as cultural, spiritual and philosophical themes will be examined in relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curricula, pedagogies and practices. There is a particular emphasis placed on understandings of land and culture as it relates to constructions of the self in relation to education. The course is constructed around three modules. The first module focuses on exploring historical, social and political contexts, background and related factors that have and continue to influence current realities of FNMI students in Canada. The second module of the course focuses on examining where we are now – here in this time – particularly with regard to educational considerations which includes constructions of the self and community engagement. The third module explores some of the ways we might all move forward together in respectful relationships.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, indigenous, urban, rural, land, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11, SDG15
CTL1615HIntroduction to AI in EducationWhile many recognize that forms of artificial intelligence (AI) technology is increasingly infused in our everyday lives, AI’s role in education (K-12, higher education and corporate) is less clear. Some are predicting that AI will enhance teaching and learning by complimenting instructional and assessment practices through big data collection, machine learning and sophisticated prediction. Some see the promise of AI through the fulfillment of support roles such as through the use of chat-bots and intelligent tutors. Others are concerned about the impact of AI on educators and learners, particularly related to security/privacy and data collection, ambiguous decision making/inherent bias, job loss and loss of control. AI is showing promise in the area of research tools, too. In this course, we explore the implications of AI in education (AEID). Included in the course is a discussion of related terminology and core concepts, the history and current state of AIED, practical considerations, current applications and future predictions about the impact of AI on the educational field. The readings will focus on a variety of theoretical concepts and will explore the integration of and implications of AIED. The key, overarching questions we’ll be considering in this course are: What definitions, terminology and core concepts of AI are important to understand as they relate to education? How do we stay current with AI developments in education? What are the implications of AI integration in education today and in the future?Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1602HIntroduction to Computers in EducationAn overview of the uses of computers in education and consideration of critical issues of those uses; recommended as a first course in this area. Current practice and research in the use of computers to guide instruction are examined. Includes aspects of computer-aided learning: computers in the schools, computer-managed instruction, computer assisted instruction, internet resources, computer mediated communication, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence applications. Specific topics change each year. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken early in the student's program.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, internetSDG4, SDG9
CTL1332HIntroduction to Decolonization in EducationThe purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and ideas related to processes of colonization and struggles for decolonization. The course seeks to engage in a reflection process of what it means to decolonize and to teach for decolonization, particularly when doing educational work within a settler colonial context. The course will focus on introducing selected foundational texts from decolonial thinkers and considering specific decolonization movements from different parts of the world. The course will gravitate around what Edward Said might call a “contrapuntal” reading of key texts from scholars of color about the topic of colonization and decolonization, which will weave around a process of reflection on how we are all impacted in and affected by ongoing colonization. This will involve a consideration of what we mean by colonization, and what are different colonial modes to impose particular knowledge frameworks in order to secure control over land as well as human and natural resources. The aim of the course is to begin to develop an initial understanding of what education for decolonization might mean by engaging “classic” texts while reflecting on how we are implicated in and/or impacted by colonization.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, decolonial, settler, of color, decolonization, natural resource, landSDG4, SDG10, SDG12, SDG15
CTL1603HIntroduction to Knowledge BuildingThis course examines the role that knowledge building can play in school and work settings. We will review the distinction between knowledge building and learning, analyze recent knowledge building literature, and discuss socio-cultural, logistical and design considerations when constructing an online Knowledge Building community. Students will visit and study existing Knowledge Building communities as one of the course assignments.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL1018HIntroduction to Qualitative Inquiry in Curriculum, Teaching, and LearningExperiential learning for students new to qualitative inquiry is provided through a broad introduction to qualitative approaches from beginning to end. A range of approaches relating to students' theoretical frameworks are explored. Thesis students are encouraged to pilot their thesis research.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7008HIntroduction to Special Education and Mental HealthIn this course, teacher candidates are introduced to topics/core content related to both Special Education and Mental Health and Well-Being. Teacher candidates will consider Special Education from the perspective of the general classroom teacher. From this perspective, special education is not "special" but is effective teaching that benefits all students in the class. Teacher candidates will consider Mental Health as pertaining to students' resilience, social/emotional well-being and mental wellness. This course is designed to promote critical and reflective thinking and learning about topics related to supporting a diverse range of learners, including students identified as requiring special education support. Specifically, this course will support teacher candidates to: (1) examine their own beliefs and practices related to supporting student learning, (2) understand and utilize a strength-based approach and teaching strategies for differentiation, accommodation, and modification to plan for and assess learning needs, (3) understand the relationship among mental health, well-being and achievement and view student well-being as inclusive of physical, cognitive/mental, social and emotional well-being, (4) identify ways to support students' mental health and well-being and identify students who require more intensive intervention (4) develop the capacities to work with families and other professionals in support of students, (5) demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence necessary to effectively promote success for students with a broad range of experiences, needs and abilities, including students with exceptionalities, (6) develop the knowledge and skills pertaining to First Nation, Métis, and Inuit ways of thinking about the kinds of differences associated with special education needs. This course will pay particular attention to current research in planning for inclusion through Universal Design for Learning (UDL), differentiated instruction (DI), and response to intervention (RTI) and how these can inform teachers' responses to students; various ways of being, learning, and showing understanding in the classroom.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningwell-being, mental health, mental wellness, knowledge, learning, cities, resilien, resilience, resilienceSDG3, SDG4, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
CTL7074HIssues in Educational Law, Policy and EthicsAs a required course in a professional program, there are both professional and academic rationales underpinning this course. Teachers and high schools are governed by a range of shifting and variably interpreted legal, policy and ethical mandates which have been produced in a range of historical, political and institutional contexts. One key aim of this course is to assure that teacher candidates are aware of their professional and legal rights and responsibilities, as defined by national and provincial legislation, local school board policy, and professional advisories. Another aim of the course is to explore ethical nuances and challenges in teaching while aiming to interpret and respond to relevant legislation that helps to define the teacher's professional role. Using academic research literature, policy documents, and case studies, the course blends theory with the consideration of practical in-school situations in order to enable teacher candidates to analyse policy, ethical and legal tensions in teaching. The course thus aims to rigorously explore teachers' professional contexts so as to inform their daily practice through thoughtful ethical reflection in light of legal and policy considerations.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginstitutSDG16
CTL7085HIssues in LiteracyIn this course, current issues related to literacy instruction and their theoretical underpinnings will be explored. We will examine research related to this issues and how the impact they can have on classroom programming. Candidates will have an opportunity to discuss their personal beliefs and views about literacy education as they bridge theory with practice. Instruction in this course will include lecture, written response, group activities, and group investigations.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL7084HIssues in NumeracyIn this course, current issues related to mathematics instruction and their theoretical underpinnings will be explored. We will examine research related to this issues and how the impact they can have on classroom programming. Candidates will have an opportunity to discuss their personal beliefs and views about mathematics education as they bridge theory with practice. Instruction in this course will include lecture, written response, group activities, and group investigations.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL7012HIssues in Secondary EducationThere are both professional and academic rationales underpinning this course. Teachers and high schools are governed by a range of shifting and variably interpreted legal, policy and ethical mandates which have been produced in a range of historical, political and institutional contexts. One key aim of this course is to assure that teacher candidates are aware of their professional and legal rights and responsibilities, as defined by national and provincial legislation, local school board policy, and professional advisories. Another aim of the course is to explore ethical nuances and challenges in teaching while aiming to interpret and respond to relevant legislation that helps to define the teacher's professional role. Using academic research literature, policy documents, and case studies, the course blends theory with the consideration of practical in-school situations in order to enable teacher candidates to analyse policy, ethical and legal tensions in teaching. The course thus aims to rigorously explore teachers' professional contexts so as to inform their daily practice through thoughtful ethical reflection in light of legal and policy considerations.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsecondary education, institutSDG4, SDG16
CTL1331HLand-centred Approaches to Research and Community EngagementIndigenous research is a dynamic, collaborative and rapidly expanding field of study and practice. This course invites students to explore and apply their growing understandings of the relationship between Indigenous research and community engagement through an in-depth review of relevant literature, independent study and group work, critical engagement, and experiential learning. This course a theoretical, conceptual and applied exploration of Indigenous approaches to conducting research and engages in topics dealing with ideological, socio-cultural -political, and ethical issues that inform Indigenous Land-centered (capital “L”) research and community engagement across various landscapes, community, and educational contexts including but not limited to philosophies, frameworks, protocols, and practices. This course also examines specific topics such as research ownership, process and outcomes framed around the 5 R’s (relationship, respect, relevance, reciprocity and responsibility) in relation to Indigenous research from Land-centred and place-specific philosophical contexts. The course also includes an exploration of the governance by Indigenous communities of their own research and ethical review processes. In relation to developing culturally relevant, responsive and emergent research processes we will explore some of the various ways to do research and engage respectfully and meaningful with Indigenous communities. Educators, researchers, and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues concerning emergent, responsive, and respectful Indigenous research and community engagement through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in both urban and rural contexts. There is a particular emphasis placed on philosophical nature of Land in relation to Indigenous research and community engagement together with constructions of the self in relationship to diverse research contexts. This course uses relevant research articles, activities, and various forms of media to foster an understanding of the pertinent literature and to assist students in engaging with some of the realities that face both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people across Turtle Island as they endeavour to engage in respectful and meaningful research. The course brings together a variety of decolonizing and anti-oppressive approaches to understanding the contexts of doing research so that educators, researchers and professional practitioners will come away with a better understanding of Indigenous research and the issues affecting insider/outsider researchers, as well as some better tools that can help develop and implement more inclusive, meaningful, fulfilling, and culturally relevant research in both urban and rural contexts and places both within Turtle Island and across the great waters. The course will explore understandings of what it means to conduct research with Indigenous peoples on the issues of pressing concern to communities across diverse contexts and asks what it means to decolonize research. It will also apply socio-cultural and socio-political frameworks to both theoretical and applied issues.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, water, labor, capital, indigenous, anti-oppressive, urban, rural, land, governance, indigenousSDG4, SDG6, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11, SDG15
CTL3015HLanguage and Literacies Education in Multilingual ContextsA seminar to examine research on literacy education in second, foreign, or minority languages in subject or medium of instruction programs. Psychological and social perspectives are explored in relation to commonalities among and differences between second-language teaching in various kinds of world contexts.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningminoritSDG10
CTL3101HLanguage Awareness for Language EducatorsThis courses explores the nature of language: its rule-governed structure, its variety and its universal characteristics, the way it is acquired by native speakers and additional language learners, its role in society, its role in creating, sustaining, and enhancing power, and its role in informal and institutional education. The aim of the course is to consider (i) language awareness and use in first, second, and foreign language education; (ii) the special need for language awareness in L2 contexts; and (iii) the role of language awareness in teacher development and program administration. Students will relate course concepts to their own language learning and teaching experiences, and will carry out observational/empirical tasks to apply their learning to the real world.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, institutSDG4, SDG16
CTL3024HLanguage Teacher EducationIn this course the many dimensions of second and foreign language teacher education will be explored. The course will focus on four main areas including 1) the foundations of second language teacher education, 2) initial teacher preparation, 3) in-service education and on-going professional development as well as 4) activities and procedures for second language teacher education. Consideration will be given to the specific needs of different types of second language teachers working in either traditional or non-traditional learning environments with learners of different ages. The implications of responding to these diverse needs for second language teacher education will also be explored.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1031HLanguage, Culture, and Identity: Using the Literary Text in Teacher DevelopmentThe literary text is used as a vehicle for reflection on issues of language and ethnic identity maintenance and for allowing students an opportunity to live vicariously in other ethnocultural worlds. The focus is on autobiographical narrative within diversity as a means to our understanding of the ''self'' in relation to the ''other''. The course examines the complex implications of understanding teacher development as autobiographical/biographical text. We then extend this epistemological investigation into more broadly conceived notions of meaning-making that incorporate aesthetic and moral dimensions within the multicultural/anti-racist/anti-bias teacher educational enterprise.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninginvest, anti-racistSDG9, SDG10
CTL1322HLiteracies of Land: Narrative, Storying and LiteratureThis course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on literacies grounded in understandings of Land (capital "L") while looking at how these literacies can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the various literacies and ways to support literacy success in classrooms. We will explore culturally aligned texts, stories, and oral narratives together with symbolically rich themes that support literacies of land as living and emergent. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues concerning literacies through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, capital, urban, rural, landSDG4, SDG9, SDG11, SDG15
CTL3033HLiteracy Research MethodologiesAn exploration of the relationships between theory, research findings, course members' teaching experiences. Course members contribute their teaching experience as a context in which the group discusses ideas drawn as far as possible from original sources read and reported on. The topic, language and learning, cuts across various areas commonly taught in the school curriculum and embraces original work in a number of disciplines (e.g., philosophy, linguistics, psychology, sociology, literary criticism).Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1219HMaking Secondary Mathematics MeaningfulVarious approaches to making mathematics meaningful for, and accessible to intermediate and senior level students will be examined in the light of recent developments in the field and the Ontario mathematics curriculum guidelines. Throughout the course, we will focus on the question 'making mathematics meaningful for whom,' so an equity focus will pervade each week's readings and discussions. Topics may include: Streaming and school structures, the use of open-ended problems, identity issues, building on community knowledge, classroom discourse, and assessment.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, equity, equit, accessibSDG4, SDG10, SDG11
CTL7099YMaster of Teaching Research ProjectThe Master of Teaching Research Project is designed to provide a deeper exploration of the interrelationships between educational theory, research, and practice. The overarching goal of this project is to engage students in an in-depth analysis of issues related to curriculum, teaching, and learning through systematic research. The MTRP has value both for students who are intending to pursue a career in classroom teaching, and for students who are planning to pursue doctoral studies. The Project involves the identification of a research problem, a literature review, data collection, data analysis, the construction of a formal report, which is published in a public online repository, and a formal presentation. As part of this process, students develop a variety of research-related skills, including the ability to formulate effective research questions, conduct interviews, review the academic and professional literatures, analyze data, and present research findings.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7100HMathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher CandidatesThis course equips students with the math knowledge and skills needed by Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate teachers. A strong foundation in math content knowledge is necessary for teachers to build pedagogical content knowledge capacities. Students will develop an understanding of numeracy concepts in: quantity relationships, operational sense and proportional reasoning. The course will build on problem solving content skills in multiplication, division, order of operations, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios, integers, exponents, manipulating expressions and solving algebraic equations. Students will be immersed in meta-cognition as math learners and will reflect on their own math strengths, needs and learning styles. The course will offer various math pedagogies, such as math games and hands-on activities suitable for elementary classes. At the beginning of the course, teacher candidates may opt into taking a math proficiency test geared at the grade 8 and 9 level. Students who earn a minimum achievement of 90% on the test will earn an immediate CR grade for CTL 7100H and will be excused from the remainder of the course. This test is most appropriate for teacher candidates who have a major or minor in math for their undergraduate degree.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learning, citiesSDG4, SDG11
CTL1225HMathematics Education: Linking Research and PracticeIn mathematics education today, policymakers, teachers, and researchers all agree that it is critical to link research to teaching practices in our schools. This means conducting research that is directly relevant to the everyday dilemmas of mathematics teachers and supporting teachers to adopt practices that research has shown to be effective. In this course, we draw from a recent publication by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, that outlines ten key questions that teachers put forward to guide researchers in their work. Topics include: assessment, curriculum, culturally relevant mathematics pedagogy, student thinking, effective algebra teaching, teacher professional development, influence of technology on mathematical learning, effective teaching with technology, interventions for struggling students, and helping students engage in ‘productive struggle.’ We will also investigate various theoretical and conceptual frameworks for mathematics education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, learning, investSDG4, SDG9
CTL1819HMulticultural Literature in the Schools: Critical Perspectives and PracticesIn this course, we examine multiple and multicultural books. We examine the multicultural literature (what we read) as well as critically analyzing (how we read) these texts. Critical (indications of class, race and gender relations); multicultural (acknowledges the diversity in cultural experiences) analysis and social action/justice (what and how we act on these analyses) will guide our work together. The new knowledge constructed will inform how we create and develop critical perspectives and practices with students in the schools.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, knowledges, genderSDG4, SDG5
CTL1033HMulticultural Perspectives in Teacher Development: Reflective PracticumThis course will focus on the dynamics of multiculturalism within the individual classroom and their implications for teacher development. It is intended to examine how teachers can prepare themselves in a more fundamental way to reflect on their underlying personal attitudes toward the multicultural micro-society of their classrooms. Discussions will be concerned with the interaction between personal life histories and the shaping of assumptions about the teaching-learning experience, especially in the multicultural context. The course will have a ''hands-on'' component, where students (whether practising teachers or teacher/researchers) will have the opportunity to become participant-observers and reflect upon issues of cultural and linguistic diversity within the classroom.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3805HMultilingualism and plurilingualismThis course will examine several forms of linguistic diversity at the individual and community level as well as their impact on language and identity construction. Through the class, students will discuss and understand the emerging notion of plurilingualism as distinct from multilingualism and analyze it from three different scientific points of view: cognitive, sociological/sociocultural and pedagogical. The course will adopt a global perspective in investigating language diversity and its implications in different geographical areas and historical times. The course is at doctoral level but it is open to Master's students (with permission of the instructor).Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL7056HMusic - InstrumentalThese courses investigate approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through instrumental performance, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving; and personal experience with music and technology (MIDI) and media arts. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-10. Current music education philosophies, Ministry of Education and Training policy and best practices from the field will be the basis for the designing of curriculum lessons and units. Assignments involve practical applications of methodology and frequent personal reflections on music teaching.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, investSDG4, SDG9
CTL7057HMusic - VocalThese courses investigate approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal and instrumental performance, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving; and personal experience with music and technology (MIDI) and media arts. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-10. Current music education philosophies, Ministry of Education and Training policy and best practices from the field will be the basis for the designing of curriculum lessons and units. Assignments involve practical applications of methodology and frequent personal reflections on music teaching.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, investSDG4, SDG9
CTL1809HNarrative and Story in Research and Professional PracticeThe course examines narrative and storytelling approaches to the study of educational experience in research and professional practice. Narrative is explored as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience and the representation of meanings. Course participants will engage in narrative self-study research, collaborative research with colleagues, and in the review of narrative theses and literature. The course examines narrative and storytelling approaches to the study of educational experience in research and professional practice. Narrative is explored as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience and the representation of meanings. Course participants will engage in narrative self-study research, collaborative research with colleagues, and in the review of narrative theses and literature.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglaborSDG8
CTL3034HNew Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings"New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings" is a graduate seminar for masters and doctoral students interested in exploring issues and research literature in the field of literacy. This course takes up the notion that literacy is not singular, but multiple and ideological: diverse social practices that are embedded in local contexts. The course is designed as a collaborative inquiry into uses and associations that "literacy" has in particular educational projects and contexts. Using a seminar format, we will look at theoretical and empirical literature as well as examples from practice to explore the social functions of literacy in work, home, and school settings, with an eye toward how these conversations and ideas can be useful for researching, theorizing, and teaching in our own areas of interest. We examine new and historical developments in New Literacy Studies, multiliteracies, multimodality, critical literacy, as well as practitioner and activist traditions, and other work that considers literacy in relation to critical, social, political, technological, and educational factors.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglaborSDG8
CTL1063HPedagogies of SolidarityTaking as a starting point a conception of pedagogy that centres relational encounters, this course seeks to consider the question of how to enter into relationships with others that seek to transform the very terms that define such relationships. The course explores how the concept of solidarity has been used to both explain the nature of social relationships between groups and individuals, as well as how it has been mobilized as a strategy for political work. In both counts, solidarity plays a key pedagogical role because it seeks to either sustain or challenge particular social arrangements. The course takes education and educational experience as a particular site for thinking through solidarity as both explanation and strategy, and considers a range of educational situations, including the classroom, to consider the complexities of solidarity as ethical encounters in pedagogical relations.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL3003HPlanning and Organizing the Second Language CurriculumThis course deals with current theory and practice in the development of the second language curriculum -- the planning, needs analysis, objectives, content, structure, and evaluation of second language programs for preschoolers to adults. The course is not an introduction to language teaching methods, but rather assumes that participants have taken such a course previously and/or have significant language teaching experience, which they now wish to consolidate -- by studying fundamental issues, current theory and research, recent publications and curriculum initiatives -- to develop their professional knowledge and capacities in this area.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, citiesSDG4, SDG11
CTL1104HPlay, Drama, and Arts EducationThe examination of current topics or problems in play, drama, and arts education as related to curriculum studies. Issues will be identified from all age levels of education as well as from dramatic play, each of the arts disciplines, and aesthetic education as a whole. Students will address one specific topic through self-directed learning and present the results in an appropriate form. Topics vary from year to year depending upon interests of course members.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3038HPlay, Language and Literacy in Primary ClassroomsThis course brings together research and practice in primary classrooms, introducing sociolinguistic and sociocultural perspectives on young children’s oral language and literacy (with a focus on writing and other symbolic representation), and play-based pedagogy supporting literacy. In addition to contributing to ongoing online conversations about readings, students will learn a story well enough to tell it to an audience and discuss the play-based pedagogical possibilities of the story. Students will also develop a creative collaborative curriculum activity intended to support young children’s oral language and literacy.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, laborSDG4, SDG8
CTL1448HPopular Culture and the Social History of Education IIThis course examines a range of themes in the history of education and popular culture, drawn primarily from nineteenth and twentieth-century Canadian history. Topics that will be covered include the impact of popular forms of amusement and education: theatre, tourism, public parades and festivals, and commercial exhibitions and museums. We also will explore the relationship of various levels of the state and of capitalism to popular culture and the relation of "high" culture to mass culture. This course will pay attention to the influences of gender, race and ethnicity, class, and sexuality in shaping and, at times, challenging, particular forms of popular culture.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninggender, capitalSDG5, SDG9
CTL1024HPoststructuralism and EducationThis course will examine the foundations of educational thought from the perspectives of Jacques Derrida, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Luce Irigaray, Hélène Cixous, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, Julia Kristeva, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean Baudrillard. Educational implications and applications of poststructural philosophy will be stressed in relation to the discursive and non-discursive limits of the scene of teaching.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglandSDG15
CTL1797HPracticum in Curriculum & Pedagogy: Masters LevelSupervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningpedagogySDG4
CTL3797HPracticum in Language and Literacies Education: Master's LevelAn individualized course linking research and theory in Language and Literacies Education (LLE) with practical fieldwork supervised by a professor. Credit is not given for the fieldwork per se, but rather for the academic work related to it. Academic assignments related to the field work are established collaboratively between the student and professor supervising the course, and evaluated accordingly, in a manner similar to an individual reading and research course (e.g., CTL 3998H). A student wishing to propose a Practicum course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglaborSDG8
CTL3026HPragmatics in Language EducationThis course examines theories, research methods, and substantive findings about second language speakers' and learners' pragmatic style and development. Themes to be explored include the relationship between pragmatic and grammatical development, the role of different learning environments (such as study abroad, EFL vs. ESL), options and effects of instruction, individual differences, institutional discourse, cross-cultural politeness studies, electronic communication, and the interrelation of social context, identity, and L2 pragmatic learning. Through the class, students will understand basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in interlanguage and cross-cultural pragmatics; develop perspectives on the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages as pertains to the acquisition of pragmatic competence; and investigate in detail a topic related to the field of interlanguage pragmatics.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, invest, institutSDG4, SDG9, SDG16
CTL1812HProfessional Ethics of Teaching and SchoolingCurrent educational literature reflects increasing attention to the practical and philosophical significance of ethical decision-making as a central aspect of the professionalism and accountability of teachers in their role as moral agents. This course will examine, through in part the use of case studies, some of the ethical complexities, dilemmas, and controversial issues that arise within the overall context of the school. It will raise questions about ethical concerns that occur as a result of teachers' daily work with students, colleagues, administrators, and parents. The course will consider the nature of professional ethics in education and associated concepts of the moral climate of schools. It will explore theoretical and empirical knowledge in the field of applied educational ethics and the moral/ethical dimensions of teaching and schooling.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, climateSDG4, SDG13
CTL1048HQualitative Methodology: Challenges and InnovationWorking within a broad discussion of methodology and the problems of theory and praxis particular to a 'global', postmodern, and neoliberal era, this course invites students to work through methodological dilemmas, choices and experiments within the context of their own research projects and in conversation with a variety of qualitative methodologists. Readings will propose critical, creative, and collaborative solutions to a range of contemporary qualitative methodology concerns in the field of education today. In particular, the problematics of gender and race, the impact of neoliberal politics on workers and learners, the tensions of local and global, the competing epistemologies of art and science, structural and post-structural, the ethical relations between researchers and research participants, the challenges of 'representation', the struggles over claims to truth are some of the subjects to be addressed in the discussion of research design and methodology.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninggender, labor, workerSDG5, SDG8
CTL3413HReading Cinema and Cultural IdentityThis course is concerned with the ways in which historical films treat the subject of identity. In this regard, it has four sub-sections: power/gender, class struggle, inter- and intra-cultural connections, and appearances and reality. Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period. Students write weekly reports and a term paper.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninggenderSDG5
CTL1319HReligious Education: Comparative and International PerspectivesThis course presents and examines various international and comparative perspectives on religious education within and across Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Islamic, and Jewish faith communities. We will critically and comparatively engage in the policies, practices, and research on religious education in public and faith-based schools Canada and internationally. No previous knowledge or coursework on religious education is necessary.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL3001HResearch Colloquium in Second Language EducationThis course focuses on the range of research under way or recently done by professors in or affiliated with the LLE program as well as some recent graduates or visiting scholars. Topics, research projects, and presenters vary each year. Participants analyze examples of diverse research methods and topics, critique theses previously completed in the program, and undertake a systematic synthesis of prior research related to their prospective thesis on language and/or literacies learning, teaching, curriculum, or policy. The course is required of students in the MA and PhD and may also be taken by students in the MEd. This colloquium provides opportunities to become familiar with ongoing research, research methodologies, and curriculum activities in second-language learning and teaching.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1407HRural Education and Social Reform in Canadian History 1860-1960This course is directed at those students interested in exploring the deep connections between education and social change in Canadian history. Before 1941, the majority of Canadian families lived outside of cities. This course will examine institutional structures, popular responses, and community involvement, and the ways that these factors interacted as state-run compulsory schooling was slowly accepted. It invites students to explore the vital, but relatively unknown, relationship that existed between education, social protest, and the search for reform in rural Canada in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings in this course will allow students to explore the ways that various people, kinds of people, and organizations, both rural and urban – First Peoples; recent British, African, and eastern European immigrants; educational bureaucrats and revolutionaries; social reformers; settled farm families and itinerant miners – used various kinds of education to encourage, resist and direct social reform in rural Canada.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningcities, urban, rural, institut, social changeSDG11, SDG16
CTL3810HSecond Language Classroom Research MethodsThe purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation in the breadth of possibilities for researching the second language classroom. The course is structured to capture this breadth methodologically (primarily quantitative and qualitative social science approaches, but also research informed by humanities approaches); theoretically (cognitivist, socio-cultural, and critical approaches); contextually in terms of program models (both across bilingual, foreign, heritage, Indigenous, and multilingual mainstream contexts, but also in terms of K-12 and adult settings); and in terms of domain (e.g., research with varying foci on language itself, the teacher, learners, curriculum, policy, home-school connections, etc.). As much as possible, the course pairs "how-to" readings with exemplars of second language classroom research. The course also includes structured activities to support students in gaining direct experience with typical methods for doing research in and about language classrooms. Based on the interests of students enrolled in the course, we can agree to adapt the syllabus at the beginning of the semester to narrow or shift our focus. By the end of this course, participants are expected to: 1) Articulate the relationship between theoretical perspective, research design, and methods in the study of second language classrooms; 2) Use course and other readings to critique an exemplar of second language classroom research; 3) Formulate a research(-able) question of interest to the participant; 4) Use small-scale data collection techniques and reflect on their experience with them; 5) Use course and other readings to develop a research proposal.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningindigenous, indigenousSDG10, SDG16
CTL3807HSecond Language Education Research MethodsFor thesis students (MA, PhD, or EdD) preparing to do empirical research on second language learning, instruction, and/or curriculum, this course reviews and provides experience with relevant techniques for data collection (e.g. focus groups, interviewing, verbal reports, observation, discourse analysis, questionnaires, tests); data analyses (e.g., coding, profiling, summarizing, reliability and verification checks, validation), and addressing ethical issues in research with humans.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3010HSecond Language LearningThis course examines theory and research in second language (L2) acquisition, including cognitive, linguistic, social, biological and affective variables that account for relative success in L2 learning. The role of instruction in L2 learning is also discussed.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3002HSecond Language Teaching MethodologiesThis course offers a historical survey of second language teaching methodologies and provides students with theoretical knowledge of innovative current practices, including the movement to a post-method era, new ways of teaching traditional second language skills, and other key issues current in the field. All learner groups are considered in minority and majority settings in Canada and internationally, though English and French are emphasized.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, minoritSDG4, SDG10
CTL1333HSettler Colonialism and Pedagogies of OppressionThe course allows students to learn about schools, pedagogy and education through the lens of settler colonial studies. Settler colonialism is the process by which colonial nations and populations seek to displace Indigenous people from the Land in order to establish, and maintain, modern nations such as Canada. The course takes a critical approach to ways that settler colonialism persists through a matrix of oppressive pedagogies of knowledge, subjectivity, state and land theft/occupation. The course offers pathways for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to deepen their understandings, to challenge and to delink from pedagogies and practices that support settler colonialism. Indigenous knowledge and scholarship will guide how we approach un/learning settler colonialism in ways that are accountable to Indigenous resurgence. Topics covered include Land theft/occupation (privatization, containment, dispossession); knowledge (reason, positivism, Western Enlightenment); schooling (residential schools, school to prison pipeline, multiculturalism); school subjects (social studies, physical education, environmental education, peace education); subjectivity (racism, gendered violence, heteropatriarchy, homonationalism); and public pedagogies (sport, popular culture, media). Students will be encouraged to make connections between local, everyday practices and wider historical contexts and critically analyze settler colonialism across Turtle Island (Canada/US) and other settler colonial contexts, such as Aotearoa/New Zealand, Palestine/Israel, South Americas and South Africa.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, knowledge, learning, settler, racism, peace, environmental education, gender, patriarchy, indigenous, environmental, land, peace, nationalism, indigenous, violenceSDG4, SDG16, SDG5, SDG10, SDG13, SDG15
CTL1617HSocial Media & EducationThis course explores issues related to the use of social media in education contexts. There will be a particular focus on K-12 schools but the course will also examine the use of social media in higher education. Some of the topics that will be discussed include: popular social media tools and their application to teaching and learning, policies and practices related to integrating social media into classrooms, student safety in online environments, cyber bullying, elements of digital citizenship, e-professionalism and teachers as models of digital citizenship. The course format will include a combination of whole class instruction, small group activities, and independent work.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, citizenSDG4
CTL1220HSociocultural Theories of LearningThis course is an introduction to sociocultural theories of learning, including both historical and contemporary views on how culture, society and history influence the nature of learning. We will begin with Vygotsky and activity theory, and then consider a broad spectrum of current views that draw on this work.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3806HSociocultural Theory and Second Language LearningThis course will examine aspects of second language learning (SLL) from the perspective of a sociocultural theory of mind. Key concepts from sociocultural theory, for example zone of proximal development (ZPD), scaffolding, private speech, and mediation will be considered as they relate to SLL. Relevant writings of Vygotsky, Leont'ev, Cole, Donato, Lantolf, van Lier, Wertsch and others will be read in depth.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL7019HSupporting English Language LearnersThis course focuses on the inclusion of English Language Learners (ELLs) across the school curriculum. It is intended to support teacher candidates' development of a pedagogical approach and a repertoire of instructional and assessment strategies to engage ELLs in developing language and content knowledge simultaneously. Using an asset-based perspective to language diversity, the course is structured around the broad domains of (1) theories of language learning and teaching, (2) language awareness, analysis, and assessment, (3) ESL strategies in the content areas, and (4) family, school, community, and policy contexts. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates should be able to identify and use ELLs' individual strengths and interests to promote their learning and development, to work with families and other professionals to support ELLs, and to understand their roles and responsibilities as teachers with respect to ELLs and their academic, social, and personal success.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL1045HSurvey ResearchThe course studies survey research design and questionnaire development. Topics include single and multiple waves research designs, sampling strategies, data collection methods (mail, telephone, computer administered, and individual and group interviews), non-response issues, questionnaire construction and validation, and sources of errors in self-reporting. Course content relating to the use of questionnaire as a form of data collection applies to research designs other than survey research. Teaching and learning will be conducted through reading, lecturing, class and internet discussion, and take-home and in class individual or small group exercises.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, internetSDG4, SDG9
CTL7070HSustainability Education: Issues & PracticeThe Sustainability course is designed to assist candidates in the Master of Teaching Program in implementing the Ontario curriculum for Environmental Education (MOE 2017) within their subject specializations, and, heeding the United Nations' repeated calls for action on sustainable development, to promote both critical and caring perspectives on the serious ecological and humanitarian challenges we face globally and locally. The course will survey various aspects of the broad topic space: environmental sustainability education, place-based education, sustainable development goals, global citizenship education, and eco-justice. The course builds upon and compliments learning in the other foundations courses without repeating the content: CTL7074H-Issues in Educational Law, Policy and Ethics; CTL7073H-Indigenous Experiences of Racism and Settler Colonialism in Canada: An Introduction; and, CTL7009H-Anti-Discriminatory Education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learninglearning, settler, racism, citizen, sustainability education, environmental education, place-based education, sustainable development, humanitarian, indigenous, anti-discriminatory, sustainable development, environmental, ecolog, indigenousSDG4, SDG8, SDG11, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG15
CTL1037HTeacher Development: Comparative and Cross-Cultural PerspectivesIn this course we explore differences in the ways ''Knowledge'', ''Teaching'', and ''Learning'' are constructed and understood in different cultures, and how these affect how teachers learn and promote learning, with particular emphasis on multicultural settings. An underlying theme is how one can best bring together a) narrative, and b) comparative/structural ways of knowing in order to better understand teacher development in varying cultural/national contexts. The choice of particular nations/regions/cultures on which to focus in the course responds to the experience and interest of the students and the availability of useful literature regarding a particular geo-cultural area with respect to the basic themes of the course.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningknowledge, learningSDG4
CTL1215HTeaching and Learning About Science and Technology: Beyond SchoolsThis course will focus on theoretical and practical perspectives and current research on teaching and learning science and technology in school and non-school settings. Consideration will be given to classroom environments, as well as science centres, zoos, aquaria, museums, out-door centres, botanical gardens, science fairs, science hobby clubs, and media experiences. In particular, the course will focus on the nature of teaching and learning in these diverse settings, representations of science and technology, scientific and technological literacy, and socio-cultural interpretations of science and technology.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1207HTeaching and Learning about Science: Issues and Strategies in Science, Technology, Society, and Environment (STSE) EducationA detailed study of issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science that have significance for science education, an examination of the philosophy underpinning the STS movement, and a consideration of some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding the implementation of science curricula intended to focus on environmental, socioeconomic, cultural, and moral-ethical issues.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsocioeconomic, learning, environmentalSDG1, SDG4, SDG13
CTL1206HTeaching and Learning ScienceThis course involves a study of theories of learning in the context of science education, a survey of research relating to children's understanding of concepts in science, and an exploration of strategies for more effective science teaching.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1318HTeaching Conflict and Conflict ResolutionThis seminar examines how young people may be taught (and given opportunities), implicitly or explicitly, to handle interpersonal and social conflict. The course examines the ways conflict may be confronted, silenced, transformed, or resolved in school knowledge, pedagogy, hidden curriculum, peacemaking and peacebuilding programs, governance, discipline, restorative justice, and social relations, from Canadian and international/ comparative perspectives. The focus is to become aware of a range of choices and to analyze how various practices and lessons about conflict fit in (and challenge) the regular activities and assumptions of curriculum and schooling, and their implications for democracy, justice, and social exclusion/ inclusion. Participants will become skilled in analyzing the conflict and relational learning opportunities and dilemmas embedded in various institutional patterns or initiatives to teach or facilitate conflict resolution and transformation and to prevent violence.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, knowledge, learning, peace, institut, governance, peace, democra, violenceSDG4, SDG16
CTL1454HThe Battle Over History Education in CanadaCanadians, like other peoples around the world, have witnessed a breakdown in consensus about what history should be taught in schools, and a heightened awareness of the political nature of deciding whose history is, or should be, taught. Debates about what to teach, and how, are appearing as strands within larger discussions about the social and political meaning and purposes of history, and 'historical consciousness' is emerging in a wide range of cultural activities, from visiting museums to watching the History Channel. Adults and children alike seem to be seeking answers to questions of identity, meaning, community and nation in their study of the past. Students in this course will explore through readings and seminar discussions some of the complex meanings that our society gives to historical knowledge, with particular emphasis on the current debates about history teaching in Canadian schools, and the political and ethical issues involved. This course was previously listed under TPS1461 - "Special Topics in History: History Wars: Issues in Canadian History Education".Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearningknowledgeSDG4
CTL1426HThe History of Gender and Education in CanadaThis course explores the changing dimensions of gender relations in Canada from the late 18th to the 20th century. It will examine selected social, cultural, economic, and political developments, shifting meanings of femininity and masculinity in these developments, and their effect on formal and informal forms of education.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninggenderSDG5
CTL1110HThe Holistic CurriculumThis course will focus on curriculum that facilitates personal growth and social change. Various programs and techniques that reflect a holistic orientation will be analysed: for example, Waldorf education, social action programs, and transpersonal techniques such as visualization and the use of imagery in the classroom. The philosophical, psychological, and social context of the holistic curriculum will also be examined.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningsocial changeSDG16
CTL3808HThe Role of Instruction in Second Language LearningThis course examines theory and research on the role of instruction in second language acquisition. The central issues to be addressed are the extent to which different types of instructional input and corrective feedback contribute to second language acquisition (SLA). The extent to which different language features and proficiency levels interact with instructional input is also examined alongside other learner and teacher variables.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL3030HTheory and Practice in Elementary Literacy InstructionThis course examines a number of theoretical perspectives on literacy exploring their implications for work with Theory and Practice in Elementary literacy, learning and instruction. Topics such as literacy across the curriculum, reading comprehension, beginning writing instruction, use of media and technology in writing, and sociocultural influences on literacy learning, will be explored in terms of various theoretical approaches.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
CTL1046HTraining EvaluationThis course studies methods of evaluating training. Topics covered by the course include training models, practice analysis, Kirkpatrick's 4 level training outcome evaluation model and its variants, Return on Investment (ROI) analysis, and measurement and design issues in training evaluation.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninginvestSDG9
CTL1822HUrban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the ArtsThis course will examine conceptual, theoretical, and methodological considerations of urban school research. The arts generally- and theatre/drama in particular- will be used as a conceptual and methodological lens that informs questions of curriculum, subjectivity, space, diversity, policy, and youth culture in the study of urban schools. Studies of children/youth and youth culture and conceptions of arts/theatre practices and pedagogies in schools will be examined. Discussions of research problems in school-based research, and methodological and design choices in the development of school-based research projects will be a particular focus. Two of the primary goals of the course are: to expand students' qualitative research interpretation skills by examining the work of other school-based researchers and to help students formulate and articulate their research designs and methods for their own projects.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learningpedagogy, urbanSDG4, SDG11
CTL3020HWriting in a Second LanguageThis course focuses on second-language writing, with special attention to relations between research, theory, and practice. Topics include text, psychological and social models of second-language writing instruction and learning, ways of responding to student writing, and techniques for evaluating writing.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and LearninglearningSDG4
DEN1094HAdvanced Oral Radiology IThe objective of this Year 1 course is directed toward the interpretation and diagnosis of diseases of the maxillofacial region, and to stimulate the critical analysis of the application of diagnostic imaging for this purpose. The course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.Faculty of DentistryinvestSDG9
DEN1095HAdvanced Oral Radiology IIThis course builds on the foundations developed in DEN1094Y. This Year 2 course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.Faculty of DentistryinvestSDG9
DEN1096HAdvanced Oral Radiology IIIThis course builds on the foundations developed in DEN1094Y and DEN1095Y. This Year 3 course consists of seminars and radiologic clinics that are composed of the following components: seminars in advanced radiologic interpretation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; a radiologic clinic and radiologic rounds directed to the investigation of abnormalities and diseases of the maxillofacial region; seminars in the mechanisms of disease with correlations to their appearances on diagnostic images; and review of the current literature in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Clinical training includes practical experiences with the applications of extraoral and intraoral radiology, sialography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnostic process.Faculty of DentistryinvestSDG9
DEN1056YBasic Concepts in Clinical MedicineThe objective of this course is to provide dental anaesthesia residents with the clinical knowledge and skills of physical evaluation and medical risk assessment. This will build on the academic basis of the course “Foundations of Medicine as applied to Dental Anaesthesia”. It will consist of a 3-hour per week clinical session for the first year in the program.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1081HBone Interfacing ImplantsOsseointegration is a central tenant of current dental therapy—yet, not only is the concept poorly understood, but the terminology and dogma surrounding this vitally important concept confuses even the most engaged practitioners. This course discusses the concept of osseointegration from the perspective of bone biology. Bone is one of the many connective tissues; and to understand bone biology one has to have an understanding of connective tissue structure and function. Of course, to truly understand the interface a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to take into account both the material and biological variables. To address this subject matter, the course is centered around every student being able to identify and critically evaluate each of the connective tissues. We do this by spending considerable time studying the microscopic structure of connective tissues; recording observations; and sharing information between the group. While this is happening a series of spontaneous tutorials, generated predominantly as a function of student inquiry, guides the group towards a unique understanding of the biology of, and logic that drives, osseointegration. It transpires that osseointegration is a wound healing phenomenon that reflects many natural phenomena where a new equilibrium is established following a disruption of homeostasis. Recently, as a result of work undertaken at the U of T, it has become possible, for the first time, to objectively compare the osseointegration rate and ultimate strength of bone anchorage of differing implant designs. Neither prior knowledge of connective tissue biology, nor material surface design, is required; but an inquiring mind is essential. (Offered in alternate years – available 2020-21).Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN4010YCare of Patients with Special Needs and Applied Paediatric DentistryThis seminar course has emphasis on examination of the scientific evidence supporting contemporary practice. The pediatric dentistry graduate student will gain understanding of what being a member of hospital staff entails, principles of management of dental disease under general anesthesia, medical management of a variety of co-morbidities to support their caring for the oral health of children. Topics addressed include: oro-facial wound healing, hematological diseases, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, renal disease, common syndromes & those with craniofacial malformations, dermatological diseases, disorders of muscular function, metabolic and endocrine disorders, children with medical devices, childhood cancers, respiratory diseases, neurological disorders, allergy, immunodeficiency, infectious diseases, obesity & eating disorders, pregnancy and substance abuse. Additionally, the course will inform clinical decision-making, incorporating the added complexity of developing a comprehensive treatment plan for the pediatric patient with special health care needs. It will also discuss the issues surrounding palliative and end-of-life management of oral pain/diseaseFaculty of Dentistryhealth care, substance abuseSDG3
DEN2009HClassic Theories of Craniofacial GrowthA guided reading seminar course covering classical theories of craniofacial growth. References are cited refuting or supporting these theories. Students learn not only about the scientific and clinical evidence to support the 6 main theories of craniofacial growth and development, but they also learn to critically analyze this evidence and apply it to their own understanding and clinical exposure. The objective of the second part of the course is to give the student an understanding and working knowledge of the current concept of craniofacial growth at the molecular and genetic levels. Key aspects of craniofacial embryology, general concepts of patterning in development, pattering in craniofacial development and the molecular basis of a specific craniofacial disorder are discussed. This involves recent research advances in molecular biologic factors in facial growth as well as the clinical relevance of craniofacial growth.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1014HClinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based CareClinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Care is a core course in the Faculty of Dentistry. Successful completion of this course is one of the program requirements for the dental graduates seeking advanced training in a clinical specialty. This course will demonstrate the scientific basis for clinical decision-making in prognosis, causation, diagnosis and therapy following the principles of evidence- based health care. Examples from the dental literature are used to illustrate the concepts and their practical application. The specific objectives of the course are: 1) to introduce principles of epidemiology as applied to clinical research; 2) to provide Clinical Specialty Graduate students with the fundamental scientific skills in clinical epidemiology to enable them to practice evidence-based dental care; 3) to provide the students with skills in answering questions using biomedical literature; 4) to provide students with the skills needed to critically appraise a biomedical research article.Faculty of Dentistryhealth careSDG3
DEN4012YClinical Pediatric Dentistry IThis clinical course comprises the first year of clinical activity in pediatric dentistry. A pre-requisite clinical simulation course is delivered during the orientation period. This is supported by didactic introductory seminars to review basic pediatric restorative dentistry techniques, caries risk assessment and treatment planning, and permits calibration of operative skills. Following successful completion of simulation exercises, the graduate student will be assigned to clinical activity at various sites. These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the infant and child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at SickKids Hospital. Additional clinical assignments include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic, Mt. Sinai clinic for persons with disabilities and Oral Moderate Sedation clinic in the Pediatric Surgicenter. All graduate students begin participation in after-hours emergency call at SickKids towards the end of the clinical year. Grad students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.Faculty of Dentistrypublic health, health care, disabilitSDG3
DEN4013YClinical Pediatric Dentistry IIThis clinical course comprises the second year of clinical activity in pediatric dentistry. The graduate student will be assigned to clinical activity at various sites. These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the infant and child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at SickKids Hospital. Additional clinical assignments include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic, Mt. Sinai operating room for persons with disabilities. Graduate students will rotate to the Pediatric Surgicenter on a regular basis in this second year to participate in dental rehabilitation using non-intubated and intubated general anesthesia and in Oral Moderate Sedation clinic. All graduate students participate in after-hours emergency call at SickKids towards the end of the clinical year. A mandatory rotation in anesthesia will be assigned during the second or third year. Grad students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.Faculty of Dentistrypublic health, health care, disabilitSDG3
DEN1046YClinical ProsthodonticsExtensive clinical training is provided over three years in the Graduate Prosthodontics clinic. Treatments are done in close cooperation with specialists in other clinical specialties and dental technicians in relation to treatment planning and patient management. On-site and off-site clinical rotations supplement core clinical training. On-site rotation to the Implant Prosthodontic Unit (IPU) focuses on implant-related surgical training. Off-site rotations focus on management of patients with specific needs. Rotation to the Princess Margaret Hospital focuses on Maxillofacial Prosthodontics and oncologic management. Rotation to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital focuses on management of Prosthodontic needs in a pediatric population.Faculty of DentistrylandSDG15
DEN1073YDental Anaesthesia Graduate SeminarsThis weekly course consists of both Faculty-led and student-led presentations that cover a range of topics relevant to dental anaesthesia. Residents receive introductory lessons in pharmacology from Faculty. The student presentations cover the management of anaesthesia for common systemic diseases, with facilitation and feedback from Faculty. Students apply anaesthesia planning principles to case-based learning exercises.Faculty of DentistrylearningSDG4
DEN1083YExperiences in Clinical MedicineThe objective of this course is to provide clinical experience in medicine for residents in dental anaesthesia. Residents complete rotations in the Department of Internal Medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the Departments of Cardiology and Respirology at Women’s College Hospital. Emphasis is on the application of knowledge and clinical skills in a variety of patient care contexts. This course is taken in year two. This is a credit/ no credit course.Faculty of Dentistryknowledge, womenSDG4, SDG5
DEN1084HExperiences in Clinical Teaching IThe objective of this course is to strengthen understanding of instructional pedagogy and teaching skills. Developed from the Centre for Faculty Development Teaching and Learning Collaboration workshops, this course consists of small group instruction and practical teaching assignments. Residents participate in workshops on best educational practices for learning in clinical contexts to prepare themselves for instructor roles. Mandatory teaching assignments consist of a minimum of 10 half-days per year in each of the three years of the program. Seminar facilitation and clinical supervision is carried out in the Faculty clinics for: second year undergraduate dental students local anesthetic techniques; third year dental students and dentists enrolled in continuing education for nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation techniques; fourth year dental student medical emergency seminars and simulations; peer teaching for dental anaesthesia residents. Progress is measured by a portfolio of personal reflections and objective evaluations. (Credit/No credit courses)Faculty of Dentistrypedagogy, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
DEN1074YFoundations of Medicine as Applied to Dental AnaesthesiaThe objective of this course is to provide the academic basis of clinical medicine for residents in dental anaesthesia. The content will include: interpretation of complete medical histories; techniques of physical examination; interpretation of physical evaluation results; understanding the implications of systemic disease, in particular those of the cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine systems; understanding the indications for and interpretations of laboratory studies and other techniques used in physical diagnosis and preoperative evaluation. The course will consist of 3 hours of seminars per week, divided into 2 weekly sessions, for the fall term of the first year in the program and combined into a single weekly session in the winter term of the first year of the program.Faculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN5001YGraduate Endodontics Case PresentationsThis weekly three-year seminar series is intended to discuss clinical cases, recently diagnosed, currently under treatment or already treated. The cases are presented by the endodontics graduate students in accordance with a specific schedule, with three cases normally presented in any given session. Presentations follow a standardized format, and include all pre-operative and intra-operative information pertaining to the presented cases. Information on anamnesis and clinical and radiographic findings is presented to form the basis for differential diagnosis, treatment planning and projection of prognosis. Information on treatment procedures performed is then presented using radiographic and photographic visual aids. The presentation is concluded with discussion of learning points and critique of the treated case provided by the presenting student. Diagnostic and therapeutic steps are to be supported by relevant evidence. The presentation is open to discussion and critique by attending students and staff.Faculty of DentistrylearningSDG4
DEN5003YGraduate Endodontics Current LiteratureThis weekly three-year seminar series reviews the current publications pertaining to endodontics. Using comprehensive on-line search strategies, current publications related to each of 15 themes are identified. Selected journal articles on each theme are assigned to students for review. Each seminar session addresses either one of the 15 themes in accordance with a structured schedule. Few sessions are also spent to review the recent position statements and miscellaneous topics of current interest. The students submit a review on their assigned articles comprising a summary and critique, both in writing for archiving purposes and verbally during the seminars. The seminars are moderated by graduate endodontics staff members who provide the context for the impact of the reviewed articles on the body of knowledge related to each theme. Course components include reading of assigned articles, submission of written summaries and critique of articles, submission of two multiple-choice questions for each article, presentation of the summary and critique during the seminar, and use of cross references to provide context for the reviewed article. Graded components of the course include (1) thoroughness of cross-referencing, and (2) critique of the article. The cumulative grades for each component amount to 20% of the final grade. An examination at the end of each academic term (December and June) amounts to the remaining 80% of the course grade for that year. This course is designed to help the students develop the necessary skills for critical reading of the scientific literature, while also acquiring knowledge of the most current advances in most areas of endodontic research. Participation in this course is a program requirementFaculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN5002YGraduate Endodontics Topical LiteratureThis weekly two-year seminar series reviews the historic and principle literature that provides the basis for understanding of endodontic disease and its treatment. The scientific literature identified as being important to the field is critically reviewed and key concepts are established. Specific areas reviewed include the (i) development, structure and pathophysiology of the dental pulp and periapical tissues, (ii) causes, prevention, and management of endodontic post-treatment disease (treatment failure), (iii) effects and management of traumatic injury to the developing and developed permanent dentition, (iv) evolution and testing of methods and materials for root canal preparation and filling, (v) long-term outcomes of endodontic treatment, (vi) considerations for post-treatment restoration, (vii) benefits and risks associated with internal bleaching, and (viii) several clinical topics. An extensive reading list and the oral presentation of selected articles on assigned topics constitute the course requirement. The series is a continuum spanning two years. Students enter the course in the beginning or in the middle in alternating years. Course components include (1) reading of assigned literature, (2) participation in the discussion of the assigned literature, (3) presentation of the summaries of selected assigned articles, (4) preparation and presentation of entire seminars on selected topics. There is no percentage value allocated to the course components. A grade for this course is assigned based on performance in a final examination. This course is designed to provide the biological foundation for endodontic therapy. Acquiring knowledge about this foundation is essential for education of specialists in the field of Endodontics. Participation in this course is a program requirement.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN3005HHead and Neck AnatomyThe Division of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, together with the Faculty of Dentistry, offers a comprehensive head and neck anatomy course tailored for the specialties of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS), Endodontics and Prosthodontics. The course will comprise four-week (12 hour) lecture series and prosection review. There is an additional cadaver dissection and surgical approaches component (32 hours) for residents of the OMFS program. Students will have access to specially prepared material, which may be studied in the Division of Anatomy. Dissection manuals will be available for the laboratory activities. Instructors and staff will be available during the surgical dissection laboratories and on a consulting basisFaculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN5005HIntroduction to Graduate EndodonticsStudents entering the MSc program in Endodontics are all dentists who have had different educational and clinical experiences. Before these students can begin treating patients, they have to increase their theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to a level expected of the specialty student. This course is designed to achieve that goal by combining the basic theoretical knowledge with hands on practice on extracted teeth.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1022HInvestigating Pathogenic BiofilmsThis graduate course focuses on fundamental biology of microbial biofilms and how biofilm ecology impacts on the pathogenesis of infections. The course draws knowledge of microbiology, microbial genetics, and functional genomics. The course consists principally in the reading of assigned materials and reading quizzes. It is intended as a core course for graduate students whose specialty areas deal with biofilm-related diseases and for doctoral stream students from diverse SGS departments, whose research centers on bacterial adhesion, bacterial physiology, and bacterial genetics.Faculty of Dentistryknowledge, invest, ecologSDG4, SDG9, SDG15
DEN1036YLiterature Review in PeriodontologyThe literature review program combines required reading and review of discussion points in order to gain an understanding of the classic and current literature in the field of periodontology. Each week, the student is presented with a list of articles that cover a given subject in its entirety. The student is expected over the course of the year to have read and be familiar with each article. Articles are chosen due to their “classic” standing, or because they highlight a given learning objective. This allows to student to focus on these articles for the weekly discussions in our seminar series. Along with a “classic” literature review, seminars are designated for current literature review in the most recent journals.Faculty of DentistrylearningSDG4
DEN1016HOcclusion: Function and DysfunctionThis is a lecture- and seminar- based course held for graduate and postgraduate students in the second-term of the academic year (2 hours per week). This course integrates current knowledge of dental occlusion by presenting a multidisciplinary array of lectures delivered by experts in prosthodontics, periodontics, orthodontics, pedodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, dental materials, oral neurophysiology, speech pathology and sleep bruxism. It also utilizes topical reading and evidence-based discussion seminars led by course participants and critical appraisal assignments of recent peer-reviewed publications. The aims of this course are to demonstrate that multidisciplinary clinical approaches that take into consideration developmental, biological, neurophysiological, psychological and biomechanical factors are indispensable in the diagnosis, management and prevention of a dysfunctional dental occlusion. This course is targeted principally at postgraduate candidates in clinical dental specialties. Participants are required to have a dental degree. Successful completion of the course is based on mandatory attendance in all seminars, a topic presentation, a written assignment, short quizzes and participation and demonstration of critical appraisal skills in the seminars and the written assignments. (Offered in alternate years – not available 2021-22 ).Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN3001YOral and Maxillofacial Surgery 1: The Physiologic Basis of DiseaseThis course provides the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident with the fundamental medical knowledge. It covers physical diagnosis, medicine and physiology. It is required for patient care and management, especially in the pre and post-operative phases, and for general consults in a hospital setting. The course also provides an assessment of current literature and clinical research. The relationship of the basic sciences (physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry and microbiology) to disease processes through a systematic discipline, is emphasized.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN3002YOral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2: Principles and Practice of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryThe didactic component of this course provides the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident with a complete understanding of the diagnosis and surgical management of diseases of the head, face, and neck regions. Seminar presentations use a case-based format. Residents participate in all areas of the clinical practice of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Sound judgment is developed through the formulation of differential diagnoses, rational treatment options and participation in the surgical procedures. In Year I, the clinical component is primarily related to the care of inpatients and an introduction to simple operative procedures. It also provides a thorough and rigorous introduction to surgery and surgical principles in general. In years III and IV, advanced clinical practice and increasing levels of responsibility for patient care are demanded which culminate in a high level of surgical skill and knowledge.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1012YOral MedicineThis course is conducted in various relevant departments of the University affiliated teaching hospitals and through seminars, a pharmacology course and case discussions. Experience is obtained in the investigation, diagnosis and management of a wide range of diseases and disorders of the oral and craniofacial structures including oral mucosal and salivary gland diseases/disorders and orofacial pain/dysfunctions. As well, students gain experience in the management of patients with complicating medical conditions.Faculty of Dentistryinvest, landSDG9, SDG15
DEN1060HOral Physiology: Sensory and Neuromuscular FunctionThis is a lecture- and seminar- based course held for graduate and postgraduate students in the first-term of the academic year (2 hours per week). Attendees will gain an in-depth understanding of the current knowledge in the field of orofacial sensory and motor functions, and critical reading and summary of articles in this field as well as experience in preparing and delivering critiqued seminars. The following topics will be covered: a review of structural and functional neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neurogenetics, psychophysics, and behavioral studies relevant to the orofacial region, garnered using rodent and human models, as related to the sensations of touch, temperature, taste and pain in the orofacial region. The course will also review unique peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms of somatosensory functions involving orofacial skin, mucosa, periodontium, tooth pulp, periosteum, tendons, muscles, temporomandibular joints, salivary glands, and taste buds. Also covered are motor aspects of the neurophysiology of the orofacial region, including muscle physiology and its relationship to reflex and voluntary orofacial motor activity manifesting as mastication, swallowing, facial expression, speech and sleep; as well as basic and clinical pathophysiological correlates of the above functions.Faculty of Dentistryknowledge, landSDG4, SDG15
DEN2001YOrthodontics 1: Advanced Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment PlanningVarious methods of appraising dentofacial deformities and growth trends are discussed. The diagnosis and treatment planning of surgical cases and temporomandibular joint problems are included, as is an introduction to biomechanics. Also included is a concentrated laboratory technique course as preparation for clinical practice. The course is limited to orthodontics graduate students.Faculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN2003YOrthodontics 3: Orthodontic Technique and Clinical PracticeThis is a concentrated clinical course, extending over three years, involving patient treatment under the supervision of staff. This includes diagnosis and treatment planning as well as actual clinical treatment of assigned cases. The predominant orthodontic techniques are stressed including surgical orthodontic treatment, adult orthodontics and functional appliance therapy. Throughout the course, the knowledge and theory discussed in Orthodontics 1 and 2 will be thoroughly applied and expanded upon. The course is limited to orthodontics graduate students.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN4001YPaediatric Dentistry 1: Theoretical Paediatric DentistryThis seminar course is continuous throughout the program. Reading assignments and periodic seminar presentations are assigned. The majority of these seminars are presented by the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, but may be given by members of other departments to include subjects such as Advanced Periodontics, Practice Management, Pediatric Pharmacology, Dental Public Health, and Hospital Dentistry, Feeding Disorders, Speech Pathology, Prevention, Cariology, as it applies to Pediatric Dentistry. Includes formal case presentations by the graduate students that must be prepared to the standards set by the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry.Faculty of Dentistrypublic healthSDG3
DEN4003YPaediatric Dentistry 3: Facial and Dental Growth and Development in Paediatric DentistryThis seminar course provides a comprehensive review of growth and development of the craniofacial complex. The course focuses on head & neck anatomy and dental development from in utero to adolescence. Several theories related to “how the head grows” are discussed including an examination of the functional matrix theory as it applies to craniofacial growth. The principles of bone development in the craniofacial region are reviewed in great detail. The student will gain an understanding of the biology of soft and hard tissues in the cranium. The objective of the second part of the course is to give the student an understanding and working knowledge of the current concept of craniofacial growth at the molecular and genetic levels. Key aspects of craniofacial embryology, general concepts of patterning in development, patterning in craniofacial development and the molecular basis of a specific craniofacial disorder are discussed. This involves recent research advances in molecular biologic factors in facial growth as well as the clinical relevance of craniofacial growth.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN4005YPaediatric Dentistry 5: Clinical Paediatric DentistryThis continuous three-year course will be phased out in 2022 as new individual one-year courses in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry are introduced. Clinical assignments are undertaken at various sites through a rotation schedule. These encompass all clinical aspects related to the practice of the specialty of Pediatric Dentistry. The examination, diagnosis and treatment of the child patient and patients with special health care needs are supervised in the Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Clinic at the University of Toronto and in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the Hospital for Sick Children. The students will also be assigned to the Surgicentre at the Faculty of Dentistry for the comprehensive treatment of children using oral moderate sedation, non-intubated and intubated general anesthesia. Additional clinical assignments over the 3 years may include City of Toronto Public Health Clinic and Mt. Sinai Hospital. All graduate students participate in after-hours emergency call at the Hospital for Sick Children in their core program. There is a mandatory two weekanesthesia rotation at SickKids and graduate students may have the choice of an additional 1 week elective rotation in any of the following areas: plastics/craniofacial surgery, cardiology, hematology, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab Centre, among others. Graduate students also participate with clinical staff in weekly patient care conferences and chart auditing exercises.Faculty of Dentistrypublic health, health care, landSDG3, SDG15
DEN4009YPaediatricsThis is a series of seminars and ward rounds directed by the Department of Pediatrics at the Hospital for Sick Children. A study of growth and development from birth to adulthood is presented, stressing normal values as well as causes and effects of deviations from them. This course runs concurrently with DEN4010Y and major topic areas are reinforced through patient presentations during ward rounds. Major infections are reviewed as to etiology, clinical manifestations and treatment, and current immunization procedures are presented. Tumors of a benign or malignant nature which are common to the pediatric age group are discussed as to clinical aspects and current therapies, and common bleeding disorders are described, with emphasis on management and relevance to dental practice. The aspects of cardiac disease in childhood are presented as well as related prophylactic measures in current use in dental practice. A lecture on basic genetics is given as to modes of inheritance, chromosomal abnormalities and methods of investigation. At the Hospital for Sick Children, patients are presented who represent some of the subjects discussed in the lecture series, thereby enhancing the latter through clinical illustrationsFaculty of DentistryinvestSDG9
DEN1033YPeriodontology: Seminars and Clinics IThis ongoing course represents a three-year major program consisting of educational experiences targeted directly at developing the knowledge and clinical skill required of a specialist in periodontics, including many aspects not covered in other required courses. Seminars will include Conscious Sedation, Periodontics-Prosthodontics Treatment Planning, Therapeutics, Clinical Photography, Practice Management, and Surgical Periodontics. Clinical rotations include Implant Prosthodontic Unit, Periodontal Consultation Service for severe and refractory diseases, and hospital rotations for Periodontal Care of Medically Compromised patients, oral medicine, and diagnosis and treatment of facial pain and temporomandibular disorders. Residents will also be exposed to training in single drug I.V. sedation techniques, and other conscious sedation methods. There will be seminars in oral medicine and in the interrelationships of Orthodontics, Endodontics and Prosthodontics with Periodontology. (See Clinical Conferences).Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1063YPracticum in Dental Public HealthA student will normally be assigned for 14 weeks to an agency that provides dental public health services or is engaged in dental public health-related issues. The purpose is to learn, by observation and participation, methods of management used by the agency and to conduct a project of use to the agency. A dental public health specialist or other leader from the agency will supervise the student with periodic contact from director of the programFaculty of Dentistrypublic healthSDG3
DEN1042YProsthodontics II: Restorative DentistryThe seminar course will cover key concepts, methods and materials in prosthodontics, and laboratory management and is intended to prepare students for patient care.Faculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN1044YProsthodontics IV: Patients with the Fully Edentulous Mouth and Advanced Prosthodontic CareThis seminar course reviews and critically appraises the current scientific literature pertaining to prosthodontics. This course is designed to help the students develop the necessary skill for critical reading of the scientific literature, while also acquiring knowledge of the most current advances in the diverse areas of research in prosthodontics and related areas. During weekly seminars, the students select, present and defend what they have identified as the best research papers in the contemporary literature relevant to prosthodontic care.Faculty of DentistryknowledgeSDG4
DEN1010HResearch EthicsThis course aims to highlight ethical values and regulations in different topics that are research-related: scientific writing, confidentiality agreements, students mentoring, research with humans, animals and biological samples, etc. The course involves participation in a seminar and the fulfillment of an online course offered by the Tri-council Funding Agencies of Canada. The same seminar will be offered in two different dates and attendance in one of the sessions is mandatory. Additionally, proof of completion of the online tutorial course “Tri-Council Policy Statement 2 – Tutorial Course on Research Ethics” is required. This is a credit, non-credit course.Faculty of Dentistryanimal, animalSDG14, SDG15
DEN1061HResearch PracticumThe research practicum aims to give students hands-on experience of one or more components of the research process. This can include analyzing an existing data set, undertaking a systematic review and/or meta-analysis or a review article. This type of experience will give students the opportunity to use skills in, and an appreciation of, such matters as literature searching, hypothesis setting, experimental design, methodological limitations, laboratory practice, and writing a paper for publication. Consequently, it provides a more limited exposure to the research process than research leading to a M.Sc. level thesis. The requirements for this course can be met by undertaking a research project or an essay in the form of a review article. In either case, the required outcome is a paper in a format suitable for publication. The research practicum will be undertaken with the assistance of an appropriate supervisor and examined by a committee comprised of three faculty members, at least one of whom is from the student’s specialty.Faculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN1006YSeminars in Dental Public HealthThis course uses a seminar format to survey the discipline of dental public health. This includes the determinants of health, primary health care, oral health care systems, insurance, health economics, health planning and evaluation, and ethical issues in dentistry. The course is available for all graduate students at the faculty.Faculty of Dentistrypublic health, health careSDG3
DEN1013YSeminars in Oral Surgical PathologyThe course is organized as a series of clinical-pathological conferences and covers all forms of disease of the mouth. A case-based approach is used for teaching and learning. Emphasis is placed on synthesizing clinical, radiographic and histological data for a comprehensive evaluation of the case being discussed. The material for study is derived from the Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service and the hospital pathology departments. Current cases of interest are studied and in addition the surgical pathology of all oral disease is covered in a systematic manner. The course is divided into two sections. The first part is the clinical-pathological component held weekly. Students have the opportunity to review the case histories and virtual microscopic slides of the cases to be presented in the upcoming session, so they can be prepared to discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment, as well as controversies in treatment and topics that require further clinical research. The second part consists of a rotation for individual students to Oral Pathology, to be organized with the head of the respective graduate programs. The rotation provides an immersion in Oral Pathology that is appropriate for the student’s future specialty practice.Faculty of DentistrylearningSDG4
DEN2005YSurgical OrthodonticsThis course is a collaborative educational component of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Orthodontic programs. It exposes the OMFS and Orthodontic residents to a comprehensive, detailed, and innovative clinic. The Centre for Corrective Jaw Surgery at the University of Toronto is unique in Canada and is a weekly clinic held in the orthodontic clinic with patient visits. Orthodontic follow up, presurgical orthognathic surgery preparation and post-operative aftercare are all provided in this clinic. Operative orthognathic surgery (assisted by orthodontic residents) takes place at Mount Sinai or Humber River hospitals. Milestones in orthognathic surgery and in surgical orthodontics are met through clinic, seminar and operating room interactions. Supported by industry grants, special access allows the residents to have the full experience of digital planning: virtual surgical preparation, surgical guide fabrication, surgical orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. The course is further enhanced by 24 cased-based seminars covering the full scope of facial deformity correction. These seminars are jointly presented by OMFS and Orthodontic teams, staff, and guest lecturersFaculty of DentistrylaborSDG8
DEN1017HTemporomandibular DisordersThe objective of this course is to integrate the latest evidence in basic and clinical sciences related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD), in order to improve knowledge on differential diagnosis, TMD etiology, mechanisms and evidence-based management. The course will also address the socioeconomic burden of acute and chronic pain, in addition to their effects on the patient’s quality of life. The topics will be presented by various scholars, dental and medical specialists. (Offered in alternate years – available 2021-22).Faculty of Dentistrysocioeconomic, knowledgeSDG1, SDG4
DEN2010HTissue Reaction to Orthodontic and Orthopedic ForcesThe objective of the course is to investigate the reaction of tissues to forces created by orthodontic and functional appliances. The areas to be covered are: a) Reaction of the periodontal ligament, cortical bone, attached and free gingiva, the root and the pulp to orthodontic tooth movement with heavy and light forces; b) Muscle reaction to orthodontic and orthopedic forces: c) The condyle. Students are required to write a term paper on a particular topic and to present this paper to the class. Students are required to plan an original project in conjunction with their term paper topic.Faculty of DentistryinvestSDG9
DRA3906HBlack Playwrights: Resistance, Resilience and TransformationAn exploration of dramatic literature by writers from the African Diaspora (Canada, USA, UK and the Caribbean) from 1959 to the present. The course will identify a selection of playwrights central to the development of Black drama, their plays, and performance practices. Emphasis will be placed on dramaturgical analysis, sociohistorical context, the author’s influences, and relevant critical writing, in order to evaluate these works as sites of social resistance, cultural resilience, and aesthetic transformation. Readings include works for the stage by Lorraine Hansberry, Wole Soyinka, August Wilson, Derek Walcott, Debbie Hunter Green, George Elliott Clarke, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Walter Borden, Jocelyn Bioh, Kwame Kwei-Armah and Ntozake Shange.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studiesresilien, resilience, resilienceSDG11, SDG13, SDG15
DRA1002HGraduate Laboratory in Drama, Theatre and Performance StudiesThis course provides an experiential learning opportunity to MA students by allowing them to pursue a practice-based project of their design under the supervision of a faculty member and with feedback from their cohort. Major components of the course are the discussion and application of various models of integrating critical analysis into practice, the introduction of different modes of research-based and critical creative practice, the development of students’ individual projects toward a workshop-oriented presentation, and the practice of peer critique.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studieslearning, laborSDG4, SDG8
DRA1001HHistory and Historiography in Drama, Theatre and Performance StudiesAs an introduction to graduate-level theatre and performance history and historiography, this course will teach students how to do theatre and performance history. It will combine consideration of selected topics and case studies with methodological awareness of the problems and questions that arise in the writing of such histories. The course will endeavor to present theatre and performance history as a subject that encompasses dramatic literature, material culture, embodiment, visual culture—and even how history can itself be understood as drama. Emphasis will be directed towards learning how to contextualize and situate sources within their historical and cultural frameworks.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance StudieslearningSDG4
DRA1011HSources and Concepts in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies ISources and Concepts of Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies I is the first of a two-part cycle of foundational PhD-level semester courses in international histories of intellectual and creative ideas that inform drama, theatre, and performance studies. The courses invite students to examine the most significant dramatic and theatrical developments—in both theories and practices—across cultures. They focus on the historically, methodologically and theoretically informed analyses of dramatic texts, theatre productions, and performances with reference to their formal and stylistic choices, performative significance, cultural systems and conventions, and historical contexts. The courses provide ways of integrating culture-specific theory/criticism/ideas into a comprehensive understanding of world drama, theatre, and performance. This cycle may not use a fixed structure. According to the course instructor’s pedagogical approach and academic expertise, the courses may be organized along chronology, around themes, with a focus on geography, or with a combination of the previous perspectives.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance StudiesproductionSDG12
DRA1012HSources and Concepts in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies IISources and Concepts of Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies II is the second of a two-part cycle of foundational PhD-level semester courses in international histories of intellectual and creative ideas that inform drama, theatre, and performance studies. The courses invite students to examine the most significant dramatic and theatrical developments—in both theories and practices—across cultures. They focus on the historically, methodologically and theoretically informed analyses of dramatic texts, theatre productions, and performances with reference to their formal and stylistic choices, performative significance, cultural systems and conventions, and historical contexts. The courses provide ways of integrating culture-specific theory/criticism/ideas into a comprehensive understanding of world drama, theatre, and performance. This cycle may not use a fixed structure. According to the course instructor’s pedagogical approach and academic expertise, the courses may be organized along chronology, around themes, with a focus on geography, or with a combination of the previous perspectives.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance StudiesproductionSDG12
DRA1014HTeaching and Learning in Drama, Theatre and Performance StudiesThis course is designed to acquaint students with contemporary approaches and issues in teaching and learning as they pertain to the interdisciplinary field of drama, theatre and performance studies. Emphasis will be on the theory and practice of knowledge construction and transmission. By the end of the course, students will have developed a stronger understanding of the history of pedagogy in the field, considered important theoretical paradigms in relation to their practical applications, been introduced to Indigenous and non-Western perspectives on teaching and learning, developed and experimented with specific teaching techniques appropriate to their individual professional goals, and positioned their own values and practice in relation to a community of learning, producing a statement of teaching philosophy.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studiespedagogy, knowledge, learning, indigenous, indigenousSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
DRA3907HTheatre and Emerging TechnologiesThis interdisciplinary graduate course explores the collision between the arts and technologies with all of its creative potential, unintentional collateral damage, compelling attraction, and complex social implications. It brings together scholars, artists, and students from Drama/Theatre, Visual Studies, Comparative Literature Music, Engineering, and Computer Science who are already excited by and engaged in this intersection. For students coming from an arts background the course offers direct experience of emerging technologies and chance to explore their applications to their research. For students with a technology background, the course provides the opportunity to integrate their research into an art-based, publicly presented project. The course exposes all of the students to rigorous interdisciplinary practices and their conceptual, practical and theoretical challenges through group discussions, concept generation, practical experimentation and research, and engagement with visiting artists. The course will culminate in a collaborative performance project.Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance StudieslaborSDG8
DTS1000HComparative Research Methods in DTSThis seminar will introduce students to a range of theories to do with diaspora and transnationalism from the humanities and the social sciences. Core questions will include the methodological differences between diaspora and its many synonyms, such as migrant communities, exile, refugee, etc. The different emphases and overlaps between Migration Studies, Urban Studies, and Diaspora and Transnational Studies will also be pursued.Centre for Diaspora & Transnational Studiesrefugee, urban, nationalismSDG10, SDG11, SDG16
EAS1180HEnvironmental CriticismPlease contact departmentDepartment of East Asian StudiesenvironmentalSDG13
EAS1426HTransition, Subjectivity, RevolutionPlease contact departmentDepartment of East Asian StudiestransitSDG11
ECE1253HActive Microwave CircuitsThis course deals with the design of microwave circuit employing active devices. Topics addressed include a brief review of representation of two-port networks, scattering parameters, signal flow graphs, Smith charts, and matching networks; characteristics of microwave transistors (bipolar transistors, MOSFETS, MESFETS); microwave transistor linear amplifier design (gain equations, stability considerations, gain circles, unilateral and bilateral design cases, conjugate matching, bias considerations); low noise amplifiers (noise figure, noise circles), power amplifiers (amplifier classes, intermodulation and harmonic distortion, high efficiency topologies), broadband amplifiers; microwave mixers (mixer design and configurations: single-ended, balanced, double-balanced); and oscillators (feedback oscillators, reflection / negative resistance oscillators, dielectric resonator oscillators, tuning techniques). Lecture material will be strongly enforced using a laboratory which will teach students the use of industry standard RF/microwave CAD and simulation tools.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.laborSDG8
ECE1529HAdaptive Systems for Signal Processing and CommunicationsThe course explores the theoretical and practical procedures for designing adaptive systems. Topics include decision theory, parameter estimation, supervised learning, unsupervised learning, state-space models, adaptive signal detection, channel characterization, iterative detection, forward-backward adaptive algorithms.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECE1773HAdvanced Computer ArchitectureState-of-the-art Uniprocessor Design. In a nutshell we ask not “how can I build a processor that works?” but “how can we build the ‘best’ processor possible?”. The following topics are included: instruction set architecture, performance analysis and metrics, cost, simulation methods and tools, instruction-level parallelism, vector processors, VLIW processors. Advanced uniprocessor prediction-based techniques and memory systems. If you will be pursuing research in computer architecture this course provides the knowledge necessary to get started. If you will not be pursuing research in computer architecture this course will expose you to the current cutting-edge techniques used in modern processors. Prerequisites: Basic uniprocessor design. Basic Instruction set. Computer organization. Hardwired and Microcoded control. Basic pipelining. Basic Memory Systems.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledgeSDG4
ECE1510HAdvanced Inference AlgorithmsAdvanced concepts in machine learning and probabilistic inference. An introductory course on inference algorithms or machine learning should be taken prior to this course. Topics covered: Probability models, neural networks, graphical models, Bayesian networks, factor graphs, Markov random fields (MRFs). Structured models, convolutional networks, transformations as hidden variables, bivariate and trivariate potentials, high-order potentials. Exact probabilistic inference, variable elimination, sum-product and max-product algorithms, factorizing high-order potentials. Approximate probabilistic inference, iterated conditional modes, gradient-based inference, loopy belief propagation, variational techniques, expectation propagation, sampling methods (MCMC). Learning in directed and undirected models, EM, sampling, contrastive divergence. Deep belief networks. Applications to image processing, scene analysis, pattern recognition, speech recognition, computational biology.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECE1548HAdvanced Network ArchitecturesThis course is one of two companion courses on network softwarization offered simultaneously in the Winter 2018 session. The first course (this one) introduces concepts and principles of network softwarization while the second course focuses on hands on experience with technology enablers. The courses will be offered simultaneously in 4 Universities, namely University of Waterloo, University of Toronto, Université Laval and École des Technologies Supérieures (ETS).Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.waterSDG6
ECE1475HBio PhotonicsThis graduate course will review the field of Bio-photonics, and the interactions of light and biological matter. We will look at Bio-photonics from an engineering and physics perspective, and will review basic principles as well as the instrumentation (imaging and sensing systems) that are used in this field. This course is listed as a graduate course at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept. and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering. There are 12 two hour lecture sessions, a midterm (after ~ 9 sessions), and two seminar presentations by the students during the semester.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.institutSDG16
ECE1517HBiometric SystemsThis is an introductory level course for graduate students or practitioners to gain knowledge and hands-on experiences in biometric systems and security applications. Topics include: Introduction to important biometric security technologies and policies, biometric modalities and signal processing, biometric solutions and applications, biometric encryption and cryptosystems, biometrics identity analysis and privacy considerations.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledgeSDG4
ECE1545HBridges and RoutersBasic concepts. Data link layer issues: Transparent bridges, learning bridges, spanning tree algorithm. Source routing bridges, interworking with . Networtransparent bridgesk layer issues: Service interface, addressing, address resolution protocol, routing algorithms, routing protocols, QOS issues: Integrated services, RSVP; Differentiated Services, Tag Switching and MPLS.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECE1541HCommunication Networks IThis course teaches the fundamentals of network performance and analysis. The topics are: traffic modeling for voice, video and data, self-similarity and long range dependence in the internet, queueing systems, large deviations and buffer management, multiple access communications, scheduling and processor sharing, routing and dynamic programming, vehicular networks.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.internetSDG9
ECE1637HControl of Discrete-Event Systems IIThis course is a continuation of ECE1636H, and is conducted on a seminar basis. Participants will present and discuss articles in the current literature, and complete a project that could lead into graduate research in the discrete-event system area. Topics recently examined include controlled Petri nets, min-max algebra, real-time control via timed-transition-models (TTMs), recursive process algebras, and state charts.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.transitSDG11
ECE1505HConvex OptimizationThis course provides a comprehensive coverage of the theoretical foundation and numerical algorithms for convex optimization with engineering applications. Topics include: convex sets and convex functions; convex optimization problems; least-square problems; optimal control problems; Lagrangian duality theory. Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) theorem; Slater’s condition; generalized inequalities; minimiax optimization and saddle point; introduction to linear programming, quadratic programming, semidefinite programming and geometric programming; numerical algorithms: descent methods, Newton’s method, interior-point method; convex relaxation; applications to communications and signal processing.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.equalitSDG10
ECE1778HCreative Applications for Mobile DevicesMobile and wearable devices have had a dramatic impact on a vast array of new areas including psychology, medicine, global health, music, banking, cooking, exploring, travel, shopping, and games. Many more things are possible, and so the purpose of this course is to encourage creativity in the creation of new applications of mobile, wearable devices, often together with online servers in an inter-disciplinary environment. The course is open to all graduate students at the University of Toronto, and is primarily a project-based course in which the goal is to produce a working app by the end of course. Projects will be done in groups of three: two students with programming skills are matched with one from a non-programming (a ‘specialist’) background. The project subject area must in the specialist’s field. Some of the projects are also driven by external (non-student) specialists recruited to participate in the course. There will be three kinds of lectures: 1. On the capabilities of modern mobile devices at both a technical and lay level for non-specialists. 2. Case studies of innovative applications, linking to methods of innovating. 3. Project Proposals and Presentations Grading will be on a four basic assignments (programming mobile devices for the programmers, and explorations of mobile ideas and case studies for the non-programmers) project proposals, interim presentations, and final project report and presentation. The course will support the use Google Android-based phones and Apple iOS-based phones only. This course is a mixture of technical work, creativity in the medium of software mobile applications, communication and inter-disciplinary interaction.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.global healthSDG3
ECE1767HDesign for Test and TestabilityThe Semiconductor Industry Association anticipates that Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) semi-conductor devices of the near future will indeed be “very large”, including designs that integrate 100-200 million transistors operating in 1-3 GHz clock rates. Due to the increasing dependence on microelectronic devices and the concern for high reliability and short time-to-market window, the VLSI Computer Aided Design community faces great challenges in the development of tools that aid the design of complex devices and guarantee their functionality. This course covers fundamentals of testing theory and practice for complex VLSI designs and it is a good source of information for engineers with interests in chip and system level design, test engineers and CAD developers. The objective is to give students the ability to solve a wide range of non-trivial testing problems using practical and cost effective techniques. Computer-aided design tools will be developed throughout the semester from the students. These tools will serve as an application of the theory presented in class. Topics covered include Logic Simulation, Fault Modeling, Fault Simulation, Algorithms and techniques for Automatic Test Pattern Generation in Combinational and Sequential Circuits (D-algorithm, PODEM, recursive learning), Design Error/Fault Diagnosis, Introduction to Functional Testing of Microprocessors, ALUs and Memories, Design for Testability, and logic and scan Built-in Self-Test. Course requirements include a full-term design project and a final exam. During the project, each student will develop a parallel fault simulator and a test generator for single stuck-at faults in combinational and sequential circuits. Course prerequisites include any senior-level VLSI design or logic design course plus intermediate level skills in programming with C or C++.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learning, windSDG4, SDG7
ECE1066HDesign of High-Frequency Switch-Mode Power Supplies (SMPS)Design, analysis, and practical implementation of advanced controllers for high-frequency switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) are covered. The topics include: continuous and discrete time modeling of switching converters; current-program mode control, power factor correction rectifiers; practical implementation of analog and digital controllers. The course also has a laboratory portion, where a high-frequency switching converter and its controller are designed and fabricated.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.laborSDG8
ECE1783HDesign Tradeoffs in Digital SystemsSkillful system architects ought to study the customers’ requirements and the target use-cases carefully and adequately before designing their algorithms/architectures. This course introduces the students to various design aspects of digital systems, and train them to deal with the existing tradeoffs, by influencing their designs to meet the target use-cases. Digital video codec system(s) are chosen to be the case-study to explain the concepts that are delivered throughout the course. The students will be introduced to the multi-dimensional design aspects of such a digital system, and will learn how technology leaders seek compromises between various important parameters such as throughput, power consumption, cost, programmability, time to market, as well as application-specific aspects such as quality, target bitrate, latency, and error resiliency. They will be trained to model different algorithms using high-level software and analyze the gains/losses of various tradeoffs. The course is intended to be self-contained, hence, reasonable preparation for most of the topics is provided. This is a hands-on type of course, so enrolled students should expect to roll up their sleeves and develop some high-level software code to solve interesting problems.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.trade, resilien, consumSDG10, SDG11, SDG12
ECE1093HElectrical Insulation Design and CoordinationThe course organizes the voltage stresses that appear in high voltage systems in terms of amplitude, duration and occurrence. Suitable models for electrical breakdown and withstand are developed, with specific emphasis on outdoor insulation in adverse weather conditions. The functions of surge protective devices, grounding and other overvoltage control measures will be discussed. The treatment makes use of empirical models typical of relevant IEEE and IEC industrial standards.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.weatherSDG13
ECE1228HElectromagnetic TheoryThis course is intended to benefit graduate students with interest in Electromagnetics and Photonics. It revisits and expands some of the more fundamental electromagnetic laws and theories. The course provides the students with the necessary foundation and specific knowledge of electromagnetic theory and the dynamics of wave propagation and interaction with materials and structures. Maxwell equations in differential and integral forms; constitutive relations; electric field and electrostatic potential, electric and magnetic polarization; boundary conditions, energy and power, material dispersion (electric response), material dispersion (magnetic response), conductors and conductivity, Multipole expansion, Maxwell-Helmholtz wave equations, solutions to Maxwell-Helmholtz wave equations, plane waves, polarization, reflection and transmission at interfaces, beam optics (time permitting), the other wave equation (Schrödinger wave equation), electron-photon analogies, waveguides, optical multilayers and transfer matrix method, dynamics of wave propagation (phase velocity, group velocity, energy velocity, forerunners), dispersive effects, introduction to waves in periodic structures, wave equation as operator, operator calculus and bases, anisotropic and bi-anisotropic medium, electromagnetic principles and theorems (duality, uniqueness, reciprocity theorem), and if time permits Green functions and Hamilton-Jacobi canonical equations.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledge, energySDG4, SDG7
ECE1657HGame Theory and Evolutionary GamesThis course presents a mathematical treatment of classical and evolutionary game theory. Topics covered in classical game theory: matrix games, continuous games, Nash equilibrium (NE) solution, existence and uniqueness, best-response correspondence. Topics covered in evolutionary games: evolutionary stable strategy concept, population games, replicator dynamics, relation to dynamic asymptotic stability. Learning in games: imitation dynamics, fictitious play and their relation to replicator dynamics. Applications to engineering: communication networks, multi-agent learning. There is no required textbook. PDF course notes are available; the notes are self-contained and serve as a textbook. Weekly formal lectures based on the course notes.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECE1658HGeometric Nonlinear Control of Robotics SystemsThis course presents recent developments on control of underactuated mechanical systems, focusing on the notion of virtual constraint. Traditionally, motion control problems in robotics are partitioned in two parts: motion planning and trajectory tracking. The motion planning algorithm converts the motion specification into reference signals for the robot joints. The trajectory tracker uses feedback control to make the robot joints track the reference signals. There is an emerging consensus in the academic community that this approach is inadequate for sophisticated motion control problems, in that reference signals impose a timing on the control loop which is unnatural and inherently non robust. The virtual constraint technique does not rely on any reference signal, and does not impose any timing in the feedback loop. Motions are characterized implicitly through constraints that are enforced via feedback. Through judicious choice of the constraints, one may induce motions that are surprisingly natural and biologically plausible. For this reason, the virtual constraints technique has become a dominant paradigm in bipedal robot locomotion, and has the potential of becoming even more widespread in other area of robot locomotion. The virtual constraint approach is geometric in nature. This course presents the required mathematical tools from differential geometry and surveys the basic results in this emergent research area. Topics covered will include: – Differentiable manifolds and basic operations. – Controlled invariant manifolds and zero dynamics of nonlinear control systems – Euler-Lagrange robot models and models of impulsive impacts – Virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) – Constrained dynamics resulting from VHCs, and conditions for existence of a Lagrangian structure – Virtual constraint generators – Stabilization of periodic orbits on the constraint manifold. – Virtual constraints for walking robotsEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.judicSDG16
ECE1095HGrounding and BondingThe course introduces the objectives, components and principles of grounding systems. Empirical models for risk of electrocution and perception are identified, using relevant IEEE and IEC industrial standards. Methods for characterizing soil resistivity are demonstrated and then related to electrical characteristics of typical service entrance, line and station ground grid electrodes. Much of the course focus is on 60-Hz analysis but the scope will include considerations for dc and lightning impulse performance, including testing of transfer impedance from lightning protection systems to victim circuits and components.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.soilSDG15
ECE1502HInformation TheoryThis course deals with fundamental limits on communication, including the following topics: entropy, relative entropy and mutual information: entropy rates for stochastic processes; differential entropy; data compression; the Kraft inequality; Shannon-Fano codes; Huffman codes; arithmetic coding; channel capacity; discrete channels; the random coding bound and its converse; the capacity of Gaussian channels; the sphere-packing bound; coloured Gaussian noise and water-filling; rate-distortion theory; the rate-distortion function; multiuser information theory.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.water, inequality, equalitSDG6, SDG10
ECE1749HInterconnection Networks for Parallel Computer ArchitecturesInterconnection networks form the communication backbone of computers at a variety of scales, from the internet to on-chip networks in multi-core/many-core architectures. With growing emphasis on parallelism as a means of extracting additional processor performance, the communication substrate is a critical factor in both the performance and power consumption of many-core architectures. This course will explore the architecture and design of interconnection networks including topology, routing, flow control and router microarchitecture. This course will also look into the impact on communication requirements of various parallel architectures and cache coherence mechanism. This graduate-level course will focus on interconnection network architectures used in multiprocessor systems and many-core designs with emphasis on recent research innovations in these areas.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.internet, consumSDG9, SDG12
ECE1068HIntroduction to EMCThis course provides a fundamental understanding of the means by which electromagnetic interference arises. Techniques to reduce, overcome, or to protect sensitive electronic equipment from electromagnetic interference are covered. Course content: source of noise, modes of noise coupling, preventative measures, transmitters and receivers, grounding, surge protection. The course concludes with a case study. This course requires a basic background in circuit theory, fields and waves, and some knowledge in power electronics.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledgeSDG4
ECE1513HIntroduction to Machine LearningAn Introduction to the basic theory, the fundamental algorithms, and the computational toolboxes of machine learning. The focus is on a balanced treatment of the practical and theoretical approaches, along with hands on experience with relevant software packages. Supervised learning methods covered in the course will include: the study of linear models for classification and regression and neural networks. Unsupervised learning methods covered in the course will include: principal component analysis, k-means clustering, and Gaussian mixture models. Techniques to control overfitting, including regularization and validation, will be covered.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
APS1080HIntroduction to Reinforcement LearningReinforcement Learning (RL) is a systems-level Artificial Intelligence toolset; this course will provide the student with both a solid theoretical foundation and a strong practical understanding of the subject. RL enables autonomous agents to cope with poorly-characterized, novel environments by exploring the environment to gain knowledge about it, and to exploit this knowledge of the environment to act in a goal-directed manner. Although RL is positioned as one of three facets of Machine Learning, RL has far broader scope than the narrower tools of supervised and unsupervised learning. RL, being founded on agent design, has the goal of developing artificial intelligence schemes that can endow an agent with autonomy. This introduction, thus, will be presented within the motivating context of an overall AI system. There are three foundational RL tools we will cover (dynamic programming, Monte Carlo, Temporal-Difference Learning); we will also show how hybridizations of these foundational tools are employed to create production schemes. The student should leave the course with the ability to practically apply this AI toolset to novel problems.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledge, learning, productionSDG4, SDG12
ECE1478HLasers and DetectorsThis course focuses on photonic components which generate or absorb light. Lasers: spontaneous and stimulated emission, gain and absorption, gain broadening; modulation dynamics, mode-locking, Q-switching; semiconductor lasers. Photodetectors: absorption, photo-generated currents, noise in detection.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.emissionSDG7
ECE1619HLinear Geometric Control TheoryThe course presents a more advanced treatment of linear control theory via the geometric approach. The coverage roughly corresponds to the first six chapters of “Linear Multivariable Control: A Geometric Approach”, by W.M. Wonham. We adopt the abstract algebra approach of the text to study controllability, observability, controlled invariant subspaces, controllability subspaces, and controllability indices. These concepts are applied to solve the problems of stabilization, output stabilization, disturbance decoupling, and the restricted regulator problem. Areas of current research in linear geometric control will also be discussed.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.urbanSDG11
ECE1551HMobile Broadband Radio Access NetworkThis course covers Radio Access Network (RAN) aspects of the 5G New Radio (NR). Important RF parameters like power flux density, electrical field and various power definitions are introduced and their relationship to regulatory requirements and standards based usage are covered in great detail. Also, various RF impediments such as the noise figure, out of band emissions and ACS/ACLR are introduced. The link budget, receiver sensitivity, channel models and how they relate to 5G systems are explained. Spectrum and RF characteristics of 5G NR are an important part of the course. Moreover, we will go over the architectural solutions, remote radio heads (distributed radio solutions), and important hardware components in the network. Throughout the course, students will get substantial exposure to the practice-based content not commonly found in the textbooks. The course will offer an insight into the important industry standards and initiatives, trials and the global vendor/operator status in terms of product development and network deployments. A large selection of course projects and guest lectures from major infrastructure vendors and operators are intended to complement the material covered in the lectures.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.emission, infrastructure, emissionsSDG7, SDG9, SDG13
ECE1552HModern Mobile Air InterfacesThis course provides an in-depth coverage of modern mobile air-interfaces, focusing mainly on the fourth (4G) and fifth generation (5G) of cellular networks. Following the introduction to multicarrier transmission, the key elements of layer 1, 2 and 3 of air interfaces of the 4G and 5G systems are covered in detail. Frequency division duplex and time division duplex solutions are compared and contrasted, and the differences between two main frequency ranges (i.e. below and above 6 GHz) are highlighted. Finally, the last segment of the course covers some more advanced topics, such as carrier aggregation, dual connectivity, massive machine type communication and ultra-reliable low latency communication. Students will get the latest updates from the 3GPP standardization process as they become available, and study the impact of these changes on the performance improvement of mobile networks. Additionally, students will be exposed to practical problems that operators and infrastructure vendors are facing on daily basis. Two course projects will help students to supplement the learning material within the area of their own interest. Also, guest lecturers from major infrastructure vendors and operators will be invited to complement the lecture material.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learning, infrastructureSDG4, SDG9
ECE1755HParallel Computer Architecture and ProgrammingWith the advent of multicore processors, we are faced with the challenge of exploiting this ubiquitous multi-threaded hardware. This course explores the evolution of modern parallel architectures and programming models, and is divided into two phases. In the first phase, we will investigate in detail the design and operation of modern parallel architectures, with a brief look at how they are programmed. The second phase of the course will switch gears: we will study current research and development of emerging parallel architectures including multicore processors, interconnection networks, and accelerators and heterogeneous systems-on-chip. In this phase we will read research papers, and through the class project, implement and evaluate new ideas. Students are welcome to suggest topics for class discussion and/or projects.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.investSDG9
ECE1550HPhysics of InformationPart A: Reversible Computation and the Second Law of Thermodynamics Reversible Computation: motivation, principle and limitations; Moore’s law and energy cost in classical computations (theory and practice); Landaurer’s principle; Maxwell’s demon and its resolution with information theory; Cost of erasure of information from the Second law of thermodynamics. Part B: Entropy The concept of entropy in Physics and Information Theory; Subjective (i.e. observer-dependent) nature of entropy; Resolution of Gibbs’ paradox from information theory. Part C: von Neumman entropy and quantum computation From classical (Shannon) entropy to quantum (von Neumann) entropy; Quantum computer as an ultimate reversible computer. Part D: Carnot cycle in a Quantum World The smallest possible refrigeratorEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.energy, landSDG7, SDG15
ECE1086HPower Management for Photovoltaic SystemsThis course provides a comprehensive overview of grid-connected and off-grid Photovoltaic (PV) technology with an emphasis on power electronics. The course is intended to accommodate students from a range of backgrounds with an interest in renewable energy. Course topics include: I. Core PV technology (types of PV cells, concentrating/multi-junction PV, I/V characteristics, electrical models, basic semiconductor principles). II. PV System Overview (Economics and trends, PV forecasting, shading effects). III. Power Electronic Converters for PV Systems (micro-inverters, micro-converters, multi-port dc-dc converters, maximum power point tracking techniques, efficiency optimization, digital control techniques, practical issues, semiconductor devices). Students may choose either a theoretical/simulation based final project or an experimental project. Students also have the opportunity to use the PV experimental platform on the roof of the Galbraith building.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.energy, renewablSDG7
ECE1094HPower Systems Operations and EconomicsThis course covers modern developments in power systems from a mathematical perspective. The content includes: convex relaxations of optimal power flow; renewable variability and aggregation; duality, pricing and transmission rights; game theoretic modeling of market abuse; optimal control of energy storage; scheduling techniques for demand response. Prerequisite: ECE1505H or equivalent.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.energy, renewablSDG7
ECE1771HQuality of ServiceThis course aims to present a collection of fundamental design principles and guidelines in modern distributed systems and real- world large-scale networks. In the process, we review a small collection of important research results, not only in the recent literature but also in the literature spanning the past two decades, and see how they reflect fundamental design principles that we have discussed. Our focus is on more recent research literature, in the areas that have been studied extensively: multimedia networking, peer- to-peer networks, as well as multi-hop wireless networks. The holy grail of distributed systems and networking design is to achieve Quality of Service, or QoS. Quality of Service is concerned with the “peace of mind” that resources are set aside to guarantee a particular level of performance, even with competition from other users sharing the same pool of resources. We will see why this is hard, and why it sometimes may not be necessary. However, having such an objective is important to motivate innovation in the design of distributed systems and real-world networks, wireless or wired. The course is divided into a number of episodes (each covered in the time of approximately one lecture depending on progress). We start with an examination of our design objectives, including Quality of Service. We then introduce a number of fundamental design principles that may lead to a high-quality design. Subsequently, we take a leisure walk through more specific areas of research, spanning peer- to-peer networks, wireless mesh networks, secure protocols, so-called “killer” applications, as well as recent advances in network coding. Throughout the course, we revisit the design principles often, and see how they affect the successes (or failures) of research ideas.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.peace, peaceSDG4, SDG16
ECE1448HQuantum Mechanics for EngineersThis course develops the theoretical background of quantum electronics and electro-optics and their applications to laser theory. The course is intended for engineering students with limited working knowledge of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger wave equation, quantum wells, hydrogen and multi-electron atoms, angular momentum and electron spin, harmonic oscillators and molecular structure, energy bands of solids, electric dipole moments, perturbation theory, and interaction of light with matter.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledge, energySDG4, SDG7
ECE1659HRobust and Optimal ControlConvex optimization methods based on Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) have dramatically expanded our ability to analyze and design complex multivariable control systems. This course explores material from the broad areas of robust and optimal control, with an emphasis on formulating systems analysis and controller design problems using LMIs. Topics include: historical context of robust control, fundamentals of optimization, linear matrix inequalities and semidefinite programming. Linear systems theory: Lyapunov inequalities, input-output performance criteria for dynamic systems, dissipative dynamical systems, and the generalized plant framework for optimal control. LMI solutions of H2 and H-Infinity state and output feedback control problems. Uncertain systems: linear and nonlinear uncertainty modelling, linear fractional representations, robust stability analysis. Time permitting: frequency-domain stability criteria, the KYP lemma, and introduction to integral quadratic constraints.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.equalitSDG10
ECE1518HSeminar in Identity, Privacy, and SecurityThis interdisciplinary course examines issues of identity, privacy and security from a range of technological, policy and scientific perspectives, highlighting the relationships, overlaps, tensions, tradeoffs and synergies between them. Based on a combination of public lectures, in-depth seminar discussions and group project work, it will study contemporary identity, privacy and security systems, practices and controversies, with such focal topics as biometric identification schemes, public key encryption infrastructure, privacy enhancing technologies, identity theft risks and protections, on-line fraud detection and prevention, and computer crime, varying between offerings.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.infrastructure, tradeSDG9, SDG10
ECE1524HService Provider NetworksIn last decade telecom industry has gone through transformational changes that started with the introduction of the concept of software defined networking or SDN and the emergence of Big Data as well as Machine Learning techniques. With hyper-scalers like Google and Amazon in the horizon, the landscape for traditional Telco service providers are changing. The course is primarily about this change and its profound impacts in telco service providers from different angles, including architecture, service design, business model, security and privacy. The SDN journey starts by network programmability, that is why the first part of will be walking the students through different steps of building a programmable network. Having programmable network we will have to start building intelligence by introducing closed loop control logics, the second part of the course deals with ideas around creating multilayer control logics, where we employ concepts of Big Data and Machine Learning to create innovative services. Given that SDN is meaningless without proper abstraction and interface modeling, we will discuss model driven approach to network management and from there we open the door to discuss orchestration strategies. Nowadays all telco discussions end with 5G; therefore, we explain 5G with the focus on the role of SDN there, followed by some important 5G use cases including smart cities and IoT. In the last part of the course we zoom into software defined security aspects, as well as a discussion on new methods of creating innovative services. the course will be concluded by discussing some operational aspects of SDN and the role of AI and Machine Learning there.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learning, cities, landSDG4, SDG11, SDG15
ECE1476HSolar Energy Capture and Storage in Natural and Engineered SystemsThis course covers the fundamental and applied aspects of light-to-electricity and electricity-to-light conversion devices. Upon completion of the course, students will gain practical knowledge on the working principles and operation of light-emitting diodes and solar cells. We will begin by introducing basics of solid state physics and quantum mechanics and apply them to analyze P-N junctions, diodes and heterostructures. Fundamentals of light-emitting diodes will then be covered, including physical and optical properties, band diagrams, and characterization of devices and materials. In a parallel analysis, the focus will then shift towards photovoltaics, covering thermodynamic limits, device architecture, characterization and modern material advances. Analytical and computational problem sets will allow students to apply the course material to the practical study of devices, using semiconductor device modeling tools such as SCAPS. Knowledge of quantum mechanics, solid-state physics, semiconductors, and familiarity with a numerical computing software is helpful, but not required.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.knowledge, energy, solarSDG4, SDG7
ECE1030HSpace Vector Theory and ControlThe course presents the general theory of dynamic modelling and control of the voltage source converter using space vectors. Applications include: active filters, FACTS (flexible AC Transmission Systems) controllers, VSC based HVDC systems, motor drives and most grid connected storage systems and renewable energy sources. Co-ordinate transforms necessary for the analysis of these devices are presented: space vectors, synchronous reference frame quantities, complex Fourier components and their relations. Converter controls are developed using both continuous time and discrete time space vector control concepts. In addition, state space modelling methods are employed for the study of interactions between a dc/ac converter and the network. The course typically includes an extensive laboratory componentEdward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.energy, renewabl, laborSDG7, SDG8
ECE1504HStatistical LearningThis course is designed for students with a background in communication systems and information theory, interested in doing research in machine learning. The first half of the course will focus on one-shot approaches in multiuser information theory and discuss some applications to machine learning. The second half will develop information theoretic bounds on the generalization error in statistical learning. The final course project is expected to be on a topic at the intersection of information theory and machine learning.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECE1549HStochastic NetworksAn introduction to the modeling and analysis of stochastic networks. We cover both classical Markovian queueing networks and recent advances in network analysis and optimization. Topics include Jackson and Whittle networks, Φ-balance, reversible Markov chains, Kolmogorov criterion, reversible network processes, Kelly and BCMP networks, point processes, Lévy’s formula, Poisson transitions and flows, Palm probabilities, MUSTA property, stationary functionals, Campbell-Mecke formula, Laplace functionals, stochastic geometry, Poisson point processes, marked point processes, Lyapunov stability, network utility maximization, and stochastic network optimization.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.transitSDG11
ECE1784HTrustworthy Machine LearningThe deployment of machine learning in real-world systems calls for a set of complementary technologies that will ensure that machine learning is trustworthy. Here, the notion of trust is used in its broad meaning: the course covers different topics in emerging research areas related to the broader study of security and privacy in machine learning. Students will learn about attacks against computer systems leveraging machine learning, as well as defense techniques to mitigate such attacks. The course assumes students already have a basic understanding of machine learning. Students will familiarize themselves with the emerging body of literature from different research communities investigating these questions. The class is designed to help students explore new research directions and applications. Most of the course readings will come from seminal papers in the field.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learning, investSDG4, SDG9
ECE1388HVLSI Design MethodologyThe course introduces a design methodology for very-large-scale-integration (VLSI) circuits using advanced computer-aided-design (CAD) tools. The focus is on learning Cadence integrated circuit (IC) design tools to implement the IC design flow. The methodology includes the steps of: custom digital circuit design, automated digital circuit synthesis, digital and mixed-signal circuit simulation, custom layout design, and automated layout generation. The course includes several projects using a 65nm CMOS process: (1) transistor characterization, (2) full custom digital circuit and layout design, (3) automated digital circuit synthesis and layout place-and-route, and (4) team-based design of a full IC employing the methodology learned in the course.Edward S. Rogers Sr. Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engin.learningSDG4
ECO3450HAdvanced Methods for Empirical MicroeconomicsThis course is directed at graduate students conducting research in the applied micro fields, especially (but not exclusively) labour, development, and public economics. While it has a labour course number, this is not purely a labour economics course: it is a course in empirical and applied econometrics. The tools covered in the course, however are central to those used in empirical labour economics, as well as other applied microeconomics fields like development and public economics. The focus will be on the identification of casual relationships using regression-based analysis. Empirical examples will be drawn from recent work in labour economics.Department of EconomicslabourSDG8
ECO2405HApplied EconometricsThis tutorial is designed for MA students who are enrolled in ECO2400H and ECO2401H. Co-requisites: ECO 2400 and ECO 2401.Department of Economicsco2SDG13
ECO2105YApplied MacroeconomicsThis tutorial is designed for direct-entry PhD students and MA students who are enrolled in ECO2100H and ECO2101H. (Co-requisites: ECO2100H and ECO2101H).Department of Economicsco2SDG13
ECO2205HApplied MicroeconomicsThis tutorial is designed for direct-entry PhD students and MA students who are enrolled in ECO2200H and ECO2201H. (Co-requisites: ECO2200H and ECO2201H).Department of Economicsco2SDG13
ECO2205YApplied MicroeconomicsThis tutorial is designed for direct-entry PhD students and MA students who are enrolled in ECO2200H and ECO2201H. (Co-requisites: ECO2200H and ECO2201H).Department of Economicsco2SDG13
ECO2701HDevelopment Economics IThis is a graduate course in development economics, appropriate for graduate students in the Department of Economics and other students with preparation in microeconomic theory and econometrics. The focus is on the application of economic theory, and especially econometrics, to a variety of questions important for understanding household and government behaviour in developing countries. A further purpose is to demonstrate how the analytic techniques used in applied microeconomics can be used to inform public policy in these countries. The material covered draws on (calculus-based) microeconomic theory and econometrics; it is suitable for both MA and PhD students. The emphasis of the course is on the interpretation and evaluation of empirical evidence relevant for the conduct of public policy in developing countries. We will use both economic theory and empirical evidence during the course. The theoretical arguments will guide us in understanding the mechanisms and forces driving poor household decisions in developing countries. The empirical tools and existing evidence will help us bring those models to real settings and evaluate the success of implemented policies in poverty alleviation. Our objective is to develop a deep understanding of economic development and the lives of the poor that allow students to contribute with their own research to the global debates around the topic.Department of EconomicspovertySDG1
ECO1400HEconometricsEconometrics combines elements of economic theory, statistics, probability theory, and mathematics. The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a solid theoretical and practical foundation for the interpretation of empirical evidence in economics. As such there is a dual focus on econometric theory and “hands-on” experience working with economic data. The centerpiece of the course is an empirical term paper on a topic of the student’s choice. At the end of the course, students should be able to conduct their own empirical investigations, and critically evaluate econometric and other statistical evidence.Department of EconomicsinvestSDG9
ECO2460HEconomic Applications of Machine LearningThe course will cover various techniques of machine learning that are used in economics. Both theoretical approaches and applications in Python will be presented. We will cover the two main axes of machine learning, namely supervised learning and unsupervised learning. We will see, among other things, natural language processing, classifiers, sentiment analysis, and neural networks, all of which will be supported by an overview of the economic literature using those methods.Department of EconomicslearningSDG4
ECO1100HEconomics Theory - Macro (MA)The course is intended to familiarize students with current topics in macroeconomics. Topics covered will include economic growth, consumption and investment, business cycle theory and unemployment. Calculus will be used throughout the course.Department of Economicsemployment, economic growth, invest, consumSDG8, SDG9, SDG12
ECO1100FEconomics Theory - Macro (MFE)The course is intended to familiarize students with current topics in macroeconomics. Topics covered will include economic growth, consumption and investment, business cycle theory and unemployment. Calculus will be used throughout the course.Department of Economicsemployment, economic growth, invest, consumSDG8, SDG9, SDG12
ECO1960HEnergy and RegulationThis course provides a general treatment of the economics of energy markets and the use of regulation in addressing environmental and other issues arising in these markets. A central theme is the search for an appropriate balance between market forces and regulatory/government intervention. A related objective is the development of a framework for understanding the public discourse on energy and the environment. Familiarity with tools of microeconomics and statistics is essential. Topics include renewable energy and storage, electricity markets, global warming, carbon pricing, hydrocarbons (oil, natural gas, coal) and fracking, the politics and geopolitics of energy.Department of Economicsenergy, renewabl, carbon pricing, global warming, environmentalSDG7, SDG12, SDG13
ECO1501HFinancial Economics: Corporate FinanceThe focus of this course is on corporate finance. The course deals with the following issues: (1) Theoretical and empirical issues concerning the nature and efficiency of capital markets. (2) The “relevance” of corporate financial structure and determinants of optimal financial structure. (3) Interactions between corporate investment and financing decisions. (4) The debt “overhang” problem.Department of Economicscapital, investSDG9
ECO3901HINDUSRIAL ORGANIZATION IIThis course deals with Empirical Industrial Organization. It covers topics related to econometric models and empirical applications of competition in industries. We study empirically the determinants of firms’ behaviour and market outcomes in the context of problems of market entry/exit, investment, innovation, product design, networks, matching, and natural resources. The course focuses on research papers using empirical dynamic games to investigate firms’ strategies and competition, and how firms’ information and beliefs play a fundamental role in competition and on market outcomes and welfare. The course emphasizes the importance of combining data, economic models, and appropriate identification strategies and econometric techniques to answer empirical questions in economics.Department of Economicswelfare, invest, natural resourceSDG1, SDG9, SDG12
ECO3900HIndustrial Organization IThis is a course in the Industrial Organization sequence. We aim to give a solid grounding in understanding the structure of markets, and the strategic behavior of firms and their consumers. The goal is to familiarize students with selected theoretical and empirical topics in industrial organization. In particular, this course aims to help students start their own research agendas, and to look at some particular IO topics in greater depth. Why studying industrial organization? There are policy issues on anti-trust, regulation, and consumer protection and commercial implications which are based primarily around IO issues including pricing and competitive analysis. In this course we will cover fundamental topics and techniques in IO, and such techniques are widely used in other economics fields as well. Beyond the economics discipling, estimating demand, understanding product positioning, pricing, and the other topics that we cover are also central concerns in the literature on marketing, strategy and information systems.Department of EconomicsconsumSDG12
ECO3301HInternational Trade IINo descriptionDepartment of EconomicstradeSDG10
ECO1320HInternational Trade RegulationThis seminar will explore the regulatory framework governing international trading relations. It will begin with the economic theory of international trade and in particular the case for free trade, then examine the politics of trade policy and objections and sources of opposition to free trade. The following topics will be examined: international economic institutions, the GATT/WTO multilateral trade law regime, the principles of non-discrimination (most favoured nation and national treatment), preferential trade agreements, special & differential treatment for developing countries, antidumping regulation, subsidies and countervailing duties, safeguards, adjustment assistance, trade and agriculture, trade in services and migration, trade-related investment measures, trade-related intellectual property rights, trade and health and safety standards, trade and the environment, trade and labour standards & human rights. The seminar will strongly emphasize the institutions and political economy of international trading relations and how economic and political forces have shaped current regulatory policies and may shape future policies, with a special focus on the US-China trade conflict and the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic on international trade and investment.Department of Economicsagricultur, labour, invest, trade, institut, human rightsSDG2, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
ECO3300HInternational Trade TheoryThe course develops the theory of international trade with emphasis on the structure of general equilibrium, the foundations of comparative advantage, determinants of the pattern of trade, the gains and losses from trade, trade impacts on the domestic and international distributions of income, commercial policy, and trade in a dynamic world. Throughout, careful attention is given to empirical evidence.Department of Economicstrade, incomeSDG10
ECO3800HLabour Economics IECO2800F is a core course in labour economics. The course is pitched at the PhD level. Qualified MA students are also welcomed. MA students who are interested in a more public policy oriented labour course should take ECO2801S. ECO 2800F is not a prerequisite for ECO2801S. Both courses are required for PhD students who want to write the field examination in labour economics. The objective of ECO2800 is to use microeconomics and econometrics to study the labour market. Special attention will be paid to the interaction between economic theory and empirical research. The topics covered will include labour supply, educational attainment, on-the-job training, on-the-job matching, hedonic markets, internal labour markets, and economics of the family.Department of Economicslabour, co2SDG8, SDG13
ECO3801HLabour Economics IIThis is a graduate course in labor economics, appropriate for graduate students in the Department of Economics and other students with preparation in microeconomic theory and econometrics, as well as Master students with a strong interest in research in labor economics. It is a natural follow-up of Graduate Labor Economics I ECO3800H1F. The course teaches core topics in the field of labor economics as well as empirical methods for applied microeconomic analysis. The goal of this course is to prepare students to produce and consume published labor economics research.Department of Economicslabour, labor, consumSDG8, SDG12
ECO2101HMacroeconomic Theory IIThis course provides an in-depth presentation of a small number of recent research topics in macro. In recent years, topics have included growth theory, dynamic Ramsay taxation, search and bargaining, efficiency wage models, and empirical research on consumption and asset-pricingDepartment of Economicswage, taxation, consumSDG8, SDG10, SDG12
ECO2200HMicroeconomic Theory IThis class combins the first two out of four parts of the Ph.D microeconomics sequence. There ares two objectives. (1) The primary objective is to introduce you to the foundations of microeconomic theory. The class is divided into two main parts: • The first part is devoted to single agents and consists of the choice theory, the consumer theory, firm theory, methods of comparative statics, the decision theory under uncertainty, and risk. Although most of you have seen the elements of the consumer’s and the firm’s theory in either your undergraduate or master’s education, our approach is going be very different from what you know. We are going to be much more formal and analyze things at much more fundamental, deep level. For example, in your undergraduate class, you would start the consumer theory with writing down the consumer problem, i.e., utility maximization given the budget constraint. Here, we derive the consumer problem from the basic choice theory and formally prove when observable choices of the consumer can be represented (or interpreted) as the utility maximization problem. For the great majority of you, the latter two topics will be completely new. The goal of the comparative statics is to provide you with a basic set of mathematical tools to analyze the effects of the change of parameters on the variables of interests in a whole range of problems across all areas of economics. In the last part, we study foundations of the expected utility model and various uncertainty related behaviors. The second part idevoted to studying economic allocations in a society. We spent at least half of the course talking about allocations in the Walrasian economy, including their feasibility, efficiency, equilibrium, etc. The rest of the class will be devoted to allocations in other problems, including matching. Most of the material will be new to you (unless you have taken the graduate course before). (2) The second, and more universal, objective of this course is to introduce you to the formal approach to the economic argument. The class is proof-based and most of the lecture is going to proceed in the rhythm of definition-theoremproof-example. You will learn how to read the proofs and how to carefully write them. Because the topics are either new, or approached in a novel way, and because most of you haven’t seen a proof-based class before, many of you will find that it is a difficult class, perhaps the most difficult course you have ever taken. It is essential that you allocate a sufficient amount of time to study for this course, and that you study in a right way. You can find some advice how to do it below.Department of EconomicsconsumSDG12
ECO2201HMicroeconomic Theory IIThis is the Game theory part of the first year Microeconomic Theory PhD sequence, the second part of the class on Information Economics and Mechanism Design is taught by Professor Gabriel Carroll. This class is designed for first year Economics Ph.D. students. The focus is to provide a technically sound introduction to game theory. We will discuss the central concepts as well as some proofs and typical proof techniques that are used in game theory. At the end of the class, you should have a solid understanding of the central concepts and results in game theory – an important basis for theoretical and applied work. Moreover, this class will provide you with the tools and skills to be able to further your knowledge in game theory through self-study, understand and assess the quality of proofs, and have an understanding of how to write proofs in game theory yourself. The course assumes the knowledge of the materials taught in the first semester in Microeconomic Theory sequence (ECO 2200H1F). In addition, the course assumes a strong background in math, especially proofbased advanced calculus and probability theory.Department of EconomicsknowledgeSDG4
ECO2600HPublic Economics IThe course will cover various techniques of machine learning that are used in economics. Both theoretical approaches and applications in Python will be presented. We will cover the two main axes of machine learning, namely supervised learning and unsupervised learning. We will see, among other things, natural language processing, classifiers, sentiment analysis, and neural networks, all of which will be supported by an overview of the economic literature using those methods.Department of EconomicslearningSDG4
ECO2601HPublic Economics IIECO 2600 & ECO 2601 constitute the core offering in Public Finance. The theory of public expenditures will be covered in detail during one term and the theory of taxation during the other term, with briefer looks at selected topics (e.g., fiscal policy, theory of public debt, federal finance).Department of EconomicstaxationSDG10
EEB1340HComparative Plant MorphologyThe origin of land plants and the subsequent diversification of land plant vegetative and reproductive form and function. Discussions synthesize morphological and anatomical knowledge from living organisms and fossil records with cellular, physiological, and molecular information on the developmental “tool kit” of land plants and their ancestors throughout geological time. Topics address the evolution of vegetative and reproductive meristems; stem, leaf, and root architecture; vascular tissue; the ovule habit; fertilization processes; and pollination biology. Lab Materials Fee: $25; Lab Manual Fee: $25Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyknowledge, landSDG4, SDG15
EEB1320HEcologyThe Core Ecology course will provide students with a foundation of the conceptual basis of ecology through lectures, readings, and discussions. The structure of course content will follow the four levels of ecological organization: (1) individuals, (2) populations, (3) communities, and (4) ecosystems. By exploring the theoretical foundations of ecology and the linkages among ecological theories, students will gain a broad perspective of the historical development and current trends in ecology, particularly at the population and community levels. This course should be useful preparation for PhD students for the Question Bank part of the Appraisal Exam.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyecosystem, ecolog, ecosystemSDG14, SDG15
EEB1350HEvolutionThe Core Evolution Course will cover the basics of evolution. This course should be useful preparation for PhD students for the Question Bank part of the Appraisal Exam. If you have taken two or more 3rd or 4th year undergrad courses in evolution, the course may not be especially useful for providing you with background knowledge—discuss with your supervisor and supervisory committee whether you should take this course. On the other hand, if you have no or very little background in the field, you may need to sit in on undergrad lectures or do outside reading before you take this course; however, if you have taken other courses in ecology, math, or biological theory, ask the EEB graduate office and your supervisor and committee whether you will be equipped to take one of these courses.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyknowledge, ecologSDG4, SDG15
EEB1430HModelling in Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyThe study of ecology and evolution uses models to explain biological phenomena including the maintenance of biodiversity, population growth, competition, eco-evolutionary dynamics, trait and molecular evolution, epidemiology, spatial ecology, phylogeny and extinction. Students will learn to develop, assess and apply analytical, simulation and statistical models for analysis and data interpretation. Note that an undergrad course in calculus and an undergrad course in ecology or evolution are recommended.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologybiodivers, biodivers, ecologSDG14, SDG15
EEB1462HPhylogenetic SystematicsThe Tree of Life metaphor for evolutionary relationships among species, phylogenies, is now fundamental in biology. Phylogenetic trees are now used both in species classification and to investigate myriad biological hypotheses about the evolutionary process and applied problems like virus and cancer epidemiology. This course will train students in the concepts and core methods of phylogenetic tree inference, including parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian techniques. Students will gain bioinformatics skills with application to DNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree inference. Through a combination of lectures, discussion, and computer labs, students will master theory and practice of phylogenetic tree construction and inference.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologyinvest, species, speciesSDG9, SDG14, SDG15
EEB1328HPhysiological EcologyAn advanced treatment of the physiological mechanisms controlling plant and animal distribution and ecological success. Topics of focus include photosynthesis and resource balance, water and nutrient relations, temperature effects, and adaptations to abiotic stress. A fee of approximately $15 may be charged for field trip transportation.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologywater, animal, ecolog, animalSDG6, SDG14, SDG15
EEB1250HSpatial StatisticsEcological processes are inherently spatially structured due to spatial dependence on environmental conditions and spatial autocorrelation of species behaviours. The goal of this course is to provide a broad overview of the various spatial analytical methods available to quantify (geostatistics, network theory, boundary detection), test (restricted randomization) and model (spatial regressions) spatially autocorrelated ecological data. Students will be introduced to concepts of spatial scales and how multiscale analysis can be performed with census and sampled data. Furthermore, specific spatial methods to deal with point pattern data and surface pattern data will be reviewed. A combination of lectures and computer laboratory sessions will be used.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biologylabor, environmental, species, ecolog, speciesSDG8, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENG3337HComedy and Sentimentality in Eighteenth-Century LiteratureThis course juxtaposes two contrary modes of eighteenth-century literary culture. On one hand, we will read a number of well-known sentimental novels (Richardson's Pamela and Sterne's Sentimental Journey) as well as a range of non-novelistic sentimental texts. On the other hand, we will explore a set of eighteenth-century comic texts and the everyday humour that they reflect-a coarse, cruel, and often misogynistic humour that is completely unfamiliar to modern readers. Many of these texts directly parody the rising tide of sentimentalism, making fun of the very idea of tender feelings. These include Fielding's well-known travesty of Richardsonian sentimentality in Shamela, but also a range of lesser-known texts: short travestic tales that exaggerate sentimental conventions to the point of absurdity; mock-epistolary correspondences between rustic idiots; and mock-sentimental elegies for senile old women or dead insects. Such texts foreground, in the most unmistakeable way, the sheer risibility of sentimentalism to so many of those who witnessed its emergence. One major theme of the course will be the promise of the archive-of all the minor, ephemeral publications of the age - to dispute literary-historical commonplaces and to produce new readings of major texts.Department of EnglishwomenSDG5
ENG6822HCritical Theory and Science and Technology StudiesScholars in the humanities are increasingly drawn to debates concerning the social impact of science and technology. These interdisciplinary conversations often balance the rigors of scientific method alongside the interpretive power of the humanities. How has critical theory combined with science and technology studies (STS) to interpret and challenge scientific discourse across the years? This course will provide an introduction to important intersections between critical theory and STS. With an eye to the latest developments in these overlapping fields, we will investigate the nature of these interdisciplinary formations. From the 1960s "science wars" to critical code studies in the age of ubiquitous computing, this course will provide a grounding in methods and arguments that have shaped how literary and humanistic inquiry lay claim to the world of science and technology.Department of EnglishinvestSDG9
ENG6365HDiasporic EnglishesA survey of diasporic Englishes, with strong emphases on lexicon, morphology, syntactical structure, and pronunciation in their distinctness from "standard English". Attention will be given to the historical and cultural circumstances that have informed these transformations. While we survey specific developments (such as, for instance, Englishes in Scotland, Canada, the Caribbean, India, and on the internet), these varieties will illustrate more general developments and dynamics of language variation in the diaspora. General topics may include concepts and terms for describing language; language contact and language change; pidgins and Creoles; the use of English as a primary language, and official second language, and an international language; globalization; language planning; issues pertaining to the codification and teaching of 'non-standard' Englishes; the dynamics of the Creole continuum and of language-mixing in literary and non-literary texts.Department of Englishinternet, globaliz, landSDG9, SDG15
ENG2022HEarly Modern Critical Race StudiesThis course has three main aims: firstly, to explore and analyse a range of early modern texts, from plays and poems to travel narratives and maps, which trace the landscape of early modern racial ideologies, frameworks and constructions; secondly, to read, engage and think with key works in the field of critical race studies; and finally, to map the history and terrain of early modern critical race studies and think about its future directions. Students will analyse and engage with the multiple registers of premodern race and its implications for discussions of nation, empire and slavery; religion, class and conduct; capitalism and economy; gender and sexuality; family, blood and kinship; complexion, embodiment and the somatic. We shall also think about questions of reception, representation and appropriation, placing early modern race in conversation with contemporary contexts.Department of Englishgender, capital, landSDG5, SDG9, SDG15
ENG2464HEarly Modern Literature and the Crisis of RepresentationA study of the poetry and prose of early modern England in light of the fractious new theories of linguistic and political representation that occasioned them. With attention to the forces behind the generation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries of new literary genres and modes, the course will examine the emergence of some of literature's most striking forms: the treatise of political and religious obligation, the utopian fantasy, the Biblical tragedy, the devotional poem, the speculative essay, and the "realist" allegorical quest narrative. Authors studied likely include Bacon, Herbert, Hobbes, Crashaw, Browne, Cavendish, and Bunyan. The semester's investigation of the struggles over what it means to express, communicate, and represent will culminate in a look at Restoration England's Universal and Artificial Language Movement, with its signal achievement in John Wilkins's 1668 Essay Towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language.Department of Englishinvest, landSDG9, SDG15
ENG2019HEarly Modern Psyches: Shakespeare and PsychoanalysisFreud's frequent, often pivotal, references to Shakespeare signal both deep cultural influence and a complex intertwining of shared attention to the nature and structure of the human psyche. The dominance of historicist approaches to early modern studies over the past three decades has tended to marginalize psychoanalysis as a discourse; this seminar will explore the resources of psychoanalytic theory for understanding the early modern "emergence" of subjectivity. We will consider historicism's skepticism about and exclusion of psychoanalysis, what was at stake in these debates, the role of historical phenomenology and cognitive approaches, and the current reemergence of psychoanalytic theory. Five Shakespearean texts (The Rape of Lucrece, Measure for Measure, The Winter's Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest) will serve as case studies for our exploration of such topics as the operations of the mind, the imagination, boundaries between the human subject and their animal counterparts or between human subjects and the landscape, the passions, dream-work, consciousness, gender, and sexuality. Readings will include papers by Freud (on animism, dreams, the unconscious, the uncanny), Laplanche (fantasy and sexuality), and Kristeva (language, the semiotic, the abject), and recent scholarship by such critics as Lynn Enterline, Mary Thomas Crane, David Hillman, and Bruce Smith.Department of Englishgender, animal, animal, landSDG5, SDG14, SDG15
ENG6182HEating WellIn 2019, a report by Oxford University Researchers found that adopting a plant-based diet was the single most significant intervention consumers could make in the face of climate disaster. Others counter that ‘eating meat is one of the things that makes us human.’ Derrida says the moral question isn’t whether one eats or doesn’t eat this or that. Is it possible to eat well in the Anthropocene, an era in which ‘what it means to be human’ is invoked with increasing frequency? Are there ethical omnivores? What do these questions have to do with students of English Literature? During this course, we will study a range of thinkers who have engaged with the issue of eating, eating well, eating others, and (sometimes) ‘what it means to be human.’ In How to Live Together, Roland Barthes is concerned with the philosopher’s food; Friedrich Nietzsche and Jacques Derrida also reflect on this issue. Feminist theorists such as Carol Adams and Susan Fraiman regard not eating other species as an essential to feminist care ethics, while three fictions by J.M. Coetzee represent the problem of eating well, particularly during times of political crisis. Peter Singer and Michael Pollan offer contrasting views of the ethics of eating well and eating others. We won’t resolve these questions but we may at least, as Nietzsche says, gain some insight into ‘a question on which the “salvation of humanity” depends . . . the question of nutrition’ (Ecce Homo, ‘Why I am so clever’).Department of Englishnutrition, feminis, consum, climate, anthropocene, species, species, landSDG2, SDG5, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENG5074HIn the First Person: Memoirs and MedialityThis course will engage with the construction and social function of autobiographical subjectivity in printed and graphic memoir forms that blend different discourses or combine two or more media. Framed by the premise that the memoir is a mediated mode of self-expression, the course will study the relationship between what Foucault calls the "technologies of the self" and the media technologies through which the memoir's self-referential subject expresses itself. We will approach this issue by putting memoirs in dialogue with a range of theoretical and critical material about life writing, subject formation, corporeality, and mediality. Our discussions will then focus on the performativity, positionality, and relationality of the writing subject; the tropes through which the body figures in self- narratives; the intertextual and inter/medial structure of memoirs; the ways in which discourses such as the self-reflexive essay, philosophy, autoethnography, and confession inflect self-expression; the agency gained in writing a memoir, especially in relation to collectivities; and the impact of digital technologies and social media on memoirs today. The range of (mostly Canadian) memoirs selected will afford us the opportunity to address these questions in relation to gender, sexuality, "race," and class.Department of EnglishgenderSDG5
ENG1002HIntroduction to Old English II BeowulfThis course is devoted to a collaborative reading and analysis of the Old English poem Beowulf: its language, its cultural and historical backgrounds, and its style. The work of our class will rely on close and informed attention to the poem's language and rhetorical strategies. In addition, we'll begin to explore some of the more technical aspects of studying Old English verse: possible topics include metrical analysis, paleography, and/or the problems of dating and authorship.Department of EnglishlaborSDG8
ENG5527HMaking and Re-Making ModernismModernist literary culture was built on strong relationships between writing and other kinds of making. Writers and artists were publishing their own magazines, printing their own pamphlets, and staging their own experimental plays. Taking matters of literary circulation and publication literally into their own hands, modernist writers emphasized the importance of the handmade in an increasingly mechanized world. In this course, we will examine modernist little magazines, small presses, interdisciplinary artistic workshops, and theatrical productions in Britain and Ireland from 1900 to 1945 in order to understand the collaborative practices and aesthetic imperatives of modernist writers and interdisciplinary artists. Now that about a century has passed since these artistic collaborations took place, the objects that modernists made are being re-made and re-distributed through library special collections and digitization initiatives. Everything from scraps of fabric from dance costumes to handprinted books are now being remediated and represented in online collections. Our reading of modernist texts in all genres will therefore be informed by a constellation of critical works on digital archives, taste, craft, class, and the avant-garde.Department of Englishlabor, production, landSDG8, SDG12, SDG15
ENG5025HMalcolm X and African-Canadian LiteratureIn this seminar, we will explore the seminal influence upon African-Canadian letters of the African-American public intellectual Malcolm X, only 39 when assassinated in 1965. Although (European/Caucasian) Canadian media accorded X usually cursory and derogatory attention, and though he was marginalized by both U.S. Civil Rights Movement figures and by the Nation of Islam, his ideas for Black Nationalism, anti-imperialism, and Black cultural and political empowerment still made their way into the works of African-Canadian authors. We will explore the meaning of the various appropriations, by Black Canadian writers, of various "Malcolms."Department of Englishmarginalized, nationalismSDG10, SDG16
ENG5994HModern South Asia in Literature and MediaThroughout the twentieth century, territorial re- mappings, independence struggles, and ethnonationalist state violence have constituted modern South Asia as a radically shifting cultural construct that coincides and collides with lived experience and aspiration. This course tackles urgent questions of anti-colonialism, feminism, queerness, technology, spirituality, stardom, caste apartheid, ecology, and populism, through a close reading of literature and media spanning the mid- twentieth century to present times. It brings the insights of cultural critique to bear upon a range of materials, from Anglophone classics and fiction and film in translation to poetic cosmopolitanism and avant-garde re- imaginings.Department of Englishqueer, feminis, gini, ecolog, violenceSDG5, SDG10, SDG15, SDG16
ENG1001HOld English IAn introduction for reading knowledge to the oldest literary form of English, with discussion of readings drawn from the surviving prose and verse literature.Department of EnglishknowledgeSDG4
ENG6519HPostcolonial Theory and the World Literature DebatesWhen publishers, scholars, and critics talk about the prismatic literary and cultural traditions outside the West, they sometimes refer to them by their geographical provenance-African literature, say, or Sumerian art-or perhaps by their historical moment-Ottoman architecture, or postcolonial Indonesian poetry. More and more, the catch-all category of World Literature has begun to hold sway in influential places, and is changing the shape of how we think, learn, and write about non-Western aesthetics, as well as how we participate in our "own" complex cultures. If we can imagine a literature that truly goes under the heading of the World, what can we possibly exclude? What might we gain by using this term, and what might we lose? What histories are attached to the various names and classifications we assign to culture and how does cultural "othering" uphold or resist forms of economic, political, and military dominance? In this course we will work carefully through the history and influential writings of postcolonialism as a method designed to challenge to hegemonic forms of representation, cultural production, and study. In the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to the historical underpinnings and current critics of World Literature.Department of EnglishproductionSDG12
ENG4722HReparative Readings of Victorian FictionThis course will invite students to reconsider the reading of a canonical Victorian novel in light of urgent, present-day issues, including social, economic, and environmental concerns as well as issues that arise in direct response to student interests. We will read Dickens's Bleak House through different reparative lenses, including feminism; economic inequality; social and class inequality ideas of and analogies to racial difference; questions of managing bodies, including population control and the management of disease. Exploring in theory and practice what it means to re-situate the Victorians in this way, we will consider what it means to study Victorian novels in the present day.Department of Englishfeminis, inequality, equalit, environmentalSDG5, SDG10, SDG13
ENG6848HRepresenting VandalismMarking walls, defacing monuments, burning books, blowing up statues, breaking windows...for as long as humans have created things, they have also wilfully defaced and destroyed them. What is vandalism? Who does it, and why? Does vandalism also create? Can a transhistorical, humanist approach to vandalism offer new perspectives on old and new forms of vandalism that period-specific historians and (more recently) social scientists may have missed? These are the working questions of my current research/book. Besides key theoretical discussions of vandalism old and new, this inter-disciplinary seminar will explore representations of vandalism in both "fact" and fiction, media coverage and creative literature. Our topics of conversation, and potentially of your own research and essays, will include such things as state-sponsored vs. citizen vandalism, cultural vandalism, political vandalism, literary vandalism, the vandalism of art, art as vandalism, vandalism for fun and vandalism for profit.Department of Englishcitizen, windSDG4, SDG7
ENG6549HReproductive Justice, Feminist Theory, American LiteratureThis course will seek to contextualize and theorize questions of reproductive rights in American literature and culture in relationship to what a range of black feminist theorists have called "reproductive justice." We will focus on particular historical periods (and their afterlives), prioritizing the relationship between reproductive politics and chattel slavery in the United States, the ideology of Republican motherhood and the sanctification of domesticity, the so-called "eugenic feminism" of the progressive era, contexts for and critiques of life vs. choice in relationship to second-wave feminism and evangelical Christianity, and, finally, the rise of a movement for a more inclusive model of reproductive justice. We will read a range of literary texts by authors including, Herman Melville, Kate Chopin, Sui Sin Far, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison and Maggie Nelson. We will also read critical and theoretical works by Saidiya Hartman, Sophie Lewis, Barbara Johnson, Alys Weinbaum, Silvia Federici, Chikako Takeshita and others. Subjects for consideration will include reproductive slavery and its afterlives, the ethics of infanticide, the relationship between social and sexual reproduction under neoliberalism, pregnancy and theories of subjectivity, surrogacy and reproductive technology, incarceration and reproductive rights, and environmentalism and the decision to reproduce.Department of Englishfeminis, production, environmentalSDG5, SDG12, SDG13
ENG2533HShakespeare's LanguageIf the Muses themselves spoke English, they would speak with "Shakespeare's fine-filed phrase," Francis Meres commented in 1598, suggesting that Shakespeare's linguistic art tapped the emerging potential of the English language and extended its resources. Aiming at methodological advances in close reading attentive to the linguistic texture of cultural and literary texts, this course focuses on Shakespeare's still-resonant language. As shaping contexts, we consider the arts of language promoted by Renaissance humanist education, the dynamics of everyday social dialogue, and variation and language change in Early Modern English. The course draws upon an interdisciplinary collection of readings to test out theories and tools, with attention to rhetoric, discourse analysis and pragmatics, historical sociolinguistics, history of English, and the emerging digital approaches to text analysis and to the "distant reading" of large digital archives. We ask in what ways “the life of Shakespeare’s plays is in the language.” We also ask how new methods of language analysis can extend the reach of other current literary approaches, concerned, for example, with race, environment, gender, or cultural history. While the course models language analysis on Shakespeare's works, it also encourages graduate student researchers to develop advanced reading strategies which they can adapt to the cultural and literary texts of their chosen fields.Department of EnglishgenderSDG5
ENG4904HSlavery and Anti-Slavery in the Ante-Bellum United StatesThis course will examine essays, stories, poems, autobiographies and other writings associated with the expansion of and resistance to enslaved labour in the United States between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The course will also trace the effects of a disavowed relationship to slavery and racial violence on major texts of the period.Department of Englishlabour, violenceSDG8, SDG16
ENG6818HSocial Robots in the Cultural ImaginationThis course will explore the production and portrayal of social robots in the cultural imagination in conjunction with literary and religious myths of creation. While the course looks back to the history of AI and early literary accounts of robots in the 1960s, it concentrates on modes of production and on works written in or after the 1990s when western society experienced "the development of a fully networked life." The course will explore the ethical and aesthetic questions raised by the intersection between the production and the imaginative portrayals of transhuman relationships. Questions to be considered in interpreting developments in AI and in reading literature about social robots in light of the religious and classical myths-include: how is creation figured? What or who is created and why? Who plays God? Who serves as Eve/Adam? Who is cast as Satan? What is the locus of the Garden? What constitutes power/knowledge? And, finally, how does a particular treatment of the social robot potentially alter our understanding of the foundational imaginative intertexts and, by extension, notions of divinity, humanity, gender, animality, and relations of kinship and care.Department of Englishknowledge, gender, production, animal, animalSDG4, SDG5, SDG12, SDG14, SDG15
ENG6844HThe Roots of Autotheory: Nietzsche, Milner, BarthesThis course consists of a close reading of three major thinkers whose mode of writing anticipated what since the turn of the twenty-first century has come to be known as autotheory: a combination of autobiographical meditation and theoretical reflection. The thinkers in question are Friedrich Nietzsche, Marion Milner, and Roland Barthes, all of whom wrote aphoristically, elliptically, and personally about topics such as self-fashioning, self-actualization, living a meaningful life, opposing normativity, creativity, love, desire, loss, mourning, relationality, solitude, and the interplay of light and shadow in human existence. For all three, writing and living were inextricably intertwined, with the result that they produced deeply self-reflexive texts that are characterized by lively stylistic innovation. Their topics were timeless and their bold rhetorical originality has left an indelible imprint on subsequent thinkers interested in combining the personal with the theoretical. The purpose of this seminar is simple: to explore the poignant theoretical contributions and stylistic acrobatics of three authors who possessed an unusually keen eye for the complexities of human life and to consider the relationship between living, thinking, and writing that these authors foregrounded.Department of EnglishlandSDG15
ENG2484HThomas Heywood and the Early Modern TheaterThis course will serve as an introduction to a broad sweep of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English drama through the works of Thomas Heywood, the playwright who famously claimed to have had "an entire hand, or at least a maine finger" in more than two hundred plays. (We will not read all of them.) Concentrating primarily on Heywood's dramatic texts, with short excursions in his prose works (from English histories to polemical writings), we will use the plays to map the dominant concerns of the early modern theater. Our readings will range across major dramatic genres, from city comedy to domestic tragedy, alongside plays that resist predictable forms and categories, such as the Age plays. Our secondary aim in this course will be to explore Heywood's work through critical approaches to identity that have, in early modern studies, typically focused on Shakespeare's plays. With attention to critical race theory (with The Fair Maid of the West), disability theory (with The Fair Maid of the Exchange, often attributed to Heywood), and feminist theory (with A Woman Killed With Kindness), for example, we will consider how Heywood's plays amplify and complicate key theoretical interventions in early modern studies.Department of Englishdisabilit, feminisSDG3, SDG5
ENG6531HTreesTrees, writes botanist Robin Wall Kimmerer, "are our teachers." This course looks at what trees teach in multiple ways. In creation myths and totem poles, in tales of metamorphosis of humans into trees, in meditations on snowy woods, in woodcarving, in a cozy fire, in paper itself, trees are a site of nature-culture. "[T]heir merely being there," John Ashbery archly suggests, "Means something." This course investigates the meaning of trees in diverse genres and traditions as well by walking through streets and parks. The seminar will introduce students not only to eco-criticism, theories of wilderness and colonialism, but also to botany and the Wood-Wide-Web or "dendrocommunication." Stories of trees speak of settler-indigenous relations and of global warming. German forester Peter Wohlleben suggests that trees communicate "daily dramas and moving love stories" among themselves. The first half of the course will range from creation myths to children's literature to poetry of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second will focus on two major novels of the past decade, Annie Proulx's Barkskins and Richard Powers's Overstory, which respond to climate change via tales of deforestation, elevating trees over human characters.Department of Englishsettler, invest, indigenous, climate, global warming, forest, deforestation, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG15
ENG6560HVisual Media and Human Rights WorkVisual media plays an important role in advancing human rights work. From its recognition as a site that directs the spectator's gaze to themes conveyed by human rights struggles and failures, to its pedagogical aims of providing viewers with a framework from which to act on behalf of others, documentary film participates in dramatizing and making proximate the future work that remains to be done by human rights mechanisms. In this course, we will explore how visual media in the form of documentary film participates in this practice. We will screen films associated with literary texts to ask how visual media widens the scope of representation associated with human rights narratives and assess the degree to which film, like literature, disrupts settler-colonial nation-states representational practices that project a "fantasy of victims in the image of perpetrators" in order to justify "retrospectively what perpetrators have done" (Moore "Film After Atrocity"). Course readings and class discussions will focus on literature, film, and legal cases to explore how these texts overlap and diverge.Department of Englishsettler, human rightsSDG4, SDG16
ENG5281HWhitman and Nationalism 1855-1891/2As most scholars have noted, and as any new reader soon sees, Whitman's poetry and prose is everywhere exuberantly nationalistic. And yet at the same time, readers and scholars also agree that Whitman's writing is everywhere deeply marked by his experiences of perceived social exclusion as a homosexual, as a brother to the mentally ill, and as a member of the working class. His writing is thus sensitive and resistant to the pervasive tendency of human collectivities to organize themselves according to binary oppositions of "in-group" versus "out-group." How then, it is fair to ask, was it possible for Whitman at once to draw upon the always-incipiently-binary rhetoric of nationalism and to undermine structural social exclusion? Our course will explore this central tension as expressed in Whitman's poetry and prose across the full arc of his career, from 1855-1891/2. This exploration will include delving into both the theory and history of nationalism, especially the various currents of nationalistic discourse prominent in American public life in the 19th century. We will also be interested in comparative perspectives generated by consulting examples of "national" poetry from other countries.Department of EnglishnationalismSDG16
ENG4154HWordsworth: Poetry, Context, and InterpretationA study of the poetry of Wordsworth with a view to understanding its importance, historical contexts, and theoretical interpretation. This course will provide students with an opportunity to get to know an author in depth and also to gain a better knowledge of the range and diversity of contemporary criticism. In addition to reading Wordsworth's major poetry and prose, students will also read some of what Wordsworth read, notably works by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Erasmus Darwin.Department of EnglishknowledgeSDG4
ENV1444HCapitalist NatureThis course is organized around the idea of “capitalist nature”.ⁱⁱ Specifically, the course is concerned most centrally with six questions: 1) What are the unique political, ecological, and geographical dynamics of environmental change propelled by capital accumulation and the dynamics of specifically capitalist forms of “commodification”? 2) How and why is nature commodified (however partially) in a capitalist political economy, and what are the associated problems and contradictions? 3) How do the contemporary dynamics of environmental change, environmental politics, and environmental justice shape and help us understand transformations in markets, commodity production regimes, and capitalist social relations and institutions more broadly? 4) How can we understand the main currents of policy and regulatory responses to these dynamics? 5) How do prevailing ideas about nature (non-human as well as human) reflect, reinforce and subvert capital accumulation? 6) Is there or can there be any such thing as “green capitalism”? 1 O'Connor, M. (1993). On the misadventures of capitalist nature. Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, 4(3), 7-40.School of Environmentcapital, production, environmental, environmental justice, ecolog, institutSDG9, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15, SDG16
ENV1005HEcological StatisticsThis course will cover popular statistical models for the analysis of ecological data. There will be a particular focus on the statistical properties and assumptions underlying the methods. We will cover topics such as identifiability/estimability, understanding the theory underlying distinct inferential approaches and their impact on ecological conclusions, as well as simulation-based model assessment.School of EnvironmentecologSDG15
ENV1704HEnvironmental Analysis and Risk ManagementThis course introduces the principles of environmental toxicology and risk assessment. Study of the basic principles of toxicology, including routes of exposure, dose response, and target organ effects from exposure to environmental toxicants will be covered. The course presents the quantitative methods used to assess the human health risks associated with exposure to toxicants, focusing on the four major components of risk assessment: hazard identification dose-response assessment exposure assessment risk characterization. Risk communication and public consultation will also be addressed. The course will include an overview of Canadian regulations and policies and their impact on the practical realties facing practitioners, policy makers, and stakeholders. We will explore risk assessment issues related to exposure to contaminated sites, air quality, and projects undergoing Environmental Assessment. The intent is to make this course hands on and practical so that you are able to participate as a team member conducting human health and ecological risk assessment upon its completion. The course will be based on actual undertakings of Canadian risk assessment projects.School of Environmentenvironmental, ecologSDG13, SDG15
ENV1001H SEnvironmental Decision MakingENV1001H S is the core course for the graduate Collaborative Specialization in Environmental Studies at the School of the Environment. This course addresses the topic of “environmental decision-making”, which we understand broadly as the challenging process of how humans engage with the natural world, and the many iterative (and sometimes invisible) decisions we make about how to organize human societies and activities. While decision-making is itself a field of study, this course takes a more flexible interpretation of the term, involving choices about, and affecting, the environment. Drawing on insights from across a range of disciplines—throughout the humanities, social sciences, and natural and applied sciences—and with attention to fields beyond academia, we consider multiple perspectives on the environment. Through bi-weekly guest lectures, student presentations, group projects, and individual written assignments, we explore worldviews and values (what assumptions we make about the world that shape the kinds of decisions we can make), conflicting interests and information (at multiple scales), and decision-making models and tools (a survey of the range of tools that are available), along with questions of uncertainty, adaptation, and iterative decision-making processes. In a time of online learning provoked by the global pandemic, we will also turn analytic attention to the benefits and challenges associated with virtual technologies for interdisciplinary collaboration, research, and decision-making. As travel becomes constrained not only by the pandemic, but also as a response to climate change and environmental degradation, we anticipate the need for these tools will increase in the future. In the class, we will consider how online platforms may be useful in enabling ongoing research efforts at a distance, and how different strategies and tools may be designed for better communication and action. Students should emerge from the course with a broader perspective on environmental and social challenges, enhanced communication skills across disciplines, and additional experience working in diverse teams. In addition, students should also leave the course more confident about the options for inter-disciplinary collaboration online. Our central goal in the course and the Collaborative Specialization program is to enable conversations to take place within and beyond the classroom about the challenges of human-environment relationships, with new ideas on creative and just approaches to social and political decisions.School of Environmentworldview, learning, labor, climate, environmentalSDG4, SDG8, SDG13
ENV1001H FEnvironmental Decision MakingENV1001H F is the core course for the graduate Collaborative Specialization in Environmental Studies at the School of the Environment. In this course, we address the topic of “environmental decision-making”, which we understand broadly as the challenging process of how humans engage with the natural world, and the many iterative (and sometimes invisible) decisions we make about how to organize human societies and activities. While decision-making is itself a field of study, this course takes a more flexible interpretation of the term, involving choices about, and affecting, the environment. With a focus on the insights from across a range of disciplines—throughout the humanities, social sciences, and natural and applied sciences—and with attention to fields beyond academia, we consider multiple perspectives on the environment. Through bi-weekly guest lectures, student presentations, group projects, and individual written assignments, we explore themes of worldviews and values (what assumptions we make about the world that shapes the kinds of decisions we can make), conflicting interests and information (at multiple scales), and decision-making models and tools (a survey of the range of tools that are available), along with questions of uncertainty, adaptation, and iterative decision-making processes. In a time of online learning provoked by public health concerns, we will turn analytic attention to the benefits and challenges associated with a range of virtual technologies for interdisciplinary collaboration, research, and decision-making. As travel becomes constrained not only by pandemic conditions but also as a response to climate change and environmental degradation, we anticipate the need for these tools will increase in the future. In the class, then, we will consider how online platforms may be useful in enabling ongoing research efforts at a distance, and how different strategies and tools may be designed for better communication and action. Students should emerge from the course with a broader set of perspectives on environmental and social challenges, enhanced communication skills across disciplines, and additional experience working in diverse teams. In addition, based on our new online course structure, students should also leave the course more confident about the options for virtual collaboration across disciplines. Our central goal in the course and the Collaborative Specialization program is to enable conversations to take place within and beyond the classroom about the challenges of human-environment relationships, with new ideas on creative and just approaches to social and political decisions, and bioacoustics—as well as with electroacoustic composition, sonic art, and everyday sound-based practices. We will also consider pressing issues for the humanistic study of the environment, and reflect on the value and ethics of an acoustic approach. This course is open to students with any disciplinary background. Proficiency in music is not required.School of Environmentpublic health, worldview, learning, labor, climate, environmentalSDG3, SDG4, SDG8, SDG13
ENV1707HEnvironmental FinanceClimate Finance involves the application of new and established financial market instruments and practices to the management of climate change-related risks and investment opportunities, and the incorporation of such factors into stock valuation and selection processes, as well as shareholder engagement strategies. Asset owners and managers, banks, insurance companies, venture capitalists, corporations and government agencies are becoming increasingly engaged in the financing of climate change mitigation and resilience in order to manage risks and capitalize on new opportunities. This course explores the research, projected outcomes and recommendations from the IPCC, multi-stakeholder initiatives and finance collaborations, and assesses signals of future actions to address them. An in-depth knowledge of financial markets is not required. Students leaving the course will be able to apply their new knowledge to a variety of career paths. The following professions and/or fields will benefit from a knowledge of climate finance and environmental markets: Financial analyst, portfolio manager, financial product development Investment and management consultant Sustainability specialists (especially for firms in high impact sectors such as oil & gas, forestry, chemicals, metals and mining and utilities) Commodities trader Venture capitalist, private equity or real estate investor Credit and insurance risk analysts; - Investor relations, public relations, communications Not-for-profit managers and executives The objective of the course is to provide students with a firm grounding in the range of issues at stake in climate change and the application of finance to address it. The course will examine how established practices, procedures, and tools from within the mainstream financial and corporate markets are being adapted to integrate a climate lens in the pursuit of financial performance goals from both an investor and corporate perspective.School of Environmentknowledge, equity, labor, capital, invest, trade, financial market, equit, resilien, climate change mitigation, climate, environmental, climate change mitigation, resilience, climate finance, forest, resilienceSDG4, SDG8, SDG9, SDG10, SDG11, SDG13, SDG15
ENV1701HEnvironmental LawLaw, policy, and ethics are key in understanding how we respect, manage and utilize our environment. This course will introduce students to basic principles of environmental law. What is it? How did it evolve? Does it deal fairly with resource preservation, use, and allocation? Can it deal with complex emerging problems such as climate change, species at risk, accumulation of toxics, urban sprawl and so on? We will review the state of the environmental law, with an emphasis on topical issues in Toronto, Ontario, and Canada. Throughout the course, students will be asked to consider the ethical foundations for environmental laws, and their capability of addressing today’s challenges. We will also consider how to present information in a legal setting. Students will be required to research and prepare a presentation (on-line) on a current issue in environmental law. This work will be done individually, and as a group, using the tools available on Quercus.School of Environmenturban, climate, environmental, species, speciesSDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV1002HEnvironmental PolicyThis course will provide an introduction to the study of public policy, from the perspective of political science. It begins from the premise that policymaking is an inherently political process, and seeks to demonstrate the ways in which policies are a reflection of power, values and interest groups. The course will be divided into three parts: First, we discuss basic concepts that underpin environmental policy: What is the distinction between market and polis? What are the goals of environmental policy? What are the obstacles to collective action? Second, we will examine the mechanics of policymaking: how the policymaking process works, and what types of instruments are available to protect and manage the environment. Finally, the last portion of the class will be devoted to examining cases of national and international environmental policy.School of EnvironmentenvironmentalSDG13
ENV4444YInternshipMaster’s students who are pursuing a course-work stream degree program in their home unit and do not have an internship requirement built in their home unit degree program, when registering on ROSI/ACORN for the internship, shall use the School’s designated course code (ENV4444Y) for this purpose. Master’s students who have an internship requirement built in their home unit degree program, will use their home unit degree program code designator to register on ROSI/ACORN. The internship taken in their home unit degree program will count towards both their master’s degree program credits and the respective collaborative specialization requirements, provided it is an environment (or environment & health) related internship or has an environment (or environment & health) related component. For a more detailed description of the Internship requirement, please visit the Internship Guidelines webpage.School of EnvironmentlaborSDG8
ENV4001HGraduate Seminar: Environment and HealthThere is a pressing need to study the complex relationships between the environment and human health, especially as we are increasingly challenged by environmental health issues. This course introduces students to various issues related to environment and health in providing an academic environment of inquiry and dialogue where graduate students from various disciplines can exchange ideas, information and insights. Through participation in the affiliated public environment and health seminar series and student-led seminars, the aim is to expose the students to the many ways that issues related to the environment and health are framed, examined, discussed, and addressed. The course will stimulate students to reflect on this diverse discussion and to integrate their work into a broader context and perspective. Students will have the opportunity to explore linkages between environmental factors and health issues as these intersect with environmental and health policy, toxicological impacts, psychosocial factors, economic factors, and ethical and legal issues.School of Environmentmental health, health issues, environmentalSDG3, SDG13
ENV5555YResearch PaperMaster’s students who are pursuing a course-work stream degree program in their home unit and do not have a research paper requirement included in their home unit degree program, when registering on ROSI/ACORN for the research paper, shall use the School’s designated course code (ENV5555Y) for this purpose. Master’s students who have a research paper requirement built in their home unit degree program, will use their home unit degree program code designator to register on ROSI/ACORN. The research paper written for their home unit degree program will count towards both their master’s degree program credits and the respective collaborative specialization requirements, provided it is on an environment (or environment & health) related topic entirely or has an environment (or environment & health) related component included in it. For a more detailed description of the Internship requirement, please visit the Research Paper and Thesis Guidelines webpage.School of EnvironmentlaborSDG8
ENV1103HThe U of T Campus as a Living Lab of SustainabilitySustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet relatively few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research, and teaching. Such living lab approaches offer a large potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking briefly at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational and/or administrative staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to produce information relevant to real‐world problem‐solving across disciplines and fields of study, and with non‐academic partners.School of Environmentlabor, transitSDG8, SDG11
ENV1007HThe Warming Papers: The Scientific Foundation of Climate ChangeClimate change, which is driven by global warming, is one of the most pressing global environmental crises of our generation and our children’s and grandchildren’s generations. Although the crisis has only been recognized in the public sphere in the past couple of decades, the foundations of our understanding of global warming are almost two centuries old. We will use The Warming Papers, a compilation of the canonical papers describing the scientific logic of global warming, as our guide. This course will lay out the scientific logic of global warming from Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier’s 1824 paper on what would come to be known as the greenhouse effect, through to the most recent discoveries, and will cover climate physics and the carbon cycle.School of Environmentgreenhouse, climate, global warming, environmentalSDG7, SDG13
ENV1703HWater Resource Management and PolicyFreshwater is both plentiful and renewable. Yet, freshwater resources at both the global and local levels are becoming increasingly scarce, partly due to population growth, increasing demands for energy and food, and climate change, and partly due to poor management and policies. We have failed to understand the complexity of water systems…so here we are- in the middle of day zeros, unavailability of safe drinking water, lack of access to sanitation, and increasing contaminants in our water bodies. This course, therefore, will focus on water management and policy in the context of scarcity with special emphasis on science-based policies for sustainable aquatic ecosystems. In order to frame sound policies for future sustainability, we will navigate this course through the lens of four pillars that should support all water management strategies. The first pillar is to integrate the strong spiritual and cultural connections we have with water especially learning from the indigenous cultures of the world. The second pillar is to invest in understanding the science of water and integrating with innovative technologies. The third pillar is to examine water as an economic good, in terms of demand, supply and financing. Finally, the fourth pillar is to create and implement effective management and governance policies based on combination of demand side, soft path and integrated watershed management. In the absence of, or weakness in any of the pillars, water sector is vulnerable to continued inequity, depletion and contamination.School of Environmentlearning, equity, water, sanita, contamination, energy, renewabl, invest, equit, indigenous, climate, ecosystem, ecosystem, governance, indigenousSDG4, SDG6, SDG7, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ENV1008HWorldviews and Ecology"Will religions assume a disengaged pose as species go extinct, forests are exterminated, soil, air, and water are polluted beyond restoration, and human health and well-being deteriorate?" -Mary Evelyn Tucker. The connection among worldviews, religion and ecology, while perplexing for many, has been of growing academic and pragmatic concern in recent years. Scientists, policy makers, and activists have of late been frustrated with the long-term efficacy of their actions, and have begun to reflect on the underlying worldviews and core values of their work. Is the neoliberal economic model a worldview, for example? Is consumerism? This has led to a recrudescence of interest in religious worldviews as a source of environmental theory and practice. The fact that certain religious groups are beginning to take ecological systems seriously is a distinctive, important emergence within environmentalism. Given that approximately eighty-five percent of the human family reads their reality through a religious lens, any environmental policy or ethic that does not relate to religious concerns potentially ignores dialogue with ethical and moral traditions held by the majority of the world's peoples. Religions traditionally challenge their members to ask foundational questions of human existence; such as what is the place or role of the human in the universe? What are the ethical and moral imperatives of being human? What responsibilities do humans have, if any, to other aspects of creation? As the ecological challenge forces the human family to deeply query social, economic, political, cultural, and ethical traditions, many are beginning to argue that the reading assistance of the world's religious traditions in - 2 - 2, answering such queries might be helpful, and perhaps necessary, for an informed and effective response to the world's current ecological plight. The participation of religions in environmental movements is of course not unproblematic. Certain religions have been fingered and faulted for their accent on transcendence, and for their patriarchal, hierarchical systems, which help engender a disregard for the earth and the women who have been historically associated with it--as ecofeminism suggests. Moreover, religions, as institutions, have not been at the vanguard of the environmental movement, and many potential pitfalls, such as sectarianism, fundamentalism, and triumphalism, surround the involvement of the world's religions in environmental questions. While much of the religious discourse around ecology has entailed ontological, doctrinal, and cosmological or "worldview" questions, there have also been religious responses that take issues of class, race, gender, poverty, and justice seriously. Indeed, many tensions have surfaced and continue to exist between these two broadly outlined ecological approaches. Thus, the question has emerged whether the ecological contributions of the world's religions are chiefly in the realm of worldviews, doctrine, and cosmology, or in the realm of a political and economic critique. Through weekly seminars, we will probe sundry ecological worldviews, religious and otherwise, and how they help shape environmental discourse, practice, and theory.School of Environmentpoverty, well-being, worldview, gender, women, feminis, water, consum, environmental, pollut, species, forest, ecolog, pollut, species, soil, institutSDG1, SDG3, SDG4, SDG5, SDG6, SDG12, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
ESS2608HAdvanced Glacial SedimentologyGlacial sediments left by successive continental ice sheets cover a large area of Canada and provide a record of past climate change across the Northern Hemisphere. They also allow modelling of ice flow processes and provide insights into the flow of modern ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, especially in regard to ‘ice streams’ which are regional-scale corridors inset within the ice sheet of fast flowing ice. Mapping of paleo-ice streams in Canada is actively underway aided by new high -resolution topographic imagery (e.g., LiDAR) and is a key part of mineral exploration projects across the Canadian Shield. This course will explore how ice sheets form and decay and their sedimentary records; assessment will be by a brief research project and write up.Department of Earth Sciencesclimate, landSDG13, SDG15
ESS1441HAdvanced StructureThis advanced course focuses on analyzing structures to understand how “strain” and “stress” are expressed in the rocks. Through geometric, kinematic and mechanical analysis of these structures, we will learn to elucidate the geological processes that have occurred over time. Graduate student will be given the opportunity to apply the knowledge they learn in this course towards their graduate research.Department of Earth SciencesknowledgeSDG4
ESS2708HCharacterization of Geological MaterialsThis course provides both theoretical and practical instruction on a range of instrumental methods used in determining the composition, structure and chemical state of geological materials, including fluids, gases, glasses, rocks and minerals. The course includes laboratory assignments providing practical application of these techniques.Department of Earth ScienceslaborSDG8
ESS2303HEarth Systems EvolutionThis course will focus on the geological evidence and causes for change in the Earth System (coupled lithosphere-hydrosphere-biosphere-atmosphere) over the last 4.5 billion years. It will be taught using specific case studies from selected time intervals, which will change on a yearly basis. Possible topics will include global biogeochemical cycling of C,S,O; deep biosphere geobiology and the origin and evolution of life; proxy indicators for global change; evolution of the atmosphere; the stratigraphic record of sea level change and plate reconstruction. The course will be team taught, in which individual instructors will focus on a particular topic, providing some lectures for background prior to reading the important literature.Department of Earth Sciencessea levelSDG13
JPE1452HGeophysical Imaging: Non-seismic MethodsCurrent geophysical surface and borehole methodologies (gravity, magnetics, electrical, electromagnetic, nuclear) and their theoretical basis for investigating Earth’s interior to depths ranging from several metres to tens of kilometers.Department of Earth SciencesinvestSDG9
ESS1445HGlobal TectonicsExploration of the tectonic processes of the Earth from a global and regional perspective. The course examines the nature of these surface tectonics based on geological observations and tries to unravel the geodynamics that give rise to planetary activity.Department of Earth SciencesplanetSDG13
ESS2704HIsotope GeochemistryThe course is focused on the principles and applications of stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry to understanding geological and planetary processes. The course will be taught using specific case studies from selected themes, which will change on a yearly basis. Possible themes might include: early solar system chronology, isotopic contraints on Earth differentiation, tracing pollutants in the subsurface, nature of the early Earth, ocean and atmospheric circulation, applications to tectonics. The course will be team taught, in which individual instructors will focus on a particular aspect of each theme, providing some lectures for background prior to reading the important literature.Department of Earth Sciencessolar, planet, ocean, pollut, ocean, pollutSDG7, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ESS1423HMineralogyCrystal chemistry of the major rock forming minerals. The course covers the underlying concepts behind the behaviour of minerals as solid-state materials including: Structure and bonding of minerals, chemical substitutions and solid-state transformations, high temperature and pressure behaviour, chemical weathering and kinetics. Prerequisite: ESS221H1Department of Earth SciencesweatherSDG13
ESS1461HPaleoenvironmental StudiesThe use of proxy data (terrestial and aquatic microfossils) to infer past environmental conditions. The nature and extent of Quaternary environmental change is considered in the context of assessing current issues such as acidification, metal pollution, eutrophication and global climate change. Paleoenvironmental techniques are applied in the laboratory. Prerequisite: A 200-level course from one of BIO, GGR, GLG. Recommended preparation: BIO468H1/469Y1/ GLG216H1Department of Earth Sciencespollution, labor, climate, environmental, pollut, pollutSDG3, SDG8, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
ESS3601YResearch PresentationThe mark for this course is based on the written report produced in GLG3603Y and the student’s performance in an oral defence of that work. The examining committee for the oral defense will consist of the supervisor and two members of the graduate faculty selected by the supervisor. The student must provide members of the examining committee a copy of the report at least one week in advance. The oral defense will consist of a 20 minute presentation of the work, followed by questioning by members of the examining committee. Other students may attend the presentation and question period with the permission of the candidate and examining committee. The examination concludes when the committee finishes with questions. Each committee member will evaluate the student based on the quality of the written report, and the student’s explanation of it, the depth and breadth of knowledge relevant to the project demonstrated during the oral examination and overall originality and creativity. The mark for this course will be the average mark assigned by the three examiners. For candidates who start their M.Sc. studies in September, the final grade for this course must be submitted to the Graduate Affairs Officer no later than the end of the third week of the following August.Department of Earth SciencesknowledgeSDG4
ESS2222HTectonics and Planetary DynamicsA treatment of the fundamental physical processes by which planets form and evolve. The course will be taught using specific case studies from selected themes, which will change on a yearly basis. Possible themes might include: tectonic modeling, structural analysis, Precambrian geophysics and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. The course will be team taught, in which individual instructors will focus on a particular aspect of each theme, providing some lectures for background prior to reading the important literature.Department of Earth SciencesplanetSDG13
EXS5539HAdvanced Disordered Movement and NeurorehabilitationThe course provides an overview of topics relevant to the field of neurorehabilitation and is designed for students conducting fundamental research in motor control and learning, and/or students beginning research in neurorehabilitation. Students will develop knowledge about how injury to the central nervous system affects the control of movements, and approaches that rehabilitate motor dysfunction. The course is divided into three sections. First, we will review foundational principles of the motor system that include neuromotor control, neuroplasticity and motor learning. Second, we will discuss normal and abnormal movement in the context of posture, mobility, and reaching and grasping. We will also examine how changes in movements are measured, using clinical, kinematic and brain-based tools. Third, we will discuss therapeutic approaches that aim to rehabilitate motor dysfunction. Disorders that will be studied include stroke, spinal cord injury, and Parkinson’s disease, but are not limited to these.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, learningSDG4
EXS5541HAdvanced Exercise MetabolismThis course explores the regulation of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise in humans. Focus will be placed on the regulation of carbohydrate and fat metabolism in response to acute and chronic exercise and the potential impact of factors such as nutrition, biological sex, training and inactivity. In addition, students will explore the metabolic dysregulation that occurs in obesity and type 2 diabetes and how exerciseinduced changes in skeletal muscle metabolism can result in improved health at the whole-body and tissue-specific level.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)nutrition, energySDG2, SDG7
KIN5541HAdvanced Exercise MetabolismThis course explores the regulation of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise in humans. Focus will be placed on the regulation of carbohydrate and fat metabolism in response to acute and chronic exercise and the potential impact of factors such as nutrition, biological sex, training and inactivity. In addition, students will explore the metabolic dysregulation that occurs in obesity and type 2 diabetes and how exercise- induced changes in skeletal muscle metabolism can result in improved health at the whole-body and tissue-specific level.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)nutrition, energySDG2, SDG7
EXS5509HApplied Muscle Physiology and BiochemistryThis course provides a detailed discussion and description of the unique features of skeletal muscle as they apply to muscle adaptation. Specific topics including techniques, fibre types, stress responses, atrophy, hypertrophy, muscle damage, genetics, aging, and inflammation will be discussed and evaluated. The goal is to communicate important and relevant aspects of muscle physiology and biochemistry as well as relevant laboratory techniques to the learner such that they will have a solid understanding of investigation.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)labor, investSDG8, SDG9
KIN5509HApplied Muscle Physiology and BiochemistryThis course provides a detailed discussion and description of the unique features of skeletal muscle as they apply to muscle adaptation. Specific topics including techniques, fibre types, stress responses, atrophy, hypertrophy, muscle damage, genetics, aging, and inflammation will be discussed and evaluated. The goal is to communicate important and relevant aspects of muscle physiology and biochemistry as well as relevant laboratory techniques to the learner such that they will have a solid understanding of investigation.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)labor, investSDG8, SDG9
MPK4003YBehavioral Assessment & InterventionsSupporting and adapting behaviours towards improved health are central to the role of kinesiologists in delivering client care. The complex interaction of clients’ perceptions, goals, experiences, objectives, barriers and facilitators around health behaviours, must be considered for the appropriate development healthy lifestyle planning. In this course, students will enhance their understanding of the principles and application of theory-driven health behaviour assessment and intervention techniques for the prevention, treatment, or management of health and performance. Skill development will focus on critical appraisal of assessment instruments, individualized interviewing and counseling techniques, strategies to accommodate varying degrees of health literacy, and dynamic approaches to establishing and monitoring chronic health behaviour change. Students will engage in case-based learning, partner/small-group role-playing, and lectures to develop a rich understanding of behaviour change theory and its application.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learningSDG4
MPK4002YBiophysical Assessment & InterventionsKinesiology assessment and intervention techniques should be selected and adapted to accommodate environmental, individual, and task factors. In this course, students will learn how to appropriately design, select and administer a range of general and population-specific kinesiology assessments and interventions that relate to biological and physical performance for clients across the health-to-performance continuum. Lectures will stress the consideration of how anatomy, physiology, injury and pathology affect decisions regarding client screening, assessment, and intervention approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the demonstration of critical thinking, evidence-based decision-making, and applied skills within case-based learning sessions and laboratories. 2 hours of lecture/2 hour lab/tutorial per week.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learning, labor, environmentalSDG4, SDG8, SDG13
MPK4009HBusiness of Kinesiology & EntrepreneurshipThere is a growing demand for health promotion and support services creating opportunities for innovation in professional kinesiology services and/or products. Successful kinesiology-related ventures in a competitive climate require a foundation of business and management skills that are framed within the health industry and professional standards. In this course, students will learn about kinesiology as a business, project management, and entrepreneurial strategy. Business models and strategies will be discussed within the context of kinesiology professional standards with an emphasis on relevant codes and regulations. This course will be delivered in lectures, facilitated by partner and group activities using problem and case-based learning approaches.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learning, entrepreneur, climateSDG4, SDG8, SDG13
MPK4001YClinical Assessment & InterventionsClinical practice refers to the delivery of health services based upon the interaction between practitioners and clients, rather than theory or basic science alone. Quality of clinical practice is achieved through patient interaction, involving various processes within the clinical paradigm of the practitioner, client and services. These interactions allow for thoughtful clinical reasoning and decision-making to guide patient care across the health continuum, including assessment, intervention, and the long-term management of health. In this course, students will explore the nature of the clinical paradigm and develop clinical reasoning skills related to the delivery of kinesiology assessment and intervention. This course will assist in developing the critical thinking skills required for effective decision making, while considering the needs of the client in the broad paradigm of clinical management. A mixture of lecture, problem and case-based learning sessions, laboratories, and assignments will be used to aid in development of knowledge and skills related to clinical assessments and intervention.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
KIN5544HDecolonizing Sports StudiesThis course begins with a recognition that Indigenous and racialized communities are simultaneously hyper-surveilled and invisibilized by the state and by academia. In sport studies the experiences of, and oppressions faced by, various groups are inadequately accounted for due to the Eurocentric and colonial approach to scholarship and education. This course will introduce students to theories and practices of decolonization to comprehend how structures of power and domination are interconnected and co-constitutive. Decolonization rejects generalised narratives and masterful figurations of universal subjects and Eurocentric epistemologies, which occlude histories of violent and racialised exclusion; explores the linkages among colonialism, capitalism, sexism, ablism, racism, and other forms of dehumanization; and involves artistic, political and intellectual movements to return land, form feminisms of color, and challenge settler dominance. This course will shift our understanding of ourselves as pedagogues and writers, change our relationships to land, and transform our research populations, partners, and questions.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)settler, racism, feminis, capital, of color, indigenous, decolonization, land, indigenousSDG4, SDG5, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
EXS5507HDesire and Bodies in PlaceThe myriad of practices, politics and epistemological concerns that surround and shape (post)modern conceptions and experiences of power, pleasures, bodies and spaces have garnered much attention in critical physical cultural studies. The relationships between power, pleasure and embodiment and the conditions under which peoples’ lives are governed, subjected to practices of normativity, (dis)placement, inclusion/exclusion, othering, differentiation and/or agency and freedom are important to examine. This course will interrogate a range of theoretical frameworks in order to enhance examinations of bodies, pleasure and power relations. The course will be more than descriptive. It will explore the effects and widespread implications – philosophical, social and political – of the production of power and pleasure with respect to bodies. It will also examine theoretical critiques and applied questions of freedom, resistance and agency.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)productionSDG12
KIN5507HDesire and Bodies in PlaceThe myriad of practices, politics and epistemological concerns that surround and shape (post)modern conceptions and experiences of power, pleasures, bodies and spaces have garnered much attention in critical physical cultural studies. The relationships between power, pleasure and embodiment and the conditions under which peoples’ lives are governed, subjected to practices of normativity, (dis)placement, inclusion/exclusion, othering, differentiation and/ or agency and freedom are important to examine. This course will interrogate a range of theoretical frameworks in order to enhance examinations of bodies, pleasure and power relations. The course will be more than descriptive. It will explore the effects and widespread implications – philosophical, social and political – of the production of power and pleasure with respect to bodies. It will also examine theoretical critiques and applied questions of freedom, resistance and agency.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)productionSDG12
MPK4008YEvidence Supported PracticeEvidence supported practice refers to the integration of available scientific evidence into decision-making processes that guide the delivery of health services. Critical appraisal of research methodology and interpretation is an essential skill that ensures current best-practice approaches are maintained. In this course, students will enhance their understanding of research design and methodology, practice guidelines, and knowledge translation strategies to clients and colleagues. An emphasis of this course is to develop advanced skills in primary research retrieval and evaluation, synthesis of research findings across studies towards evidence-based decision-making, strategies for rigorous programmatic evaluation, and application of research findings in professional practice. Students will have opportunities to practice discussing research and knowledge with various audiences (researchers, practitioners, clients and the public) through various media. Concepts and frameworks from implementation science and knowledge translation will be used. A mixture of lecture, problem and case-based learning sessions, and assignments will be used to aid in development of knowledge and skills.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, learningSDG4
EXS5530HExtreme Human PhysiologyPeople are pushing the limits of what humans are capable of in a variety of activities and environments. This course is designed to enable students to gain an in-depth understanding of the foundational science of human physiology in extreme conditions related to exercise performance. Students will explore the existing body of literature and evidence investigating human performance in extreme conditions. They will also study current contentious issues and the applicability of research findings. The course will involve analyzing interviews with athletes and explorers who have completed remarkable activities and expeditions. The analysis will be discussed in class and students will be required to write reports summarizing their analysis and observations.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)investSDG9
EXS5537HHealth, Media & Social ChangeAn interdisciplinary graduate course that combines cultural studies of media and health, physical cultural studies of sport and fitness, and critical approaches to social change. Topics to be addressed include foundations for social change, communicating the social determinants of health, media advocacy for policy and program change, activism in sport and physical cultures, and the merits and limitations of various media platforms.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)social changeSDG16
KIN5537HHealth, Media, and Social ChangeThis interdisciplinary graduate course combines cultural studies of media and health, physical cultural studies of sport and fitness, and critical approaches to social change. Topics to be addressed include foundations for social change, power and biopedagogy, intersectionality and communicating the social determinants of health, media advocacy for policy and program change, activism in sport and physical cultures, media framing and representations of health.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)pedagogy, social changeSDG4, SDG16
EXS5514HHuman Sensory and Motor NeurophysiologyThe objective of the course is for students to develop of a comprehensive knowledge of the neural networks underlying the processes of perception and action from the micro to the macroscopic levels. Topics include: neural anatomy and physiology, neurotransmitters, cortical and subcortical structures of the central nervous system, and neurophysiological techniques employed to study the structure and function of the human nervous system. Students will then use the principles and theories uncovered during the course to develop an appreciation of neural dysfunctions leading to a cognitive or motor disorder of their choosing.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledgeSDG4
KIN5514HHuman Sensory and Motor NeurophysiologyThe objective of the course is for students to develop of a comprehensive knowledge of the neural networks underlying the processes of perception and action from the micro to the macroscopic levels. Topics include: neural anatomy and physiology, neurotransmitters, cortical and subcortical structures of the central nervous system, and neurophysiological techniques employed to study the structure and function of the human nervous system. Students will then use the principles and theories uncovered during the course to develop an appreciation of neural dysfunctions leading to a cognitive or motor disorder of their choosing.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledgeSDG4
MPK4006HInterprofessional PracticeKinesiologists practice among an extensive team of practitioners to provide comprehensive and coordinated services for clients. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the principles and concepts of interdisciplinary teamwork in a healthcare and health promotion context. A focus of the course will be placed on strategies that facilitate appropriate coordination of service delivery, appropriate referral pathways, collaborative interprofessional communication, and practicing within the limits of professional scope of practice. Guest lecturers from across the healthcare disciplines and related groups will contribute to the learning experience. Students will participate in IPE sessions throughout the year with health care students from other programsDepartment of Kinesiology (Graduate)health care, healthcare, learning, laborSDG3, SDG4, SDG8
MPK4000YIntroduction to Professional KinesiologyThis course will assist students in developing an advanced understanding of how Kinesiology can be applied in a professional context to enhance the health, wellness, and functional capacity of clients. Students will learn how fundamentals of movement science, current research, business and ethics are integrated to provide the highest level of practice. Students will draw on their previous knowledge of anatomy, biomechanics, motor learning and control, exercise physiology, behavioral sciences and ethics in developing a client centred approach to movement adaptation, with integrated assessments, interventions, and ongoing management and advocacy for of health and performance. They will be able to apply safety techniques and procedures (universal precautions, emergency procedures, work place standards. A mixture of lecture, laboratory and practical sessions will be used to aid in development of knowledge and skills related to movement science practice. This compressed course will include 10 hours classroom activity and 10 hours of afternoon laboratories, tutorials and service learning and/or fieldtrips per week.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, learning, laborSDG4, SDG8
KIN5532HKnowledge TranslationContact DepartmentDepartment of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledgeSDG4
KIN5543HLifestyle Toxicity & Chronic DiseaseThe top two causes of death and chronic disease burden in Canada are cancer and cardiovascular disease. Although commonly thought of as two separate disease entities, an emerging paradigm recognizes that cancer and cardiovascular disease possess various similarities and possible interactions. The two diseases share common biological mechanisms and risk factors including inflammation, oxidative stress, obesity and smoking. Further, poor lifestyle behaviors (or lifestyle toxicity) increase the risk of development of both conditions, in addition to most other chronic diseases, and negatively affect prognosis after diagnosis. This advanced seminar- based course will discuss the intersectionality among chronic diseases, the role of lifestyle toxicity in development and prognosis as well as the role of healthy lifestyle behaviours in prevention and treatment. The content will include a mix of epidemiology and pathophysiology topics. The primary focus of course content will be on cardiovascular disease and cancer, but students will have opportunities to complete individual assignments on other chronic diseases. An important secondary learning outcome is the development of scientific skills including presentations, facilitating group discussions, and giving and receiving peer-based feedback.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learningSDG4
EXS5540HNarrative Methods in Health ResearchNarrative methodologies and their associated techniques of research practice have ascended to popularity in health-related research across the social sciences, humanities, and medical sciences. In this course, we examine the rise of narrative methods in the pursuit of phenomenological and existential accounts of pain, illness, disease, and more patient-oriented healthcare. Specific attention is given to the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of narrative methods, and several narrative-producing and representational methodologies such as interviewing, life history analysis, discourse analysis, arts-based techniques, visual and documentary approaches, and narrative ethnography. Emphasis is also given to the complex and evolving relationship between narrative methods, the field of narrative ethics, and the practice of narrative medicine by healthcare practitioners. The use of case studies, first-hand assignments conducted by students, and patient accounts of pain, illness, and suffering will highlight the personal significance and translational impact of narrative methods within healthcare.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)healthcare, illnessSDG3
KIN5540HNarrative Methods in Health ResearchNarrative methodologies and their associated techniques of research practice have ascended to popularity in health-related research across the social sciences, humanities, and medical sciences. In this course, we examine the rise of narrative methods in the pursuit of phenomenological and existential accounts of pain, illness, disease, and more patient-oriented healthcare. Specific attention is given to the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of narrative methods, and several narrative-producing and representational methodologies such as interviewing, life history analysis, discourse analysis, arts-based techniques, visual and documentary approaches, and narrative ethnography. Emphasis is also given to the complex and evolving relationship between narrative methods, the field of narrative ethics, and the practice of narrative medicine by healthcare practitioners. The use of case studies, first- hand assignments conducted by students, and patient accounts of pain, illness, and suffering will highlight the personal significance and translational impact of narrative methods within healthcare.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)healthcare, illnessSDG3
KIN5546HOxygen Delivery and Exercise PerformanceThis course provides students with an opportunity to explore the relationship between oxygen delivery and exercise performance, while developing a strong capacity to critically assess the literature and present evidence to support their scientific interpretation. This course will address the oxygen delivery pathway from the lung to the active skeletal muscle. In doing so, factors controlling oxygen delivery, and in particular local control of muscle blood flow, will be explored while applying transferable physiological models to develop a working knowledge of course material. Students will have the opportunity to develop communication skills, both verbal and written, through participation in guided scientific debates and drafting of journal article reviews.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledgeSDG4
EXS5518HPhysical Cultural Studies and Social TheoryThis course is intended to provide students with a graduate level (re) introduction to the development and current status of physical cultural studies (PCS) theory. In this course, we approach the physical cultural studies oeuvre as an inter- and trans-disciplinary approach to the analysis of human movement, embodiment and corporeal representation within and across social institutions and cultural groups. In the process of dissecting the theoretical bases of PCS, we will be visiting and revisiting classic and core theoretical statements in sociology, philosophy and the humanities on the nature of the society, and the self and culture.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)institutSDG16
KIN5518HPhysical Cultural Studies and Social TheoryThis course is intended to provide students with a graduate level (re) introduction to the development and current status of physical cultural studies (PCS) theory. In this course, we approach the physical cultural studies oeuvre as an inter- and trans-disciplinary approach to the analysis of human movement, embodiment and corporeal representation within and across social institutions and cultural groups. In the process of dissecting the theoretical bases of PCS, we will be visiting and revisiting classic and core theoretical statements in sociology, philosophy and the humanities on the nature of the society, and the self and culture.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)institutSDG16
MPK4004YPhysical Culture Health and Social EnvironmentsA comprehensive examination of the cultural, social and ecological effects environments that help shape health environments and behaviours provides important information and direction for health promoting strategies. Accordingly, understanding and respecting the beliefs, backgrounds, and broader social influences on health (and cultural understandings of health practices) and how they impact the client are essential to creation of optimal kinesiology services. In this course, students will learn about the interactions between society, environments, culture, social justice and physical health and how to apply these understandings in the development of health promoting programming. Furthermore, students will develop their ability to conceptualize and critically analyze the complicated institutional relationships between personal health, health care service and practice, and broader-scale structural determinants for effective, responsible, interdisciplinary client care. A mixture of lecture, problem and case based learning sessions, and assignments will be used to aid in development of knowledge and skills.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)health care, knowledge, learning, ecolog, institut, social justiceSDG3, SDG4, SDG15, SDG16
MPK8002HPlacement (300 hours)Over 240 practice hours, this placement provides the opportunity for students to gain practical kinesiology experience in a real-world work environment. Possible settings include, hospitals, clinics, sport institutes, and community organizations. This course will be evaluated as pass/fail.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)institutSDG16
MPK8003HPlacement (300 hours)Over 240 practice hours, this placement provides the opportunity for students to gain practical kinesiology experience in a real-world work environment. Possible settings include, hospitals, clinics, sport institutes, and community organizations. This course will be evaluated as pass/fail.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)institutSDG16
MPK4007YPractice Setting ConsiderationsKinesiologists have the expertise to work with a range of populations in a variety of settings, including, but not limited to hospitals, rehabilitation centres, workplace environments, and sport. Models of service delivery in kinesiology are guided with consideration for the professional, physical, social and economic environments in which they operate. Through the course, student will learn to critically appraise the facilitators and barriers to programmatic development and delivery. Professional environments that align with Faculty practice and research strength will serve as cases for students to apply creativity, critical thinking and problem solving skills. A mixture of lecture, case-based learning, and field trips will be integrated to facilitate the learning experience.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learningSDG4
MPK4010HProfessional PracticeThis is a credit/no credit course. This course supports the learning environment throughout Placement 2 (MPK 8002) with routine meetings and peer-facilitated discussions about professional experiences to encourage the development of reflective practitioners. Issues related to the intersection of theory and practice will be explored. Electronic video conferencing will be used for weekly discussions to reduce travel by students from dispersed clinical sites.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)learningSDG4
EXS5525HQuantitative Motion AnalysisThrough any combination of assigned readings, presentations, tutorials, laboratory activities, and a directed project, students will learn basic principles and practices of motion analysis used to study the biomechanics and motor control of human movement. Topics covered vary in accordance with student needs/interests, but generally relate to the acquisition, processing, and analyses of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic signals. The overarching objective of this course is to provide kinesiology students with knowledge and skills necessary to conduct, critically evaluate and disseminate research that incorporates motion analysis equipment, tools, and techniques.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
KIN5525HQuantitative Motion AnalysisThrough any combination of assigned readings, presentations, tutorials, laboratory activities, and a directed project, students will learn basic principles and practices of motion analysis used to study the biomechanics and motor control of human movement. Topics covered vary in accordance with student needs/interests, but generally relate to the acquisition, processing, and analyses of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic signals. The overarching objective of this course is to provide kinesiology students with knowledge and skills necessary to conduct, critically evaluate and disseminate research that incorporates motion analysis equipment, tools, and techniques.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
EXS1150HSafeguarding Youth in SportWhile the vast majority of young people experience positive benefits from their sport participation, some however, experience harmful behaviours in the sport context. In order to optimize the sport experiences of young athletes, it is paramount that adults in positions of responsibility over young people in sport are aware of the potential for these negative experiences and are educated about specific strategies for prevention and intervention. As issues of athlete maltreatment continue to emerge through research and media outlets, the need for athlete protection and positive athlete development models increases. In this course students will be introduced to concepts, theories and ideologies of maltreatment and protection as they apply to sport. Students will have the opportunity to critically discuss current dilemmas within the field of athlete welfare and will be challenged to critique present research as well as educational, advocacy, and policy initiatives intended to safeguard young people in sport.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)welfareSDG1
KIN1150HSafeguarding Youth in SportWhile the vast majority of young people experience positive benefits from their sport participation, some however, experience harmful behaviours in the sport context. In order to optimize the sport experiences of young athletes, it is paramount that adults in positions of responsibility over young people in sport are aware of the potential for these negative experiences and are educated about specific strategies for prevention and intervention. As issues of athlete maltreatment continue to emerge through research and media outlets, the need for athlete protection and positive athlete development models increases. In this course students will be introduced to concepts, theories and ideologies of maltreatment and protection as they apply to sport. Students will have the opportunity to critically discuss current dilemmas within the field of athlete welfare and will be challenged to critique present research as well as educational, advocacy, and policy initiatives intended to safeguard young people in sport.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)welfareSDG1
EXS5531HSkeletal Muscle PlasticitySkeletal muscle is an extremely plastic tissue capable of altering its structure and function to a range of physiological stimuli. This course will discuss how changes in activity (either exercise or disuse) contribute to the remodelling of skeletal muscle. An emphasis will also be placed on understanding the role nutrition plays in enhancing the recovery from and/or adaptation to exercise. Populations to be discussed may include recreationally active individuals, elite and sub-elite athletes, and/or special populations (e.g. older adults). Focus will be placed on understanding the role protein metabolism plays in the dynamic remodeling of this tissue.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)nutritionSDG2
KIN5531HSkeletal Muscle PlasticitySkeletal muscle is an extremely plastic tissue capable of altering its structure and function to a range of physiological stimuli. This course will discuss how changes in activity (either exercise or disuse) contribute to the remodelling of skeletal muscle. An emphasis will also be placed on understanding the role nutrition plays in enhancing the recovery from and/or adaptation to exercise. Populations to be discussed may include recreationally active individuals, elite and sub-elite athletes, and/or special populations (e.g. older adults). Focus will be placed on understanding the role protein metabolism plays in the dynamic remodeling of this tissue.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)nutritionSDG2
EXS5534HSport Politics and Social DevelopmentSport has long been understood to have significant social and political implications, both positive and negative. The significance of these implications has only been bolstered by the recent institutionalization of sport in the service of international development and peace building. For example, in announcing the new Sustainable Development Goals, the United Nations referred to sport as an “important enabler of sustainable development.” With this context in mind, this course is designed to stimulate and propel scholarly discussion and analysis of the relationship between sport and social development. The course materials and discussion will approach this relationship from a variety of viewpoints, including but not limited to: history, politics, policy studies, social theory and political economy. The goal is that students will draw on the materials, discussions and activities in the course in order to conceptualize, contextualize and eventually conduct their own research and theorizing on the topic of sport and social development.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)peace, sustainable development, sustainable development, institut, peaceSDG4, SDG16, SDG8, SDG11
KIN5534HSport, Politics, and Social DevelopmentSport has long been understood to have significant social and political implications, both positive and negative. The significance of these implications has only been bolstered by the recent institutionalization of sport in the service of international development and peace building. For example, in announcing the new Sustainable Development Goals, the United Nations referred to sport as an “important enabler of sustainable development.” With this context in mind, this course is designed to stimulate and propel scholarly discussion and analysis of the relationship between sport and social development. The course materials and discussion will approach this relationship from a variety of viewpoints, including but not limited to: history, politics, policy studies, social theory and political economy. The goal is that students will draw on the materials, discussions and activities in the course in order to conceptualize, contextualize and eventually conduct their own research and theorizing on the topic of sport and social development.Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)peace, sustainable development, sustainable development, institut, peaceSDG4, SDG16, SDG8, SDG11
MPK4005HStrength Based Professional PracticeThe purpose of this course is to develop theoretic knowledge and understanding in models of service program delivery and development. Special attention will be paid to kinesiology service delivery strategies across populations at the client and programmatic level, the influence of varying program and practitioner approaches on client outcomes, learning and training opportunities for professional development, and leadership across practice settings. This will support students in examining and sharing their experiences in delivering kinesiology services to clients. Students will reflect and examine professional issues and experiences across kinesiology service models and will integrate knowledge from their experiences in MPK 8001 and knowledge and theory from the set of concurrent courses (MPK4001, 4002, 4003, 4004).Department of Kinesiology (Graduate)knowledge, learningSDG4
FAH1758HAPPROACHES FROM SOUTH ASIAThis seminar examines approaches to the efficacies of images from the standpoint of South Asia, where—as elsewhere, only more clearly—the force of the aesthetic far exceeds the arena of “fine” art. In doing so, this seminar explicitly reflects on postcolonial and decolonizing challenges to art history’s Eurocentric presuppositions. While based in South Asian materials, the course therefore has wider relevance to issues of art historical method. Each week, representative scholarship and critical texts on South Asian images, mostly (but not exclusively) from the mid-nineteenth century onwards, will be examined in relation to the questions they pose about art history’s objects, categories, methods, and narratives. The course does not require background knowledge of South Asia, however participants will be expected to fill this in as required for the weekly reading, as they are for unfamiliar Western materials.Department of Art HistoryknowledgeSDG4
FAH1961HArt & ActivismThis course will explore activism within art contemporary movements as well as art strategies used by activist movements, with a specific focus on the local and ongoing. The course will span theory and praxis, asking how we might bring the critical and decolonial lenses of our texts into the world and vice versa. We will learn from artists and activists working locally, and from these conversations move into a wider global framing.Department of Art HistorydecolonialSDG4
FAH1177HBuilding the Islamic Empire: Architecture of the UmayyadsThe Umayyads present a unique opportunity for the study of Medieval Mediterranean architectural history. As religious and political leaders, Umayyad caliphs and their patronage manifest a rootedness in late antiquity that challenges notions of Islamic art as “other.” By considering key Umayyad monuments, cities and material culture we will problematize binaries of east vs. west, sacred vs. secular and center vs. periphery to reveal what makes the Umayyads empire builders of the first order. Contextualized through ceremonial, pilgrimage, trade, praxis and governance, the built environment operates as a vehicle to access deeper and more nuanced understandings of Islamic history.Department of Art Historytrade, cities, governanceSDG10, SDG11, SDG16
FAH1921HGeoAestheticsWe will examine the extensive visual culture of voyages in the Arctic from the 16th century to the present, with an emphasis on the long 19th century and the Angloshpere. Topics include Western and Inuit perspectives on the Northwest Passage, the magnetic and geographic north poles in print culture, imaging technologies, commercial enterprises in the Arctic and in Europe, the USA, and Canada, nationalism, colonialism, and scientific understandings of the unique meteorological, human, and animal phenomena of this region. We will also interrogate the notion of the Anthropocene and competing contemporary ideas of the human impact on nature as a way to explore ecological understandings of the Arctic in the 19th century and today.Department of Art Historyanthropocene, animal, ecolog, animal, nationalismSDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
FAH1232HLiquescent Art and CulturesWater comprises the majority of the earth's surface, and has shaped the creation of art, architecture, and objects as the means of travel and transport as well as a powerful cultural metaphor. This course offers students the opportunity to study the environmental conditions, imagery, and mechanisms used by artists and craftsmen as well as the everyday experiences of water. Each week will offer a particular case study and point of view through which to study the connections between liquid contexts and art objects. Themes will include flows, surfaces and depths, water edges, and technologies. Students may work on projects in their choice of geographical and historical moments.Department of Art Historywater, environmentalSDG6, SDG13
FAH1759HModern Architecture and Its RepresentationsThis seminar examines significant buildings, movements, and ideas in nineteenth- and twentieth-century architecture. We will pay particular attention to relationships between art and architecture: the built environments in which art is created and exhibited, forms of graphic representation that have been instrumental in the development of modern architecture, and methodological links between architectural and art history scholarship. Finally, we will engage with the contested question of architecture’s medium-specificity or autonomy. Previous study of architecture is not required.Department of Art HistorybuildingsSDG9
FAH1231HNorthern European Sculpture 1400 - 1600This course examines varieties of sculpture in Northern Europe during the fifteenth and sixteenth century with particular emphasis on the Netherlands and Germany. The course questions the near-exclusive focus on painting as the quintessential artistic medium of Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Sculpture was an essential medium for the expression of power relations. Tombs of the high nobility framed and controlled the communal space of churches and chapels. Towering sacrament houses offered magnificent stages for the Eucharist—the material focus of the central drama of the church. Mantelpieces in town halls asserted the complex relationship between competing groups within the city. Carved altarpieces found visual formulas for metaphysical notions of sacred space and time. And smaller works like bronze statuettes became treasured objects in Renaissance collections.Department of Art HistorylandSDG15
FAH1118HThe Medieval TreasuryThis course examines medieval church treasuries, their contents and architectural settings, and the ways they have been conceptualized from the Middle Ages to the present. It highlights the diversity of treasury contents, from liturgical chalices to legal documents, who contributed to the shape of such collections and why, and how the collections were documented. Major themes in present-day art history create the conceptual underpinnings of the course, including materiality, collecting and display, mobility, and patronage. The course will provide opportunities for students to work with objects in local museums and to develop research projects in the Digital Humanities. Recommended: Reading knowledge of French, German, Italian, and Latin helpful.Department of Art HistoryknowledgeSDG4
INF2165HAccessibility and Inclusive DesignThis course will introduce students to concepts related to disability, accessibility and inclusive design as relevant to UI/UX design; it does not require any previous knowledge or experience in the areas of disability or accessibility. The course will primarily focus on accessibility of digital interfaces, especially those governed by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines published by the World Wide Web consortium. It will also emphasize the need for designing inclusively by working with people with disabilities during research, design, and evaluation; and highlight how inclusive design results in better outcomes for everyone. In the course, students will be exposed to prior academic research and publications on accessibility and inclusive design as well as current practices in the industry around their implementation in practical scenarios. Regulatory and legal implications will also be introduced. In assignments, students will adopt a two-pronged approach: 1. Rethinking the field of user experience design by including accessibility and inclusive design perspectives; 2. Apply the understanding in doing a new inclusive design project. Students will work in teams to create a proposal for inclusive design of a digital product such as website, app, or some other, work through the design and present their results and reflections at the end. The focus of the learning will be on developing empathy for the digital interaction needs of people with disabilities and learning how to address them in a design process.Faculty of Informationdisabilit, knowledge, learning, accessibSDG3, SDG4, SDG11
INF1331HArchival Arrangement and DescriptionThe goal of this course is to provide students with the theoretical and methodological knowledge necessary to arrange and describe archival documents. Topics include the principles and methods underlying the arrangement of archival documents as well as the description of archival materials and the establishment of name access points according to standards adopted by the archival community.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2104HArchives and CommunityThis course builds upon and extends concepts, themes, and theories ARM students were introduced to through INF 1330H. Through a focus on archival reciprocity, accountability, collaboration, and consultation this course introduces students to the field of community archiving and will explore the unique relationships that are formed between archives and the communities they both serve and represent. In particular, this course will explore the discourse of ‘community’ within the archival studies field with an eye to how it shapes and constrains particular modes of practice and process. Through a focus on both community-based and institutional archival practice, this course will prepare students for the unique ethical challenges of building non-extractive, reciprocal relations with source communities. Throughout the term we will be studying a range of archival projects and practices and we will hear from community archives workers and researchers involved in a range of localized archiving projects. By the end of term, students will have developed a nuanced and sophisticated understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities afforded by community-based archival work and practice.Faculty of Informationlabor, worker, institutSDG8, SDG16
INF2312HArt Librarianship in Theory and PracticeArt and design research has been revitalized by the revisionist impulse of visual culture analysis, which seeks to embed creativity within sociological and historical contexts. In response, art librarians must empower users to explore inter-disciplinary search tools that explore traditional aesthetic literature in relation to cultural studies. Using case-studies to replicate practical experience with reference interactions, students will develop an understanding of how the new artistic environment informs all aspects of art librarianship from reference and instruction, to collection development and cataloguing. Issues of peer-review, artistic freedom, censorship, and intellectual property will be explored in relation to their impact on creative and intellectual production in the art and design environment. Models of art and design libraries, archives, and museums will be analyzed in their differing roles in supporting creative activity.Faculty of InformationproductionSDG12
INF2166HBusiness Process Management and MiningBusiness processes are pervasive in our lives: in banks, telecommunication centers, webservices, and healthcare. Processes in organizations are there to make sure that the business goals are achieved in an efficient way with the highest quality of products and/or services. The field of Business Process Management (BPM) focuses on improving an organization’s performance by managing, analyzing and improving its processes. The first part of the course comprises basic concepts of Business Process Management. We shall learn the BPM lifecycle: (Re)Design, Modeling, Executing, Monitoring and Optimizing business processes. Moreover, we shall cover the methodological aspects of BPM such as modeling languages, model discovery, qualitative and quantitative analysis of processes models. In the second part of the course, the focus shifts to a Data Science methodology for BPM, namely Process Mining. The students will learn the three basic steps of Process Mining: discovery of models from data, conformance analysis of the resulting models with data, and performance analytics. The emphasis of the Process Mining part will be on performance analytics. The course will cover state-of-the-art literature, and as part of the final grade will require the students to present real business case studies on applications of BPMM in industry.Faculty of InformationhealthcareSDG3
INF2141HChildren's Cultural Texts and ArtifactsThis course will provide students with a forum for engaging in historically grounded explorations of the centrality of cultural texts and artifacts within contemporary childhood. From toys to fairy tales, books to videogames, this course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to examine how texts and artifacts not only play a crucial role within children’s culture, but furthermore reflect and reproduce dominant (and oftentimes conflicting) ideologies, traditions, controversies and social values. Students will examine the complex interplay between children’s texts and artifacts, particularly as it relates to the concurrent rise of transmedia intertextuality and commercialization within children’s culture. They will learn about the key issues, institutions and “cultural gatekeepers” (including librarians) involved in the production, circulation and management of adult-produced texts and artifacts for children, and the ways in which children in turn engage with these texts and artifacts as part of a deeply meaningful shared cultural experience. A variety of examples and case studies will be examined, through in-class analysis and discussion of foundational children’s books, films, television series, toys, video games and digital applications. Recurring motifs, narrative themes and genres will be addressed. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the continuities and discontinuities that exist between new and traditional cultural forms. Students will also be invited to consider the unique set of opportunities and challenges associated with digital technologies, and how they are currently (re)shaping children’s culture in potentially significant ways.Faculty of Informationproduction, institutSDG12, SDG16
INF3902HCo-operative Workplace Placement IIINF3902H, or Cooperative Education Placement II is worth .5 FTE and unfolds in the summer following a student’s first year in the program. It comprises the student’s 4 month work placement in their field of interest/concentration, and the completion of a number of deliverable throughout that placement. Workplace-integrated-learning is the umbrella term used to describe educational experiences that combine periods of in-class study with actual workplace experiences. Examples of workplace-integrated learning include internships, practicums, and co-operative education. As the name suggests, co-operative education describes the three way partnership that is established through negotiation, contractual agreements, and ongoing communication between the student, the employer and the university.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF3903HCo-operative Workplace Placement IIIINF3903H or Cooperative Education Placement III is worth .5 FTE and unfolds in the fall following a student’s first year in the program. It comprises the student’s second 4 month work placement in their field of interest/concentration, and the completion of a number of deliverable throughout that placement. Workplace-integrated-learning is the umbrella term used to describe educational experiences that combine periods of in-class study with actual workplace experiences. Examples of workplace-integrated learning include internships, practicums, and co-operative education. As the name suggests, co-operative education describes the three way partnership that is established through negotiation, contractual agreements, and ongoing communication between the student, the employer and the university.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
MSL1150HCollection ManagementThis course is designed to provide an understanding of objects, the storage, handling, conservations and management of collections, that is, the activities upon which the curatorial, research and educational functions of the museum are based.Faculty of Informationconserv, conservSDG14, SDG15
INF1322HCommunities and ValuesLibrarianship is a service profession that conceives of knowledge, in all its aspects, as fundamental to the human condition. People and communities exist at the heart of the discipline and at the heart of professional practices. They are the focus of our research and the clients of our practitioners. They come to us as unique individuals at any point along the life course seeking knowledge, and in communities (both large and small, formal and informal) working to achieve a common end. These social interactions bear the imprint of the professional values, core assumptions and principles upon which our discipline is founded. Some of these values include intellectual freedom, diversity, a respect for privacy, human rights, social justice, equal and open access without barriers, compassion, and empathy. Further, a commitment to these values demands knowledge of and participation in the public policy arena where decisions around the social, economic, cultural, and political implications of innovating information and communications technologies and their distribution are debated. Then there are the information professionals whom we work with and for; they are the communities of practice of which we are a part.Faculty of Informationknowledge, social justice, human rightsSDG4, SDG16
INF2120HConservation and Preservation of Recorded InformationAn introductory course in preservation issues covering both restoration of the artifact and preservation of content. Topics include composition and manufacture of paper, principles and ethics of restoration; restoration methods; archival conservation practices; rare book conservation practices; preservation microfilming, theory and practice; national and international preservation filming efforts; mass deacidification; organization, administration and funding of preservation efforts; new document substrates; and, emergency and disaster planning.Faculty of Informationconserv, conservSDG14, SDG15
MSL1300HContemporary Theories of Art and CultureThis inter-disciplinary course offers students an overview of a wide range of contemporary developments in theoretical approaches to the study of art and culture. In particular, the course focuses on the recent turn towards more socially and historically-grounded modes of analysis within a number of disciplines and research fields, including art history, philosophy and museum studies. The course also traces the development of contemporary cultural theory, surveying recent work in cultural studies, sociology, feminism, and postmodernism, and drawing on several case studies in the museum, gallery, and public art sectors.Faculty of InformationfeminisSDG5
INF2250HCopyright for Information ProfessionalsThis course provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of Canadian copyright law and how it is applied in the policies and practices of cultural heritage institutions (libraries, archives, and museums) in a time of rapid technological change. After considering the rationales for copyright, the course examines the structure and key provisions of the Canadian Copyright Act, before going on to explore selected copyright issues that are currently confronting policy makers and courts.Faculty of InformationinstitutSDG16
INF2243HCritical Histories of Information and Communication TechnologiesThis seminar approaches information and communication technologies from critical and historical perspectives. We will investigate theories of the relations among technology, information, ideology, culture, and social structure, as well as methods for studying those relations. First, we will survey the available theories and methods for understanding large scale technological systems, including the social construction of technology, technological determinism, feminist technology studies, and the political economy of information and communication. We will ask about the interests, motives, and tactics of news media, pop culture producers, amateurs, universities, corporations, and governments in promoting, sustaining, and interpreting information and communication systems. Finally, we will ask how information systems mediate, alter, or entrench power relations and cultural practices. While our focus will be on media and information technologies, more theoretical or methodological readings will necessarily cover other systems. Case studies may include investigations of writing, the printing press, industrialized printing, telegraphy, telephony, computing, and the internet.Faculty of Informationfeminis, invest, internetSDG5, SDG9
INF1324HCritical InfrastructuresInfrastructures are ecologies of numerous systems, each with unique origins and goals, which are made to interoperate by means of standards, socket layers, social practices, norms, and individual behaviours. This course examines how information infrastructures form, how they change, and how they shape (and are shaped by) social and cultural forces. Particular focus is paid to libraries, archives, scientific research practices, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and cyber-infrastructures. The course includes an examination of the role of standards, such as library catalogues, classification systems, TCP/IP, HTML, and metadata standards, and changing social structures and knowledge practices, such as scientific disciplines, professional societies, and universities. Finally, the course engages with broad theories of infrastructure and foreground the usually hidden aspects of infrastructures, be they material, informational, or structural.Faculty of Informationknowledge, infrastructure, internet, ecologSDG4, SDG9, SDG15
INF2241HCritical Making: Information Studies, Social Values, and Physical ComputingThe focus of this class in on evaluating and exploring current critical themes in Information Studies through both literature and hands-on work. The course is organized around values that have been identified as key in regards to the design and implementation of socially and culturally sensitive information systems, in particular the values of privacy, autonomy, community, democracy, and social justice. Using design-based research on physical computing as an adjunct to critical scholarship in this area, we will explore how these values are expressed, debated, and resisted within the development and use of information systems. The class has three goals: first, to critically explore the social issues inherent in technical systems; second, to acquaint students with some of the possibilities and problems of new physical and ubiquitous information technologies; and third, to help them develop basic skills in designing, making, and evaluating information systems that use these new technologies.Faculty of Informationsocial justice, democraSDG16
INF2316HCritical Studies of Social MediaIn 2018, it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica had profiled 80 million Facebook users and arguably used these profiles to influence their political decision-making in the US presidential elections and the Brexit vote. While Facebook’s data practices and the potential for influencing targeted users became as a surprise for many, critical studies of social media have highlighted for almost a decade now that social media sites are not neutral playgrounds for its users. Rather, social media sites are designed for the purposes of influencing users, monetizing their connections, and providing value for the owners of the site. To elaborate the complexity of our social media relations, the course draws on different phenomenological and material approaches of media theory. In specific, the course brings together some of the core themes of contemporary social media studies focusing on recent books that introduce critical approaches. Critical in this context does not mean positioning social media as something negative but rather it is an approach that investigates social media through its continuities and breaks, challenges corporate definitions of social media bringing the world closer together, and provides tools to analyze the logics according to which social media sites function and individuals are positioned as user subjectivities.Faculty of Informationlabor, investSDG8, SDG9
INF3014HCultural Interpretive Methods for Media and TechnologyThis course is a survey of cultural and interpretive methods as they are applied to the study of media and technology across fields such as media studies, science and technology studies, cultural studies, game studies, and internet studies. Students will learn about genealogical, analytical and interpretative approaches to media content and technologies as well as cultural and critical ethnographic approaches to the understanding of media audiences, online communities, and creative labour participants. The emergent ethical and political dimensions of cultural and interpretive research will be stressed. This course presents the opportunity for students to learn and apply foundational theories in the field of Media, Technology and Culture through coursework deliverables such as research papers, proposal reviews, and research design documents. This fulfills objectives such as PLO 2: Research and Scholarship – b. The ability to make informed judgments on complex and emerging issues in information studies, which may require the creation of innovative methodologies, as well as c. The ability to produce original research, or other advanced scholarship, of a quality to satisfy peer review, and to merit publication in diverse scholarly and practitioner venues.Faculty of Informationlabour, internetSDG8, SDG9
INF1501HCulture & Technology IIntroduction to the wide range of issues and methodologies employed across the academy to identify, understand, analyze, investigate, and critique issues at the intersection of culture and technology. Provides a background in philosophy of information, philosophy of technology, and science and technology studies. Affiliated with the McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology, a program of the Coach House Institute (CHI). Particular focus on socio-technical issues having to do with computing, information systems and services, digital technologies, media, and the internet and social media.Faculty of Informationinvest, internet, institutSDG9, SDG16
INF1502HCulture & Technology IIIn-depth exploration of student-selected issues at the intersection of culture and technology, using the philosophical, critical, and methodological skills, knowledge, and techniques developed in INF1501H Culture & Technology I. Students will identify a topic on which they have educational and/or professional background, and explore the socio- technical consequences of that issue’s transformation in virtue of the development of computing, digital technologies, and information systems, services, and practices. Affiliated with the McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology, a program of the Coach House Institute (CHI).Faculty of Informationknowledge, institutSDG4, SDG16
MSL2000HCuratorial PracticeCuration is no longer a practice solely attached to the museum as it has been coopted by several communities and cultural producers, from bloggers to makers, and even chefs. It is in this context, full of contradictions about what curation represents – the skilled practice of the museum professional trained to take care of, research, and display artefacts, or the creative process, framed as democratic and inclusive, of selecting and re-arranging objects and information – that we situate our explorations of curatorial practice. This course, thus, explores the role of the curator (collector, researcher, storyteller, trend setter, social activist, etc.) in various types of museums, from the art gallery to the heritage site, in order to reflect on different models of curatorial practice. These methods for curatorship will be discussed with an emphasis on their histories and their specific cultural, social and political contexts. Likewise, they will be explored as dynamic, complex and shifting practices highly influenced by institutional context, audience expectations and broader taste cultures. To understand the curator’s place in contemporary cultural institutions, this class will explore a series of theoretical concepts such as author, connoisseurship, taste and visual culture, along with a series of curatorial research methods. Students will engage with professional and intellectual practices through a series of hands on projects designed to reflect critically on curation.Faculty of Informationinstitut, democraSDG16
INF2202HData Governance in a World of Big DataThe goal of this course is to prepare students for successful careers in the information profession by providing an understanding of the concepts and practices of Data Governance. Data governance is about formally managing critical data throughout the organization and making sure organizations derive value from it. Organizations are typically forced to stitch together separate clusters, each with its own business purpose or data stores and processes and unique data types such as files, tables, or streams. Data Governance capabilities creates structure for the complexity to allow organizations to navigate their data landscape more efficiently. Data Governance is generally achieved through a combination of people, process and technology to ensure the volume, variety, velocity, and veracity of data brings the most value in the form of data science and analytics.Faculty of Informationland, governanceSDG15, SDG16
INF2115HData LibrarianshipThe course will address topics in the acquisition, management and retrieval of numerical information, both aggregated (statistics) and disaggregated (data). Topics will include public, private and academic sector data gathering, statistical production and dissemination, data warehousing and management, data repositories and consortia, user needs and the reference interview, data extraction and manipulation, and privacy issues. While the focus will be on socio-economic data and statistics, business and scientific datasets and statistical products will be discussed as well. The course will take the form of lectures and tutorials. There will also be a significant lab component outside of the scheduled hoursFaculty of Informationsocio-economic, housing, productionSDG1, SDG11, SDG12
INF1343HData Modeling and Database DesignThe purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to databases by analyzing their structure, content and measurement and by applying principles governing data modeling, database design and production with an emphasis on modeling, design and representation of content, decisions and tradeoffs involved in modeling, design and creation, and issues of standardization, security and emerging trends.Faculty of Informationtrade, productionSDG10, SDG12
INF2122HDigital Preservation and CurationThis course examines the creation, curation, conservation, and preservation of digital materials in both the public and private sectors and enables students to develop an appreciation of the principles of management of digital information in the context of digital longevity. Students gain an understanding of the organizational, technical, social, and economic challenges encountered when enabling the long-term availability of digital materials. It provides an introduction to key models, workflows (from pre-ingest to dissemination), policies, characteristics of digital repositories, standards, metadata, annotation, audit and certification, technical approaches from hardware preservation to emulation, and future research challenges that need to be addressed if the preservation landscape is to be transitioned out of an arts and craft mode.Faculty of Informationtransit, conserv, conserv, landSDG11, SDG14, SDG15
INF2256HDigital ScholarshipThis course examines the sources of data, methods of inquiry, and dissemination outputs in current threads of digital scholarship across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Digital scholarship facilitates new modes of research and learning that challenge and alter the way we think about scholarship in academic and public discourse. Topics in digital scholarship frequently intersect with legal, labour, and advocacy issues around access, preservation, and knowledge mobilization. Information professionals are increasingly required to provide support services in data management, specialized software and tool training, and publishing. The skills and knowledge to be taken away by the student include both the theoretical and methodological knowledge above, as well as hands-on experience with current projects, software and technologies, and to create a digital scholarship project to support an organization’s goals and strategies.Faculty of Informationknowledge, learning, labourSDG4, SDG8
MSL1230HEthics, Leadership, ManagementThis course introduces a perspective based on museum ethics and contemporary approaches to leadership in order to address key concepts, contexts and issues of museum management: the changing missions, external environments and stakeholders of contemporary museums, organizational structure and design, mission, policy and strategy, planning and programming, marketing, museum economics and financial management, museum professionalism, leadership and motivation, and managing creativity and change. Drawing from recent museum management practice and research, it touches upon organizational and strategic issues such as the role and responsibilities of the Board of Trustees, managerialism and the museum director, the virtues and limitations of instrumentalism, the balance between collections stewardship and public service, de-accessioning and repatriation, gate-keeping through cultural representation, working with communities, social inclusion, autonomy vs. commercialization, and the socioeconomic impact of museums. The approach, supported by an extensive reading list and guest speakers, connects pragmatic museum management concerns with values-based, critical management insights of value to future museum leaders.Faculty of InformationsocioeconomicSDG1
INF2135HEvidence-Based Healthcare for LibrariansStudents in this course will study how librarians support evidence-based healthcare: the integration of the best evidence into healthcare decision making. This course will provide an overview of the healthcare information ecosystem and systematic review methods. Topics covered include: the history of evidence-based healthcare; a critical understanding of the evidence pyramid; an in-depth investigation of bibliographic health science databases; and the roles of medical librarians in academic institutions, hospitals, and in under-resourced contexts. The course takes a practice-based approach to learning exhaustive, reproducible, and transparent search techniques; to the use of international reporting guidelines and conduct standards; and to software required to organize, screen, and document search results.Faculty of Informationhealthcare, learning, invest, ecosystem, ecosystem, institutSDG3, SDG4, SDG9, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
INF2178HExperimental Design for Data ScienceAt the heart of every Data Science project exists the planning, design and execution of experiments. Such experiments aim at understanding the data, potentially cleaning it and performing the necessary data analysis for knowledge discovery and decision-making. Without knowing the experimental design processes that are used in practice, researchers may not be able to discover what is really hidden in their data. The first aim of this course is to look at existing experimental designs that take into account the questions that need to be answered as well as the nature of the data and the different parameters used by algorithms. Subsequently, the course will introduce different qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the quality of the results. All concepts will be accompanied by examples and the students will have practical exercises and a project in which they will demonstrate their knowledge.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
MSL2352HFoundations of Visitor ResearchThis course is intended to provide students with an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of visitor research in museums. Through course readings, guest lectures by museum professionals working in the field, and practical experience with instrument development as well as data collection, analysis and reporting, among other pedagogical strategies, students will learn institutions’ methods for learning about their audiences and evaluating museum exhibitions and programs.Faculty of Informationlearning, institutSDG4, SDG16
INF1602HFundamentals of User ExperienceThis course introduces students to the fundamentals of User Experience (UX) and User Experience Research (UER). The course covers a series of methods and tools in three areas: research, design, and evaluation. Methods and tools to conduct and analyse research data may include interviews, observations, questionnaires, secondary research, affinity diagrams, thematic analysis, stakeholder maps, empathy maps, and personas. Method and tools to design may include requirements analysis, use cases, scenarios, sketching, prototyping toolkits, and sequential storyboards. Method and tools to evaluate designs may include heuristic inspections, walkthroughs, usability testing, analytics, predictive models, and lean validation. More practical topics may include design thinking, UX strategy, UX ethic, agile and Lean UX, building a UX portfolio, and institutionalization of UX.Faculty of InformationinstitutSDG16
MSL2115HGlobal Cultures and MuseumsThis course examines museums and other cultural institutions – public memorials, UNESCO heritage sites or national parks – from a global perspective. The course looks at museums as participants within a global network of institutions, communities and practices informed by diverse histories – colonialism, post-colonialism, socialism, apartheid, etc. It explores, deconstructs and challenges both common global trends in museological culture and particularities of local and national practices. The course introduces students to contemporary and historical case studies from around the world including Eastern Europe, Asia and Africa, examined through interdisciplinary and international theoretical perspectives borrowing from anthropology, cultural studies, global studies, history, museum studies and memory studies.Faculty of InformationinstitutSDG16
INF2209HHuman-Centered Topic ModelsTopic models have emerged as a powerful methodological approach in human-centered data science since they lie at the intersection of empirical, positivist and interpretive techniques. Data scientists like topic models because they can provide sophisticated insights about large amounts of text data by incorporating human context and knowledge. This course will provide students with the computational ability to uncover latent topics from text documents and use qualitative, thematic analysis to make sense of them.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2177HInformation Management and SystemsThis course examines various notions of information architecture, systems architecture, and organizational architecture, and their inter-relationships and interactions. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of systems types, including traditional information systems, document management systems, workflow systems, groupware, Internet and intranet systems, enterprise systems, data warehousing, metadata repositories, and intelligent agents. Issues will include dealing with legacy and change, enterprise-wide interoperability and beyond (e.g., e-commerce), convergence of information content and processing, and support for knowledge management. Frameworks and techniques for architectural modeling, analysis, and design will be consideredFaculty of Informationknowledge, internet, housingSDG4, SDG9, SDG11
INF2176HInformation Management in Organizations - Models and PlatformsThe course covers both theoretical and practical aspects of managing information processes in organizations. In terms of theory, it introduces conceptual frameworks for the management of organizational information processes, including an analysis of their implications for the design and implementation of information systems and services. On the practical side, the course introduces the capabilities and tools associated with platforms such as the World Wide Web and Intranets to enhance the effectiveness of organizational information processes. As a course project, students work together to design an Intranet site as a platform for information and knowledge management.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2181HInformation Policy, Regulation and LawIntroduction to policymaking and the players and stakes involved in information creation, access and use. Emphasis on the political, economic, legal and social issues affecting information and its institutions, including relevant social theory and analytical methods. The focal policy issues considered in depth will vary from year to year: e.g. government information, intellectual property, intellectual freedom, (universal) access, cultural content, community networking, and privacy.Faculty of InformationinstitutSDG16
INF2173HInformation Professional PracticumThe goal of the practicum is to provide you with hands-on experience to supplement your theoretical knowledge and to help you develop professional competencies. Assignments are carefully structured to fit with the workplace and the classes are designed to focus on professional issues and workplace practices in different environments. The aim is to foster sharing, to deepen knowledge through experience, and to promote a high standard of professional practice and conduct in information work. The places and projects are assembled by the iSchool in the term before the course, and these are offered to students enrolled in the course on their first class (or as determined by the instructors). Each placement is discussed so that you can make a choice that is informed by your interests as well as the opportunities that are on offer. Students select their placements based on the proposals hosts provide. You are also welcome to arrange your own placement in consultation with the iSchool Careers Officer ahead of time to make sure the placement would be suitable.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2239HInformation, Misinformation, and HealthWhat is misinformation? How does it take root, how can it be identified, and what can be done about it? One way to distinguish misinformation from valid information is to examine outcomes. Misinformation generally leads to poor outcomes based on poor decision making, which is itself based on faulty understanding. However, there are many cognitive and social mechanisms that give rise to misinformation, and there is also an enormous degree of subjectivity and positionality concerning what actually constitutes misinformation. Exploring the causes, subjectivities, and consequences of misinformation is the focus of this course. Health is an ideal context for analysis for three reasons: it is literally vital to everyone, it is rife with conflict and disagreement about what is safe or dangerous, and health information beliefs are situated on a wide continuum of education, expertise, and ways of knowing. Grappling with the concept of critical information literacy is an integral part of the course. This course unfolds in three parts. The first third is an exploration of epistemic foundations of knowing, with some emphasis on identifying limitations of positivism and the scientific method, and questioning health authority. The middle of the course focuses on the individual’s cognition, including health information seeking, information appraisal, and cognitive biases that can influence or impair understanding. The final third of the course is concerned with social dimensions of (mis)information and health, including intersectionality and health information, trust, and the postCOVID nature of expertise in public health.Faculty of Informationpublic healthSDG3
MSL3000HInternshipThe Museum Studies internship is a placement with a recognized museum, gallery or related institution. The goal of the Internship is the development of competence in the practice of museum studies. It is an integral part of the MMSt curriculum, intended to reinforce knowledge gained in coursework, apply it to real museum situations, provide increased context for subsequent courses and prepare students for the transition to emerging museum professional. Internship placements are chosen by students who work closely with the Careers Officer and the Instructor to ensure that the placement will meet their identified goals.Faculty of Informationknowledge, transit, institutSDG4, SDG11, SDG16
MSL2330HInterpretation and Meaning Making in MuseumsThis course explores contemporary practices of interpretive planning in various museums. In order to study how museums do interpretation, we explore a series of contemporary interdisciplinary theories of interpretation and discuss in depth different articulations of what and who constitutes the museum’s publics and communities. Further, we apply these theoretical perspectives to interpretive planning and work on a variety of individual and group projects in order to experiment with various interpretive practices. We reflect critically and in depth on official and unofficial forms of public programming and education visible in different cultural spaces and we investigate various interpretative methods utilized by cultural institutions to communicate with their audiences. As visitor centered institutions, museums engage in various acts of interpretation, either large scale, as it is the case of interpretive planning or in more obvious ways, through public programming and various other practices. Generally, this course observes interpretation as a form of communication with diverse audiences as museums are, first and foremost, public communicators. Therefore, this course has as its main objective to show students the multiple forms which interpretation, a very dynamic process, takes in a museum. The course educates students about two sides of interpretation: (1) the practices of meaning making (the crafting and communication of meaning) in various types of museums by museum professionals and (2) the complex and “messy” ways in which visitors make meaning (understand, translate and negotiate meaning) in museum environmentsFaculty of Informationinvest, institutSDG9, SDG16
INF1344HIntroduction to Statistics for Data ScienceThis course will provide students an introduction to statistics and statistical methods. It is intended and designed for students who have little or no familiarity with statistics in the Master of Information program so that their knowledge base is built on a solid foundation, which will prepare them for advanced data science courses in the program. This course emphasizes the application of statistical concepts and methods. This course will help students develop the ability to use quantitative methods to describe real world situations and to make ethical inferences and decisions based on the statistical results. Students will strengthen critical thinking skills to assess the value and limitations of measures and statistical estimates. This course will help students learn to construct reports that include meaningful charts, tables, and graphs for various audiences and that provide text that is appropriate for different audiences. The course will have lab sessions throughout the semester. The purpose of the lab session is to provide students with hands-on experience with data handling and regression analysis.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2230HJust Sustainability DesignInformation technology and systems are reshaping our societies. Those involved in technology design and development have a chance to work towards social justice and sustainability. But how? Despite the enormous potential of IT to make the world a better place, actual tech development practice often reinforces inequality, fossil fuel production and other unjust and unsustainable aspects of our societies. The rising refusal of tech workers to build what they consider “evil” tech is a reminder that it doesn’t have to be that way. But how can those involved in systems design exercise professional responsibility and ethical judgment? What is the room for maneuver that we have available in systems design to make the world a more just and sustainable place? And what do we need to understand about computational systems, engineering methods and social theory to make meaningful contributions and interventions in this space?Faculty of Informationworker, inequality, equalit, production, fossil fuel, social justiceSDG8, SDG10, SDG12, SDG13, SDG16
INF1001HKnowledge and Information in SocietyThis course provides an introduction to the ways that information and information processes shape and are shaped by society. In particular, it examines the social, institutional, political, legal, and economic roles of information and knowledge in public life, including how forms of new media, new distribution channels and new delivery systems are affecting traditional means of creating and disseminating information. We also discuss changes that stem from developments in the information environment at the individual, organizational and societal level. Focal issues include: the politics, ethics, and values of information; information as an economic phenomenon; the institutional structure of knowledge and cultural production; and the role of information professionals in all of these activities. The intent is to provide opportunity for students to: take a thematic approach to understanding the nature and role of information in both private and public spheres; create a contextual framework within which to analyze the major social issues and developments associated with information creation, dissemination and use; and consider the various perspectives that characterize current policy discussions on those issues as well as alternative interpretations to conventional wisdom.Faculty of Informationknowledge, production, institutSDG4, SDG12, SDG16
INF2232HKnowledge Equity in Information OrganizationsThe purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to concepts and considerations of epistemic injustice and knowledge equity in the context of GLAM organizations. The course examines theories of epistemic injustice, particularly as it touches on the circulation of information through information spaces such as libraries and explores and teaches practices that bring knowledge equity. Theorist Miranda Fricker has described epistemic injustice as “wrong done to someone specifically in their capacity as a knower.” Students will critically examine the ways dominant information organization (infra)structures are sites of epistemic injustice, where frameworks of description, digital encoding, and standardized naming are used as methods of domination and oppression. Students will also engage and explore theories and mechanisms to work toward knowledge equity within GLAM organizations.Faculty of Informationknowledge, equity, equit, injusticeSDG4, SDG10, SDG16
INF2179HMachine Learning with Applications in PythonMachine learning has recently become the dominant field in AI research and constitutes the main part of the tools applied in industry-based AI positions. Business analysts, data scientists and AI engineers are required to know machine learning at different levels. The course will give a broad high-level overview of state-of-the-art machine learning methodologies. We shall focus on the application of these techniques to real-world data using the most advanced tools available for Python. The techniques will include: linear regression, basic techniques for classification, advanced regression and classification methods, and unsupervised learning.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF2186HMetadata Schemas and ApplicationsWith reference to different types of metadata (structural, descriptive, rights management, administrative, preservation, etc.) this course provides an examination of semantic and syntactic metadata schemas and applications across diverse domains, such as education, medicine, government information, cultural sector institutions, publishing, etc. Analyses of international metadata standards development, and a case study approach to metadata projects within a content management framework are important components of the course.Faculty of InformationinstitutSDG16
MSL2100HMuseum EnvironmentThis course is an introduction to preventive conservation. As such, it focuses on: identifying and quantifying the environmental factors that affect collections; developing strategies that mitigate those factors; understanding the materials that make up a museum collection – how they degrade, react to their environment and the objects around them; and evaluating the conservation requirements for the safe exhibition and storage of museum collections.Faculty of Informationenvironmental, conserv, conservSDG13, SDG14, SDG15
MSL2360HMuseums and Indigenous Communities: Changing Relationships, Changing PracticeThis course explores the changing relationships between aboriginal source communities and museums holding their material heritage. We begin with a historical overview of collecting practices, the role of indigenous material culture in the development of museums, and the relationship between museums and colonialism. Contemporary case studies primarily drawn from post-colonial and settler contexts during the last three decades are investigated as a response to earlier practices. Students are challenged to use these case studies in order to interrogate ideas of the museum as a ‘contact zone’, the shifting meaning of objects, contemporary curatorial challenges, the potential of new museum practices, and source community expectations. Actual exhibitions, repatriation requests and museological dilemmas are used to engage critically with theoretical developments in material culture studies, material anthropology, art history, and indigenous studies.Faculty of Informationsettler, invest, indigenous, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
MSL2230HNature & Culture: Histories of Heritage Interpretations in North AmericaIn North America, heritage interpretation is a professional field with complex histories, which have significant impacts on the current practices. This course delves deep into these histories to trace the foundations of heritage interpretation as a field of practice, with its values and methods. More specifically, we start our journey in the late decades of the 19th century, when American and Canadian governments formed national parks, which had severe implications for Indigenous communities. The formation of settler states resulted in a series of cultural institutions – national parks, historic houses, living history museums – which served the purpose of preserving the national past through nature and culture. Other large socio-political forces, industrialization, urbanization, migration, also contributed to the development of these institutions. Meanwhile, local and community needs further shaped these new (at the time) cultural spaces. As these cultural institutions were finding their place within the North American landscape, a new professional field was being shaped: heritage interpretation. This course uses a thematic and chronological approach to map out the field of heritage interpretation and tease out the following: the types of cultural institutions involved in preserving the nature and culture of the past; the professionalization mechanisms of these institutions (e.g. organizations, manuals); the resulting practices. Like any historical take on a field, this course will focus on the notions of change and relevance, looking at pivotal moments (e.g. the introduction of the Multicultural Act) and case studies (e.g. historical Williamsburg’s re-evaluation of enslaved communities histories), and aiming to balance large scale policy interventions with grassroots community initiatives. The course will be delivered through a hybrid method, combining lecturettes, seminar-style discussions, and mini-workshops. Learners in this course will read a variety of resources, including books, journal articles, professional publications, and grey literature. While the focus of this course is on the North American context, learners will be able to apply methods and frameworks from this course to other models outside of North America.Faculty of Informationsettler, industrialization, indigenous, urban, land, institut, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11, SDG15
INF2223HOpen Government and Research DataOver two decades humans have increasingly recognized that data created by researchers and governments are a public good and have recurring value when these data are made broadly accessible. This has been encapsulated in the concept of Open Data. Open Data, whether produced as the result of governmental initiatives or research projects, are data that are released (made accessible) for redistribution, reuse, remixing, and reanalysis. This course provides students an opportunity to develop a functional knowledge of the open data concept in the context of government open data and research open data. In the case of research data, the release of these data are essential to facilitate the reproducibility, transparency, and verification of scientific studies. They also can become foundational resources for innovation and new discoveries. In the case of government open data, when effectively used these data enable citizens to tap public information resources which can empower citizens to contribute to social activism through using the analysis of data to underpin the questioning of public policy, to create new information services, and even to produce economic value and establish new businesses. The abilities to navigate critically the open data landscape to discover, assess, analyse, remix, and re-distribute these data are highly relevant for information professionals. In this course students will develop an understanding as to how to use open data personally and professionally and to support others to use it for a variety of purposes from, for instance, in the case of open research data validating or questioning research findings to in the case of open government data to enabling social activism.Faculty of Informationknowledge, citizen, accessib, reuse, landSDG4, SDG11, SDG12, SDG15
INF2235HOuter Space and the CityCities are sites of capital accumulation and locations whereby technology finds concrete expression. As new urban interventions are needed to respond to conditions of massification, densification, mobility, global health, and environmental degradation, this seminar addresses the relation between outer space exploration and urban infrastructures. Outer space science and technology plays a central role in the design and development of urban, architectural and transportation systems, yet its impact and ubiquity often go unnoticed. Because outer space science and technology is a field that heavily relies on the tools and methodologies of information science (IS), IS specialists can play a crucial role in developing ethical frameworks for the urbanization of outer space technology. This seminar will equip students with the tools to identify -and develop- practical, tactical, and speculative modes of engagement that critically assess (document, evaluate, and subvert) the impact of outer space at an urban level. Students will be introduced to key concepts, theories, and case studies in science and technology studies, architecture, urbanism, and art to reflect -and speculate- on the cultural, social, and political implications of an interplanetary project of inhabitation. Students will engage with how outer space is reconfiguring the ways in which we design our cities by studying urban communication and infrastructures, satellites and drone technology as well as sites where the future of human inhabitation under extreme conditions is currently being envisioned and constructed.Faculty of Informationglobal health, infrastructure, capital, cities, urban, environmental, planetSDG3, SDG9, SDG11, SDG13
INF2245HPlatforms: Global Histories, Practices,and TheoriesWe are told that now we are living in a platform society because digital platforms, from Amazon and Flipkart to Instagram and WeChat, shape the social life of a great majority of the global population. This course is designed to advance the knowledge about the global origin and development of the platform-turn in the intersecting fields of information studies, studies of science and technologies, management studies, and political economy of communication and media. The course provides an intellectual voyage of the global experience and expression of platform from the geography outside Anglophone where the term was first theorized in the manufacturing industry, and from the days when the concerning experiences were not yet understood through the perspective platforms as we know today to the contemporary era when we can hardly imagine an internet without digital platforms. The course explores the global histories and practices of the platform, as well as the implications of the increasing penetration of digital platforms into the social fabric of our life on a global scale. The course will guide the students to pay special attention to how local conditions, globalization, and the geo-politics of information and knowledge production intertwine to shape and be shaped by the intellectual undertaking to theorize platform as a discourse, business model, mediation device, power relation, and organizational revolution. Students will engage with key concepts, theories, and approaches in the emerging field of platform studies, but also with some overlooked histories and local articulations of what platform is and how platform works. The course will be a discussion-oriented seminar. Discussions will revolve around history, theorization, and politics of platform through examples of different platforms beyond the digital realm and from a variety of geographies.Faculty of Informationknowledge, internet, globaliz, productionSDG4, SDG9, SDG12
INF2240HPolitical Economy and Cultural Studies of InformationExplores the institutionalized production and management of the economic value in information in relation to the production of lived culture. Includes critical examinations of globalization, the knowledge economy, media ownership, indigenous knowledge, and the commodification of culture, information, and knowledge.Faculty of Informationknowledge, globaliz, indigenous, production, institut, indigenousSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12
MSL2332HPublic Programs and EducationThis course examines the theoretical roots, the ideological positions and the research literature on public programming and education strategies deployed in museums, parks, libraries, and heritage institutions. The course offers a critique of models of schooling, experience, citizenship and critical engagement that dominate current discourse and practices. Students will have the opportunity to try out and experiment with new programming strategies in class and during selected museum visits. The final project for this course is a production plan for an education program at a current exhibition, institution or cultural event. This a blended learning or hybrid course; part of the course will take place in an electronic learning environment, part will take place in an in-person classroom environment, and part in cultural heritage and museum environments.Faculty of Informationlearning, citizen, production, institutSDG4, SDG12, SDG16
INF2226HQueer GLAMThis course provides an introduction to queer experiences and queer studies — including intersections of race, gender, and sexuality – within the context of Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAM). The purpose of this seminar is to examine, synthesize, and understand a range of critical pressure points that have been central to queer experiences in the context of cultural heritage institutions, public history, community outreach, and “information labor” and “knowledge work.” Conversely, we will ask, how do GLAM institutions shape queer identity, activism, sociability, sex, art, and politics?Faculty of Informationknowledge, gender, queer, labor, institutSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG16
INF2167HR for Data ScienceData science is a fast-growing field and new tools and techniques are designed everyday to perform data analysis in quick and robust ways. This course covers the fundamentals of data science using the R language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. R is currently widely used by information students and data scientists from various disciplines. The course will teach students how to do data science in an easy way. It is designed for students from the social sciences and from non-programming backgrounds. The course focus is not on learning a new programming language but rather on providing students with skills to approach various research questions that involve analysis of social sciences data. We will learn skills of data collection, storage, cleaning, transformation, visualization, and various techniques of data analysis. Most important, we will learn how those skills are applied in research involving the social world. We will apply those techniques to analyze structured tabular data, networked data, and unstructured text data through experimenting on real datasets, including online data. This course will provide students with a new skill highly in demand in the information and dataFaculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF2162HRare Books and ManuscriptsThis course serves as an introduction to rare book and manuscript librarianship. Students will explore concepts ranging from book history and bibliographical description to the stewardship of rare books and manuscripts, and strategies for advocacy and outreach on behalf of special collections. While especially relevant for students interested in special collections librarianship, the course is accessible for all students with interests in rare books and manuscripts.Faculty of InformationaccessibSDG11
INF2320HRemix CultureRemix encapsulates the confluence of critical thinking and creativity in cultural production in particular and in creative endeavors more generally. This course enables students to examine the place of remix in contemporary society against the backdrop of legal constraints, moral and cultural challenges, political and economic vested interests, and the rise of participatory culture and remix as socially embedded behaviour. Remix practices involve finding inspiration in what has already been created and then deconstructing, transforming, contrasting, re-using, reconstituting and combining media to produce novel creative outputs that deliver new value. It happens both in physical and virtual environments. The practice is endemic in contemporary culture. We see it now in many forms of art from assemblages to video art, in data construction, in film and video, animation, games, genetic engineering, food, and many other aspects of our culture. Remix is not a new behaviour, it has a long history— for many its ubiquitousness in music production (e.g., hip hop) beginning in the 1980s was a key awareness point, but we have long seen its presence in architecture (e.g., spolia), art (e.g., cubism, collage, “readymades”), film, literature, and music. It has become a cornerstone of our participatory culture and a core information practice. What is different is that the virtual has made the processes of production more accessible to a broader audience and made it possible to distribute the results of remix activities effortlessly. At the same time content which appears to many as source material to inspire collective creativity is subject to vigorous efforts to lock it down as intellectual property. There are many perspectives, for instance, remix practices juxtaposes piracy against these restrictive practices. Remix raises questions about intellectual property rights (IPR), authorship, the collective, what creativity is and where its boundaries lie, what is novel, innovative and original, and the very nature of the producer-consumer. We will view remix through multiple lens some historical, some social, some political and others economic. Remix lies at the juncture of People-Content-Technology and this course investigates remix from the vantage of the field of Information and sets remix within the context of digital culture more generally.Faculty of Informationinvest, accessib, consum, productionSDG9, SDG11, SDG12
INF1321HRepresenting, Documenting, and Accessing the Cultural RecordWithin the context of human activity, both individual and institutional, an exploration of epistemological and ontological approaches to creating, organizing, preserving, and accessing information and knowledge. The design and evaluation of tools and techniques used in support of curatorship, stewardship, discovery, and use of cultural artefacts and their records.Faculty of Informationknowledge, institutSDG4, SDG16
INF3001HResearch in Information: FoundationsAn introduction to, exploration of, and examination of the fundamental intellectual landscape of information research. Topics include: (i) an historically, conceptually and methodologically grounded understanding of the use of concepts of information and knowledge across the academy (in philosophy, history, social science, politics, engineering, etc.); and (ii) contemporary uses of ‘information’ as a substantial theoretical notion, both in the world in general (e.g., in public political discourse, in such constructions as “the information or knowledge age, economy, society, etc.”), and in such fields as political theory, biology, medicine, computing, etc.Faculty of Informationknowledge, landSDG4, SDG15
INF1240HResearch MethodsFocuses on developing an understanding of appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and relevant descriptive and inferential statistics for the investigation of both practical and theoretical problems in the information professions. By considering the nature, concepts, and logic of the research enterprise, permits a critically informed assessment of published research, including data gathering and data analysis procedures.Faculty of InformationinvestSDG9
INF2224HService DesignThis course examines the methods and theories of Service Design. Students will apply service design methods such as touchpoint mapping, service blueprinting, storyboarding, ethnomethodological service enactments, and video prototyping. The course examines the underlying theories of service design and the enablers and drawbacks of applying service design within a variety of organizational contexts. The course will emphasize studio-based learning and discussions of strategies for understanding and responding to the needs of service-based organizations. Each student will examine and demonstrate the applications of service design within a chosen organization. Throughout the course, students will also work on a major group design project. An emphasis will be placed on applied learning projects, in which students will partner with service-based organizations to complete their course project. Additional mentors and speakers will round-out the educational experience so that students appreciate the breadth of applications and opportunities to apply this growing discipline.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
MSL2255HSocial Digital MemoryThis course introduces students to the theoretical frameworks and practices of digital memory, identity and participatory heritage involving networked communication, virtual communities, and social media. It aims to address the increased importance of online social networks and digital communication as fields relevant to the formation of the contemporary social and cultural record, and as components of an emerging digital infrastructure for identity, memory, and participatory heritage work. Participants will be exposed to concepts and theories on digital memory and online social networks, the sociotechnical infrastructures they depend on, and significant examples of social digital memory practice in contexts such as traumatic and contested memory work, self-representation, national, subaltern and intersectional identity, social activism, and participatory heritage curation. The course will address challenges posed by the platform economy, surveillance, group self-affirmation and fragmentation, dis/misinformation, digital exclusion, symbolic appropriation, and digital obsolescence of social digital memory. It will also explore the opportunities for institutional responses to practices of social digital memory, identity and participatory heritage, which adhere to principles of inclusion, diversity and equity, and promote equitable cultural representation, human rights, civic participation and social justice. Examples to be discussed include Korean pop social media fandom, the Archive of Our Own fanfiction community, the memory of the Holocaust on Instagram, the mnemonic affordances of TikTok, digital death on Facebook, pro-am digitization as well as #BlackLivesMatter hashtag activism. This is a hybrid, online course. As part of the asynchronous component of the course, students are expected to consult readings, recorded instructor lecturettes, and other resources available on the Quercus course website, actively identify and study additional online resources, and complete homework activities on a weekly basis, in line with the course schedule and instructions published in Quercus. To facilitate interaction and peer learning, they will be asked to participate in two online chat groups (between 3-7 people), one focusing on a platform they are interested into (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, Wikipedia, YouTube, TikTok), another on a key issue facing memory, identity and heritage practice on social media (e.g., activism, contested heritage, privacy, misinformation, participatory curation), to be agreed on the first week of class. An instructor-moderated discussion forum will also be created on Quercus, where they may ask questions, offer suggestions, and receive instructor feedback. The synchronous part of the course consists of mandatory online webinars, workshops and small group tutorials defined on the course schedule (1-2 hours weekly), aiming not at content delivery but at active learning through feedback to coursework and questions, group discussion, and collective engagement with examples of social media memory, identity and participatory heritage practice.Faculty of Informationequitable, learning, equitable, equity, infrastructure, equit, institut, social justice, human rightsSDG4, SDG9, SDG10, SDG16
INF2203HStorytelling with DataWith the exponential growth of data in all aspects of our lives, the need to develop a meaningful narrative with the data is key to effective communication of findings. In this course, we will combine the art of storytelling with data science to develop an engaging and impactful narrative from data. Students will then choose datasets to work on as their project and explore the data to find the insights required to develop their stories. The project can be in any area of interest such as information systems, public policy, business where they have access to the required public data. The students can use their own datasets or use sources introduced by the instructor. This part requires prior experience with data science (INF1340) or programming in Python or R. Additionally, we will review a visualization tool (Tableau) and discuss considerations in choosing the right visuals. Once the initial exploration is done, students will work on explanation and developing an engaging narrative based on their findings. In this part, we will learn how leaders like TED and Pixar create their stories to engage the audience. We also incorporate learnings from design thinking to present possible solutions to the problems identified and to deliver to the stakeholders. At the end, the students will present their data stories to the class.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF2242HStudying Information and Knowledge PracticeThis is a seminar-style course that engages critical theories of knowledge-making practices and methodological approaches to their study. The focus is methodological and extends from the foundational themes and topics in information and knowledge. The emphasis is on how to study these issues, rather than merely on what the issues are. Approaches include ethnographic field studies, laboratory studies, critical discourse analysis, feminist science studies, social construction of technology, actor-network theory, activity theory, and distributed cognition.Faculty of Informationknowledge, feminis, laborSDG4, SDG5, SDG8
INF2124HSurveillance and IdentityFollowing Foucault and others, we can think of surveillance as a discursive technique which produces knowledge and identities. Surveillance infrastructures infiltrate and mediate everyday life. For example, internet “cookies,” shopping loyalty cards, and mobile phone numbers all individuate and identify us. These identifiers are used to index databases recording our web surfing activities, our movements, and our purchases. The databases are subjected to statistical analysis in order to produce knowledge of demographic categories, typical patterns, or suspect behavior. This knowledge is then applied back to individuals in the population in order to assign each to a particular niche market or risk group, and to act toward them accordingly. Thus, through surveillance, knowledge is created, categories and types are produced, and individuals are made visible as representatives of those types. This course investigates the technical, social, and legal contexts and implications of these practices.Faculty of Informationknowledge, infrastructure, invest, internetSDG4, SDG9
INF1342HSystem Requirements and Architectural DesignDesigning information systems in the face of competing goals from multiple stakeholders, e.g., efficiency, cost, reliability, security, privacy, usability, adaptability, reusability, time-to-market. Systematic techniques and models for identifying and evaluating alternatives. Non-functional requirements and architectural design. Organizing design knowledge for reuse.Faculty of Informationknowledge, reuseSDG4, SDG12
MSL2335HThe Digital Museum: From Strategy to ImplementationDigital technologies present exciting new opportunities for interaction with museum objects. They help forge unique and novel paths of meaning, and facilitate the creation of new museum publics. But they also unsettle the foundation of stability, materiality, and temporal order upon which many museums reside. This course explores the role of new and emerging digital technologies in the context of the contemporary museum experience. It is intended to provide students with the knowledge and skills to make informed decisions regarding opportunities and challenges afforded by digital technologies. Students in this course will investigate the impact of digital technologies on museums, their staff, their audiences, and their value propositions. They will explore the adoption of user-centred, multi-channel approaches to content creation and distribution, and will consider the requisite digital skills and literacies that can inform responsible digital adoption, development, and transformation. From digital strategy to the practical aspects of project management and development of digital experiences, students will gain an overview of processes related to the use of digital technologies by museum professionals. To develop this overview, students will participate in collaborative prototyping of digital experiences with our partners at the Ontario Science Centre. The development of these experiences will be supported by readings, case studies, planning exercises, technical demonstrations and tutorials, and guest speakers.Faculty of Informationknowledge, labor, investSDG4, SDG8, SDG9
MSL3900HThe Emerging Museum ProfessionalThe Group of Ontario Emerging Museum Professionals defines an emerging museum professional as someone in the first 10 years of their museum career. According to the National Emerging Professional Network in the United States, “the word ‘emerging’ is subjective and means different things to different people. It cannot be defined by a length of time, level of education, title, or position. With constant advances and changes in the museum profession, one might consider themselves constantly “emerging” as they continually learn, grow, and develop new interests and skills.” MSL3900H integrates these two perspectives by introducing students to both the broad dimensions of the museum profession and the skills and learning strategies required to build a career in the field. Characteristics of museum professionals include engaging in autonomous reflection to drive self-improvement and solve problems, dedication to and capacity for continuous learning, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, well-developed emotional intelligence, the exercise of sound ethical judgment and conducting oneself in a manner that elevates the profession. Students in this course will identify and begin to develop the skills, knowledge and behaviors required of a museum professional. Through readings, group work, panel discussions and informational interviews, they will gain an understanding of the composition of the museum workforce and the nature of the museum workplace. Through MSL3900H, students will be prepared to undertake an internship placement, develop their professional identities and begin their journey from graduate student to emerging museum professional.Faculty of Informationknowledge, learningSDG4
INF3900HThe Emerging ProfessionalThe purpose of this course is to prepare students to hone their professional identity, professional communication skills, and professional learning capacity. Learning to become a capable workplace professional is as important as competence in one’s field of study. Characteristics of the capable workplace professional include: engaging in reflective practice to aid learning and to solve problems, valuing excellent communication and interpersonal skills, developing strong self-awareness, exercising sound ethical judgment, and developing an orientation to elevating their profession. The conceptual hub of the course is an exploration of the ideal type of ‘the professional’. Three overarching course themes are: (a) developing new awareness of learning and skills needed to become a capable workplace professional: (b) the reflective journey to develop one’s own sense of professional identity; (c) a practical emphasis on presenting oneself effectively in the job market. Students will become prepared to enter their field and to thrive as emerging professionals, both in student placements and beyond graduation. This course is recommended for first-year students contemplating the Co-op option and it is also suitable for graduating students contemplating the job market.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF2331HThe Future of the BookThis course considers the history and possible futures of books in a digital world. In this course “the book” is interpreted broadly, meaning not just an object with covers and pages, but also an evolving metaphor for conceptual frameworks for knowledge, and a metonym that brings together many different technologies, institutions, and cultural practices. The course introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches such as book history, textual studies, history of reading, and digital humanities, with an emphasis on balancing theoretical speculation with practical implementation. Readings will survey topics such as the ontology of born-digital artifacts, critical assessment of digitization projects, collaborative knowledge work, reading devices (old and new), e-book interface design, text/image/multimedia relationships, theories and practices of markup, the gendering of technologies, the politics of digital archiving, the materiality of texts, and the epistemology of digital tools. Students will also receive a practical introduction to XML markup and visualization tools.Faculty of Informationknowledge, gender, labor, institutSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG16
INF2228HThe Future of Things: Digitization and RemediationThis course will explore how and why material objects, cultural artifacts, and artistic works relate to and are transformed through technological mediation. We will examine several case studies in which elements of the analogue or natural world are digitized and presented in new screen-based forms. Throughout the course we will combine theoretical readings on the nature of materiality, the politics of digitization, and the aesthetics of digital representation with case studies of specific digital archives, collections, and organizations. Topics will include the scanning of books by mass digitization organizations like the Internet Archive and Google Books; diverse practices of curation and remediation in the museum and library sectors; technologies for digitization and remediation including 3D scanning, photography, OCR and applications of machine learning for textual transcription; specialist imaging techniques including multi-spectral imaging and micro-CT scanning; the mediation and digitization of social processes; artistic and conceptual engagements with digitization; the relationship between digitization and conservation of historical materials; and the creation of digital archives and collections. We will conclude the course by considering the role of materiality and embodiment in a highly digitized culture and the significance of material craft and the handmade alongside digital surrogates.Faculty of Informationlearning, remediation, internet, conserv, conservSDG4, SDG6, SDG9, SDG14, SDG15
INF1323HThe Information ExperienceINF1323H focuses on identifying and understanding what is “informational” in any setting. Students will develop sharpened vision to discern informational patterns, that is, an ability to trace what Bates (1999) calls the “red thread of information” pervading life. This metaperspective is unique to the academic discipline of Library and Information Science (LIS) and brings information resources, structures, systems, and behaviours into focus to enable and improve information provision. Each semester the aforementioned information phenomena will be critically examined in social contexts germaine to LIS, such as: reference service, readers’ advisory, scholarly knowledge production, and hobby careers, among others. Theoretical and methodological tools will be introduced to help participants understand these information environments as socially-constructed, patterned, knit-together, and dynamic. As the semester unfolds, students will refine their observational and analytical skills by conducting an exploratory Research Project about the information experience within a setting or population of personal interest or career relevance, which can serve as the starting point for lifelong learning and a concatenated research career.Faculty of Informationknowledge, learning, productionSDG4, SDG12
MSL2331HThe Museum Exhibition: Histories, Practices, GenresThe exhibition is a museum’s main form of public engagement, and this course investigates the histories, processes and practices through which exhibitions have developed over time, within a Western and global context. Why do museums prioritize exhibitions over other forms of programming? Why do exhibitions succeed, and why do they fail? How do professional communities develop best practices, and how prone are such practices to change? This course starts by introducing you to the foundational theoretical models developed by museum studies scholars and museum professionals to think about museum exhibitions. To explore these theories in practice, the course will zoom in on specific case studies and exhibition development strategies from diverse types of institutions, including art galleries, encyclopedic, history and natural history museums, science centers, historic and heritage sites. Within this framework, the course will expand on curation, interpretation and communication, three pillars of exhibition development which define the museological “front of house”. This course embraces a holistic approach to the study of the museum exhibition, which requires that you observe exhibitions in their institutional and cultural contexts, and with the awareness that each institution is different in its approach to curation, interpretation and communication.Faculty of Informationinvest, institutSDG9, SDG16
INF3009HTheory and History of Media TechnologyHistorical and theoretical perspectives on technological change and its social implications provide a foundation for intensive study and critical analysis of new communication technologies. A grasp of the social, political and economic contexts in which technologies emerge allows the student to discern the way culture both shapes and is shaped by information and communication technologies. Course topics are thus chosen to broadly acquaint students with key historical moments in the history of technology and in the historical situatededness of academic knowledge production regarding media and technology. They provide a framework in which early theorizations of media and technology are studied to enrich current understanding of media. The course also provides grounding in a range of theorizations to give the student a broad overview of the multiplicity of approaches and methods that can aid investigations of technological change in social contexts. This graduate seminar explores the history of “new” media as agents of change in cultural, social, and spatial infrastructures, economies, and cultural politics. By remembering that every media was once new, and that we need new theory to conceptualize new media, students will investigate how the emergence of new interfaces change communication relationships, information dissemination, audience practices, and consequently the way we think about the world and ourselves. Having in mind that each media reflects old media, but also brings up the new, one must learn how to critically think about each new medium by taking into consideration its specific characteristics.Faculty of Informationknowledge, infrastructure, invest, productionSDG4, SDG9, SDG12
INF2171HUsability Assessment: Concepts, Methods and ToolsThis course will introduce students to concepts related to usability, methods for conducting usability assessments, and tools used by usability professionals; it does not require any previous knowledge or experience in the area of usability. Although usability is most often associated with websites, desktop applications and mobile apps, it also applies to anything with a user interface, from smartwatches, to eReaders, elevator controls, remote controls, election ballots and forms. In the course, students will be exposed to professional and research publications on usability and to resources widely used by usability professionals. In assignments, students will gain experience using two methods for assessing usability. First, students will conduct a heuristic evaluation. Second, students will plan and carry out a small-scale usability test, analyze the data from the test, and prepare a final report. In carrying out the usability test, team members will have an opportunity to experience multiple roles. In the last session, each teamwill present their findings.Faculty of InformationknowledgeSDG4
INF2191HUser Interface DesignUser Interface Design is broadly concerned with the design of user interfaces for machines and software. On computer screens, this refers to the shaping and the presentation of navigation controls and information displays, as well as functional controls. With the gradual rise over the last decade in mobile and ubiquitous computing (the “internet of things”), the study of user interface design has necessarily broadened to small screens and even everyday objects. Students will learn basic principles of user interface design, interaction models and laws, differentiation of interaction styles, and different user interface paradigms. More practical topics may include physical ergonomics, cognitive ergonomics, design guidelines for different platforms, differentiation of interaction styles, design widgets, accessibility, localization, and software prototyping tools.Faculty of Informationinternet, accessibSDG9, SDG11
INF2208HUser-Centered Systems for CommunicationThis course will introduce students to concepts related to systems for human-human and human-agent communication. In particular, the course covers the theoretical mechanisms and UI/UX design principles for developing technology to support communication through the system (e.g. teleconferencing), around the system (e.g. collaborative software and hardware), and directly with the system (e.g. human communication with intelligent agents). The course will provide students with a mix of theoretical knowledge and practical application of that knowledge. Specifically, the course focuses on developing the foundational knowledge driving the design of these systems, and on examining the practical design mechanisms for their support. In the course, students are exposed to existing academic research and publications on design for communication, as well as current practices in the industry around their implementation in practical scenarios. Key trends in design practice will be illustrated with current examples. The course also emphasizes the need for designing with consideration for privacy, diversity, and communication ethics, and demonstrates how and when core UX research methods are applicable.Faculty of Informationknowledge, laborSDG4, SDG8
INF2200HUX Leadership and InfluenceIn a fast-moving business world, User Experience (UX) leadership and influence are necessary skills for UX professionals to be successful. UX leaders advocate for user-centered design practises, infuse this into the culture of an organization, and drive business by user needs and design mandates. In addition to cultural leadership, the UX leader needs to work closely with other stakeholders – including users, product owners, managers, engineers, and experts/specialists in other disciplines – to set up best UX delivery practices, design operations, and agile methodologies to ensure effective design and delivery of excellent end-to-end user experiences. This course introduces students to essential UX leadership skills, provides opportunities to develop and hone those skills, and builds awareness of the expectations for exemplary UX leadership. Studio-based learning and discussions of strategies for understanding the tenets of UX leadership will be employed. Each student will examine and demonstrate the applications of UX leadership via lectures, individual assignments, and a major group design project. Students will then learn how to communicate the value of UX to executives, as well as how to recognize business challenges that can be turned into UX opportunities and successes. An emphasis will be placed on the application of both UX best practices – including design thinking, user research, and agile development – and personal skills relating to influence, like empathy, awareness, storytelling, and persuasion.Faculty of InformationlearningSDG4
INF2164HUX Research and Design for Video Gameshis course examines the particular roles of User Experience Design (UXD) and User Experience Research (UXR) in video games and the video games industry. The course specializes in video games as interactive interfaces, introduces core video game concepts, discusses the role of UX in the video game development process, and highlights how and when core UX research methods are applicable to this unique domain. Key trends in the video game industry will be illustrated with current examples. Throughout the course, students will practice video game analysis, heuristic evaluation of video games, as well as usability, appreciation, and challenge testing using industry-standard user research tools. Inclusivity, accessibility, and making video games for everyone will be a recurring theme that reflects the current state of the industry.Faculty of InformationaccessibSDG11
FOR3012HAnalytical Methods in ForestryA series of modules designed to provide an introduction to practical methods in basic statistics, geographic information systems (GIS), conflict resolution and social sciences. Students will be required to complete at least three of four modules.Faculty of ForestryforestSDG15
FOR3002HApplied Forest Ecology and SilvicultureAn examination of the natural processes that determine the structure and function of forest ecosystems at the tree, stand and landscape scale, and approaches to integrating ecological theory in forest management practice. Topics include silvics and functional ecology of tree species, forest succession, soils and biogeochemical cycles, stand dynamics, growth and yield modelling, silvicultural systems and forest conservation ecology. The emphasis will be on northern temperate forests with select examples from other regions. Field and laboratory exercises will provide practical experience in forest biometrics and inventory, silvicultural experimental design, stand management prescriptions and the use of forest landscape databases and models.Faculty of Forestrylabor, conserv, species, ecosystem, forest, ecolog, conserv, species, land, forest conservation, soil, ecosystemSDG8, SDG14, SDG15
FOR3001HBiodiversity of Forest OrganismsIntroduction to systematics, identification and classification of plants and animals comprising the main taxonomic groups of forest organisms: trees, fungi, bryophytes, lichens, ferns, conifers and other Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, insects, other arthropods, amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals. Community ecology, diversity and function in relation to forest management planning are addressed through field trips, lectures & a team-based consultant report. The course is composed of a 8-day field camp at the beginning of term, followed by lectures and field trips covering topics in biodiversity of forested landscapes and ecosystems.Faculty of Forestryanimal, biodivers, ecosystem, forest, biodivers, ecolog, animal, land, ecosystemSDG14, SDG15
FOR1294HBioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologyThis course focuses on technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels and chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels from the biomass will be discussed. Processing options for valuable chemicals for other applications will also be discussed. Emphasis will also be placed on the economics and processing efficiencies of these conversion technologies.Faculty of Forestryenergy, biofuel, forestSDG7, SDG15
FOR3008HCapstone Project in Forest ConservationThis course will involve analysing information and preparing formal reports based on the summer internship, in consultation with individual faculty supervisors. Students will deliver brief seminar presentations on their work, and there will be an oral defence of the final paper.Faculty of Forestryconserv, forest, conserv, forest conservationSDG14, SDG15
FOR3006HCase Study Analysis in Forest ManagementCase Study Analysis in Forest Management: The course focuses on developing skills in integrating forest management related knowledge from natural and social sciences , and offers opportunities, through discussion of case studies, to learn applications of knowledge from natural and social sciences to the solution of real-life multi-dimensional forest management problems. Concepts related to integration science and case study analysis are introduced and many case studies, related to forest conservation, forests for industrial production, forestry NGOs, international forestry, trade of forest products, wildlife management, public participation, and Aboriginal forestry are discussed.Faculty of Forestryknowledge, trade, production, conserv, forest, conserv, forest conservation, wildlifeSDG4, SDG10, SDG12, SDG14, SDG15
FOR3000HCurrent Issues in Forest ConservationMajor approaches and challenges facing effective conservation of the world’s forests are addressed through critical analysis of Canadian and international forest management and practices, including global land use conflicts within inhabited and pristine landscapes, aboriginal communities and the forest industry. Guest lectures and professionally-based assignments are used to investigate ENGO and governmental perspectives in topical areas including climate change, carbon sequestration, endangered species legislation, value-added wood product technology, and biomolecular advances.Faculty of Forestryinvest, climate, carbon sequestration, conserv, species, forest, conserv, land use, species, land, forest conservation, carbon sequestration, endangered speciesSDG9, SDG13, SDG15, SDG14
FOR1288HDesign and Manufacturing of BiomaterialsThis course focuses on the manufacturing processes, properties and uses of wood and agricultural fibre based products including wood based composites, ligno-cellulosic/thermoplastic composites and structural or engineered composites. There will be particular emphasis on the effects of adhesives and additives. Rheological behaviour of wood-furnish mats and visco-elastic behaviour of materials and final products.Faculty of ForestryagriculturSDG2
FOR3003HEconomics of Forest EcosystemsThe focus of the course is to build theoretical foundations of economic issues related to forest ecosystems and to develop an understanding of their applications to real life situations of forest conservation. The different economic concepts related to forest ecosystems are taught in a three-step process – theory, practice, and application. First, some basic concepts of economics, such as consumer choice, firm behavior, and competitive markets are introduced. The second part of the course is organized in five units – one unit each on welfare theory, rent theory, cost-benefit analysis, forest rotation, and international trade of forest products.Faculty of Forestrywelfare, trade, consum, conserv, ecosystem, forest, conserv, forest conservation, ecosystemSDG1, SDG10, SDG12, SDG14, SDG15
FOR1270HForest Biomaterial Sciences: Fundamentals, Applications, and the Next FrontierA key course for graduate students to gain fundamental knowledge focused on forest biomaterial sciences, to have an overview of the utilization of these renewable materials for industrial applications, and to be exposed to leading-edge sciences and technologies in fields relevant to the application of forest biomaterials. Topics will cover materials science, mechanics, wood chemistry, surface sciences, adhesives, nanotechnology and relevant advanced analytical characterizations methods. The course format will be a combination of seminars and student projects and presentations according to specific topics that are selected based on students’ interests or thesis projects.Faculty of Forestryknowledge, renewabl, forestSDG4, SDG7, SDG15
FOR3009HForest Conservation BiologyThis course provides students with an understanding of the distribution and ecology of the world’s major forested ecosystems and a broad grasp of major conservation biology issues in each. A summary of global physical geography and ecosystem classification in the opening weeks is followed by lectures, presentations, and discussions on key conservation biology issues organized into three modules: tropical forests, subtropical forests, and temperate forests. Topics include the evolution of concepts of forest conservation, sustainable forestry and ecosystem conservation; and the effectiveness of regulatory approaches and management practices in different societies, regions, and nations.Faculty of Forestryconserv, ecosystem, forest, ecolog, conserv, forest conservation, ecosystemSDG14, SDG15
FOR1416HForest Fire Danger RatingThe assessment of forest fire danger is a critical aspect of forest fire management. We will review the physical, mathematical and statistical aspects of models used for forest fire danger rating in Canada, including fuel moisture, fire occurrence and fire behaviour models and will examine how these models have been developed based on field and laboratory experimentation and statistical modelling techniques. Through lectures and assignments we will examine the assumptions underlying these models and their use, and develop an understanding of how to modify or develop new models to fit new forest types or management needs.Faculty of Forestrylabor, forestSDG8, SDG15
FOR3004HForest Management Decision Support SystemsThe use of analytical methods and mathematical modelling in the planning for sustainable management of forests and integration of the ecological, economic and social issues related to forest management. Introduction of various decision-making techniques such as linear programming, computer simulation and geographic information systems.Faculty of Forestryforest, ecologSDG15
FOR3011HInternational Forest Conservation Field CampAn intensive two-week field course based at international field stations will take place at the beginning of the summer term following the first academic session of the program. (See “Field Work Note” under “Introduction”.) The application of theoretical principles acquired in academic core courses to practical projects in community forestry and forest conservation. The course will involve students in group research and assessment, and will include cooperation with local training and research institutes, conservation projects and non-government organizations. A number of international course locations will be used.Faculty of Forestryconserv, forest, conserv, forest conservation, institutSDG14, SDG15, SDG16
FOR3007HInternship in Forest ConservationA guided research practical internship to take place in the summer following the first winter session to provide students with experience in applying concepts, principles and methods acquired in formal courses to the solution of practical forest management problems. Students, individually or in groups, will carry out detailed analyses of practical problems in forest conservation at a field location in Canada or abroad. The internship will include interaction with forest managers and individuals or groups involved in forest-related issues. The results of the internship will be used in the subsequent fall semester to prepare practical policy recommendations which will be incorporated in a research paper, consulting report or management plan (see FOR3008F).Faculty of Forestryconserv, forest, conserv, forest conservationSDG14, SDG15
FOR1413HNatural Resource Management IIDirected studies (master’s level) course dealing with selected aspects of natural resource management by arrangement between student and individual staff member. A maximum of one directed studies course taken with a student’s supervisor can be credited toward meeting departmental degree program requirements.Faculty of Forestrynatural resourceSDG12
FOR1001HGraduate SeminarAn overview of the current issues facing forest conservation, management and research is presented in guest seminars and student presentations. Students will improve their writing and presentation skills as well as broaden their appreciation of forest science through written assignments and presentations. Weekly attendance at seminars and a poster presentation during the fall along with a written research proposal and seminar workshop the following spring are required. During the first fall session, the course includes select assignments in conjunction with students from the professional forest conservation program (MFC).Faculty of Forestryconserv, forest, conserv, forest conservationSDG14, SDG15
FOR3010HSociety and Forest ConservationThe course focuses on social and political dimensions of human-forest interactions and theoretical approaches to study these interactions. It explores the social practices, institutions and regimes of power and knowledge in shaping human-forest relations. Taking a political ecology approach, the course examines how power, knowledge, culture and nature intersect and shape each other; and explore issues of equity and justice in different forest governance contexts. The course explores forest governance challenges in different parts of the world, including in Canada. The course will be run as a seminar, with student-led activities, research and presentations.Faculty of Forestryknowledge, equity, equit, political ecology, conserv, forest, ecolog, conserv, forest conservation, institut, governanceSDG4, SDG10, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16
FOR3005HStresses in the Forest EnvironmentThe natural functioning of forest systems with emphasis on the disruption caused by stress factors in tree and forest development. Classification and identification of important stresses including pollution, forest insects, diseases and competing vegetation. The role of environmental factors that influence forest health will be considered at the level of the cell, tree and stand. Students will apply the principles and techniques of managing disturbed forests to both urban and general forest situations. An integrated approach to sustaining forest health will be taken through exposure to strategies of decision-making in appropriate laboratory and project assignments.Faculty of Forestrypollution, labor, urban, environmental, pollut, forest, pollutSDG3, SDG8, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
FOR1610HSustainable Forest Management and CertificationThe field and practice of sustainable forest management and certification are rapidly evolving. This course is designed to provide an overview of sustainable forest management policies and programs from a provincial, national and international perspective. Through the implementation of such policies and programs, various outcomes should be achieved (ecological sustainability, biodiversity conservation, economic stability and community longevity). Historical perspectives, current initiatives and future opportunities are reviewed. The successes achieved by the implementation of such a program are measured through the use of criteria and indicators and certification processes. The ISO, SFI, the Canadian Standards Association, the Forest Stewardship Council and other certification processes are studied.Faculty of Forestryconserv, biodivers, forest, biodivers, ecolog, conservSDG14, SDG15
JFG1610HSustainable Forest Management and CertificationThe field and practice of sustainable forest management and certification are rapidly evolving. This course is designed to provide an overview of sustainable forest management policies and programs from a provincial, national and international perspective. Through the implementation of such policies and programs, various outcomes should be achieved (ecological sustainability, biodiversity conservation, economic stability and community longevity). Historical perspectives, current initiatives and future opportunities are reviewed. The successes achieved by the implementation of such a program are measured through the use of criteria and indicators and certification processes. The ISO, SFI, the Canadian Standards Association, the Forest Stewardship Council and other certification processes are studied.Faculty of Forestryconserv, biodivers, forest, biodivers, ecolog, conservSDG14, SDG15
FOR1575HUrban Forest ConservationCourse objective: to provide background on the many challenges facing those charged with the responsibility of managing urban forest ecosystems. A major theme will be the need to address these challenges within the context of planning and legislative processes. Topics: the historical role of tree and green spaces in urban environments; socio-economic and environmental benefits; urban forests and the law; stresses acting on trees in the urban environment and potential remedial measures.Faculty of Forestrysocio-economic, urban, environmental, conserv, ecosystem, forest, conserv, forest conservation, ecosystemSDG1, SDG11, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15
FRE2024HAlterite et representation: litterature d'Afrique et des CaraibesDe Frantz Fanon et Aimé Césaire à Valentin Mudimbe, Patrick Chamoiseau, Fatou Diome et Véronique Tadjo, nombreux et nombreuses sont les auteurs/autrices francophones qui réfléchissent sur l’altérité et son rapport à des contextes d’oppression vécus par les populations africaines et caribéennes, tels l’esclavage, la colonisation ou le racisme dans les sociétés contemporaines. Certain-es auteurs/autrices attirent l’attention sur la relation entre l’altérité et les types de représentations qui influencent les structures, institutions et dynamiques sociales. D’autres inscrivent un commentaire dans leurs œuvres sur leurs propres rôles et responsabilités en tant qu’auteurs/autrices qui créent, à travers leurs écrits, des représentations de Soi et de l’Autre. Dans ce séminaire, nous analyserons une sélection d’œuvres littéraires, de textes critiques et théoriques par des auteurs et autrices africain-es et caribéen-nes dans l’objectif d’explorer le fonctionnement de la représentation, notamment à l’égard du lien qu’elle entretient avec l’altérité et, aussi, avec les contextes sociaux spécifiques qui sont abordés dans les œuvres. Ces textes révèlent une vision critique, voire autocritique, de la représentation. Ils traitent la littérature, dotée de capacités autoréflexives, comme un terrain riche pour interroger l’altérité au sein de contextes d’oppression.Department of Frenchracism, reuse, institutSDG4, SDG12, SDG16
FRE1136HArguments, structures et representations en francaisCe cours se veut une exploration des questions fondamentales soulevées par la représentation linguistique des relations prédicat-argument en français. Après une exploration préliminaire des propriétés de la structure de la phrase en français, nous nous pencherons sur le problème spécifique de la détermination des mécanismes minimalement nécessaires pour rendre compte de la projection des arguments verbaux sélectionnés et non sélectionnés. La construction d’une typologie des verbes du français basée sur la sélection des arguments sera à la base de nos discussions. Les types de verbes suivants seront examinés : transitif, inergatif, ditransitif et inaccusatif. Les arguments non sélectionnés jouent un rôle de premier plan dans les avancées récentes en linguistique théorique. Nous nous concentrerons surtout sur les arguments datifs appliqués en français, ce qui nous conduira à explorer les systèmes casuels et pronominaux du français.Department of Frenchsmes, transitSDG8, SDG11
FRE1905HBaudelaire et la modernite symboliste (1850-1900)Nous nous proposons dans ce séminaire d’explorer l’œuvre poétique et critique de Baudelaire, puis d’en mesurer la profonde imprégnation dans la littérature de la seconde partie du XIXe siècle. Nous vérifierons en quoi elle détermine chez Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rimbaud et chez l’ensemble des représentants de la modernité poétique, par delà leurs nombreuses différences, une conception commune de la poésie. Nous serons ainsi amenés à constater que, tout en cultivant le fantasme romantique d’une poésie qui donnerait accès à l’ordre transcendant du Sens, les héritiers de Baudelaire ont la particularité d’ancrer les conditions de possibilité d’une telle expérience spirituelle dans le monde des sens, en promouvant une pratique innovante et « stupéfiante » du langage propre à stimuler les sensations, à agir sur les affects et incidemment propre à creuser et nourrir chez leurs lecteurs une « fringale d’intensité perceptive et d’ultra-sensibilité » (H. Lemaître).Department of FrenchreuseSDG12
FRE2036HConfigurations du genre sexuel-dans la prose contemporaine des femmesLa problématique du genre sexuel (du «gender») est un des enjeux majeurs, sinon le plus important, des diverses théories et pratiques féministes récentes. Si le genre sexuel est généralement conçu comme un ensemble d’éléments constitutifs de rapports sociaux fondé sur les différences perçues entre les sexes, et aussi comme une façon de signifier les rapports de pouvoir, aucun consensus sur son sens et sur son fonctionnement n’existe. Catégorie de pensée qui fait partie intégrante de la subjectivité et de l’identité, le genre sexuel soulève plusieurs questions déterminantes: la différence sexuelle, les rapports entre le biologique et le culturel, l’apport de la socialisation dans la construction de l’identité, la critique des rôles sociaux (souvent stéréotypés) assignés aux individus, la définition et la composition de la catégorie des femmes, etc. Dans un premier temps, il s’agira d’analyser et de contraster les multiples conceptions du genre sexuel chez certaines théoriciennes féministes françaises (Delphy, Guillaumin, Mathieu, Wittig) et anglo-américaines (Butler, de Lauretis, Scott, Showalter). Ensuite, nous étudierons quelques textes contemporains de femmes, pour en dégager les stratégies textuelles et épistémologiques qui sous-tendent ces différentes représentations littéraires du genre sexuel et l’apport de ces stratégies aux modalités plurielles de la construction du sujet féminin. Il importe de préciser que les volets théorique et analytique de ce cours seront d’un apport utile à celles et ceux qui travaillent sur les questions de l’identité et du sujet, quel que soit le siècle de leur spécialisation.Department of Frenchgender, sexesSDG5
FRE2105HEcritures du moi: de la representation textuelle a la representation visuelle du sujet vivantIl y a aujourd'hui dans les sciences humaines un regain d'intérêt pour les récits autobiographiques. L'on ne manque pas d'appellations pour désigner les nombreux sous-genres autobiographiques qui foisonnent les littératures françaises et québécoises depuis plus de trois décennies : littérature personnelle ou intime, récits ou témoignages autobiographiques, histoires de vie, documents vécus, témoignages autobiographiques illustrés, mémoires, photo-journal, album de famille, carnet d’écriture, etc. Quelle que soit l’expression adoptée pour désigner toutes ces artères susceptibles d'être chapeautées par l'appellation des « écritures du moi », cette production littéraire répond à une fascination pour le « vécu », marque chez l'instance scripturale une revendication du sujet écrivant, de l’artiste, de la subjectivité masculine/féminine, voire elle apparaît comme un espace privilégié pour arriver à une compréhension intime du sujet et du contexte sociohistorique et culturel dans lequel il s'inscrit. Ce cours poursuivra deux objectifs. En privilégiant les problèmes épistémologiques et formels présentés dans les théories de l'autobiographie et des rapports texte/image, il s'agira tout d'abord de se pencher sur les traits caractériels qui sous-tendent les différents sous-genres autobiographiques qui composent notre corpus littéraire et les différents types d’images qui parsèment leurs textes : journal intime (Blais et Ernaux), récits autobiographiques illustrés de clichés (Ernaux et Lilar), reproductions/descriptions de portraits (Blais et Ernaux), récits autobiographiques ponctués d’ekphrasis photographiques (Ernaux et Duperey), journal illustré de portraits peints (Blais) et albums de famille (Duperey, Ernaux et Lilar). Seront ensuite étudiées les stratégies textuelles et visuelles mises en œuvre dans la construction des différents sujets autobiographes, diaristes et épistoliers mis en œuvre dans la production littéraire et iconographique de ces écrivain(e)s et artistes québécois, français et belge.Department of FrenchproductionSDG12
FRE2109HHistoire des pratiques litteraires et culturelles des femmes au Quebec (1830-1960)Reposant sur l’étude de plusieurs trajectoires d’écrivaines, de textes et de supports écrits (documents d’archive, livres, journaux, magazines), ce cours veut inviter les étudiants et les étudiantes à réviser le préjugé tenace selon lequel peu de femmes auraient écrit au Québec avant les années 1960. Le 19e siècle et la première moitié du 20e siècle forment un moment déterminant pour le développement d’une littérature nationale au Québec, grâce entre autres à l’expansion de la presse et de la culture médiatique, à l’émergence d’un champ éditorial dynamique, et à l’épanouissement d’une critique littéraire tant laïque que d’obédience religieuse. Les femmes sont loin d’être absentes de ces phénomènes, que ce soit en tant qu’agentes de production de la littérature (romancières, poétesses, journalistes, scénaristes) qu’en tant que destinataires. Reconnaître et éclairer leur existence n’a d’ailleurs rien d’anodin, puisqu’un tel geste implique de modifier substantiellement notre manière de faire et de dire l’histoire littéraire. Ce cours examinera cette « autre » histoire de la littérature québécoise, en prenant soin de replacer l’écriture des femmes et leurs pratiques de lecture dans leur contexte social et culturel. Notre lecture approfondie de plusieurs œuvres significatives (poésie, roman, nouvelle, pièce de théâtre, chronique, critique) et notre exploration de quelques pratiques discursives (comme la correspondance, le journal intime ou la page féminine d’un journal quotidien) nous permettront de mieux comprendre les contraintes et les possibles qui conditionnaient, avant la Révolution tranquille, les pratiques d’écriture des femmes au Québec. Nous verrons ainsi comment les écrivaines parvenaient à négocier leur place dans la sphère littéraire et à publier leurs propres textes.Department of FrenchproductionSDG12
FRE1203HLITERATURE SEMINAR II: LITERARY PERIODSLes Lumières Souvent étendues au 18e siècle entier comme « Le siècle des Lumières », les Lumières propres n'en occupent que la deuxième moitié. Ancrés dans les valeurs de l'humanisme de la Renaissance, des esprits «éclairés» créent un mouvement philosophique, littéraire et intellectuel qui détermine profondément la vision occidentale du monde. C'est dans ce siècle que les bases de nos sociétés modernes sont établies. Que ce soit du point de vue politique et philosophique avec la Déclaration de l'indépendance américaine, la Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen et l'établissement de la première république avec la Révolution française ou du point de vue économique avec le développement du capitalisme et du système colonial ou encore du point de vue culturel qui voit la langue et la culture françaises élevées au statut de modèle pour l'Europe entière. Ce cours offre un accès à la richesse intellectuelle des Lumières dans les domaines des arts, lettres et sciences en situant les «lettres» dans leur contexte historique. Le programme inclut un échantillon des productions culturelles de «philosophes» comme Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot et Rousseau, de femmes auteures telles Mme de Graffigny, Olympe de Gouges et Mme Riccoboni ou d'auteurs, dramaturges, poètes et artistes moins connus. En parallèle, le cours invite à une réflexion sur l'historiographie des Lumières et l'héritage de la modernité.Department of Frenchcapital, productionSDG9, SDG12
FRE1204HLITERATURE SEMINAR III: LITERARY GENRESCe séminaire se propose d’aborder la prose d’idées comme lieu de réflexion et d’élaboration intellectuelle à l’intersection des genres littéraires. Il s’agit d’envisager la prose d’idées à travers les écrits des femmes qui se sont approprié ce genre en raison de sa flexibilité esthétique, discursive et formelle. En croisant les approches synchronique et diachronique, le séminaire suivra un parcours permettant de définir les jalons du genre tout en analysant finement des textes précis qui contribueront à améliorer notre compréhension de ses étendues. Sans emprunter une chronologie descendante, le séminaire abordera la prose d’idées en tant qu’elle développe un argumentaire implicite ou explicite, et vise à convaincre ou à enseigner. Ce genre se distingue par sa tendance à modeler son lectorat en obéissant au schéma discursif du protagoniste et de l’antagoniste. Les modalités du débat d’idées au sein de l’essai chez Simone de Beauvoir et du manifeste de Hélène Cixous (XXe siècle) nous offriront la possibilité de mesurer l’envergure de ce genre souvent polémique. Avec des écrivaines de l’Ancien Régime (Marie de Gournay et Olympe de Gouges) nous découvrirons que l’histoire de ce genre s’apparente aux écrits politiques des revendications des droits des femmes, sans pour autant s’y limiter, puisque la question de l’abolition de l’esclavage est également traitée par Olympe de Gouges à la veille de la Révolution française. De plus, les productions apparentées à la conservation, à la lettre, au traité d’éducation ou à l’éditorial prennent une place de choix dans les écrits provocateurs ancrés dans l’actualité des débats sociaux et littéraires de la Renaissance chez Christine de Pizan et Hélisenne de Crenne ainsi que dans les chroniques de Delphine de Girardin, une pionnière du journalisme naissant au XIXe siècle.Department of Frenchlabor, production, conserv, conservSDG8, SDG12, SDG14, SDG15
FRE2007HLitterature et ethique : nouveaux textes, nouvelles problematiquesLoin d’être nouveau, le rapport entre l’éthique et la littérature a été repensé autant dans les œuvres littéraires contemporaines que dans la théorie. Dans un monde où l’éthique est constamment remise à l’avant-plan des discours (politiques, scientifiques, culturels, économiques), il devient très stimulant, voire nécessaire de s’interroger sur la façon dont la littérature met en jeu et refaçonne ces discours ou ces nouveaux enjeux éthiques. C’est ce que nous chercherons à faire dans ce séminaire, en insistant non pas tant sur les questions de théorie éthique (ou de philosophie morale) que sur les liens complexes et conflictuels entre éthique et esthétique littéraire. Au regard de l’éthique, nous aborderons une série de problématiques variées, qu’elles soient philosophiques, culturelles, politiques ou autres (pensons à la posthumanité, à la torture, au « souci de soi ») que nous tenterons de lier à des concepts et pratiques littéraires à l’œuvre dans les textes à l’étude : le fictionnel, l’essai, la narration, l’intertextualité, l’ironie, etc.). Sans oublier de créer des ponts avec d’autres époques ou d’autres cultures, le séminaire s’attardera à des œuvres contemporaines françaises et québécoises (roman, essai, théâtre), qui non seulement mettent en scène de nouveaux conflits de nature éthique, mais proposent surtout des questionnements sur l’éthique de l’écriture ou la responsabilité du geste d’écrire.Department of FrenchtortureSDG16
FRE1103HSeminaire de linguistique I: Phonetique et phonologieCe cours abordera des thèmes et des problématiques reliés au traitement de la parole - la perception, la mémoire lexicale, et la production - à la lumière d'exemples pertinents au français : sa structure phonologique et son influence sur la perception et l'acquisition ; des difficultés d'apprentissage L2 ; le traitement automatique de la parole ; ainsi que des questions formelles. Les étudiants apprendront à s'engager avec des questions de recherche actuelles en phonétique et phonologie par le biais d'un mini projet de recherche.Department of FrenchproductionSDG12
RSM3034HCapital Markets WorkshopContact departmentGraduate Department of ManagementcapitalSDG9
RSM3054HCurrent Topics in Consumer BehaviourContact departmentGraduate Department of ManagementconsumSDG12
RSM3055HEconometric Methods in MarketingThis course focuses on recent developments in quantitative marketing and empirical industrial organization, with an emphasis on dynamic structural models. We will study techniques for developing and estimating models of demand and competition in both static and dynamic settings. In these types of models, an economic agent’s decision today can have an impact on how he and other players make their decisions in the future. In many situations, economic agents recognize this relationship and make strategic choices. Examples of dynamic demand models include consumer learning models, inventory and stockpiling problems, durable goods adoption and replacement decisions. Examples of dynamic competition models include dynamic price competition, entry-exit, store location and product positioning. We will emphasize the importance of combining theory, institutional details and e