Sustainability CEL Course Inventory

University of Toronto’s 2022-2023 Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Sustainability Inventory

The CEL Sustainability Course Inventory gathers information about all sustainability-related undergraduate courses at the University of Toronto with a community engaged learning component (public, civil or private sector). This CEL inventory builds off of U of T’s Sustainability Course Inventory, an inventory that contains all sustainability-related courses based on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Sustainability Community-Engaged Learning Courses must cover the following criteria:

  • it is a credit-bearing academic course with full or partial CEL component
  • it takes place in partnership with a community or grassroots, non-profit or for-profit, public or private, or non-governmental organization
  • it responds to partner-led priorities
  • it is reciprocal so both the community partner and the students benefit from the engagement students undertake reflection that connects their community engagement to the learning outcomes of the initiative
  • it works towards one or more of the sixteen United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The 2022-23 CEL course inventory includes 117 sustainability oriented CEL courses. The purpose of the CEL sustainability course inventory is to increase the visibility of sustainability courses that foster community engagement and partnerships. In the 2022-23 Sustainability Undergraduate Course Inventory, the following ten CEL keywords were used to filter for potential CEL courses: *placement, *community, *experiential, *internship, *partner, *client, *service, *capstone, *office, *professional. The search results were then manually reviewed for quality assurance by CECCS. Any output deemed irrelevant to CEL based on the course description has been removed. 

If you are an instructor at the University of Toronto and think that a CEL course should be included in or removed from this inventory, please contact ayako.ariga@utoronto.ca.

Course CodeCourse TitleCourse DescriptionDivisionUnitCEL KeywordsSDGs
ANT241H5Anthropology and the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (in Canada)This course will examine the relationship between the field of anthropology and Indigenous people of Turtle Island. We will examine the past, present, and future manifestations of this relationship. This course will emphasize Indigenous, decolonial, and community scholars. Students will be encouraged to think critically and reflect on their own world views.University of Toronto MississaugaAnthropologycommunitySDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG15
AFSA03H3Experiencing Development in AfricaThis experiential learning course allows students to experience first hand the realities, challenges, and opportunities of working with development organizations in Africa. The goal is to allow students to actively engage in research, decision-making, problem solving, partnership building, and fundraising, processes that are the key elements of development work. Same as IDSA02H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofexperiential, partnerSDG16
BPM232H1Buddhist PsychologyDescribes the psychology inherent within the original teachings of Buddhism. Primary focus is on the understanding of the causes of suffering and happiness, the nature of cognition and emotion, characteristics of the self/ego, personality transformation, the role of the unconscious, and mindfulness meditation. Includes an option for Community Engaged Learning experience.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3, SDG4
CAR332Y0Puerto Rican Culture and EnvironmentBased on readings, lectures, experiential activities and discussions, CAR332Y0 examines the cultural and environmental history of Puerto Rico. The course explores debates on colonialism, capitalist modernity, development, ecosystems, religion, race and politics. Such analysis will help with the consideration of Puerto Rico as the last colony of the Americas within the larger context of the Caribbean. The course will include on-site excursions related to the lectures and reading material covered. This course will be taught in English.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLexperientialSDG13, SDG10, SDG16, SDG8
CCT404H5Remote Work, Technology and CollaborationThis project-based course aims to demonstrate how collaboration is a critical capability often overlooked. During the course students will integrate their learning and experience and first hand see how, in combination with collaboration it can lead to creatively solving problems in areas as varied as business, health care delivery, urban planning and development. In addition to lectures, students will have the benefit of a series of guest lecturers. A large, group based project will serve to integrate learning and allow students the benefit of experiential learning.University of Toronto MississaugaCommunication, Culture, Information, & Technology (UTM), Institute ofexperientialSDG3, SDG8, SDG11
CHC471H1InternshipArranged by each student in consultation with faculty, the internship enables teacher candidates to integrate, extend and deepen their learning experiences in a way not otherwise available in the program. Those wishing to take this course must have their program approved by the Program Coordinator and Director. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLinternshipSDG4
CHE403H1Professional PracticeIn this course, lectures and seminars will be given by practicing engineers who will cover the legal and ethical responsibility an engineer owes to an employer, a client and the public with particular emphasis on environmental issues.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (FASE), Department ofclient, professionalSDG13
CITC01H3Urban Communities and Neighbourhoods Case Study: East ScarboroughThis course engages students in a case study of some of the issues facing urban communities and neighbourhoods today. Students will develop both community-based and academic research skills by conducting research projects in co-operation with local residents and businesses, non-profit organizations, and government actors and agencies.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG11
CITC02H3Placements in Community DevelopmentWith a focus on building knowledge and skills in community development, civic engagement, and community action, students will ‘learn by doing’ through weekly community-based placements with community organizations in East Scarborough and participatory discussion and written reflections during class time. The course will explore topics such as community-engaged learning, social justice, equity and inclusion in communities, praxis epistemology, community development theory and practice, and community-based planning and organizing. Students will be expected to dedicate 3-4 hours per week to their placement time in addition to the weekly class time. Community-based placements will be organized and allocated by the course instructor.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofplacement, communitySDG10, SDG16
CITD12H3Planning and Building Public Spaces in TorontoThis course is designed to develop career-related skills such as policy-oriented research analysis, report writing, and presentation and networking skills through experiential learning approaches. The policy focus each year will be on a major current Toronto planning policy issue, from ‘Complete Streets’ to improvements to parks and public space infrastructure, to public transit-related investments. Students work closely in the course with planners and policymakers from the City of Toronto, policy advocates, and community organizers.University of Toronto ScarboroughHuman Geography (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, experientialSDG9, SDG11
CJS401H1Community & IdentityExploration of Jewish notions of community, identity, and humanity in classic and contemporary sources as well as through experiential learning in which students are placed in internships at organizations and institutions that identify themselves as Jewish and as serving the Jewish community in the GTA. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofJewish Studies (FAS), Anne Tanenbaum Centre forcommunity, experiential, internshipSDG16
CPS401Y5Research and Development in Science EducationThis course is intended for students in a CPS or Environmental Science Major or Specialist program. It provides an experiential learning opportunity with secondary school students and teachers. Students will research the literature of science pedagogy and acquire pedagogical content knowledge, particularly that of problem-based learning and the use of case studies. Then, through the creation of original, problem-based learning materials for Grades 11 and 12 classes and the preparation of teachers’ notes for these materials, they will enhance their subject specialization knowledge. They will then assist a teacher in implementing their materials in a school or, where the materials involve experiments, in the field or in the UTM teaching laboratories. The course is normally taken in the student's fourth year. Enrollment requires submitting an application to the CPS Department in the spring term, with the application due date being the final day of classes. Independent Studies Application Forms may be found at http://uoft.me/cpsforms. Applications should be submitted to the CPS Undergraduate Assistant. Registration on ACORN is also required.University of Toronto MississaugaChemical and Physical Sciences (UTM), Department ofexperientialSDG4, SDG8, SDG13, SDG4
CRI386H1Origins of Criminal JusticeCriminal justice practice, as well as political debate concerning crime and criminal justice, are often influenced by ideas that are initially developed outside the criminal justice arena. This course examines the history, current influence and efficacy of a range of such ideas, such as: the role of religious practice in rehabilitating offenders; military service and participation in sports as preventive of delinquency; the influence of environmental pollution on crime rates; the concept of the ‘problem family’; intelligence based policing and the use of management theories in criminal justice organizations. Note: The course may include an optional Service Learning component. If offered, additional information will be provided in the Faculty of Arts and Science's timetable.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCriminology and Sociolegal Studies (FAS), Centre forserviceSDG3, SDG4, SDG13, SDG14, SDG15, SDG16, SDG3, SDG4, SDG13, SDG15
CRI428H1Policing the City: Crime, Community and InequalityAn advanced seminar exploring the connection between neighbourhoods and the perpetuation of poverty, social marginalization, segregation and crime. The course may include an optional Service Learning component. Check the timetable for details.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCriminology and Sociolegal Studies (FAS), Centre forcommunity, serviceSDG1, SDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CRI428H1Neighbourhoods and CrimeAn advanced seminar exploring the connection between neighbourhoods and the perpetuation of poverty, social marginalization, segregation and crime. The course may include an optional Service Learning component. Check the timetable for details.Arts and Science, Faculty ofCriminology and Sociolegal Studies (FAS), Centre forserviceSDG1, SDG4, SDG10, SDG16
CTLB03H3Introduction to Community Engaged LearningIn this experiential learning course, students apply their discipline-specific academic knowledge as they learn from and engage with communities. Students provide, and gain, unique perspectives and insights as they interact with community partners. Through class discussions, workshops and assignments, students also develop transferable life skills such as interpersonal communication, professionalism and self-reflection that support their learning experiences and help them connect theory and practice.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLcommunity, experiential, partner, professionalSDG4, SDG10, SDG11, SDG16
DRE405H5Topics in Indigenous PerformanceThis senior research and creation seminar will explore topics in contemporary Indigenous performance. These topics will vary with faculty research interests; course may cover such matters as intergenerational cross-cultural collaboration, Anishinaabe star and land knowledge, working with culturally-codified objects, contextualizing projects in non-institutional spaces, international inter-indigenous productions, community outreach, and Indigenous feminisms and futurisms. The course may include a practical workshop component or a capstone research or performance project. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaEnglish and Drama (UTM), Department ofcommunity, capstoneSDG4, SDG5, SDG8, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12, SDG15
ECO417H1Economic Development Policy: Community Engaged LearningAn examination of the causes and consequence of poverty in developing countries with a microeconomic focus, and how it relates it to poverty in the developed world, using a 30-hour service placement at a community organization. Importance of community and context specific factors in policy implementation; learn how local organizations have responded. Use of reflection assignments, papers, group work and class discussions to relate to course concepts. Topics include: poverty traps, health, education, and credit. An application to the instructor is necessary. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEconomics (FAS), Department ofplacement, community, serviceSDG1, SDG8
EDS200H5Child, Adolescent and Adult Development in EducationThis course focuses on the physical skills, cognitive abilities, and socioemotional experiences that shape an individual’s capacity to learn throughout the lifespan (i.e., infancy to late adulthood). It will address how learning is a lifelong process and how we are continually educating ourselves in different ways by incorporating strategies that best suit our lifespan stage. Critical research and theorists will be discussed to enhance the topics presented. Students are required to complete an 8-hour field experience, and obtain a valid vulnerable sector police check in advance of placement. [36L]University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofplacementSDG4, SDG3
EDS200H5Learning Through the LifespanThis course focuses on the physical skills, cognitive abilities, and socioemotional experiences that shape an individual’s capacity to learn throughout the lifespan (i.e., infancy to late adulthood). It will address how learning is a lifelong process and how we are continually educating ourselves in different ways by incorporating strategies that best suit our lifespan stage. Critical research and theorists will be discussed to enhance the topics presented. Students are required to complete an 8-hour field experience, and obtain a valid vulnerable sector police check in advance of placement.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofplacementSDG4
EDS220H5Equity and Diversity in EducationThis course focuses on raising awareness and sensitivity to equity and diversity issues facing teachers and students in diverse schools and cultural communities. It includes a field experience which entails observation of, and participation in, equity and diversity efforts in a community organization.[36L]University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofcommunitySDG4, SDG10, SDG5
EDS325H5Supplemental Instruction in Higher Education: Peer-Facilitated Study GroupsLooking for an opportunity to become a facilitator of small group learning in a subject discipline in which you have expertise? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of Supplemental Instruction (SI) in higher education. Particular focus will be on the history and evolution of SI and the rationale for its use in different university contexts. EDS325H5 course participants will complete a mandatory internship that involves developing and delivering 8-10 peer led study sessions through the Facilitated Study Group (FSG) Program run by the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre. Class work will embed relevant pedagogical tools, resources and research to support the development, delivery and success of FSG sessions. Current research investigating the impact of Supplemental Instruction on student success will also be explored. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured an FSG leader position with the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofinternshipSDG4
EDS377H5Why the First Year of University Matters: The Impact of Peer MentoringThis course explores contemporary issues in higher education with a focus on experiences, issues and challenges commonly encountered by undergraduate students during their first year of university. Interdisciplinary in its focus, topics of exploration include an examination of adult and student development theories, models of student engagement and an investigation into mindset, levels of persistence, habits of mind and personality characteristics that impact student success. An internship component is required. Students taking the course will assume a peer-mentoring role to apply and contextualize theories and skills learned in the course. This is a closed course open only to those students who have successfully secured a peer-mentoring position with the First Year Peer Mentoring program. [12S]University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofinternshipSDG9
EDS388H5Experiential Learning Opportunity within the CommunityThis internship is a minimum 100-hour experiential learning opportunity. The internship connects the student's subject specialization to aspects of the teaching/training development profession. It will integrate, extend, and deepen the learning experience as students begin to identify particular academic or professional insights. Prior to enrollment, internship proposals must be approved by the program coordinator. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofcommunity, experiential, internship, professionalSDG4
EDS399H5Research Opportunity ProgramThis ROP provides the opportunity for students to join a research team and assist on projects currently underway in Education Studies. The work will include preparing an impact study, conducting interviews and using a data-informed approach to investigate the impact of a range of programs and educational interventions. The work will involve conducting pre and post surveys, leading qualitative observational data collection, and producing an analysis. Project descriptions for participating faculty members for the following summer and fall/winter sessions are posted on the ROP website in mid-February and students are invited to apply at that time. See Experiential and International Opportunities for more details.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofexperientialSDG4
EEB465H1Advanced Topics in Biodiversity Science and Conservation BiologyBiodiversity in the Anthropocene. This course links the biological and social sciences to identify human goals for future biodiversity, methods to achieve this biodiversity, and to understand key issues such as the end of the wild, ecosystem services as a unit of conservation, animal welfare as a moral responsibility, and GMOs as biodiversity. Practical training may be provided in identifying species at risk, and in applying ecological-economics to trade-off decisions.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEcology and Evolutionary Biology (FAS), Department ofserviceSDG10, SDG3, SDG4, SDG5
EESC25H3Urban ClimatologyThis course will focus on how urban areas modify the local environment, particularly the climates of cities. The physical basis of urban climatology will be examined considering the energy balance of urban surfaces. The urban heat island phenomenon and its modelling will be studied based on conceptual and applied urban-climate research. The impact of climate change on urban sectors such as urban energy systems, water and wastewater systems, and urban transportation and health systems will be examined through case studies. Students will have the opportunity to choose their own areas of interest to apply the knowledge they learn throughout the course and demonstrate their understanding in tutorial-based discussions. The students will be required to work with community or industry partners on a project to assess the impacts or urban climate change.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, partnerSDG6, SDG7, SDG11, SDG12, SDG13
EESD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester. Same as ESTD17Y3University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofcapstoneSDG4, SDG3
EESD19H3Professional Development Seminars in GeoscienceThis course consists of 12 lectures given by senior industry professionals to prepare students for a post-graduate career in environmental consulting. Lectures will convey the full range of consulting activities, including visits to environmental investigation sites in the Toronto area. Technical writing and oral communication skills will be stressed in assignments.University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofprofessionalSDG13, SDG4
EMU425H1Music and Urban EngagementThis course provides a reflective practicum experience in unique urban settings. Under the mentorship of professional community music teachers, students assist and lead music-making sessions with youth from the Regent Park School of Music and/or youth residing in detention centers. Students have the opportunity to investigate how music is an important tool for social justice.Music, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, professionalSDG11, SDG16
EMU437H1Internship in Anti-Racist and Anti-Oppressive Music EducationStudents will undertake a unique internship opportunity in partnership with the Toronto District School Board and the Marigold Team (a Black-led organization with a mission to change the visual landscape of music education). Students will lead a series of music education workshops, in schools identified as high needs, that explore culturally relevant and culturally responsive music education through an anti-oppression and anti-racism lens. The focus will be on prioritizing the socio-emotional awareness and well-being of students, while facilitating conversations about historical practices in music education that value one form of musicking over another. Students will be mentored by leaders in Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Placements must be approved by the instructor during the first week of classes.Music, Faculty ofNULLplacement, internship, partnerSDG4, SDG10, SDG1
EMU485H1Advanced Topics in Music & ChildhoodDesigned as a continuation of EMU370Y, this course will give students an opportunity to study issues pertaining to the practice of culturally relevant and responsive music teaching and learning strategies in childhood. Students will begin to formulate their own theory for the curricular development of programmes for children and school and community school contexts. Seminars and practicum experiences will be supplemented by individual research projects.Music, Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG4
ENGD02Y3Teaching Academic Writing: Theories, Methods and Service LearningThis course explores the theories and practices of teaching academic writing, mostly in middle and secondary school contexts as well as university writing instruction and/or tutoring in writing. Through its 60-hour service-learning component, the course also provides student educators with the practical opportunities for the planning and delivering of these instruction techniques in different teaching contexts.University of Toronto ScarboroughEnglish (UTSC), Department ofserviceSDG4
ENT391H1Exploring New VenturesThis experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new ventures or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization or the student’s own venture, with oversight from the Centre for Entrepreneurship. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students’ entrepreneurial skills.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLexperientialSDG8, SDG9
ENT392Y1Exploring New VenturesThis experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new ventures or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization or the student’s own, with oversight from the Centre for Entrepreneurship. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students’ entrepreneurial skills.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLexperientialSDG8, SDG9
ENV332H5Practicum in Environmental Project ManagementThis course, offered in collaboration with campus administrative offices of the University of Toronto Mississauga and various community partners, provides Environment Students with practical collaborative work experience in preparation for upper-year field courses and internships. Students will work in teams to develop skills in communication, project management, interdisciplinary teamwork, problem identification, report writing and formal presentations while working on an environmental project on campus or in the local community. This course is strongly recommended for Specialist and Major students in any of the Environment Programs. [24S, 12P]University of Toronto MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment (UTM), Department ofcommunity, internship, partner, officeSDG13
ENV421Y1Community Research for Social & Environmental ChangeThis research course will provide students with an opportunity to engage in an action-focused, community-based group research project. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a program or certificate at the School of the Environment, or special permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEnvironment (FAS), School ofcommunitySDG4
ENV440H1Professional Experience CourseRegular academic seminars complement off-campus work on an environmental project. The course enables students to gain practical experience of the needs and demands of professional environmental agencies. Students are given a choice of placements in a variety of sectors (such as government, NGOs, industry). Eligible students who wish to do a work placement in the upcoming summer or fall session are must submit an application form to the Placement Coordinator by mid-January of each year. Please contact the School of the Environment’s Placement Coordinator, David Powell, at ug.office.env@utoronto.ca, or consult the School’s undergraduate courses webpage for access to the application form, instructions and application deadline.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEnvironment (FAS), School ofplacement, office, professionalSDG13, SDG4
ENV461H1The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of SustainabilitySustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research and teaching. Arguably, it is such living lab approaches that offer the largest potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to work across disciplines and fields of study, and with non-academic partners. This course will put students to work on operational sustainability projects identified by the staff working in or with the Sustainability Office at the University of Toronto. Students will be organized into groups, each of which will be assigned one project, to be overseen by one or more U of T staff members. The bulk of the course will consist of regular meetings with the staff “clients”, with instructors, and in small groups to undertake a group project. Each group will produce a mid-term and final report, and give a mid-term and final presentation. Each student will also submit two 360 reviews of the group process. A crucial aspect of this course is the ability of students to work collaboratively together in a group environment, and to work effectively with a university staff person acting as a “client” for their work. Students will be provided with a Handbook outlining information on working in groups and the focus of the class in the second week will be on this issue. The first 360 peer review will serve to provide information on how well each group is working. Students are encouraged to discuss and resolve group process issues in the weekly group meetings, and in their regular meetings with the instructor and TA. The second 360 review will occur at the end of the term. The results of the two 360 reviews will be used, where appropriate, to adjust individual marks from the group averages.Arts and Science, Faculty ofEnvironment (FAS), School ofpartner, client, officeSDG11, SDG4
ENV496H5Restoration Ecology IIThe follow-up course to Restoration Ecology I, ENV496 will build on its theoretical foundations to focus on student involvement in a variety of restoration projects planned or underway by Credit Valley Conservation and other groups in Mississauga and the greater Credit Valley watershed. The emphasis here is on planning and implementation of restoration projects; good scientific design; understanding policies and procedures; identifying and working with stakeholders, etc. Occasional field exercises may be scheduled during regular class meeting times.University of Toronto MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment (UTM), Department ofSDG6
ESC101H1Praxis IPraxis I is the cornerstone course of the Engineering Science Foundation Design sequence and introduces the foundational models and tools of engineering design, communication, teamwork, and professionalism that underlie design education within Engineering Science. In Praxis I students work both individually and in small teams to develop their knowledge and skills in through a combination of active lectures, structured interactive studios, and hands-on practical sessions. The design projects in Praxis I are scoped to the individual student and the broader University community. Each student and team is responsible for both defining and resolving their own opportunities. Praxis I also supports students as they transition into their engineering studies and into the Engineering Science learning community. This support integrates conceptual models, concrete techniques, and University resources, and addresses both academic and non-academic concerns. All courses within the Foundation Design sequence use engineering design to provide a context in which students integrate their knowledge, develop their emerging engineering identity, and codify their individual approach to engineering practice.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofcommunity, professionalSDG4, SDG11, SDG17
ESC102H1Praxis IIPraxis II develops the models and tools of design, communication, teamwork, and professionalism introduced in Praxis I. The course also introduces additional complementary considerations including ethics and equity. In Praxis II students work primarily in small teams to develop and refine their knowledge and skills in through a combination of active lectures, structured interactive studios, and hands-on practical sessions. The design projects in Praxis II are scoped to communities within the broader City of Toronto. Student teams are responsible for identifying and engaging with these communities, and for first framing and then resolving a collaboratively identified opportunity.Praxis II culminates in a public showcase where teams present and demonstrate their designs to their stakeholders and to the general public. Praxis II also continues to support students as they integrate more fully into the Engineering Science learning community. All courses within the Foundation Design sequence use engineering design to provide a context in which students integrate their knowledge, develop their emerging engineering identity, and codify their individual approach to engineering practice.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofcommunity, professionalSDG4, SDG17
ESC204H1Praxis IIIPraxis III is the capstone course of the Engineering Science Foundation Design sequence and challenges students to apply the models of engineering design, communication, teamwork, and professionalism introduced and developed in Praxis I and II to the design and testing of a functioning product prototype. The course requires students to integrate the design, technical, and complementary knowledge gained across the Engineering Science Foundation in the context of a single, major, full-term design project. Teams in Praxis III choose from a curated set of opportunities that integrate technical and complementary considerations. They are responsible both for framing the opportunity and for designing and testing a product prototype that addresses the opportunity. Praxis III culminates in a public showcase where teams present and demonstrate their designs to their stakeholders and to the general public. All courses within the Foundation Design sequence use engineering design to provide a context in which students integrate their knowledge, develop their emerging engineering identity, and codify their individual approach to engineering practice.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofEngineering Science (FASE), Division ofcapstone, professionalSDG4
ESTD17Y3Cohort Capstone Course in Environmental StudiesThis course is designed to provide a strong interdisciplinary focus on specific environmental problems including the socioeconomic context in which environmental issues are resolved. The cohort capstone course is in 2 consecutive semesters, providing final year students the opportunity to work in a team, as environmental researchers and consultants, combining knowledge and skill-sets acquired in earlier courses. Group research to local environmental problems and exposure to critical environmental policy issues will be the focal point of the course. Students will attend preliminary meetings schedules in the Fall semester. Same as EESD17Y3University of Toronto ScarboroughPhysical & Environmental Sciences (UTSC), Department ofcapstoneSDG4, 3
FAH375H5All Our Relations: Indigenous Land Stewardship and ArtThis class embraces land- and earth-based skills as tools in the production and maintenance of revitalization efforts in Indigenous culture and knowledge. Throughout the course students will lead the development, production and maintenance of a Community Medicine Garden initiative to be located in the heart of the UTM campus. Topics include environmental liberation, food sovereignty, kinship, gardening as resistance, matriarchy, land stewardship, landscaping with regional indigenous plants, Indigenous feminisms, place-based knowledge and knowledge sharing. Activities will include: film screenings, community feasts, public readings, drumming circles, and guests speakers with Traditional Indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, environmental activists, and local grassroots community-based partners. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaVisual Studies (UTM), Department ofcommunity, partnerSDG4,, SDG10, SDG16, SDG12, SDG13, SDG15
FREC10H3Community-Engaged Learning in the Francophone CommunityIn this Community-Engaged course, students will have opportunities to strengthen their French skills (such as communication, interpersonal, intercultural skills) in the classroom in order to effectively complete a placement in the GTA’s Francophone community. By connecting the course content and their practical professional experience, students will gain a deeper understanding of the principles of experiential education: respect, reciprocity, relevance and reflection; they will enhance and apply their knowledge and problem-solving skills; they will develop their critical thinking skills to create new knowledge and products beneficial to the Francophone community partners.University of Toronto ScarboroughLanguage Studies (UTSC), Department ofplacement, community, experiential, partner, professionalSDG4, SDG11
GASD71H3Cuisine, Culture, and Societies Across Global AsiaExamines the central place of cuisine to families, societies, and cultures across Global Asian societies and their diasporas, using tastes, culinary work techniques, community-based research, oral histories, digital humanities and multi-media experiential learning, as well as critical reading and writing.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, experientialSDG4, SDG11
GER391H1iPRAKTIKUM Experiential Learning and Internationalization InternshipThe course provides curricular support for a variety of work and community-engaged, experiential learning placements in the GTA and in German-speaking countries. The placements are designed to deepen linguistic, cultural, and analytical skills acquired in the classroom in work-related environments, create an awareness of the translatability of academic knowledge to other contexts, promote global competency, and foster links to the community. The number of weekly hours spent in the field, the scope of learning objectives, and the nature of reflective activities are determined on an individual basis in consultation with the host institution, the German Department, and other units in which the student is pursuing a program degree (as required). In addition to successfully achieving the formulated learning goals, students must complete assignments such as eJournals and research papers as well as participate in peer-to-peer reporting and post-placement interviews.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGermanic Languages & Literatures (FAS), Department ofplacement, community, experiential, internshipSDG4, SDG11
GGR442H5GIS Capstone ProjectStudents apply prerequisite knowledge and techniques to real-world GIS projects requested by external clients. Through background research, proposal, data management, and implementation, students develop GIS professional competencies, which will be demonstrated through collaboration, presentations and reports.University of Toronto MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment (UTM), Department ofclientSDG9
GLBC01H3Global Leadership: Theory, Research and PracticeWhether corporate, not for profit or governmental, modern organizations require leaders who are willing to take on complex challenges and work with a global community. Effective leaders must learn how to consider and recognize diverse motivations, behaviours, and perspectives across teams and networks. Building upon content learned in GLB201H5 and focusing on applications and real-life case studies; this course will provide students with knowledge and skills to become global leaders of the future. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to adapt culturally sensitive communication, motivation and negotiation techniques, preparing them to apply new principled, inclusive, and appreciative approaches to the practice of global leadership. In preparation for GLB401Y1, this course will include group-based activities in which students collaborate on current issues of global importance. An experiential learning component will help develop skills through interactions with guest lecturers and community partners. Community partners will present real-world global leadership problems to the class, which students will work to analyze and solve. At the end of the term, students will meet in person for final group presentations to deliver key solutions to community partners. This course will be delivered primarily online through synchronous/asynchronous delivery, with specific in-person activities scheduled throughout the course.University of Toronto ScarboroughManagement (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, experiential, partnerSDG8, SDG16
HLTD05H3Directed Research on Health Services and InstitutionsProvides students with the opportunity to analyze work of health institutions. Students taking this course will arrange, in consultation with the instructor, to work as a volunteer in a health institution. They will write a major research paper related to some aspect of their experience.University of Toronto ScarboroughNULLserviceSDG3
HMB440H1DementiaThis course, featuring a service-learning component, explores dementia. In patients with dementia, intellectual, social and occupational functioning deteriorate. The course addresses the multi-disciplinary aspects of dementia (clinical, genetic, molecular, social) with a focus on the most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease. A short application to enrol in this course is required. Information may be found via the Human Biology Program website.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLserviceSDG3
HMB443H1Global Hidden HungerVitamin and mineral deficiencies, termed ‘hidden hunger,’ affect about half the world’s population. Explore the global nature, catastrophic consequences, and causes of these deficiencies. Discuss formulation and implementation of international, national, and local policies to alleviate ‘hidden hunger’ especially in infants and young children. A service-learning opportunity is integrated. Students will be required to contribute to a local community organization while using course knowledge to develop a project or initiative beneficial to the organization and community. A short application to enrol in this course is required. Information may be found via the Human Biology Program website.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, serviceSDG2, SDG3
HMB473H1Exercise and Mental HealthThis course, featuring a service-learning component, discusses how mental well-being is a critical element of total health. We explore the evidence underpinning the role of physical activity in the avoidance of mental disorders, recovery from mental disorders, and the quality of life of those with or without mental disorders. A short application to enrol in this course is required. Information may be found via the Human Biology Program website.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLserviceSDG3
HMB490Y1Health in CommunityAn experiential learning course exploring health-related challenges and social determinants of health in partnership with local community organizations. Lectures and tutorials will support learning of selected biological and social aspects of health and disease, neuroscience, genetics or population health, and the development of scientific knowledge translation skills relevant to the community agencies. Cannot be taken concurrently with a full year research project course. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the HMB Special Enrolment website: https://www.hmb.utoronto.ca/special-enrolment. The application will ask about motivation and/or relevant experience. The deadline for the application is before the first day of course enrolment. Applications will be assessed based on prerequisites, submitted answers to application prompts and cGPA. This course is open to all Human Biology students.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, experiential, partnerSDG3
HMB491Y1Project in Biotechnology IndustryStudents undertake an academic internship in the biotechnology sector, in addition to meeting regularly in class to discuss and share their experiences. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply academic learning in a professional context, build their network, and explore potential career paths. Students will be required to complete 200 hours with a placement partner over the duration of the course (normally 8 hours/week). The course is open to fourth year students. Students work with course staff to secure their internship with our partner organizations. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the HMB Special Enrolment website: https://www.hmb.utoronto.ca/special-enrolment. Application packages will be accepted in April every year, and specific due date, course/placement information, and the application form can be found in the website. The application will ask about goals, course expectations and relevant knowledge & experience. Applications will be assessed based on prerequisites, submitted answers to application prompts and relevant knowledge. Course enrolment will be based on the number of internship opportunities available (which will vary from year-to-year), student qualifications (e.g. performance in relevant courses, qualifications related to the internship positions on offer, and interview performance). Final acceptance into the course is dependent on the official acceptance of a student as an intern with a partner organization. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLplacement, internship, partner, professionalSDG4
IDSA02H3Experiencing Development in AfricaThis experiential learning course allows students to experience first hand the realities, challenges, and opportunities of working with development organizations in Africa. The goal is to allow students to actively engage in research, decision-making, problem solving, partnership building, and fundraising, processes that are the key elements of development work. Same as AFSA03H3University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofexperiential, partnerSDG9
IDSD08H3Community-Centered Media Tactics for Development Advocacy and Social ChangeThis course explores the intersection of community-centered research, art, media, politics, activism and how they intertwine with grass-root social change strategies. Students will learn about the multiple forms of media tactics, including alternative and tactical media (fusion of art, media, and activism) that are being used by individuals and grass-root organizations to promote public debate and advocate for changes in development-related public policies. Through case studies, hands-on workshops, community-led learning events, and a capstone project in collaboration with community organizations, students will gain practical research, media and advocacy skills in formulating and implementing strategies for mobilizing public support for social change.University of Toronto ScarboroughGlobal Development Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, capstoneSDG8, SDG16
INF402H1Work Integrated Learning PracticumThe practicum provides hands-on experience to supplement theoretical knowledge and to develop professional competencies. Students will complete a minimum of 100 hours of project work through one of the following: an unpaid internship, a faculty research project, a not-for-profit or an industry-based project. Students will be required to keep a reflective learning journal based on their personal, professional and intellectual growth, as well as produce a final report on the completion of their placement or project.Information, Faculty ofNULLplacement, internship, professionalSDG4
INS460H1Indigenous Theory, Research and MethodsThis course explores the basis of Indigenous knowledge and how that translates into research theory and methodology. Students will design a research project, consider Indigenous research governance and conduct an ethics review. This is a service learning course. This course is only open to students enrolled in a Specialist or Major in Indigenous Studies.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLserviceSDG4
ITA235H5Cucina Italiana: Italian History and Culture Through FoodThis course charts the regional diversity of Italian food and examines various factors (early settlers, wars, migratory trends) that have shaped Italian culinary traditions. Students will also have the opportunity to explore their own culinary traditions. Students have the option of participating in local and international field trips (to restaurants, factories, farms) and community-engaged field experience in which they visit (in-person) the Mississauga Food Bank or the UTM Food Centre. When travel experiences are offered, additional costs and application processes apply.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage StudiesSDG2
ITA388H5Italian Studies Education Internship(Offered in English/Italian) This internship is a minimum 100-hour experiential learning opportunity. The internship connects the student's subject specialization to aspects of the teaching/training development profession. It will integrate, extend, and deepen the learning experience as students begin to identify particular academic or professional insights. Prior to enrolment, internship proposals must be approved by the program coordinator.University of Toronto MississaugaLanguage Studies (UTM), Department ofexperiential, internship, professionalSDG4
JEG400Y5Geography / Environment Science InternshipThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the natural science based environmental science/physical geography expertise gained through previous course work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipalities, environmental consulting companies, corporations, provincial or federal agencies, and other organizations. Students must submit an application online. Instructions for the application can be found on the Geography Department home page: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-coursesUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment (UTM), Department ofplacementSDG4, SDG11, SDG17
JEG401Y5Geography / Environment Science InternshipThrough a part-time, unpaid work placement, students apply the natural science based environmental science/physical geography expertise gained through previous course work. Placements are made at local conservation authorities, municipalities, environmental consulting companies, corporations, provincial or federal agencies, and other organizations. Students must submit an application online. Instructions for the application can be found on the Geography Department home page: https://utm.utoronto.ca/geography/field-internship-and-thesis-coursesUniversity of Toronto MississaugaGeography, Geomatics and Environment (UTM), Department ofplacementSDG4, SDG11, SDG17
JLS476H1Linguistics in the Workforce: Clinical Practice and ResearchThis course exposes students to research and practical approaches in the context of health professions of relevance to linguistics students, especially audiology and speech-language pathology. Students learn about evidence-informed practice, research methodologies, practice approaches and theories in the health professions. Students will be poised to benefit from optional service learning placements during or following the course, in research laboratories or clinical settings. Successful completion of this course provides students with exposure and experience of use in their applications to audiology, speech-language pathology, and other clinical programs and in their future health or graduate studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered every year).Arts and Science, Faculty ofLinguistics (FAS), Department ofplacement, serviceSDG8, SDG3
KPE355Y1Interpersonal Theory in Kinesiology and Physical EducationThis course will provide students an opportunity to develop their knowledge and competencies in interpersonal theory in Kinesiology and Physical Education. Topics covered in this course include, verbal and non-verbal communication strategies, active listening with patients/clients, reflective practice, managing conflict, decision making, teamwork, and leadership. This course draws upon previous coursework and integrates theory and practice across course learning activities to apply the course content to the breadth of populations and settings within the field of Kinesiology and Physical Education. As a part of the course, students will participate in a field experience (100 hours) with a mentor observing and engaging in interpersonal relations and participating in the planning and implementation of programs as appropriate. Course evaluation activities include weekly class and tutorial sessions, written assignments, presentations, and examinations. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are two hours per week in addition to field experience. Please refer to the 'Fees and Financial Requirements' section of the calendar for information on ancillary fees.Kinesiology and Physical Education, Faculty ofNULLclientSDG4
KPE455Y1Kinesiology and Physical Education in SocietyThis course builds upon KPE350Y1/KPE355Y1 to further students’ theoretical grounding in the broader practice of Kinesiology and Physical Education in society. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, emotional intelligence in the workplace, integrity in community relations, performance adaptability, diversity, creativity, ethics and professionalism, and work-life balance. Adopting a values-based approach to learning and development students will be encouraged to consider strategies for enhancing the practice of Kinesiology and Physical Education within society. As a part of this course, students will spend 100 hours in the field and will work closely with a mentor. Course evaluation activities include weekly class and tutorial sessions, written assignments, presentations, and examinations. Notes: Classroom/tutorial sessions are two hours per week in addition to field experience. For more information visit the professional placement page on our website. Please refer to the 'Fees and Financial Requirements' section of the calendar for details on ancillary fees.Kinesiology and Physical Education, Faculty ofNULLplacement, community, professionalSDG8
LAS401H1Latinos in CanadaA historical survey of migration from Latin American countries to Canada, this course examines mediation strategies of Latinos as they adjust to a new home: negotiation of national identities, political participation, entrepreneurship, cultural representations, and charitable work. Students engage in service with organization working with/in LatAm communities.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSpanish and Portuguese (FAS), Department ofserviceSDG8, SDG16
MGAD45H3Corporate Governance and Strategy - CPA PerspectiveThis course examines issues in Corporate Governance in today’s business environment. Through case studies of corporate “ethical scandals”, students will consider workplace ethical risks, opportunities and legal issues. Students will also examine professional accounting in the public interest as well as accounting and planning for sustainability. This course includes work-integrated-learning components, and satisfies the WIL requirement of the BBA degree.University of Toronto ScarboroughManagement (UTSC), Department ofprofessionalSDG16, SDG8
MGT480H5InternshipStudents will be provided with an opportunity to apply, in a practical business setting, the management knowledge they have gained through previous course work. This is accomplished through part-time unpaid work placements, or "internships." The internship will provide students with a valuable opportunity to make personal contacts in the public or private sector. The course is also intended to help students acquire practical skills that will serve them well in the workplace. An application is required.University of Toronto MississaugaManagement (UTM), Department ofplacement, internshipSDG4
MIE491Y1Capstone DesignAn experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby students teams meet specific client needs or the requirements of a recognized design competition through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process. The project must include:The application of disciplinary knowledge and skills to conduct engineering analysis and design,The demonstration of engineering judgement in integrating economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent interdisciplinary factors,Elements of teamwork, project management and client interaction, andA demonstration of proof of the design concept.Applied Science & Engineering, Faculty ofMechanical & Industrial Engineering (FASE), Department ofclient, capstoneSDG13, SDG8
MUZC01H3Exploring Community MusicOur local communities are rich with music-making engagement. Students will critically examine community music in the GTA through the lenses of intergenerational music-making, music and social change, music and wellbeing, and interdisciplinary musical engagement. Off-campus site visits are required.University of Toronto ScarboroughArts, Culture & Media (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG3, SDG16
NEW495Y1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLplacement, community, experiential, partner, professionalSDG16, SDG11
NEW496H1Community Engaged Learning: Critical and Creative Perspectives on the Non-Profit SectorA placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers critical social justice issues and creative models of community-engagement practice from grassroots, community and non-profit organizations and other perspectives that support students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions are available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLplacement, community, experiential, partner, professionalSDG16, SDG11
NEW497Y1Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced SeminarExplores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, partnerSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
NEW498H1Critical and Creative Perspectives on Community Based Research (CBR): An Advanced SeminarExplores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge production and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally. In this course, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects with community partners. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Enrolment is by application. Detailed application instructions available on the CEL website. There are 3 enrolment application options:Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, partnerSDG10, SDG16, SDG11
PCJ362H1Service LearningStudents are given a service learning placement in the GTA in partnership with local, national, or international not-for-profits or governmental organizations. Students work in teams of 2-7 students, and help partner organizations solve important problems. Student teams mostly work independently of the organization, while receiving some mentoring, critique, and advice from the organizations. Students are expected to invest 5-7 hours per week in course projects, in addition to class time. In this non-competitive course, students are asked to engage in deep personal reflection, help teammates, advise other teams, and contribute their skills and talents to their community partners. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.Arts and Science, Faculty ofGlobal Affairs (FAS), Munk School ofplacement, community, partner, serviceSDG9, SDG11
PCL389H1Understanding the Role of Pharmacology and Toxicology in SocietyThis service learning course explores issues surrounding the effects that pharmaceuticals and chemicals have in society. Specifically, it integrates pharmacology and toxicology with social, health and political issues as they relate to drug abuse and addiction. Students are required to interact and work with community partners during the semester (approx. 20hrs). Classroom discussions will integrate community experiences with lecture material.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, partner, serviceSDG3
PHM151H1Early Practice Experience 1This course is the first of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake this first EPE-1 during the summer following Year 1 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within a community pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunity, experiential, service, professionalSDG8, SDG3
PHM205H1Medication Therapy Management 2This Medication Therapy Management (MTM) course is the second of the four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses. MTM 2 will enable a student to continue to apply knowledge and develop skills needed by a pharmacist to provide patient care, using a systematic patient-care process to define and achieve the goals of optimizing safe, effective pharmacotherapy. MTM 2 course content is drawn from relevant co- and pre-requisite courses. Lectures and simulated practice sessions are designed to facilitate independent and collaborative learning that will be transferrable to diverse practice settings and prepare a student for early experiential learning. Students will be responsible to perform and document a comprehensive patient assessment to identify, resolve and prevent drug therapy problems, and educate patients on the appropriate use of medications. Students will be required to assess a patient’s health status; integrate relevant information to recommend appropriate therapy, determine efficacy and safety endpoints for monitoring therapy, document a care plan, and appropriate follow-up parameters with patients to evaluate their response to therapy, in a simulated practice environment. Students will also actively participate in the medication dispensing process, prepare extemporaneously compounded pharmaceutical products and interpret the pharmacist’s professional, ethical and legal obligation within provincial and federal frameworks.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLexperiential, professionalSDG8
PHM206H1Medication Therapy Management 3Medication Therapy Management 3 (MTM 3) is the third of a four-part series of simulated pharmacy practice courses that is delivered longitudinally over three years of the undergraduate program. MTM 3 builds on the skills developed in MTM 1 and MTM 2, focusing on more comprehensive, integrated patient centred care. MTM is founded on the philosophy of Pharmaceutical Care and involves a partnership between the patient, pharmacist, and other health care providers to promote safe and effective medication use to achieve desirable patient outcomes. MTM 3 provides students learning opportunities to apply and integrate materials learned through all courses in the curriculum to date, using simulated practice-based interactions to enhance their patient-care skills. Lectures will provide foundational material and skills which will be applied in the simulated interactions. Simulated interactions will focus on developing effective patient-centered management of multidimensional drug-therapy anchored in a professional context, in preparation for the student’s second year practice experiential course.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLexperiential, partner, professionalSDG3
PHM251H1Early Practice Experience 2This course is the second of two early experiential rotations. Students will undertake EPE-2 during the summer following Year 2 (sometime between May and August). Each student will actively participate in day-to-day services within an institutional pharmacy practice setting, thus enabling application of knowledge, skills and values introduced in faculty-based courses and simulated practice environments (laboratories). Required activities include prescription/medication order processing, patient education, drug information provision, medication history taking, and observation of/participation in patient safety processes in the practice setting. Students also need to demonstrate effective communication skills, professionalism and teamwork during the rotation.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLexperiential, service, professionalSDG8, SDG3
PHM348H1Intermediate Pharmacy Practice ExperienceThis direct patient care rotation is designed to build and enhance students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the provision of direct patient care in institutional, community or ambulatory pharmacy practice. The rotation will build on knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in academic courses and earlier experiential rotations throughout the curriculum. This rotation will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in any patient care setting such as a hospital, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on establishing a context for the provision of pharmaceutical care in a clinical setting. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, provision of follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, with regular communication with team members to share and document their assessment of the patient’s medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunity, experientialSDG3
PHM401H1Institutional Practice Direct Patient Care 1All students will be required to complete two 5-week institutional rotations. At least five weeks will be in an adult in-patient service; the other five weeks may be in any area of the institution (including ambulatory clinics and pediatric populations). These rotations will ideally occur within academic health care institutions. The emphasis for all direct patient care rotations is for the student to be immersed in the responsibility of providing pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate effectively with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLserviceSDG3
PHM402H1Institutional Practice Direct Patient Care 2All students will be required to complete two 5-week institutional rotations. At least five weeks will be in an adult in-patient service; the other five weeks may be in any area of the institution (including ambulatory clinics and pediatric populations). These rotations will ideally occur within academic health care institutions. The emphasis for all direct patient care rotations is for the student to be immersed in the responsibility of providing pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate effectively with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLserviceSDG3
PHM411H1Community Practice Direct Patient Care 1These Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotations occur within academic community pharmacies, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage accurate and effective drug distribution under the supervision of the pharmacist and will participate in expanded scopes of pharmacy practice.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3
PHM414Y1Community Practice Direct Patient CareAll students will be required to complete a 10-week rotation in a community pharmacy setting. This type of rotation will ideally be held at an academic community pharmacy, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and carry out a follow-up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will educate and communicate effectively with patients and other health care providers, thereby providing medication therapy management, promoting health and wellness, and ensuring patient safety. The collaboration with other health care disciplines and acting as a member of a patient care team will be vital in providing optimum patient care. Students will manage safe and effective drug distribution under the guidance and supervision of the pharmacist as appropriate, and will participate in the full scope of pharmacy practice.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3
PHM424H1Selective Direct Patient CareThese rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3
PHM451H1Elective Direct Patient Care 1These rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3
PHM452H1Elective Direct Patient Care 2These rotations will occur in sites serving a variety of health care needs, including, for example, acute care, rehabilitation, pediatric, geriatric, chronic care and specialty populations. Care may be provided in an institution, family health team, community pharmacy, ambulatory clinic or other types of patient care practices, with an emphasis on the provision of pharmaceutical care. Students will participate in, and take responsibility for, direct patient care activities including: patient assessment to identify and prioritize drug therapy problems, development of care plans that address desired patient outcomes, and patient monitoring including physical and laboratory assessment, and where feasible, carry out a follow- up evaluation and appropriate documentation. Students will communicate regularly with patients and care givers to monitor patient parameters, determine and assess target outcomes, and provide education. Students will work closely with members of the health care team in providing collaborative care, engaging in regular communication and documenting their assessment of patients’ medication related needs and recommendations to address those needs.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG3
PHM461H1Elective Non Direct Patient Care 1These 5-week elective rotations are designed for the student to gain insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice and/or the health care system, which may require a diversity of knowledge or skills (e.g., pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). Such rotations enable students to gain awareness of a variety of roles for pharmacists and enhance the student’s understanding of the broader scope within which pharmacists work. The rotation will build on the knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and other experiential rotations. The specific focus of the student’s activities and rotation-specific learning objectives will be determined through a collaborative discussion between the preceptor and student, taking into account the needs of the site and student interest. Each student may complete a maximum of two 5-week NDPC rotations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLexperientialSDG3
PHM462H1Elective Non Direct Patient Care 2These 5-week elective rotations are designed for the student to gain insight into the structure and functions of various areas of pharmacy practice and/or the health care system, which may require a diversity of knowledge or skills (e.g., pharmacy administration, policy development, drug utilization review, research, etc.). Such rotations enable students to gain awareness of a variety of roles for pharmacists and enhance the student’s understanding of the broader scope within which pharmacists work. The rotation will build on the knowledge, skills and behaviours acquired in earlier academic courses and other experiential rotations. The specific focus of the student’s activities and rotation-specific learning objectives will be determined through a collaborative discussion between the preceptor and student, taking into account the needs of the site and student interest. Each student may complete a maximum of two 5-week NDPC rotations.Pharmacy, Leslie Dan Faculty ofNULLexperientialSDG3
POL405Y5Political Science InternshipThrough a part-time, unpaid internship (150 hours), students apply the knowledge and skills gained through previous coursework in political science. Participants will develop skill sets through a professional setting combined with class meetings that include workshops, writing, oral presentations, reading and reflection. Placements are made in both the public and private sectors, such as local or regional government offices, law firms, civil society organizations or non-profit agencies. Normally, the 150 hours will be completed by attending the work placement one full day each week from September to April. Students must confirm internship arrangements well in advance and secure departmental approval for their internship position prior to the start of term. Students will be admitted to through an online application.University of Toronto MississaugaPolitical Science (UTM), Department ofplacement, internship, office, professionalSDG4
POLC12H3Global Public Policy and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)This course will introduce students to the global policymaking process, with an emphasis on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Students will make practical contributions to the policy areas under the SDGs through partnerships with community not-for-profit organizations, international not-for-profit organizations, or international governmental organizations. Students will learn about problem definition and the emergence of global policy positions in the SDG policy areas. They will assess the roles of non-state actors in achieving the SDGs and analyze the mechanisms that drive the global partnership between developing countries and developed countries.ScarboroughDepartment of Political Sciencepartner, communitySDG11, SDG16
PSL310H1Clinical ReasoningImproved clinical reasoning will reduce the current likelihood that most people will suffer at least one medical diagnostic error, errors that contribute to ~10% of patient deaths. Learn to apply strategies of critical thinking and principles of physiology to solve clinical cases. Shadow a healthcare professional. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLprofessionalSDG3
PSY442Y5Practicum in Exceptionality in Human LearningSeminar and practicum on issues relating to the life-long development of individuals with disabilities. Seminar at UTM; practicum involves supervised placements in schools or social service agencies (80 hours). Course is required for students enrolled in the Exceptionality in Human Learning Specialist program and is available to Psychology Specialists, Majors and Minors on a competitive basis. Course fulfills the 400-level seminar requirement for the Psychology Specialist Program. Admission by academic merit. Interested students should submit an application to the Psychology office by mid-April. Application procedures: http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/psychology/undergraduate-studies/course-information/courses-requiring-application.University of Toronto MississaugaPsychology (UTM), Department ofplacement, service, officeSDG4, SDG10
RLG376H1Touching the EarthA study of Buddhist relationships with the earth, including “earth touching” contemplative practices, ritual ceremonies for land spirits or sacred sites, geomantic and cosmographic traditions, the use of landscape imagery to depict enlightenment, contrasts between wilderness and urban spaces, and contemporary ecological movements in Buddhist communities and their responses to climate disruption. The course combines experiential learning approaches and outdoor excursions with reading and written work.Arts and Science, Faculty ofReligion (FAS), Department for the Study ofexperientialSDG11, SDG13
SDS490Y1Engaging Our CommunitiesA service learning course with student placements in various LGBT community organizations alongside regular classroom seminars to look at the politics of engagement, active citizenship, mobilization, archiving community histories, accessibility, belonging, activism, and philanthropy. For students in the Sexual Diversity Studies Major or Specialist.Arts and Science, Faculty ofSexual Diversity Studies (FAS), Mark S Bonham Centre forplacement, community, serviceSDG11, SDG5
SOC480Y5Internship in Sociology, Criminology, Law and SocietyThrough a part-time, unpaid, 200-hour internship, students apply sociological knowledge gained primarily through previous coursework. Students can seek internship opportunities at municipal social service departments or non-profit agencies providing social services, social movement or community-based organizations working for social change, courts or parole offices, for-profit workplaces, or other organizations. Students must confirm internship arrangements well in advance and secure departmental approval for their internship position prior to the start of term (with students and host organizations required to complete institutional documentation in order for the internship to commence). This experiential learning course also includes class meetings, written assignments and oral presentations, as well as an assessment by the internship employer. An application/interview may be required (see Department of Sociology website for details). Note: International students should visit the International Education Centre to ensure they have the appropriate documentation required to work in Canada well before the start of the course/internship.University of Toronto MississaugaSociology (UTM), Department ofcommunity, experiential, internship, service, officeSDG16
SOCD02H3Global Field School: Indigenous Costa RicaThe intensive international field school course is an experiential and land-based learning trip to Indigenous territories in Costa Rica, in order to learn about settler colonialism, Indigenous communities, and UNDRIP (the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples). Students will learn with Indigenous Costa Rican university students and community partners in order to draw links between policy frameworks (UNDRIP), ideologies (colonialism) and the impacts on Indigenous communities (e.g. education, health, food security, language retention, land rights). The course involves 14-16 days of in-country travel. This course has been designated as a Research Skills course.University of Toronto ScarboroughSociology (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, experiential, partnerSDG2, SDG4, SDG10, SDG16
URB236H1A Multidisciplinary Introduction to Urban Studies II: Urban Changes and Theoretical ApplicationThis is the second of two introductory Urban Studies courses (required for minor, major, and specialist programs). As part of the course , you will work in a 12-hour placement with a community organization involved in city building. This placement forms the basis of your final paper and research poster.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, placementSDG11
URB337H1Housing and HomelessnessThis course features a community-engaged learning component, in which you will have the opportunity to participate in housing policy processes by: reflecting on your own experiences accessing housing; observing a meeting of a City of Toronto committee on housing and planning; hearing from local housing experts; conducting in-depth research on a current or proposed city policy and comparable examples from other jurisdictions; and, advocating for a particular course of action or intervention to a real politician.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG10, SDG11
URB342H1Introduction to Qualitative Methods for Urban StudiesHow do you conduct meaningful and rigorous research about cities using qualitative – not quantitative – methods, such as interviews, oral histories, mapping, surveys, photography, and archives? In this interactive workshop class, you will learn how to be a researcher and design a research project about a public space in the GTA. URB342 is one of the Urban Studies Program’s community-engaged-learning courses, meaning you will have an exciting and creative opportunity to create a unique story-driven project.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG11
URB430H1The Changing Culture of Regent ParkThis unique and creative course is a collaboration with Focus Media Arts Centre, a not-for-profit organization that counters negative stereotypes about Toronto’s Regent Park community, and provides media literacy and production training for youth living in the area. Youth, Arts, and Engagement in Cities is a community-engaged learning course.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunitySDG10, SDG11
URB437Y1Urban Experiential Learning in Toronto & the GTAA method of studying city issues that combines readings, seminar discussions, and field trips with an 8 hour / week internship in the office of a municipal politician, local government, or non-profit organization. Readings focus on community development, urban planning, economic development and local governance. Students must fill out a ballot for the course (available by contacting the Urban Studies Program Office) by June 1st. Enrolment in this course is competitive and at the discretion of the Urban Studies Director and/or course instructor.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, experiential, internship, officeSDG11, SDG16
VIC116H1Politics of the PenA study of how literature challenges prevailing political beliefs and social norms. We will situate our discussion in the broader context of human rights and freedoms. We will examine cases where literature has been censored and writers have been imprisoned or driven into exile. Part of this course involves a community service-learning component. We will consider how this literature contributes to debate and advocacy around issues of social justice. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, serviceSDG16
VIC451H1Capstone: Learning Communities and Higher EducationThis course examines higher education in Canada using Victoria University and Victoria's affiliates as a case study. Topics covered include learning communities, mentoring, experiential learning, and international contexts of education. Students gain practical mentorship experience through placement in first-year Victoria College courses. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLplacement, experiential, capstoneSDG4
VIC452H1Work-Integrated Capstone CourseThis seminar provides academic support for individual work placements in a specific sector of employment, through interdisciplinary readings, integrative discussion, and critical reflection on the culture of labour and the acquisition of workplace skills and experience. Assignments will include reflective exercises and critical analyses, leading to participation in a capstone seminar. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLplacement, capstoneSDG8
WDW199H1Indigenous Knowledge and Storytelling in TorontoThe land now known as Toronto has a 13,000+ year old history of Indigenous presence that is still unfolding. This history is inscribed in the land – it is visible in the geographical features, place names, and contemporary urban form of the city and is represented through stories (oral and written) told by diverse members of Toronto’s Indigenous community. This course engages with stories of Indigenous history and presence in Toronto through a selection of Indigenous literary works about Toronto, Indigenous guest speakers, and a series of experiential Indigenous storytelling tours of significant locations across the city. Students will be introduced to Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing and will learn why storytelling remains a significant and culturally-appropriate means for keeping and sharing land-based Indigenous Knowledge. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of the city as a traditional Indigenous territory and will reflect on their own relationships and responsibilities within these lands. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofNULLcommunity, experientialSDG4, SDG10, SDG16, SDG11
WGS435Y5Women and Gender Studies PracticumThe practicum allows advanced WGS students to combine theory and practice through part-time unpaid placement with a community agency, government body, educational or social change organization. [24S]University of Toronto MississaugaHistorical Studies (UTM), Department ofplacement, communitySDG5, SDG16
WGS470Y1Community EngagementThe application of theoretical study to practical community experience. Advanced Women and Gender Studies students have the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired in the Women and Gender Studies curriculum through a practicum placement within a community organization. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.Arts and Science, Faculty ofWomen and Gender Studies Institute (FAS)placement, communitySDG4, SDG5
WSTC02H3Feminist Qualitative Research in ActionStudents will design and conduct a qualitative research project in the community on an issue related to women and/or gender. The course will also include an overview of the various phases of carrying out research: planning the research project, choosing appropriate methods for data collection, analyzing the data and reporting the results. Students should expect to spend approximately 10 hours conducting their research in the community over the course of the semester.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG5
WSTC23H3Community Engagement PracticumAn opportunity for students in the Major and Minor programs in Women’s and Gender Studies to apply theoretical knowledge related to women and gender to practical community experience through experiential learning within a community, educational or social setting.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunity, experientialSDG5
WSTC30H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to women and gender studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG5
WSTC31H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn examination of a current topic relevant to women's and gender studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG5
WSTD10H3The Power of Story for Social ChangeWith a focus on collecting and retelling complex stories of life in Scarborough and beyond, this applied research course introduces students to the theory, methods and practice of feminist oral history. This course involves conducting research in the community and the final project includes a digital component.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG5, SDG16
WSTD11H3Special Topics in Women's and Gender StudiesAn advanced and in-depth seminar dedicated to a topic relevant to Women’s and Gender Studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore recent scholarship in a specific content area, which will vary from year to year. Participation in a related project/practicum in the community may be incorporated into the course.University of Toronto ScarboroughHistorical & Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department ofcommunitySDG5